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  | alma_mater          =  
 
  | alma_mater          =  
 
  | patron              = {{collapsible list
 
  | patron              = {{collapsible list
   | Johann Albrecht (?)
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  | Georg Johann Ⅰ
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  | Heinrich von Eberst
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   | Johann Albrecht
 
   | Johann Casimir
 
   | Johann Casimir
  | Heinrich von Eberst (?)
 
 
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  | movement            = [[Freifechter]]
 
  | movement            = [[Freifechter]]
  | notableworks        = ''[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|Gründtliche Beschreibung der <br/>Kunst des Fechtens]]'' (1570)
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  | notableworks        = ''[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des <br/>Fechtens]]'' (1570)
 
  | manuscript(s)        = {{plainlist
 
  | manuscript(s)        = {{plainlist
   | [[Joachim Meyers Fäktbok (MS A.4º.2)|MS A.4º.2]] (1560s)
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   | [[Joachim Meyers Fechtbuch (MS Bibl. 2465)|MS Bibl. 2465]] (1561)
   | [[Treatises/Manuscript purgatory|Lost manuscript]] (1561)
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   | [[Joachim Meyers Fäktbok (MS A.4º.2)|MS A.4º.2]] (1568)
   | [[Fechtbuch zu Ross und zu Fuss (MS Var.82)|MS Varia 82]] (1563-70)
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   | [[Fechtbuch zu Ross und zu Fuss (MS Var.82)|MS Varia 82]] (1570-1)
 
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  }}
 
  | principal manuscript(s)=
 
  | principal manuscript(s)=
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   | [[Johannes Liechtenauer]]
 
   | [[Johannes Liechtenauer]]
 
   | [[Achille Marozzo]]
 
   | [[Achille Marozzo]]
   | [[Andre Paurñfeyndt]]
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   | [[Andre Paurenfeyndt]]
 
   | [[Sigmund ain Ringeck]]
 
   | [[Sigmund ain Ringeck]]
 
   | [[Martin Syber]]
 
   | [[Martin Syber]]
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'''Joachim Meyer''' (ca. 1537 - 1571)<ref name="Dupuis">[[Olivier Dupuis|Dupuis, Olivier]]. ''Joachim Meyer, escrimeur libre, bourgeois de Strasbourg (1537 ? - 1571). In Maîtres et techniques de combat.'' Dijon: AEDEH, 2006.</ref> was a [[century::16th century]] [[nationality::German]] [[Freifechter]] and [[fencing master]]. He was the last major figure in the tradition of the German grand master [[Johannes Liechtenauer]], and in the last years of his life he devised at least three distinct and quite extensive [[fencing manual]]s. Meyer's writings incorporate both the traditional Germanic technical syllabus and contemporary systems that he encountered in his travels, including the Italian school of side sword fencing.<ref name="Castle 74">[[Egerton Castle|Castle, Egerton]]. {{Google books|XgYHAAAAQAAJ|Schools and Masters of Fencing: From the Middle Ages to the Eighteenth Century|page=74}}. London: George Bell and Sons, 1885. pp 74 - 76.</ref> In addition to his fencing practice, Meyer was a Burgher and a master cutler.<ref name="Naumann">Naumann, Robert. ''Serapeum.'' Vol. 5. T.O. Weigel, 1844. pp 53-59.</ref>
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'''Joachim Meyer''' (ca. 1537 - 1571)<ref name="Dupuis">[[Olivier Dupuis|Dupuis, Olivier]]. ''Joachim Meyer, escrimeur libre, bourgeois de Strasbourg (1537 ? - 1571). In Maîtres et techniques de combat.'' Dijon: AEDEH, 2006.</ref> was a [[century::16th century]] [[nationality::German]] cutler, [[Freifechter]], and [[fencing master]]. He was the last major figure in the tradition of the German grand master [[Johannes Liechtenauer]], and in the later years of his life he devised at least four distinct and quite extensive [[fencing manual]]s. Meyer's writings incorporate both the traditional Germanic technical syllabus and contemporary systems that he encountered in his travels, including Italian rapier fencing.<ref name="Castle 74">[[Egerton Castle|Castle, Egerton]]. {{Google books|XgYHAAAAQAAJ|Schools and Masters of Fencing: From the Middle Ages to the Eighteenth Century|page=74}}. London: George Bell and Sons, 1885. pp 74 - 76.</ref> In addition to his fencing practice, Meyer was a Burgher and a master cutler.<ref name="Naumann">Naumann, Robert. ''Serapeum.'' Vol. 5. T.O. Weigel, 1844. pp 53-59.</ref>
  
Meyer was born in Basel,<ref>According to his wedding certificate.</ref> where he presumably apprenticed as a cutler. He writes in his books that he traveled widely in his youth, most likely a reference to the traditional Walz that journeyman craftsmen were required to take before being eligible for mastery and membership in a guild. Journeymen were often sent to stand watch and participate in town and city militias (a responsibility that would have been amplified for the warlike cutlers' guild), and Meyer learned a great deal about foreign fencing systems during his travels. It's been speculated by some fencing historians that he trained specifically in the Bolognese school of fencing, but this doesn't stand up to closer analysis.<ref>His dagger teachings do, however, show some evidence of influence by [[Achilles Marozzo]]'s printed treatise.</ref>
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Meyer was born in Basel,<ref>According to his wedding certificate.</ref> where he presumably apprenticed as a cutler. He writes in his books that he traveled widely in his youth, most likely a reference to the traditional Walz that journeyman craftsmen were required to take before being eligible for mastery and membership in a guild. Journeymen were often sent to stand watch and participate in town and city militias (a responsibility that would have been amplified for the warlike cutlers' guild), and Meyer learned a great deal about foreign fencing systems during his travels. It's been speculated by some fencing historians that he trained specifically in the Bolognese school of fencing, but this doesn't stand up to closer analysis.<ref>The influence of [[Achilles Marozzo]]'s printed treatise is, however, apparent in the rapier illustrations of his 1561 manuscript and the dagger plays in his book.</ref>
  
 
Records show that by 4 June 1560 he had settled in Strasbourg, where he married Appolonia Ruhlman (Ruelman)<ref name="Dupuis"/> and was granted the rank of master cutler. His interests had already moved beyond smithing, however, and in 1561, Meyer petitioned the City Council of Strasbourg for the right to hold a [[Fechtschule]] (fencing competition). He would repeat this in 1563, 1566, 1567 and 1568;<ref name="Van Slambrouck">Van Slambrouck, Christopher. "[https://www.researchgate.net/publication/291284452_The_Life_and_Work_of_Joachim_Meyer The Life and Work of Joachim Meyer]". ''Meyer Frei Fechter Guild, 2010. Retrieved 29 January 2010.''</ref> the 1568 petition is the first extant record in which he identifies himself as a fencing master.
 
Records show that by 4 June 1560 he had settled in Strasbourg, where he married Appolonia Ruhlman (Ruelman)<ref name="Dupuis"/> and was granted the rank of master cutler. His interests had already moved beyond smithing, however, and in 1561, Meyer petitioned the City Council of Strasbourg for the right to hold a [[Fechtschule]] (fencing competition). He would repeat this in 1563, 1566, 1567 and 1568;<ref name="Van Slambrouck">Van Slambrouck, Christopher. "[https://www.researchgate.net/publication/291284452_The_Life_and_Work_of_Joachim_Meyer The Life and Work of Joachim Meyer]". ''Meyer Frei Fechter Guild, 2010. Retrieved 29 January 2010.''</ref> the 1568 petition is the first extant record in which he identifies himself as a fencing master.
  
Meyer probably wrote his first manuscript ([[Joachim Meyers Fäktbok (MS A.4º.2)|MS A.4º.2]]) in either 1560 or 1568 for Otto Count von Sulms, Minzenberg, and Sonnenwaldt.<ref>[[Roger Norling|Norling, Roger]]. "[http://www.hroarr.com/the-history-of-joachim-meyers-treatise-to-von-solms/ The history of Joachim Meyer’s fencing treatise to Otto von Solms]". Hroarr.com, 2012. Retrieved 14 February 2015.</ref> Its contents seem to be a series of lessons on training with [[long sword]], [[dussack]], and [[rapier]]. His second manuscript ([[Fechtbuch zu Ross und zu Fuss (MS Var.82)|MS Var.82]]), written between 1563 and 1570 for Heinrich Graf von Eberst, is of a decidedly different nature. Like many fencing manuscripts from the previous century, it is an anthology of treatises by a number of prominent German masters including [[Sigmund ain Ringeck]], [[pseudo-Peter von Danzig]], and [[Martin Syber]], and also includes a brief outline by Meyer himself on a system of rapier fencing based on German [[Messer]] teachings. Finally, on 24 February 1570 Meyer completed (and soon thereafter published) an enormous multi-weapon treatise entitled ''[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens]]'' ("A Thorough Description of the Art of Combat"); it was dedicated to Johann Casimir, Count Palatine of the Rhine, and illustrated at the workshop of [[Tobias Stimmer]].<ref>Whose members included Christoph Maurer and Hans Christoffel Stimmer.</ref>  
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Meyer probably wrote his first manuscript ([[Joachim Meyers Fechtbuch (MS Bibl. 2465)|MS Bibl. 2465]]) in 1561 for Georg Johann Ⅰ, Count Palatine of Veldenz, and his second ([[Joachim Meyers Fäktbok (MS A.4º.2)|MS A.4º.2]]) in 1568 for Otto, Count von Sulms, Minzenberg, and Sonnenwaldt.<ref>[[Roger Norling|Norling, Roger]]. "[http://www.hroarr.com/the-history-of-joachim-meyers-treatise-to-von-solms/ The history of Joachim Meyer’s fencing treatise to Otto von Solms]". Hroarr.com, 2012. Retrieved 14 February 2015.</ref> Both of these manuscripts contain a series of lessons on training with [[long sword]], [[dussack]], and [[rapier]]; the 1561 also covers [[dagger]], [[polearms]], and [[armored fencing]]. His third manuscript ([[Fechtbuch zu Ross und zu Fuss (MS Var.82)|MS Var.82]]), written between 1563 and 1571 for Heinrich Graf von Eberst, is of a decidedly different nature. Like many fencing manuscripts from the previous century, it is an anthology of treatises by a number of prominent German masters including [[Sigmund ain Ringeck]], [[pseudo-Peter von Danzig]], and [[Martin Syber]], and also includes a brief outline by Meyer himself on a system of rapier fencing based on German [[Messer]] teachings.  
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Finally, on 24 February 1570, Meyer completed an enormous treatise entitled ''[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens]]'' ("A Thorough Description of the Art of Combat"); it was dedicated to Johann Casimir, Count Palatine of the Rhine, and illustrated at the workshop of [[Tobias Stimmer]].<ref>Whose members included Christoph Maurer and Hans Christoffel Stimmer.</ref> It contains all of the weapons of the 1561 manuscript apart from fencing in armor, and dramtically expands his teachings on each.
  
 
Unfortunately, Meyer's writing and publication efforts incurred significant debts (about 1300 crowns), which Meyer pledged to repay by Christmas of 1571.<ref name="Dupuis"/> Late in 1570, Meyer accepted the position of Fechtmeister to Duke Johann Albrecht of Mecklenburg at his court in Schwerin. There Meyer hoped to sell his book for a better price than was offered locally (30 florins). Meyer sent his books ahead to Schwerin, and left from Strasbourg on 4 January 1571 after receiving his pay. He traveled the 800 miles to Schwerin in the middle of a harsh winter, arriving at the court on 10 February 1571. Two weeks later, on 24 February, Joachim Meyer died. The cause of his death is unknown, possibly disease or pneumonia.<ref name="Van Slambrouck"/>
 
Unfortunately, Meyer's writing and publication efforts incurred significant debts (about 1300 crowns), which Meyer pledged to repay by Christmas of 1571.<ref name="Dupuis"/> Late in 1570, Meyer accepted the position of Fechtmeister to Duke Johann Albrecht of Mecklenburg at his court in Schwerin. There Meyer hoped to sell his book for a better price than was offered locally (30 florins). Meyer sent his books ahead to Schwerin, and left from Strasbourg on 4 January 1571 after receiving his pay. He traveled the 800 miles to Schwerin in the middle of a harsh winter, arriving at the court on 10 February 1571. Two weeks later, on 24 February, Joachim Meyer died. The cause of his death is unknown, possibly disease or pneumonia.<ref name="Van Slambrouck"/>
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Appolonia remarried in April 1572 to another cutler named Hans Kuele, bestowing upon him the status of Burgher and Meyer's substantial debts. Joachim Meyer and Hans Kuele are both mentioned in the minutes of Cutlers' Guild archives; Kuele may have made an impression if we can judge that fact by the number of times he is mentioned. It is believed that Appolonia and either her husband or her brother were involved with the second printing of his book in 1600. According to other sources, it was reprinted yet again in 1610 and in 1660.<ref>Schaer, Alfred. {{Google books|0egSAAAAYAAJ|Die altdeutschen fechter und spielleute: Ein beitrag zur deutschen culturgeschichte|page=76}}. K.J. Trübner, 1901. p 76.</ref><ref>Pollock, W. H., Grove, F. C., and Prévost, C. {{Google books|OXSZ8FjBfhkC|Fencing|page=267}}. London and Bombay: Longmans, Green, and co, 1897. pp 267-268.</ref>
 
Appolonia remarried in April 1572 to another cutler named Hans Kuele, bestowing upon him the status of Burgher and Meyer's substantial debts. Joachim Meyer and Hans Kuele are both mentioned in the minutes of Cutlers' Guild archives; Kuele may have made an impression if we can judge that fact by the number of times he is mentioned. It is believed that Appolonia and either her husband or her brother were involved with the second printing of his book in 1600. According to other sources, it was reprinted yet again in 1610 and in 1660.<ref>Schaer, Alfred. {{Google books|0egSAAAAYAAJ|Die altdeutschen fechter und spielleute: Ein beitrag zur deutschen culturgeschichte|page=76}}. K.J. Trübner, 1901. p 76.</ref><ref>Pollock, W. H., Grove, F. C., and Prévost, C. {{Google books|OXSZ8FjBfhkC|Fencing|page=267}}. London and Bombay: Longmans, Green, and co, 1897. pp 267-268.</ref>
 
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== Treatises ==
 
== Treatises ==
  
Joachim Meyer's writings are preserved in two manuscripts prepared in the 1560s, the [[Joachim Meyers Fäktbok (MS A.4º.2)|MS A.4º.2]] (Lund) and the [[Fechtbuch zu Ross und zu Fuss (MS Var.82)|MS Var 82]] (Rostock); a third manuscript from 1561 has been lost since at least the mid-20th century, and its contents are unknown.<ref>[[Jens P. Kleinau]]. "[http://talhoffer.wordpress.com/2011/07/04/1561-joachim-meyer-dedicated-a-fencing-book-to-the-pfalzgrafen-of-pfalz-veldenz-2/ 1561 Joachim Meyer dedicated a fencing book to the Pfalzgrafen of Pfalz-Veldenz]". ''Hans Talhoffer ~ as seen by Jens P. Kleinau''. 04 July 2011. Retrieved 14 February 2015.</ref> Dwarfing these works is the massive book he published in 1570 entitled "[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|A Thorough Description of the Free, Chivalric, and Noble Art of Fencing, Showing Various Customary Defenses, Affected and Put Forth with Many Handsome and Useful Drawings]]". Meyer's writings purport to teach the entire art of fencing, something that he claimed had never been done before, and encompass a wide variety of teachings from disparate sources and traditions. To achieve this goal, Meyer seems to have constructed his treatises as a series of progressive lessons, describing a process for learning to fence rather than merely outlining the underlying theory or listing the techniques. In keeping with this, he illustrates his techniques with depictions of fencers in courtyards using training weapons such as two-handed foils, wooden dussacks, and rapiers with ball tips.
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Joachim Meyer's writings are preserved in three manuscripts prepared in the 1560s: the 1561 [[Joachim Meyers Fechtbuch (MS Bibl. 2465)|MS Bibl. 2465]] (Munich), the 1568 [[Joachim Meyers Fäktbok (MS A.4º.2)|MS A.4º.2]] (Lund), and the [[Fechtbuch zu Ross und zu Fuss (MS Var.82)|MS Var. 82]] (Rostock), which Meyer may have still been working at the time of his death in 1571. Dwarfing these works is the massive book he published in 1570 entitled "[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|A Thorough Description of the Free, Chivalric, and Noble Art of Fencing, Showing Various Customary Defenses, Affected and Put Forth with Many Handsome and Useful Drawings]]". Meyer's writings purport to teach the entire art of fencing, something that he claimed had never been done before, and encompass a wide variety of teachings from disparate sources and traditions. To achieve this goal, Meyer seems to have constructed his treatises as a series of progressive lessons, describing a process for learning to fence rather than merely outlining the underlying theory or listing the techniques. In keeping with this, he illustrates his techniques with depictions of fencers in courtyards using training weapons such as two-handed foils, wooden dussacks, and rapiers with ball tips.
  
The first part of Meyer's treatise is devoted to the long sword (the sword in two hands), which he presents as the foundational weapon of his system, and this section devotes the most space to fundamentals like stance and footwork. His long sword system draws upon the teachings of Freifechter [[Andre Paurñfeyndt]] (via [[Der Altenn Fechter anfengliche kunst (Christian Egenolff)|Christian Egenolff's reprint]]) and Liechtenauer glossators [[Sigmund ain Ringeck]] and [[Lew]], as well as using terminology otherwise unique to the brief [[Recital]] of [[Martin Syber]]. Not content merely to compile these teachings as his contemporary [[Paulus Hector Mair]] was doing, Meyer sought to update—even reinvent—them in various ways to fit the martial climate of the late sixteenth century, including adapting many techniques to accommodate the increased momentum of a [[greatsword]] and modifying others to use beats with the flat and winding slices in place of thrusts to comply with street-fighting laws in German cities (and the rules of the Fechtschule).
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The first section of Meyer's treatise is devoted to the long sword (the sword in two hands), which he describes as the foundational weapon of his system, and this section devotes the most space to fundamentals like stance and footwork. His long sword system draws upon the teachings of Freifechter [[Andre Paurenfeyndt]] (via [[Der Allten Fechter gründtliche Kunst (Christian Egenolff)|Christian Egenolff's reprint]]) and Liechtenauer glossators [[Sigmund ain Ringeck]] and [[Lew]], as well as using terminology otherwise unique to the brief [[Recital]] of [[Martin Syber]]. Not content merely to compile these teachings as his contemporary [[Paulus Hector Mair]] was doing, Meyer sought to update—even reinvent—them in various ways to fit the martial climate of the late sixteenth century, including adapting many techniques to accommodate the increased momentum of a [[greatsword]] and modifying others to use beats with the flat and winding slices in place of thrusts to comply with street-fighting laws in German cities (and the rules of the Fechtschule).
  
The second part of Meyer's treatises is designed to address new weapons gaining traction in German lands, the dussack and the rapier, and thereby find places for them in the German tradition. His early Lund manuscript presents a more summarized syllabus of techniques for these weapons, while his printed book goes into greater depth and is structured more in the fashion of lesson plans.<ref>Roberts, James. "[http://www.hroarr.com/system-vs-syllabus-meyers-1560-and-1570-sidesword-texts/ System vs Syllabus: Meyer’s 1560 and 1570 sidesword texts]". Hroarr.com, 2014. Retrieved 14 February 2015.</ref> Meyer's dussack system, designed for the broad proto-sabers that spread into German lands from Eastern Europe in the 16th century,<ref>[[Roger Norling]]. "[http://hroarr.com/the-dussack/ The Dussack - a weapon of war]". Hroarr.com, 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2015.</ref> combines the old [[Messer]] teachings of [[Johannes Lecküchner]] and the dussack teachings of Andre Paurñfeyndt with other unknown systems (some have speculated that they might include early Polish or Hungarian saber systems). His rapier system, designed for the lighter single-hand swords spreading north from Iberian and Italian lands, seems again to be a hybrid creation, integrating both the core teachings of the 15th century Liechtenauer tradition as well as components that are characteristic of the various regional Mediterranean fencing systems (including, perhaps, teachings derived from the treatise of [[Achille Marozzo]]). Interestingly, Meyer's rapier teachings in the Rostock seem to represent an attempt to unify these two weapon system, outlining a method for rapier fencing that includes key elements of his dussack teachings; it is unclear why this method did not appear in his book, but given the dates it may be that they represent his last musings on the weapon, written in the time between the completion of his book in 1570 and his death a year later.
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The second section of Meyer's treatises is designed to address new weapons gaining traction in German lands, the dussack and the rapier, and thereby find places for them in the German tradition. His early Lund manuscript presents a more summarized syllabus of techniques for these weapons, while his printed book goes into greater depth and is structured more in the fashion of lesson plans.<ref>Roberts, James. "[http://www.hroarr.com/system-vs-syllabus-meyers-1560-and-1570-sidesword-texts/ System vs Syllabus: Meyer’s 1560 and 1570 sidesword texts]". Hroarr.com, 2014. Retrieved 14 February 2015.</ref> Meyer's dussack system, designed for the broad proto-sabers that spread into German lands from Eastern Europe in the 16th century,<ref>[[Roger Norling]]. "[http://hroarr.com/the-dussack/ The Dussack - a weapon of war]". Hroarr.com, 2012. Retrieved 6 October 2015.</ref> combines the old [[Messer]] teachings of [[Johannes Lecküchner]] and the dussack teachings of Andre Paurenfeyndt with other unknown systems (some have speculated that they might include early Polish or Hungarian saber systems). His rapier system, designed for the lighter single-hand swords spreading north from Iberian and Italian lands, seems again to be a hybrid creation, integrating both the core teachings of the 15th century Liechtenauer tradition as well as components that are characteristic of the various regional Mediterranean fencing systems (including, perhaps, teachings derived from the treatise of [[Achille Marozzo]]). Interestingly, Meyer's rapier teachings in the Rostock seem to represent an attempt to unify these two weapon system, outlining a method for rapier fencing that includes key elements of his dussack teachings; it is unclear why this method did not appear in his book, but given the dates it may be that they represent his last musings on the weapon, written in the time between the completion of his book in 1570 and his death a year later.
  
The third part of Meyer's treatise only appears in his published book and covers dagger, wrestling, and various pole weapons. His dagger teachings, designed primarily for urban self-defense, seem to be based in part on the writings of Bolognese master Achille Marozzo<ref>[[Roger Norling|Norling, Roger]]. "[http://www.hroarr.com/meyer-and-marozzo-dagger-comparison/ Meyer and Marozzo dagger comparison]". Hroarr.com, 2012. Retrieved 15 February 2015.</ref> and the anonymous teachings in Egenolff, but also include much unique content of unknown origin (perhaps the anonymous dagger teachings in his Rostock manuscript). His staff material makes up the bulk of this section, beginning with the short staff, which, like Paurñfeyndt, he uses as a training tool for various pole weapons (and possibly also the greatsword), and then moving on to the halberd before ending with the long staff (representing the [[pike]]). As with the dagger, the sources Meyer based his staff teachings on are largely unknown.
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The third section of Meyer's treatise is omitted in the Lund manuscript but present in the Munich and the 1570, and covers dagger, wrestling, and various pole weapons; to this, the Munich adds several plays of armored fencing. His dagger teachings, designed primarily for urban self-defense, seem to be based in part on the writings of Bolognese master Achille Marozzo<ref>[[Roger Norling|Norling, Roger]]. "[http://www.hroarr.com/meyer-and-marozzo-dagger-comparison/ Meyer and Marozzo dagger comparison]". Hroarr.com, 2012. Retrieved 15 February 2015.</ref> and the anonymous teachings in Egenolff, but also include much unique content of unknown origin (perhaps the anonymous dagger teachings in his Rostock manuscript). His staff material makes up the bulk of this section, beginning with the short staff, which, like Paurenfeyndt, he uses as a training tool for various pole weapons (and possibly also the greatsword), and then moving on to the halberd before ending with the long staff (representing the [[pike]]). As with the dagger, the sources Meyer based his staff teachings on are largely unknown.
  
 
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! <p>[[Joachim Meyers Fechtbuch (MS Bibl. 2465)|Munich Transcription]]{{edit index|Joachim Meyers Fechtbuch (MS Bibl. 2465)}}</p>
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| [[File:MS Bibl. 2465 IIv.jpg|400px|center]]
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| rowspan="2" | <p>'''To the Well born Lord, Duke Ottbo Count of Solms, Lord of Munzenberg and Sonnewaldt my Gracious Sir'''</p>
| <p>'''To the Well born Lord, Duke Ottbo Count of Solms, Lord of Munzenberg and Sonnewaldt my Gracious Sir'''</p>
 
  
 
<p>Well born Gracious Sir, Your Grace, my subservience and  willing service, is as every time before. Kindly Sir, It's not without particular Reasons that the Old Writings of the Knightly Free Art of Fencing  with all diligence, in their Books are praised and reposed and the Princes and gentlemen themselves, with earnestness Ordered namely but that more portions of Knightly Fighting and forthright strikes from there have arisen from trustworthy,credible words, that what through' splendid feelings for Manhood originated, for the Praise also thereby in the Highest Command and administration of War will be attained/revealed not solely in the History of the Greeks and Romans but is especially proven also through daily experience, that the training in various Knights games and Fencing, is learned with diligence, like those same  practices that came long before, and it is masterful with all speed. Then more to  our times Princes and Noblemen no less, Love it, and to the highest advancement than our Old Riders, how then also, You Grace, besides other free Arts, associates this manly Art with earnestness, and therefore I, Your grace, as an innocent Fencing Master, to this end, I must Instruct your grace which I in all Subservience and with willful courage have accepted, and while I am not alone, a particular beauty to such Art, but rather through Your Grace’s, merciful and consecrated will, you have sensed and found out about me I have no knowledge and Way but with it I, Your Grace, in such Art can subserviently serve and want to save, so this Fencing manual was put together, and all Stücken described, to Your Grace, and delivered in the subservient hope, that Your grace, would not only learn the techniques that are taught here, but through them thus they be cast in memory to be held, but rather also will swift and useful Stücken hence be learnt from not less than, thus, a similar Fencing master, that Your Grace will have had. I beg thus in subservience Your grace, wants a work such as mine, although unwary and minor a work, than that from one, Your grace, to all possible service in subservience and wholeheartedly, studiously flowed and graciously will accept. Of this will I, Your Grace, subserviently serve and wherewith I can pleasurably show, also to the Highest solicitude. May that the Almighty would confer on Your Grace, besides other prosperity, also long life in good health and Freedoms.</p>
 
<p>Well born Gracious Sir, Your Grace, my subservience and  willing service, is as every time before. Kindly Sir, It's not without particular Reasons that the Old Writings of the Knightly Free Art of Fencing  with all diligence, in their Books are praised and reposed and the Princes and gentlemen themselves, with earnestness Ordered namely but that more portions of Knightly Fighting and forthright strikes from there have arisen from trustworthy,credible words, that what through' splendid feelings for Manhood originated, for the Praise also thereby in the Highest Command and administration of War will be attained/revealed not solely in the History of the Greeks and Romans but is especially proven also through daily experience, that the training in various Knights games and Fencing, is learned with diligence, like those same  practices that came long before, and it is masterful with all speed. Then more to  our times Princes and Noblemen no less, Love it, and to the highest advancement than our Old Riders, how then also, You Grace, besides other free Arts, associates this manly Art with earnestness, and therefore I, Your grace, as an innocent Fencing Master, to this end, I must Instruct your grace which I in all Subservience and with willful courage have accepted, and while I am not alone, a particular beauty to such Art, but rather through Your Grace’s, merciful and consecrated will, you have sensed and found out about me I have no knowledge and Way but with it I, Your Grace, in such Art can subserviently serve and want to save, so this Fencing manual was put together, and all Stücken described, to Your Grace, and delivered in the subservient hope, that Your grace, would not only learn the techniques that are taught here, but through them thus they be cast in memory to be held, but rather also will swift and useful Stücken hence be learnt from not less than, thus, a similar Fencing master, that Your Grace will have had. I beg thus in subservience Your grace, wants a work such as mine, although unwary and minor a work, than that from one, Your grace, to all possible service in subservience and wholeheartedly, studiously flowed and graciously will accept. Of this will I, Your Grace, subserviently serve and wherewith I can pleasurably show, also to the Highest solicitude. May that the Almighty would confer on Your Grace, besides other prosperity, also long life in good health and Freedoms.</p>
|  
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| [[File:MS A.4º.2 02v.jpg|400px|center]]
  
 
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| class="noline" | <p>Your Grace</p>
 
| class="noline" | <p>Your Grace</p>
  
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! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>Figures</p>
! <p>{{rating|C}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
+
! <p>{{rating}}<br/></p>
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}</p>
+
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
  
 
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Cover.jpg|center|400px]]
 
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Cover.jpg|center|400px]]
| <p>{{red|b=1|Thorough Descriptions / of the free Knightly and}}''' Noble Art of Fencing / with various Custom'''ary Weapons / with many beautiful and useful illustrated Figures affected and presented.'''</p>
+
| <p>{{red|b=1|Thorough Descriptions of the free Knightly and}}''' Noble Art of Fencing, with various Custom'''ary Weapons, with many beautiful and useful illustrated Figures affected and presented.'''<br/><br/></p>
  
<p>{{red|By Joachim Meyer / Free-Fencer in Strasburg}}</p>
+
<p>{{red|By Joachim Meyer, Free-Fencer in Strasburg}}</p>
  
 
<p>YEAR 1570</p>
 
<p>YEAR 1570</p>
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/9|2|lbl=a2v.2|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/10|1|lbl=a3r.1|p=1}}
  
 
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/10|3|lbl=a3r.3|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/11|1|lbl=a3v.1|p=1}}
  
 
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/11|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/12|1|lbl=a3v.2|p=1}}
  
 
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/12|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/13|1|lbl=a4v.1|p=1}}
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| class="noline" |
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| class="noline" |
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| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/13|2|lbl=a4v.1}}
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{{master subsection end}}
  
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{{master subsection begin
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| title = Foreword to the 1570
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| width = 90em
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}}
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{| class="master"
 
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! <p>Figures</p>
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! <p>{{rating}}<br/></p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/13|2|lbl=-}}
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! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
  
 
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/14|2|lbl=b1r.2|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/15|1|lbl=b1v.1|p=1}}
  
 
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/15|3|lbl=b1v.3|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/16|1|lbl=b2r.1|p=1}}
  
 
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/16|3|lbl=b2r.3|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/17|1|lbl=b2v.1|p=1}}
  
 
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| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/21|3|lbl=-}}
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| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/21|3|lbl=b4v.3}}
  
 
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{{master subsection begin
 
{{master subsection begin
 
  | title = Introduction
 
  | title = Introduction
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! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>Figures</p>
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the 1570)}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
+
! <p>{{rating|C}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}</p>
+
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
 
<section end="credits1"/>
 
<section end="credits1"/>
 
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| <p>'''Contents of the first Book on Fencing with the Sword / and how its description is ordered / and whereupon this Knightly Art’s foundations are laid.'''</p>
+
| <p>'''Contents of the first Book on Fencing with the Sword, and how its description is ordered, and whereupon this Knightly Art’s foundations are laid.'''</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/22|1|lbl=1.1ra}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/22|1|lbl=Ⅰ.1r.1}}
  
 
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| <p>As I intent to diligently and truly and to the best of my understanding and abilities describe the art of Fencing in the Knightly and Manly weapons that are currently used most often by us Germans, and because fencing with the sword is not just the source and origin of all other forms of fencing but, as experience shows and as is obvious, also the most artful and manly next to other weapons, I deem it necessary and good to begin with it and do so in brevity but also clarity as it is customary in other arts and disciplines.</p>
 
| <p>As I intent to diligently and truly and to the best of my understanding and abilities describe the art of Fencing in the Knightly and Manly weapons that are currently used most often by us Germans, and because fencing with the sword is not just the source and origin of all other forms of fencing but, as experience shows and as is obvious, also the most artful and manly next to other weapons, I deem it necessary and good to begin with it and do so in brevity but also clarity as it is customary in other arts and disciplines.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/22|2|lbl=1.1rb}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/22|2|lbl=.1r.2}}
  
 
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| <p>Firstly, list the terminology invented by masters of this art so that one can learn and comprehend the secrecy and speed of it all the quicker and easier. After that, explain these terms so that everyone may understand what is meant by them.</p>
 
| <p>Firstly, list the terminology invented by masters of this art so that one can learn and comprehend the secrecy and speed of it all the quicker and easier. After that, explain these terms so that everyone may understand what is meant by them.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/22|3|lbl=1.1rac}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/22|3|lbl=.1r.3}}
  
 
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| <p>Then thirdly, achieve the ability to extend the art in your own right, and from your clarity attain and exude the proper judgement in Stance and Strikes so that Youth will not have to learn this art unguided and, because of your unspoken word, ill is wrought and they thus learn wrongly to the detriment of the art. Once achieved, we need your words and thoughts in this art, first from notes you would clarify, then onto subjects important to read in training, then to other subjects you want to develop further, so that the discipline of fencing grows on properly understood principles you have contributed to, rather than relying on mindless juggling, thus greater the difference between juggling and fencing will become, and the Knightly art of Fencing will grow from Warriors far and wide, particularly to Citizens at large, but beware the Juggler, to whom the unseemliest losses are and who is found everywhere in the world, until all are put away.</p>
 
| <p>Then thirdly, achieve the ability to extend the art in your own right, and from your clarity attain and exude the proper judgement in Stance and Strikes so that Youth will not have to learn this art unguided and, because of your unspoken word, ill is wrought and they thus learn wrongly to the detriment of the art. Once achieved, we need your words and thoughts in this art, first from notes you would clarify, then onto subjects important to read in training, then to other subjects you want to develop further, so that the discipline of fencing grows on properly understood principles you have contributed to, rather than relying on mindless juggling, thus greater the difference between juggling and fencing will become, and the Knightly art of Fencing will grow from Warriors far and wide, particularly to Citizens at large, but beware the Juggler, to whom the unseemliest losses are and who is found everywhere in the world, until all are put away.</p>
 
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/22|4|lbl=1.1rd|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/23|1|lbl=1.1va|p=1}}
+
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/22|4|lbl=Ⅰ.1r.4|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/23|1|lbl=Ⅰ.1v.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>Fencing with the Sword is nothing other than a discipline, wherein your force strives together with your sword in placement so that one with the other, using care and agility, artfulness, delicacy and manlyness, are at need the same both in strikes and in other handwork one is obliged to, excepting when one is not in a serious situation, thus by such discipline one will be more dangerous and more skillful, and when needing to protect one’s body be more effective.</p>
 
| <p>Fencing with the Sword is nothing other than a discipline, wherein your force strives together with your sword in placement so that one with the other, using care and agility, artfulness, delicacy and manlyness, are at need the same both in strikes and in other handwork one is obliged to, excepting when one is not in a serious situation, thus by such discipline one will be more dangerous and more skillful, and when needing to protect one’s body be more effective.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/23|2|lbl=1.1vb}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/23|2|lbl=.1v.2}}
 
 
|-
 
|
 
| <p>This can be advanced in three stages and be organized thus, namely as the Start, the Middle and the End, where the three stages each have one aim which you shall fence through, and must do one by one to advance, that you thereby know with which strikes or stances you will engage your counterpart and then frontally attack as you would in the Middle stage’s handwork, letting fly to work against the openings, keeping the initiative such that his attacks are preempted.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/23|3|lbl=1.1vc}}
 
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>The Last is as you are fulfilled and will, with harm neither inflicted nor received, withdraw.</p>
+
| <p>This can be advanced in three stages and be organized thus, namely as the Start, the Middle and the End, where the three stages each have one aim which you shall fence through, and must do one by one to advance, that you thereby know with which strikes or stances you will engage your counterpart and then frontally attack as you would in the Middle stage’s handwork, letting fly to work against the openings, keeping the initiative such that his attacks are preempted. The Last is as you are fulfilled and will, with harm neither inflicted nor received, withdraw.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/23|4|lbl=1.1vd}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/23|3|lbl=Ⅰ.1v.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 345: Line 376:
 
<p>The End is the resolution, where one fencer shall withdraw without damage from his opponent and strike away if desired.</p>
 
<p>The End is the resolution, where one fencer shall withdraw without damage from his opponent and strike away if desired.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/23|5|lbl=1.1ve|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/23|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/23|7|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/24|1|lbl=1.2ra|p=1}}
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/23|4|lbl=.1v.4|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/24|1|lbl=Ⅰ.2r.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>The initial pre-fencing is the face off from the Stances to the strikes, which are of two kinds, namely the Lead Stances and the Secondary Stances, we start with the Lead Stances.</p>
 
| <p>The initial pre-fencing is the face off from the Stances to the strikes, which are of two kinds, namely the Lead Stances and the Secondary Stances, we start with the Lead Stances.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/24|2|lbl=1.2rb}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/24|2|lbl=.2r.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>There are four Lead Stances, the Roof or Upper Guard, the Ox, the Fool, and the Plough. There are eight Secondary Stances, Wrathful Guard, Window Breaker, Long Point, Barrier Guard, Unicorn, Key, Iron Door, Changer.</p>
 
| <p>There are four Lead Stances, the Roof or Upper Guard, the Ox, the Fool, and the Plough. There are eight Secondary Stances, Wrathful Guard, Window Breaker, Long Point, Barrier Guard, Unicorn, Key, Iron Door, Changer.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/24|3|lbl=1.2rc}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/24|3|lbl=.2r.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>The strikes with the Sword are many, belonging to two groups, which are common to both the direct and indirect strikes which we shall name. The first group is named the Lead or Principal strikes, on which all other strikes are based, and which are four, Over, Under, Middle, and Wrathful strikes. The others are named the secondary or derivative strikes, which are twelve in number, namely the Glance, Curve, Short, Slide, Bounce: Single and Double, Blind, Wound, Crown, Knee Hollow, Plunge, and Change Strike.</p>
 
| <p>The strikes with the Sword are many, belonging to two groups, which are common to both the direct and indirect strikes which we shall name. The first group is named the Lead or Principal strikes, on which all other strikes are based, and which are four, Over, Under, Middle, and Wrathful strikes. The others are named the secondary or derivative strikes, which are twelve in number, namely the Glance, Curve, Short, Slide, Bounce: Single and Double, Blind, Wound, Crown, Knee Hollow, Plunge, and Change Strike.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/24|4|lbl=1.2rd}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/24|4|lbl=.2r.4}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>Beyond these strikes come the proper Master Strikes, which we shall also name, from which all masterful and artful moves with the Sword are made and accomplished with varying grips, these are Wrath, Arc, Traverser, Glancer and Vertex which are all used when wanting to conclude and complete, and which I will describe to you. Just as I introduced pre-fencing, so I have clearly spoken and introduced the Strikes to you.</p>
 
| <p>Beyond these strikes come the proper Master Strikes, which we shall also name, from which all masterful and artful moves with the Sword are made and accomplished with varying grips, these are Wrath, Arc, Traverser, Glancer and Vertex which are all used when wanting to conclude and complete, and which I will describe to you. Just as I introduced pre-fencing, so I have clearly spoken and introduced the Strikes to you.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/24|5|lbl=1.2re}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/24|5|lbl=.2r.5}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 371: Line 402:
 
| <p>The second or Handwork in the Middle Stage involves the greatest art, where all your withdrawals in the fight can be advances. Look not only to how one can use the sword in binding, Winding, Changing, Enticing, Following After, Cutting, Doubling, Flowing off to leave be or in whatever shape you’ve cut, Hewing, Advancing, Twitching and Jerking, Adjusting, Grappling, Charging In, Throwing, and End Wrestling. An important concept is Targetting, through which one must come to understand Man and Sword, and through which one comes to understand proper stance and footwork, and from which how one shall handle one’s point.</p>
 
| <p>The second or Handwork in the Middle Stage involves the greatest art, where all your withdrawals in the fight can be advances. Look not only to how one can use the sword in binding, Winding, Changing, Enticing, Following After, Cutting, Doubling, Flowing off to leave be or in whatever shape you’ve cut, Hewing, Advancing, Twitching and Jerking, Adjusting, Grappling, Charging In, Throwing, and End Wrestling. An important concept is Targetting, through which one must come to understand Man and Sword, and through which one comes to understand proper stance and footwork, and from which how one shall handle one’s point.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/24|6|lbl=1.2rf|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/25|1|lbl=1.2va|p=1}}
+
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/24|6|lbl=Ⅰ.2r.6|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/25|1|lbl=Ⅰ.2v.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>That brings us to the end, which flows from the Middle, and has the greatest Practical use, by which one ends each case, from thereof Withdraw soundly, in order to report what happened, and so arrange it all in the first chapter of Sword Fighting, from the Master Principles onward, so on to officially profess more skill in this Weapon, and by using this Book you shall Teach the initiates, and so after shall this art drive on to become more useful at need, and shall from others range farther to be sufficiently retold.</p>
 
| <p>That brings us to the end, which flows from the Middle, and has the greatest Practical use, by which one ends each case, from thereof Withdraw soundly, in order to report what happened, and so arrange it all in the first chapter of Sword Fighting, from the Master Principles onward, so on to officially profess more skill in this Weapon, and by using this Book you shall Teach the initiates, and so after shall this art drive on to become more useful at need, and shall from others range farther to be sufficiently retold.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/25|2|lbl=1.2vb}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/25|2|lbl=.2v.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" | <p>Such input I have seen fit to make for purposes of clearer understanding, so that with this Book each onward going shall become easier to understand, thus easier to modify, and thus initially to learn, and thus I shall see such Knightly arts grow onward, and will now with the first Letter of this chapter, whose first purpose is to teach usefulness, instruct by moving on to present the Four Targets.</p>
 
| class="noline" | <p>Such input I have seen fit to make for purposes of clearer understanding, so that with this Book each onward going shall become easier to understand, thus easier to modify, and thus initially to learn, and thus I shall see such Knightly arts grow onward, and will now with the first Letter of this chapter, whose first purpose is to teach usefulness, instruct by moving on to present the Four Targets.</p>
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/25|3|lbl=1.2vc}}
+
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/25|3|lbl=.2v.3}}
  
 
|}
 
|}
Line 393: Line 424:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>Figures</p>
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the 1570)}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
+
! <p>{{rating|C}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}</p>
+
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword A.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword A.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Of Man and His Divisions</p>
 
| <p>'''Of Man and His Divisions</p>
  
Line 403: Line 434:
  
 
<p>From One’s divisions one shall come to understand the Openings and Stances, to and from which one will fence, ongoing to grasping the Middle or Handwork which will be described in the course of this Book, even though at first I was willing to sit and describe this subject alone without any other considerations. Then we move on to examine Fencing in all its components and arts, to be at first known from lessons, then from there to be shown, and then onward to be handled, and you shall at first want to take care to demonstrate how it’s properly done, so that not only the Middle or Handwork is attained, but that the Openings shall be minded, from lessons thereon to note taking, and going forward I shall not leave my written lessons behind me to be forgotten.</p>
 
<p>From One’s divisions one shall come to understand the Openings and Stances, to and from which one will fence, ongoing to grasping the Middle or Handwork which will be described in the course of this Book, even though at first I was willing to sit and describe this subject alone without any other considerations. Then we move on to examine Fencing in all its components and arts, to be at first known from lessons, then from there to be shown, and then onward to be handled, and you shall at first want to take care to demonstrate how it’s properly done, so that not only the Middle or Handwork is attained, but that the Openings shall be minded, from lessons thereon to note taking, and going forward I shall not leave my written lessons behind me to be forgotten.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/27|1|lbl=1.3va}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/27|1|lbl=Ⅰ.3v.1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>Now we will visualise a man in four quarters or parts, Above and Below and on both the Right and the Left. Beyond this and how you view yourself, I dare not describe further, but if you care to look, you see that humans are arranged in high and low and right and left parts. In order to better understand my meaning, examine the figure on the right side of the picture above.</p>
 
| <p>Now we will visualise a man in four quarters or parts, Above and Below and on both the Right and the Left. Beyond this and how you view yourself, I dare not describe further, but if you care to look, you see that humans are arranged in high and low and right and left parts. In order to better understand my meaning, examine the figure on the right side of the picture above.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/27|2|lbl=1.3vb}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/27|2|lbl=.3v.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 414: Line 445:
 
| <p>And if these four parts weren’t already addressed enough for one, against them the Ancient German Fencer will need to strike with the various strikes as they are known among us Germans at this time, so special in their Handywork with the Winding, these will fight the furthest and against the Greatest since all of humanity in common is divided in the above named four parts. We see how the the Upper Vertices meet, and Below how the Chin and Throat are relevant. Onward we see the Right and Left parts which are joined across the Ears, both sides are relevant, both right and Left ears will be addressed.</p>
 
| <p>And if these four parts weren’t already addressed enough for one, against them the Ancient German Fencer will need to strike with the various strikes as they are known among us Germans at this time, so special in their Handywork with the Winding, these will fight the furthest and against the Greatest since all of humanity in common is divided in the above named four parts. We see how the the Upper Vertices meet, and Below how the Chin and Throat are relevant. Onward we see the Right and Left parts which are joined across the Ears, both sides are relevant, both right and Left ears will be addressed.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/27|3|lbl=1.3vc|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/28|1|lbl=1.4ra|p=1}}
+
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/27|3|lbl=Ⅰ.3v.3|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/28|1|lbl=Ⅰ.4r.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 421: Line 452:
  
 
<p>In addition my need is to know then how in all weapons such concepts can be understood in the short term and be shown and explained, and if not to be returned to, until the Person can explain the sections, so by them if the opposing fencer tries to mark one or another part, one knows with proper displacement how to smoothly move to secure themselves. Or if one or another intends to aim for an opening, he can also strive to undertake this strike correctly. Then each one shall probe to hit the four points, be met there, and have to guard against same, and thus must always be on Guard, ready to displace.</p>
 
<p>In addition my need is to know then how in all weapons such concepts can be understood in the short term and be shown and explained, and if not to be returned to, until the Person can explain the sections, so by them if the opposing fencer tries to mark one or another part, one knows with proper displacement how to smoothly move to secure themselves. Or if one or another intends to aim for an opening, he can also strive to undertake this strike correctly. Then each one shall probe to hit the four points, be met there, and have to guard against same, and thus must always be on Guard, ready to displace.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/28|2|lbl=1.4rb}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/28|2|lbl=.4r.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" | <p>The means to learn what follows from the Stances, Strikes, and Targets is undertaken here more easily, in that these descriptions and presentations are enough for one to flow on.</p>
 
| class="noline" | <p>The means to learn what follows from the Stances, Strikes, and Targets is undertaken here more easily, in that these descriptions and presentations are enough for one to flow on.</p>
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/28|3|lbl=1.4rc}}
+
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/28|3|lbl=.4r.3}}
  
 
|}
 
|}
Line 432: Line 463:
  
 
{{master subsection begin
 
{{master subsection begin
  | title = 2 - Of the Sword and its Divisions
+
  | title = 2 - Of the Sword and Its Divisions
 
  | width = 90em
 
  | width = 90em
 
}}
 
}}
Line 438: Line 469:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>Figures</p>
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the 1570)}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
+
! <p>{{rating|C}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}</p>
+
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''Of the Sword and its Divisions'''</p>
+
| <p>'''Of the Sword and Its Divisions'''</p>
  
 
<p>Chapter 2</p>
 
<p>Chapter 2</p>
  
 
<p>Now we will clarify this and why it is done in fencing, namely how one or another are like the parts of one’s body which one strikes away from in knightly fashion or accordingly defend them at need. Just like the parts of the human are quickly understood, so it’s again apparent from noting why and how certain relative parts of the sword work against others to bring success, and similarly how you should know these labels or overviews before you try yourself likewise, so thus onward from nothing else than your Sword shall you cause communication, and meanwhile have wisdom not in only one device, but also shortly know cuts with the short edge, then with the long, then with the strong, and with the weak, then will you charge on to success from the Sword’s necessities and from heeding this Art’s known elements also have something to say.</p>
 
<p>Now we will clarify this and why it is done in fencing, namely how one or another are like the parts of one’s body which one strikes away from in knightly fashion or accordingly defend them at need. Just like the parts of the human are quickly understood, so it’s again apparent from noting why and how certain relative parts of the sword work against others to bring success, and similarly how you should know these labels or overviews before you try yourself likewise, so thus onward from nothing else than your Sword shall you cause communication, and meanwhile have wisdom not in only one device, but also shortly know cuts with the short edge, then with the long, then with the strong, and with the weak, then will you charge on to success from the Sword’s necessities and from heeding this Art’s known elements also have something to say.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/29|1|lbl=1.4va}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/29|1|lbl=Ⅰ.4v.1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>We define the form and figure of the Sword’s parts as its Pommel, Point, Cross or Hilt, Haft or Grip, and the Blade, about which, though without evaluation, we will now say several words.</p>
 
| <p>We define the form and figure of the Sword’s parts as its Pommel, Point, Cross or Hilt, Haft or Grip, and the Blade, about which, though without evaluation, we will now say several words.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/29|2|lbl=1.4vb}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/29|2|lbl=.4v.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>The Blade has basically two underlying divisions, where the first is the Strong and Weak, the other the Short and Long edges, those being the forward and trailing edges.</p>
 
| <p>The Blade has basically two underlying divisions, where the first is the Strong and Weak, the other the Short and Long edges, those being the forward and trailing edges.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/29|3|lbl=1.4vc}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/29|3|lbl=.4v.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>The Strong of the Sword is the name for the part running from the Cross or Hilt to the middle of the blade, the Weak is from the middle to and with the point or end itself, from which the Long and Short edges grow.</p>
 
| <p>The Strong of the Sword is the name for the part running from the Cross or Hilt to the middle of the blade, the Weak is from the middle to and with the point or end itself, from which the Long and Short edges grow.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/29|4|lbl=1.4vd}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/29|4|lbl=.4v.4}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword A.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword A.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>The Long Edge is the full length of edge from the fingers onward, directed against your opponent, the Short or half edge is the one nearest the thumb, between the thumb and index finger, first finger pointing at the fencer’s self, as if it is imitating the other’s weapon. We will speak as well of the spine of the sword, as shown in the previous illustration.</p>
 
| <p>The Long Edge is the full length of edge from the fingers onward, directed against your opponent, the Short or half edge is the one nearest the thumb, between the thumb and index finger, first finger pointing at the fencer’s self, as if it is imitating the other’s weapon. We will speak as well of the spine of the sword, as shown in the previous illustration.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/29|5|lbl=Ⅰ.4v.5|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/30|1|lbl=Ⅰ.5r.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <p>From the overlying parts of the sword springs forths the correct total view, which is very useful in fencing, namely that the Sword is outwardly grouped in four parts and divisions, as is seen in the previous illustration.</p>
 
| <p>From the overlying parts of the sword springs forths the correct total view, which is very useful in fencing, namely that the Sword is outwardly grouped in four parts and divisions, as is seen in the previous illustration.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/30|2|lbl=1.5rb}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/30|2|lbl=.5r.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>The first to be named is the Bind or Haft, including Pommel and Cross, for charging, Wrenching, Grappling, Throwing, and of service in other work.</p>
 
| <p>The first to be named is the Bind or Haft, including Pommel and Cross, for charging, Wrenching, Grappling, Throwing, and of service in other work.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/30|3|lbl=1.5rc}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/30|3|lbl=.5r.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>The second is the Strong, as was counted, used in Cutting, Winding, Impacting, and otherwise where the Strong is useful in fencing.</p>
 
| <p>The second is the Strong, as was counted, used in Cutting, Winding, Impacting, and otherwise where the Strong is useful in fencing.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/30|4|lbl=1.5rd}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/30|4|lbl=.5r.4}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>The third part is the Middle, which lies between strong and weak on the halfway part and is used when needing to close in the changeful work, where it will be resorted to at every opportunity when needed.</p>
 
| <p>The third part is the Middle, which lies between strong and weak on the halfway part and is used when needing to close in the changeful work, where it will be resorted to at every opportunity when needed.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/30|5|lbl=1.5re}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/30|5|lbl=.5r.5}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" | <p>The fourth is the Weak, through which Changing, Rushing, Slinging, and similar such will duly be used in fencing, of which in what follows there will be many examples and pieces.</p>
 
| class="noline" | <p>The fourth is the Weak, through which Changing, Rushing, Slinging, and similar such will duly be used in fencing, of which in what follows there will be many examples and pieces.</p>
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/30|6|lbl=1.5rf}}
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| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/30|6|lbl=.5r.6}}
 
 
  
 
|}
 
|}
Line 506: Line 536:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>Figures</p>
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the 1570)}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
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! <p>{{rating|C}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}</p>
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! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 523: Line 553:
 
<p>Since the Stances or Guards have the four sections of ones body as their obvious origin, in that one is divided into four quarters, Over, Under, Left and Right, so also one’s opponent is divided and thus shall be encountered, as four Targets, and relative to them there are the four Primary Stances or Guards, from which all others originate and spring forth, which are the Ox, Plough, Roof and Fool, from which one comes to understand the secondaries which, in due order, one comes to deploy, which are the Wrathful Guard, Long Point, Changer, Close Guard, Iron Door, Hanging Point, Key, and Unicorn.</p>
 
<p>Since the Stances or Guards have the four sections of ones body as their obvious origin, in that one is divided into four quarters, Over, Under, Left and Right, so also one’s opponent is divided and thus shall be encountered, as four Targets, and relative to them there are the four Primary Stances or Guards, from which all others originate and spring forth, which are the Ox, Plough, Roof and Fool, from which one comes to understand the secondaries which, in due order, one comes to deploy, which are the Wrathful Guard, Long Point, Changer, Close Guard, Iron Door, Hanging Point, Key, and Unicorn.</p>
 
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/30|7|lbl=1.5rg|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/31|1|lbl=1.5va|p=1}}
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/30|7|lbl=Ⅰ.5r.7|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/31|1|lbl=.5v|p=1}}
  
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword B.jpg|center|400px]]
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| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword B.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Ox'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Ox'''</p>
  
Line 535: Line 565:
  
 
<p>Thus you have been told of both Ox Guards or Stances, which is being shown by the Left Figure of illustration B above.</p>
 
<p>Thus you have been told of both Ox Guards or Stances, which is being shown by the Left Figure of illustration B above.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/33|1|lbl=1.6va}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/33|1|lbl=Ⅰ.6v.1}}
  
 
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|-  
Line 545: Line 575:
  
 
<p>The Right Plough is shown by the figure on the Right of the above illustration.</p>
 
<p>The Right Plough is shown by the figure on the Right of the above illustration.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/33|2|lbl=1.6vb}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/33|2|lbl=.6v.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword C.jpg|center|400px]]
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| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword C.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Roof'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Roof'''</p>
  
 
<p>The Guard of the Roof, which is also known as the High Guard, is explained as follows. Stand with your Left Foot forward, hold your Sword high over your head so its point is directly above, consider the figure on the left of the image above, illustration C, which indicates how one can operate from above, that all strikes can be fenced from the Roof or High Guard, which is why this Guard is named the Roof.</p>
 
<p>The Guard of the Roof, which is also known as the High Guard, is explained as follows. Stand with your Left Foot forward, hold your Sword high over your head so its point is directly above, consider the figure on the left of the image above, illustration C, which indicates how one can operate from above, that all strikes can be fenced from the Roof or High Guard, which is why this Guard is named the Roof.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/33|3|lbl=1.6vc|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/35|1|lbl=1.7ra|p=1}}
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/33|3|lbl=Ⅰ.6v.3|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/35|1|lbl=Ⅰ.7r.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 561: Line 591:
  
 
<p>This will now be described. Stand with the Left leg forward, hold your Sword with the Point stretched out in front of you aimed at the ground in front of your forward foot, with the short edge above, the long edge below. Thus you stand in this Guard rightly, as you can see in the illustrated figure above on the right.</p>
 
<p>This will now be described. Stand with the Left leg forward, hold your Sword with the Point stretched out in front of you aimed at the ground in front of your forward foot, with the short edge above, the long edge below. Thus you stand in this Guard rightly, as you can see in the illustrated figure above on the right.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/35|2|lbl=1.7rb}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/35|2|lbl=.7r.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword E.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword E.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Wrathful Guard'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Wrathful Guard'''</p>
  
 
<p>The Wrathful Guard is known as such since the stance has a wrathful bearing, as will be shown. Stand with your left foot forward, hold your sword out from your right shoulder, so that the blade hangs behind you to threaten forward strikes, and mark this well, that all strikes out from the Guard of the Ox can be intercepted from the Wrathful stance, indeed leading from this stance shows unequal bearing from which One can entice onward, whereupon one can move quickly against the other as needed, as is shown by the Figure in illustration E (on the left).</p>
 
<p>The Wrathful Guard is known as such since the stance has a wrathful bearing, as will be shown. Stand with your left foot forward, hold your sword out from your right shoulder, so that the blade hangs behind you to threaten forward strikes, and mark this well, that all strikes out from the Guard of the Ox can be intercepted from the Wrathful stance, indeed leading from this stance shows unequal bearing from which One can entice onward, whereupon one can move quickly against the other as needed, as is shown by the Figure in illustration E (on the left).</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/35|3|lbl=1.7rc}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/35|3|lbl=.7r.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword A.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword A.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Long Point'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Long Point'''</p>
  
 
<p>Stand with your Left foot forward, hold your Weapon with outstretched arms out in front of your face, so that you stand and point forward at your opponent’s face, and thus you stand in the Guard of the Long Point, which you can see in the picture in illustration A.</p>
 
<p>Stand with your Left foot forward, hold your Weapon with outstretched arms out in front of your face, so that you stand and point forward at your opponent’s face, and thus you stand in the Guard of the Long Point, which you can see in the picture in illustration A.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/35|4|lbl=1.7rd}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/35|4|lbl=.7r.4}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword D.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword D.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Changer'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Changer'''</p>
  
 
<p>This Guard shall now be fully described, stand with your Right foot forward, hold your weapon with the point or Weak stretched out from close at your side aimed at the ground, so that the short edge stands toward your opponent, such as can be seen from the right figure in illustration D above.</p>
 
<p>This Guard shall now be fully described, stand with your Right foot forward, hold your weapon with the point or Weak stretched out from close at your side aimed at the ground, so that the short edge stands toward your opponent, such as can be seen from the right figure in illustration D above.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/36|1|lbl=1.7va}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/36|1|lbl=Ⅰ.7v.1}}
  
 
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|-  
Line 589: Line 619:
  
 
<p>To put yourself into this guard, stand with your Left foot forward, hold your sword close to your right with the point to the ground and the pommel above, and with the short edge against you.</p>
 
<p>To put yourself into this guard, stand with your Left foot forward, hold your sword close to your right with the point to the ground and the pommel above, and with the short edge against you.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/36|2|lbl=1.7vb}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/36|2|lbl=.7v.2}}
  
 
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Line 596: Line 626:
  
 
<p>What the right Iron Door is, which you will find out should you go farther onto Rapier Fencing, that while it is used in stabbing with the Sword as by us Germans, this guard is also easily deflected and sent to the ground. Although at this time it is used by the Italians and other nations, it covers like the Barrier Guard, and so of the Iron Door no further report is therefore required.</p>
 
<p>What the right Iron Door is, which you will find out should you go farther onto Rapier Fencing, that while it is used in stabbing with the Sword as by us Germans, this guard is also easily deflected and sent to the ground. Although at this time it is used by the Italians and other nations, it covers like the Barrier Guard, and so of the Iron Door no further report is therefore required.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/36|3|lbl=1.7vc}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/36|3|lbl=.7v.3}}
  
 
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|  
 
|  
 
| <p>There is a basic underlying division, and here I will shortly clarify both, and so will now describe the Iron Door. Stand with your right foot forward, hold your sword with the grip in front of the knee, with straightly hanging arms, that your point stands upward out at your opponent’s face. In addition, keep your Sword in front of you to shut like an iron door, and when you stand with feet wide and so come to lower your body, you can clear all strikes and stabs out and away from you.</p>
 
| <p>There is a basic underlying division, and here I will shortly clarify both, and so will now describe the Iron Door. Stand with your right foot forward, hold your sword with the grip in front of the knee, with straightly hanging arms, that your point stands upward out at your opponent’s face. In addition, keep your Sword in front of you to shut like an iron door, and when you stand with feet wide and so come to lower your body, you can clear all strikes and stabs out and away from you.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/36|4|lbl=1.7vd}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/36|4|lbl=.7v.4}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword F.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword F.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>However, the Barrier Guard is when you hold your Sword with crossed hands in front of you with the point at the ground, which is seen from the figure in illustration F.</p>
 
| <p>However, the Barrier Guard is when you hold your Sword with crossed hands in front of you with the point at the ground, which is seen from the figure in illustration F.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/36|5|lbl=1.7ve}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/36|5|lbl=.7v.5}}
  
 
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|-  
Line 614: Line 644:
  
 
<p>This stance is very close to the Ox in similar form, only different in that in the Ox your arms are strongly held in high mode, but here shall be directly outstretched before your face, letting the Sword hang toward the Earth, therefore it is named Hanging Point.</p>
 
<p>This stance is very close to the Ox in similar form, only different in that in the Ox your arms are strongly held in high mode, but here shall be directly outstretched before your face, letting the Sword hang toward the Earth, therefore it is named Hanging Point.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/38|1|lbl=1.8va}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/38|1|lbl=Ⅰ.8v.1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword D.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword D.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Key'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Key'''</p>
  
 
<p>The Key is shown by the left figure in illustration D, stand with your Left foot forward, and hold your Sword with the haft and crossed arms in front of your chest, so that the short edge lies on your Left Arm, and the point is aimed at your opponent’s face. Thus is this stance or guard rightly made.</p>
 
<p>The Key is shown by the left figure in illustration D, stand with your Left foot forward, and hold your Sword with the haft and crossed arms in front of your chest, so that the short edge lies on your Left Arm, and the point is aimed at your opponent’s face. Thus is this stance or guard rightly made.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/38|2|lbl=1.8vb}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/38|2|lbl=.8v.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword E.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword E.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Unicorn'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Unicorn'''</p>
  
 
<p>Come into pre-fencing with your Left foot forward, wings out from both sides, as if you would stand in the forenamed Key guard, drive with crossed hands overhead on your Right, so that the point is aimed high above and outward, thus it is named Unicorn, and stand as shown by the figure on the Right of illustration E.</p>
 
<p>Come into pre-fencing with your Left foot forward, wings out from both sides, as if you would stand in the forenamed Key guard, drive with crossed hands overhead on your Right, so that the point is aimed high above and outward, thus it is named Unicorn, and stand as shown by the figure on the Right of illustration E.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/38|3|lbl=1.8vc}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/38|3|lbl=.8v.3}}
  
 
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|  
 
|  
 
| <p>And thus are named the count of the Stances or Guards, and now all in the work phase will be fully and shortly examined. After this point in all fencing, you will Strike, Strive, Displace, or float to work for what you wish, and not remain in a stance, but always drive from one to the other, as one or the other must soon become afflicted, thus you especially must move on to keep the working initiative, and will lead out from one to another of the above cited stances, which I will clarify with a few words about the strikes through the lines or pathways.</p>
 
| <p>And thus are named the count of the Stances or Guards, and now all in the work phase will be fully and shortly examined. After this point in all fencing, you will Strike, Strive, Displace, or float to work for what you wish, and not remain in a stance, but always drive from one to the other, as one or the other must soon become afflicted, thus you especially must move on to keep the working initiative, and will lead out from one to another of the above cited stances, which I will clarify with a few words about the strikes through the lines or pathways.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/39|1|lbl=1.9ra}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/39|1|lbl=Ⅰ.9r.1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword Cuts.jpg|center]]
+
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword Cuts.png|center]]
 
| <p>Firstly if you will execute the high or Vertex Strike, you will find yourself in three Stances, first in the start you will stand in the Roof, in the Middle in the Long Point, and end up in the Fool, so you have moved directly from above through the Line from A to E via three Guards or Stances. If you then drive farther on upward from below to displace with crossed hands, you will find yourself in three more Stances, at the start in the Iron Door, in the Middle the Hanging Point, and in the end full above you in the Unicorn, then grip your Sword with the haft before your chest, so that the half edge lies on your left arm. Now you stand in the Key, and thus you come have onward and drove on along Line A and E from one stance into the other.</p>
 
| <p>Firstly if you will execute the high or Vertex Strike, you will find yourself in three Stances, first in the start you will stand in the Roof, in the Middle in the Long Point, and end up in the Fool, so you have moved directly from above through the Line from A to E via three Guards or Stances. If you then drive farther on upward from below to displace with crossed hands, you will find yourself in three more Stances, at the start in the Iron Door, in the Middle the Hanging Point, and in the end full above you in the Unicorn, then grip your Sword with the haft before your chest, so that the half edge lies on your left arm. Now you stand in the Key, and thus you come have onward and drove on along Line A and E from one stance into the other.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/39|2|lbl=1.9rb}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/39|2|lbl=.9r.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 647: Line 677:
 
<p>You can similarly strike out with your Sword from the Hanging Point, from which you drive over in front of you to move into the Guard of the Ox. Thus you find always, when taking the indicated Lines, one moves through them via at least three stances.</p>
 
<p>You can similarly strike out with your Sword from the Hanging Point, from which you drive over in front of you to move into the Guard of the Ox. Thus you find always, when taking the indicated Lines, one moves through them via at least three stances.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/39|3|lbl=1.9rc|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/40|1|lbl=1.9va|p=1}}
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/39|3|lbl=Ⅰ.9r.3|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/40|1|lbl=Ⅰ.9v.1|p=1}}
  
 
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|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>However it shall be a good Fencer who does not rush and who waits longer in his Stances, so that as soon as he can reach his opponent to attack, he can Fence onward to take the pre-named paths, as waiting longer allows many displacements from which one eventually can come to strike, as will be described below.</p>
 
| <p>However it shall be a good Fencer who does not rush and who waits longer in his Stances, so that as soon as he can reach his opponent to attack, he can Fence onward to take the pre-named paths, as waiting longer allows many displacements from which one eventually can come to strike, as will be described below.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/40|2|lbl=1.9vb}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/40|2|lbl=.9v.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>The Stances are also very useful towards the divisions and openings, thus if one comes into a Stance without danger before Striking, he can soon be mindful of what path to take from pre-fencing. These then serve not just for careful and sensible changes from one Stance to the other, but also to entice the opponent, such that he will be made unable to know what you shall Fence with. Lastly this is also good and useful for all from here on, in that you will easily know and recognise your opponent’s part, and what he can safely fence with, and so thus oppose him more sensibly.</p>
 
| <p>The Stances are also very useful towards the divisions and openings, thus if one comes into a Stance without danger before Striking, he can soon be mindful of what path to take from pre-fencing. These then serve not just for careful and sensible changes from one Stance to the other, but also to entice the opponent, such that he will be made unable to know what you shall Fence with. Lastly this is also good and useful for all from here on, in that you will easily know and recognise your opponent’s part, and what he can safely fence with, and so thus oppose him more sensibly.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/40|3|lbl=1.9vc}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/40|3|lbl=.9v.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" | <p>Now much has been said about this art’s start, namely the pre-fencing against your opponent, which faces off through the Stances to the Strikes. Now the rest of the art will follow and we will move onto other parts, and in due form onto the next chapter, which is Of The Strikes.</p>
 
| class="noline" | <p>Now much has been said about this art’s start, namely the pre-fencing against your opponent, which faces off through the Stances to the Strikes. Now the rest of the art will follow and we will move onto other parts, and in due form onto the next chapter, which is Of The Strikes.</p>
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/40|4|lbl=1.9vd}}
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| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/40|4|lbl=.9v.4}}
  
 
|}
 
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{{master subsection begin
 
{{master subsection begin
  | title = 4 - Of The Strikes
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  | title = 4 - Of the Strikes
 
  | width = 90em
 
  | width = 90em
 
}}
 
}}
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|-  
 
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! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>Figures</p>
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the 1570)}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
+
! <p>{{rating|start}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}</p>
+
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
  
 
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<p>Now I come to write of the artful and free Knightly exersize, namely to the Strikes, which is a major Heading in Fencing in that the basics are given here, the number is told, each is described, and how they are executed to the full, will here be noted and told, and from here alone the friendly reader will afterward be reminded, that between the Sword Fighting times, when it was in custom for our forefathers and the ancients, and our time there is a great difference, in that not only was the point used, which is not the custom today, but of old much more of the Sword was used in the strikes, and they fenced sharply with both strikes and stabs, and thus shall I present this and other points of knowledge.</p>
 
<p>Now I come to write of the artful and free Knightly exersize, namely to the Strikes, which is a major Heading in Fencing in that the basics are given here, the number is told, each is described, and how they are executed to the full, will here be noted and told, and from here alone the friendly reader will afterward be reminded, that between the Sword Fighting times, when it was in custom for our forefathers and the ancients, and our time there is a great difference, in that not only was the point used, which is not the custom today, but of old much more of the Sword was used in the strikes, and they fenced sharply with both strikes and stabs, and thus shall I present this and other points of knowledge.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/41|1|lbl=1.10va}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/41|1|lbl=Ⅰ.10v.1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>However, as of now the Strikes with the Sword belong to two underlying principles, as in the direct and inverted strikes. The Direct strikes are named such as they strike against the opponent with the long edge and outstretched arms. There are four, the Over, Wrathful, Middle and Under Strikes, and from these all the others come forth, and in the world will still be found none conceived as such, and of them not one of these will be feebly grasped and deployed by you. These are named the Lead or Principal Strikes.</p>
 
| <p>However, as of now the Strikes with the Sword belong to two underlying principles, as in the direct and inverted strikes. The Direct strikes are named such as they strike against the opponent with the long edge and outstretched arms. There are four, the Over, Wrathful, Middle and Under Strikes, and from these all the others come forth, and in the world will still be found none conceived as such, and of them not one of these will be feebly grasped and deployed by you. These are named the Lead or Principal Strikes.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/41|2|lbl=1.10vb}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/41|2|lbl=.10v.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>The inverted strikes are those where in the strike you turn your sword hand around so that you hit the opponent, not with the full or long edge, but somewhat with the short edge, flat, or engage at an angle. Face this with the Slide, Short, Crown, Glance, Arc, Traverse, Bounce, Blind, Wind, Knee Hollow, Plunge, and Changer Strikes.</p>
 
| <p>The inverted strikes are those where in the strike you turn your sword hand around so that you hit the opponent, not with the full or long edge, but somewhat with the short edge, flat, or engage at an angle. Face this with the Slide, Short, Crown, Glance, Arc, Traverse, Bounce, Blind, Wind, Knee Hollow, Plunge, and Changer Strikes.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/41|3|lbl=1.10vc}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/41|3|lbl=.10v.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>Thus you come to the four above cited Strikes, and from there the various strikes are named.</p>
 
| <p>Thus you come to the four above cited Strikes, and from there the various strikes are named.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/42|1|lbl=1.11ra}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/42|1|lbl=Ⅰ.11r.1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>Now from these both come five for further reading, as the Master Strikes will be named, not that one can thus fully use the weapon Rightly, and Master this art so soon, but that from them one can Master all proper artful elements which will be acted on from knowing them here, and thus you can Fence properly at need, and become an artfully striking Fencer, who retains all Master principles at the same time, and against whom nothing can be borne. These Strikes are Wrathful, Arc, Thwart, Glancer, and Vertex.</p>
 
| <p>Now from these both come five for further reading, as the Master Strikes will be named, not that one can thus fully use the weapon Rightly, and Master this art so soon, but that from them one can Master all proper artful elements which will be acted on from knowing them here, and thus you can Fence properly at need, and become an artfully striking Fencer, who retains all Master principles at the same time, and against whom nothing can be borne. These Strikes are Wrathful, Arc, Thwart, Glancer, and Vertex.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/42|2|lbl=1.11rb}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/42|2|lbl=.11r.2}}
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
| <p>How all these are done I will show you in due order, and firstly speak of the Direct Strikes, of which the first will be the Over Strike.</p>
 
| <p>How all these are done I will show you in due order, and firstly speak of the Direct Strikes, of which the first will be the Over Strike.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/42|3|lbl=1.11rc}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/42|3|lbl=.11r.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
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<p>The Over Strike is a strong strike directly from Above, against your opponent’s head or scalp, therefore it is also called Vertex Strike.</p>
 
<p>The Over Strike is a strong strike directly from Above, against your opponent’s head or scalp, therefore it is also called Vertex Strike.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/42|4|lbl=1.11rd}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/42|4|lbl=.11r.4}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword Cuts.jpg|center]]
+
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword Cuts.png|center]]
 
| <p>'''Wrathful Strike'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Wrathful Strike'''</p>
  
 
<p>The Wrathful Strike is a serious strike from your Right Shoulder, against your opponent’s left ear, or through his face or chest, consider how it’s done through two lines, with the lines drawn through the upper right and crosswise overtop one another. This is the strongest beyond all others in that all one’s strength and manliness is laid against one’s opponent in fighting and fencing, therefore the ancients also named it Straight Strike or Father Strike. Along the considered lines you can move onwards, etc.</p>
 
<p>The Wrathful Strike is a serious strike from your Right Shoulder, against your opponent’s left ear, or through his face or chest, consider how it’s done through two lines, with the lines drawn through the upper right and crosswise overtop one another. This is the strongest beyond all others in that all one’s strength and manliness is laid against one’s opponent in fighting and fencing, therefore the ancients also named it Straight Strike or Father Strike. Along the considered lines you can move onwards, etc.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/42|5|lbl=1.11re}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/42|5|lbl=.11r.5}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
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<p>The Middle or Traversing Strike can execute most effects the Wrathful Strike can, the difference is only that while the Wrathful Strike is a forceful high point, the Diagonal Traverse is traverses above, as shown in the Traverse line including both C and G. Such lines are also applicable to Dusack.</p>
 
<p>The Middle or Traversing Strike can execute most effects the Wrathful Strike can, the difference is only that while the Wrathful Strike is a forceful high point, the Diagonal Traverse is traverses above, as shown in the Traverse line including both C and G. Such lines are also applicable to Dusack.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/43|1|lbl=1.11va}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/43|1|lbl=Ⅰ.11v.1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword B.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword B.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Under Strike'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Under Strike'''</p>
  
 
<p>This you execute thusly, strike so that you move into the Right Ox (more is said about this in the next chapter) and thus can bring your opponent fencer into range, and step to strike from below traversing above into their left arm, while coming into position with the hilt high above your head, and thus complete. Regarding this, see the figures fighting against the left in the background of illustration B.</p>
 
<p>This you execute thusly, strike so that you move into the Right Ox (more is said about this in the next chapter) and thus can bring your opponent fencer into range, and step to strike from below traversing above into their left arm, while coming into position with the hilt high above your head, and thus complete. Regarding this, see the figures fighting against the left in the background of illustration B.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/43|2|lbl=1.11vb}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/43|2|lbl=.11v.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword G.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword G.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Glancing Strike'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Glancing Strike'''</p>
  
 
<p>The Glancing Strike is also a High strike, but has been so named in that one closes with a small glancing blow, which is done thus: put yourself in the Guard of the Roof or Wrath (as shown in the third chapter) with your left foot forward, from which you will be striking, and while striking be sure to wind your short edge against his strike, and hit with inverting hands at the same time as closing with him, step fully with your Right Foot toward his left side, and so quickly take his head, thus have you done it rightly, and will stand as shown by the figures fighting on the left side of illustration G.</p>
 
<p>The Glancing Strike is also a High strike, but has been so named in that one closes with a small glancing blow, which is done thus: put yourself in the Guard of the Roof or Wrath (as shown in the third chapter) with your left foot forward, from which you will be striking, and while striking be sure to wind your short edge against his strike, and hit with inverting hands at the same time as closing with him, step fully with your Right Foot toward his left side, and so quickly take his head, thus have you done it rightly, and will stand as shown by the figures fighting on the left side of illustration G.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/43|3|lbl=1.11vc}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/43|3|lbl=.11v.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword D.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword D.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Arc Strike'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Arc Strike'''</p>
  
 
<p>This strike is described thus: stand in the Wrath Guard with your left foot forward, when your opponent strikes, step with your right foot fully away from his strike and against his left side, strike with the long edge and crossed hands against his strike, or between his pommel and blade, diagonally over his hands, and fully overshoot his arms to lay on the blade, as shown in illustration D by the figures on the upper right hand side.</p>
 
<p>This strike is described thus: stand in the Wrath Guard with your left foot forward, when your opponent strikes, step with your right foot fully away from his strike and against his left side, strike with the long edge and crossed hands against his strike, or between his pommel and blade, diagonally over his hands, and fully overshoot his arms to lay on the blade, as shown in illustration D by the figures on the upper right hand side.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/45|1|lbl=1.12va}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/45|1|lbl=Ⅰ.12v.1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword H.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword H.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Thwart'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Thwart'''</p>
  
 
<p>You send yourself into the Thwarter thus: assume the primary stance of Wrathful Guard to the right (as shown in the previous chapter), that is you put your left foot forward and hold your sword over your right shoulder, as if you would strike a wrathful strike, and when your opponent strikes you from the roof or above, strike closely with your short edge, breaking against his strike from below, holding your hilt high above to displace near your head, and strike to close by stepping full onto his Left side, thus displacing and closing against the other as shown by the left background figures of illustration H. This can be executed to the left thus striking his right side with a changed point, in that you will strike against his right by engaging with the long edge.</p>
 
<p>You send yourself into the Thwarter thus: assume the primary stance of Wrathful Guard to the right (as shown in the previous chapter), that is you put your left foot forward and hold your sword over your right shoulder, as if you would strike a wrathful strike, and when your opponent strikes you from the roof or above, strike closely with your short edge, breaking against his strike from below, holding your hilt high above to displace near your head, and strike to close by stepping full onto his Left side, thus displacing and closing against the other as shown by the left background figures of illustration H. This can be executed to the left thus striking his right side with a changed point, in that you will strike against his right by engaging with the long edge.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/45|2|lbl=1.12vb}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/45|2|lbl=.12v.2}}
  
 
<section begin="Kurtzhauw"/>
 
<section begin="Kurtzhauw"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword B.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword B.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Short Strike'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Short Strike'''</p>
  
 
<p>This is a secretive attack, and is described thus: when your opponent strikes you from above, stand as if you would respond with a Arc Strike, that is to bind his sword with the half edge, but let it fall and drive through under his sword, strike with the half edge and crossed arms over his right arm to hit his head, thus you have closed off his sword with the long edge, and accomplished the Short Strike, and stand as is shown by the smaller figure (mid background) on the left of illustration B fighting against the right.</p>
 
<p>This is a secretive attack, and is described thus: when your opponent strikes you from above, stand as if you would respond with a Arc Strike, that is to bind his sword with the half edge, but let it fall and drive through under his sword, strike with the half edge and crossed arms over his right arm to hit his head, thus you have closed off his sword with the long edge, and accomplished the Short Strike, and stand as is shown by the smaller figure (mid background) on the left of illustration B fighting against the right.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/45|3|lbl=1.12vc|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/46|1|lbl=1.13ra|p=1}}
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/45|3|lbl=Ⅰ.12v.3|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/46|1|lbl=Ⅰ.13r.1|p=1}}
 
<section end="Kurtzhauw"/> <section begin="Glützhauw"/>
 
<section end="Kurtzhauw"/> <section begin="Glützhauw"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
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<p>The Slide Strike is described as follows: when you are attacked from above, hit with even or free hands against his strike, aiming at his upper left opening, let your blade’s midsection ride up his blade so that the short edge will swing over his hands and hit his head.</p>
 
<p>The Slide Strike is described as follows: when you are attacked from above, hit with even or free hands against his strike, aiming at his upper left opening, let your blade’s midsection ride up his blade so that the short edge will swing over his hands and hit his head.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/46|2|lbl=1.13rb}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/46|2|lbl=.13r.2}}
 
<section end="Glützhauw"/><section begin="Prellhauw"/>
 
<section end="Glützhauw"/><section begin="Prellhauw"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword K.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword K.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Bounce Strike'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Bounce Strike'''</p>
  
 
<p>This one is twofold, one the single, the other one named the double. The single is made thus: when your adversary strikes at you from above, meet his strike with a Zwerch, as soon as it connects, twitch the sword around the head, and strike from your left with the outward flat towards his ear, as shown by the large figures on the right hand side of Illustration K, so that the sword bounces back again, thus twitch it during the rebounding swing back around the head again, strike with the Zwerch towards the left, thus it is completed.</p>
 
<p>This one is twofold, one the single, the other one named the double. The single is made thus: when your adversary strikes at you from above, meet his strike with a Zwerch, as soon as it connects, twitch the sword around the head, and strike from your left with the outward flat towards his ear, as shown by the large figures on the right hand side of Illustration K, so that the sword bounces back again, thus twitch it during the rebounding swing back around the head again, strike with the Zwerch towards the left, thus it is completed.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/46|3|lbl=1.13rc}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/46|3|lbl=.13r.3}}
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword I.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword I.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>Do the double thus: just as your adversary brings his sword in the air to work against you while closing in, place yourself in the right Ochs, twitch your sword around your head, and strike with the inward flat strongly against his blade from your right side so that your pommel touches your forearm during the strike, as it is depicted in the large picture in Illustration I, and can be seen on the left hand side. However, while striking step well around towards his left with your right foot, and as soon as it hits or connects, pull it upwards and wrench out simultaneously towards your left side and nimbly strike from the outside with inverted hands again towards the same opening, that is with the inverted flat when it strongly rebounds in a ricochet motion, thus you have done it right.</p>
 
| <p>Do the double thus: just as your adversary brings his sword in the air to work against you while closing in, place yourself in the right Ochs, twitch your sword around your head, and strike with the inward flat strongly against his blade from your right side so that your pommel touches your forearm during the strike, as it is depicted in the large picture in Illustration I, and can be seen on the left hand side. However, while striking step well around towards his left with your right foot, and as soon as it hits or connects, pull it upwards and wrench out simultaneously towards your left side and nimbly strike from the outside with inverted hands again towards the same opening, that is with the inverted flat when it strongly rebounds in a ricochet motion, thus you have done it right.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/46|4|lbl=1.13rd|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/48|1|lbl=1.14ra|p=1}}
+
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/46|4|lbl=Ⅰ.13r.4|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/48|1|lbl=Ⅰ.14r.1|p=1}}
 
<section end="Prellhauw"/><section begin="Blendthauw"/>
 
<section end="Prellhauw"/><section begin="Blendthauw"/>
 
|-  
 
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<p>Bind your opponent’s sword from your right side, wind through in the clash against his left side with your hilt or haft below, when your opponent tries to swipe away the winding, quickly move the weak with crossed hands from your right toward his left against his head, that is the forward point, wind your hands through again or twist out to your left with the half edge. Thus you have fully executed the Blind Strike, which can be made in many ways and from there further on in places.</p>
 
<p>Bind your opponent’s sword from your right side, wind through in the clash against his left side with your hilt or haft below, when your opponent tries to swipe away the winding, quickly move the weak with crossed hands from your right toward his left against his head, that is the forward point, wind your hands through again or twist out to your left with the half edge. Thus you have fully executed the Blind Strike, which can be made in many ways and from there further on in places.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/48|2|lbl=1.14rb}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/48|2|lbl=.14r.2}}
 
<section end="Blendthauw"/><section begin="Windthauw"/>
 
<section end="Blendthauw"/><section begin="Windthauw"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword H.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword H.png|center|400px]]
 
| <p>'''Wound Strike'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Wound Strike'''</p>
  
 
<p>The Wound Strike is described as follows: if your opponent strikes from above, then strike against his sword with crossed hands from the left and below, so that your pommel sits under your right arm, and thus quick to glide, step strongly from him from your left side with your left foot, swing your sword’s pommel out farther in an arc toward your left side so that the swing moves your long edge over his right arm behind his pommel or hits atop his right arm, as is shown by the figure in the right side foreground of illustration H, and closely thereafter your sword flies out from close to your side, and again strikes against the hands through the cross, so it is done.</p>
 
<p>The Wound Strike is described as follows: if your opponent strikes from above, then strike against his sword with crossed hands from the left and below, so that your pommel sits under your right arm, and thus quick to glide, step strongly from him from your left side with your left foot, swing your sword’s pommel out farther in an arc toward your left side so that the swing moves your long edge over his right arm behind his pommel or hits atop his right arm, as is shown by the figure in the right side foreground of illustration H, and closely thereafter your sword flies out from close to your side, and again strikes against the hands through the cross, so it is done.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/48|3|lbl=1.14rc}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/48|3|lbl=.14r.3}}
 
<section end="Windthauw"/><section begin="Kronhauw"/>
 
<section end="Windthauw"/><section begin="Kronhauw"/>
 
|-  
 
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<p>This you hold thus: when you stand in the Plough or in a similar stance (which are discussed in an earlier chapter) which allow stabs from below, and your opponent strikes at you from above, then drive above you with a high traversing cross, intercept his strike above on your riccasso or quillons, and as soon as he slides, bring your pommel up high and strike with the half edge behind his blade onto his head, thus you have rightly executed the Crown Strike.</p>
 
<p>This you hold thus: when you stand in the Plough or in a similar stance (which are discussed in an earlier chapter) which allow stabs from below, and your opponent strikes at you from above, then drive above you with a high traversing cross, intercept his strike above on your riccasso or quillons, and as soon as he slides, bring your pommel up high and strike with the half edge behind his blade onto his head, thus you have rightly executed the Crown Strike.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/48|4|lbl=1.14rd}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/48|4|lbl=.14r.4}}
 
<section end="Kronhauw"/><section begin="Kniechelhauw"/>
 
<section end="Kronhauw"/><section begin="Kniechelhauw"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
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<p>This strike takes its name from the joint against which it is tried, and is completed thus: when at first you hold your hands high above your head, and your opponent is moving under his sword so his head is held between both arms, then strike with a traversing strike under his sword’s pommel, with a view to his knuckles or to the joints between hand and arm. If he holds his hands much too high, then strike with a rising traverse Strike from below up against the knob of his elbows, thus is it completed.</p>
 
<p>This strike takes its name from the joint against which it is tried, and is completed thus: when at first you hold your hands high above your head, and your opponent is moving under his sword so his head is held between both arms, then strike with a traversing strike under his sword’s pommel, with a view to his knuckles or to the joints between hand and arm. If he holds his hands much too high, then strike with a rising traverse Strike from below up against the knob of his elbows, thus is it completed.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/49|1|lbl=1.14va}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/49|1|lbl=Ⅰ.14v.1}}
 
<section end="Kniechelhauw"/><section begin="Sturzhauw"/>
 
<section end="Kniechelhauw"/><section begin="Sturzhauw"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
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<p>Although this strike is an Over Strike, be aware that between one and the other lies a minor difference, from which comes this strike’s name of Plunge Strike, that one strikes through by plungeing from above, and that the point comes against one’s opponent’s face from the Ox, and can thus be executed from the start or pre-fencing.</p>
 
<p>Although this strike is an Over Strike, be aware that between one and the other lies a minor difference, from which comes this strike’s name of Plunge Strike, that one strikes through by plungeing from above, and that the point comes against one’s opponent’s face from the Ox, and can thus be executed from the start or pre-fencing.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/49|2|lbl=1.14vb}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/49|2|lbl=.14v.2}}
 
<section end="Sturzhauw"/><section begin="Wechselhauw"/>
 
<section end="Sturzhauw"/><section begin="Wechselhauw"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
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<p>The Change Strike is nothing other than changing from one side to the other, from above to below and back again, before striking your opponent, thus make it so.</p>
 
<p>The Change Strike is nothing other than changing from one side to the other, from above to below and back again, before striking your opponent, thus make it so.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/49|3|lbl=1.14vc}}
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/49|3|lbl=.14v.3}}
 
<section end="Wechselhauw"/><section begin="Schneller"/>
 
<section end="Wechselhauw"/><section begin="Schneller"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
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<p>Rusher or twitch-hit(?) is basically a thing which is actually not a strike, but if the strike should be rushed it will be completed in the middle or full work when one has engaged, namely from above or on both sides or from below against your opponent with the flat or outer part of the blade, let the weapon snatch or rush inward in a swing over or under his blade.</p>
 
<p>Rusher or twitch-hit(?) is basically a thing which is actually not a strike, but if the strike should be rushed it will be completed in the middle or full work when one has engaged, namely from above or on both sides or from below against your opponent with the flat or outer part of the blade, let the weapon snatch or rush inward in a swing over or under his blade.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/49|4|lbl=1.14vd}}  
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/49|4|lbl=.14v.4}}  
 
<section end="Schneller"/>
 
<section end="Schneller"/>
 
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/49|5|lbl=1.14ve|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/50|1|lbl=1.15ra|p=1}}
+
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/49|5|lbl=Ⅰ.14v.5|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/50|1|lbl=Ⅰ.15r.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
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| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/50|2|lbl=1.15rb}}
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| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/50|2|lbl=.15r.2}}
  
 
|}
 
|}
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|-  
 
|-  
 
! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>Figures</p>
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the 1570)}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
+
! <p>{{rating|C}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}</p>
+
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
  
 
|-  
 
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| <p>'''Of Displacing, a useful concept'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Of Displacing, a useful concept'''</p>
  
<p>Chapt. 5</p>
+
<p>Chapter 5</p>
  
 
<p>Fencing is based on two prerequisite parts, namely first on the Strikes which you initially put against your opponent, with the other being displacement, which is how you judge and work off of your opponent’s Strikes, and you do not do this weakly. How you accomplish the Strikes and the elements of striving has already been sufficiently clarified, because displacing, or how one properly meets every opposing strike with your weapon and therewith put them away at need so as not to have your body injured, cannot be learned without first learning the Strikes. Because you have now learned the Strikes you can approach the subject of how you displace those Strikes, and come to learn and understand these just as the Strikes have now been heeded and cannot be dismissed, and will be solidified from noting and treating the basics with special care. Be first aware that the parries are twofold, the first is without any particular advantage and is resorted to only for blocking parries from which you cannot do more with your weapon in that you oppose your opponent’s strike to avoid being damaged, but then seek not to damage him, but only to withdraw as you wish without being injured by him.</p>
 
<p>Fencing is based on two prerequisite parts, namely first on the Strikes which you initially put against your opponent, with the other being displacement, which is how you judge and work off of your opponent’s Strikes, and you do not do this weakly. How you accomplish the Strikes and the elements of striving has already been sufficiently clarified, because displacing, or how one properly meets every opposing strike with your weapon and therewith put them away at need so as not to have your body injured, cannot be learned without first learning the Strikes. Because you have now learned the Strikes you can approach the subject of how you displace those Strikes, and come to learn and understand these just as the Strikes have now been heeded and cannot be dismissed, and will be solidified from noting and treating the basics with special care. Be first aware that the parries are twofold, the first is without any particular advantage and is resorted to only for blocking parries from which you cannot do more with your weapon in that you oppose your opponent’s strike to avoid being damaged, but then seek not to damage him, but only to withdraw as you wish without being injured by him.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/50|3|lbl=1.15rc|p=1}} [XVv] hauwen bistu zugleich auch wie du die Häuw abtragen solt / gelert und underricht worden / dises ob es wol mit den Häuwen wie jetzt gehört / nit kann abgesondert werden / will doch von nöten sein / hie von insonderheit mit underschiedlicher theilung zuhandlen. Merck derwegen anfenglich das des Versetzens zweyerley ist / das erste ist da du ohn allen sondern vortheil / gemeniglich nur aus forcht versetzest / in welchem du nichts anders thust / dann mit deinem Wehr / so du deinem gegenfechter entgegen heltst die streich die von im beschehen aufffahest / auch nit begerest ihn zu beschedigen / allein benüget an dem / wie du ohn schaden von ihm abziehen mögest.
+
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/50|3|lbl=Ⅰ.15r.3|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/51|1|lbl=Ⅰ.15v.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| When you are forced to these parries with force and strong bearing, see that you steady yourself by stepping back, and thus be able to come into the “Before” again with advantage from the parry, to this Liechtenauer did speak.  
+
| <p>When you are forced to these parries with force and strong bearing, see that you steady yourself by stepping back, and thus be able to come into the “Before” again with advantage from the parry, to this Liechtenauer did speak.</p>
  
:''Before displacing guard yourself.<br/>Place yourself for advantage.''
+
:Before displacing guard yourself.<br/>Place yourself for advantage.
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/51|2|lbl=Ⅰ.15v.2}}
  
With which he didn’t completely warn against parrying, namely that you should teach only strikes and how to damage, as was told above. When you will succeed from displacing, it does much, thus you should displace stoutly. Thus it is used not only to return strikes, on the other hand it also keeps an eye on preventing his strikes from moving in closely, so that no more fencing can then be built or similarly be attempted without problem.
+
|-
| Wenn du aber zu disem versetzen mit gewalt unnd ubereilen getrungen wurdest / so sihe doch das du dich mit abtritten endtledigest / und mit vortheil zum Vor wider kommen mögest / Von dieser versatzung nun / thut auch Lichtenawer meldung da er spricht.
+
|
 
+
| <p>With which he didn’t completely warn against parrying, namely that you should teach only strikes and how to damage, as was told above. When you will succeed from displacing, it does much, thus you should displace stoutly. Thus it is used not only to return strikes, on the other hand it also keeps an eye on preventing his strikes from moving in closely, so that no more fencing can then be built or similarly be attempted without problem.</p>
:''Vor versetzen hüt dich /<br/>Geschichts dir not es mühet dich.''
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/51|3|lbl=Ⅰ.15v.3}}
 
 
Mit welchem er das versetzen darumb nit gar will verbieten / nemlich das du nichts anders dann zuhauwen lehren solt / dan wie es dein schad / wie droben gehört / wann du dich auff das versetzen wolltest gewehnen / dieweil es an dem zuvil / so du zu versetzen gedrungen wurdest / Also ist es nicht nutz so du mit streichen uberbolderst / gleichfals auch hingegen unbedacht gleichsam mit zugethanen augen hinwider mit seinen streichen zuglich hinein Hauwen wolltest / welches dann keinem Fechten / sonder vil mehr einem unbesunnenen Bawren getrösch gleichförmig.
 
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| However, to be more useful I will with one stroke put forward Strikes and Displacing here, and only teach you how you will need to displace such strikes, which also need to be shown as two points. First how you will intercept and put away your opponent’s strike, or set it aside in one blow, then second when you meet his advancing weapon and rush in with one blow to his body.
+
| <p>However, to be more useful I will with one stroke put forward Strikes and Displacing here, and only teach you how you will need to displace such strikes, which also need to be shown as two points. First how you will intercept and put away your opponent’s strike, or set it aside in one blow, then second when you meet his advancing weapon and rush in with one blow to his body.</p>
| Aber umb mehrer nutz willens / will ichs Hauwen und versetzen so mit einem streich geschicht alhie abtheilen / und dich lehren allein wie du solche Häuw zu versatzung brauchen solt / welches dann auch auff zweierley weiß mag beschehen / Erstlich da du deines gegenparts streich zuvor abtregst / oder mit einem Hauw abweisest / darnach wenn du im die vorwehr genommen / mit einem Hauw seinem leib zueilest.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/51|4|lbl=Ⅰ.15v.4}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The second Art of displacing is when you parry and injure your opponent with one strike, which the ancients undertook with special praise, from which these spoken words grew: a proper fencer parries not, as his opponent strikes so he too strikes, as his opponent steps so he too steps, as his opponent stabs so he too stabs.
+
| <p>The second Art of displacing is when you parry and injure your opponent with one strike, which the ancients undertook with special praise, from which these spoken words grew: a proper fencer parries not, as his opponent strikes so he too strikes, as his opponent steps so he too steps, as his opponent stabs so he too stabs.</p>
| '''[XVIr]''' Die ander Art zuversetzen ist / da du dein widerpart in einem streich zuglich versetzest und verletzest / welches die alten fürnemlich wie den billich loben / daher das sprichwort erwachsen / ein rechter Fechter versetzet nicht / sonder Hauwet man so Hauwet er auch / trit man so trit er auch / sticht man so sticht er auch.  
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/52|1|lbl=Ⅰ.16r.1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Of the first shall you now know, that the Oberhau impairs all other strikes as in the Wrath, Middle or Diagonal, and Under Strike, from above it blocks down below you, from this know when to spring against his strikes, and close to his strikes which he releases with strength so that you then rightly engage, his weapon thus weakened that you then can strike another full to his body before he can rightly take it. As the Oberhau blocks all secondary strikes down from above, so will it drive off all from the Wrath or Diagonal strike, and thus it also takes the Under with strong placing, and be there with help from stepping out with the Oberhau above one’s self.
+
| <p>Of the first shall you now know, that the Oberhau impairs all other strikes as in the Wrath, Middle or Diagonal, and Under Strike, from above it blocks down below you, from this know when to spring against his strikes, and close to his strikes which he releases with strength so that you then rightly engage, his weapon thus weakened that you then can strike another full to his body before he can rightly take it. As the Oberhau blocks all secondary strikes down from above, so will it drive off all from the Wrath or Diagonal strike, and thus it also takes the Under with strong placing, and be there with help from stepping out with the Oberhau above one’s self.</p>
| Von ersten soltu nun wissen / das der Oberhauw alle andere Häuw als den Zorn / Mittel / oder Uberzwerch unnd Underhauw / von Oben undersich dempffet / auff diese weiß wann du ihm auß seinem Hauw springest / und zugleich auff seinen Hauw in dem er herfleucht mit sterck Hauwest / damit du ihm so du anders recht antroffen / sein Wehr dermassen schwechst / das du den andern wol zu seinem leib Hauwen kanst / ehe er sich recht erholet. Wie nun der Oberhauw die andern streich alle von Oben nider dempfft / so würdt er von dem Zorn oder Uberzwerchhauw abgetriben / und nimpt auch der Under so er mit sterck geschicht / unnd dem mit außtretten geholffen wirdt / die Oberhäuw ubersich aus.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/52|2|lbl=Ⅰ.16r.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| When however two similar strikes come together thus with your orderly stepping, in that you step a little before or after the other, so that it’s placed in an eyeblink, then you bring up your displacement. This displacement is brought on with the principal and direct strikes, the other displacement however is when you closely displace and engage, then hit with the countering strikes, as in the Glance, Slide, Crown and Traverse strikes, and with them then complete, thus have you heard above about clearing every strike.
+
| <p>When however two similar strikes come together thus with your orderly stepping, in that you step a little before or after the other, so that it’s placed in an eyeblink, then you bring up your displacement. This displacement is brought on with the principal and direct strikes, the other displacement however is when you closely displace and engage, then hit with the countering strikes, as in the Glance, Slide, Crown and Traverse strikes, and with them then complete, thus have you heard above about clearing every strike.</p>
| Wo aber zwen gleicher häuw mit ihren zugeordneten tritten also zusamen geschehen / das ein trit ein wenig vor oder nach dem andern / wie das auch augenblicks geschicht / so bringen sie ihre versatzung mit / diese versatzung aber ist begriffen in den ersten und geraden Häuwen / die ander versatzung aber ist / da du zugleich versetzest und triffst / geschicht mit den verkehrten häuwen als den Schielhauw / Glütz / Kron / unnd Zwirchhauw / wie solches denn volbracht / hastu Oben bey erklerung jeden Hauwes gehört.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/52|3|lbl=Ⅰ.16r.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Then such countering strikes are taken onward from there as foundations, so that with close displacement comes hitting. However, because I should not backtrack, but direct you to more understanding and knowledge, I will give an example of displacing with the Zwerchhau.
+
| <p>Then such countering strikes are taken onward from there as foundations, so that with close displacement comes hitting. However, because I should not backtrack, but direct you to more understanding and knowledge, I will give an example of displacing with the Zwerchhau.</p>
| Dann solche verkehrte Häuw sind fürnemlich darzu erfunden / das damit zugleich versetzt und getroffen wirdt. Aber damit ich nichts hindergehe / so du zu mehrerm verstand und underweisung möchte gerathen / will ich ein Exempel des versetzens mit dem Zwirchhauw geben.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/52|4|lbl=Ⅰ.16r.4}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Place yourself into the Wrathful Guard, if you are then struck from above, then step with the right foot forward against your opponent’s side, and strike with a traverse to that side, short cut a high traverse to close in with it, thus that you take his strike onto the strong of your blade, catching it near your quillons and, with the farther end of your sword, hit his left ear, thus have you thus closely displaced and hit with a second.
+
| <p>Place yourself into the Wrathful Guard, if you are then struck from above, then step with the right foot forward against your opponent’s side, and strike with a traverse to that side, short cut a high traverse to close in with it, thus that you take his strike onto the strong of your blade, catching it near your quillons and, with the farther end of your sword, hit his left ear, thus have you thus closely displaced and hit with a second.</p>
| '''[XVIv]''' Schick dich in die Zornhut / wirt denn auff dich von Oben her gehauwen / so trit mit dem Rechten fuß gegen deines widerparts seiten / und Hauw mit einer Zwirch das sit / kurtzer schneid uberzwerch zu gleich mit hinein / also das du sein Hauw auff die sterck deiner klingen / nahe bey deiner Kreutzstangen auffangest / und mit dem eussern theil deines Schwerdts sein Linck Ohr treffest / so hastu denn zugleich versetzet und getroffen mit einander.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/53|1|lbl=Ⅰ.16v.1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The other strikes, which still can be hit with further displacement, as in with the Short Strike and feinting etc. will not be reckoned into fencing, especially since only accident or chances will be given that way, and One thus leads one on to provoke, operating wrathfully, and drive from one’s advantage, which often times cannot be done without danger, and so because of this no other displacement will be shown.
+
| <p>The other strikes, which still can be hit with further displacement, as in with the Short Strike and feinting etc. will not be reckoned into fencing, especially since only accident or chances will be given that way, and One thus leads one on to provoke, operating wrathfully, and drive from one’s advantage, which often times cannot be done without danger, and so because of this no other displacement will be shown.</p>
| Was die andere Häuw mit welchen weder versetzt noch troffen wirt / als da ist der Kurtzhauw und Feler etc. werden eigentlich dem Fechten nit zugerechnet / sonder nur per accidens oder zufelliger weiß zugegeben / den Mann damit zuverfüren anzureitzen / zornig zumachen / und aus seinem vortheil zutreiben / welches denn offtermals nicht ohn gefahr beschicht / kann derwegen damit kein versatzung auch nit beschehen.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/53|2|lbl=Ⅰ.16v.2}}
  
 
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|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Handwork'''
+
| <p>'''Handwork'''</p>
All in the first part of fencing up until now, both the Stances and Strikes, were sufficiently and properly done, and from thus we come ahead, that you come to your opponent as equals under the sword, and so first push one’s self to strive seriously, so that you drive against him accurately and forcefully into the Middle work such as Misleading, Following After, Changing, Doubling, Hitting After, setting the Prize thus as the goal all Fencers work toward and wish to attain and keep with quick work.
+
 
| '''Handtarbeit.'''
+
<p>All in the first part of fencing up until now, both the Stances and Strikes, were sufficiently and properly done, and from thus we come ahead, that you come to your opponent as equals under the sword, and so first push one’s self to strive seriously, so that you drive against him accurately and forcefully into the Middle work such as Misleading, Following After, Changing, Doubling, Hitting After, setting the Prize thus as the goal all Fencers work toward and wish to attain and keep with quick work.</p>
NAchdem bißher im ersten stuck des Fechtens / beide von den Legern unnd Häuwen gnugsamer bericht gethan / und die also ferr kommen / das du dem Mann durch dieselben under das Schwerdt kommen / so erhebt sich erst der Rechte ernst und streit / wie du nemlich mit allerley Mittel arbeit als Verführen / Nachreißen / Wechseln / Doplieren / Nachtrucken / ihn dermaßen treibest / engstigest und zwingest / damit du den Preiß so als ein ziel dahin alle Fechter begeren / gesteckt / mit geschwinder arbeyt erreichen unnd erhalten mögest.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/53|3|lbl=Ⅰ.16v.3}}
  
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Because it doesn’t start off fully and immediately, where you neither close nor safely attack, then from there on the largest art lies, which is fully grasped here in this chapter of handwork. Since similar things must happen in various ways, on this you’ll have advice in every special word and way, which will be through lessons, and from there through demonstration you shall fully draw clearly and rightly how it is done and understood.
+
| <p>Because it doesn’t start off fully and immediately, where you neither close nor safely attack, then from there on the largest art lies, which is fully grasped here in this chapter of handwork. Since similar things must happen in various ways, on this you’ll have advice in every special word and way, which will be through lessons, and from there through demonstration you shall fully draw clearly and rightly how it is done and understood.</p>
| Denn es mit nichten gnug wol und recht haben anfangen / wo du nit gleichfals auch fürsichtiglich nachtruckest / daran dann die gröste kunst gelegen / und alles hie in diesem Capitel der Handtarbeit begriffen. Dieweil aber dasselbig auff mancherley art geschehen muß / deren jeder sein sonderlich wort und art zu reden hat / will von nöten sein / von demselben was sie seyen / wie sie volzogen werden sollen / klerlich bericht zuthun und zuverstendigen.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/53|4|lbl=Ⅰ.16v.4}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword D.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword D.png|center|400px]]
| And now stands the whole Handwork applied in binding or staying, Travelling After, Cutting, Chopping Down, Walking Around, Misleading, Flowing Off, Putting Away, Displacing, Twitching, Doubling, Overturning, Capturing, Avoiding, Circling, Channeling, Winding, Winding Through, Changing, Changing Through, Cutting Away, Hand Punching, Shooting Ahead, Hanging, Moving Out, Blocking, Adjusting, Grappling, Closing, etc.
+
| <p>And now stands the whole Handwork applied in binding or staying, Travelling After, Cutting, Chopping Down, Walking Around, Misleading, Flowing Off, Putting Away, Displacing, Twitching, Doubling, Overturning, Capturing, Avoiding, Circling, Channeling, Winding, Winding Through, Changing, Changing Through, Cutting Away, Hand Punching, Shooting Ahead, Hanging, Moving Out, Blocking, Adjusting, Grappling, Closing, etc.</p>
| '''[XVIIrv]''' Und steht zwar die ganze Handtarbeit vornemlich im Binden oder bleiben / Nachreisen / Schneiden / Umbschlagen / Umblauffen / Verfüren / Verfliigen / Absetzen / Versetzen / Zucken / Doplieren / Verkehren / Schnappen / Felen / Zirckeln / Rinden / Winden / Durchwinden / Wechseln / Durchwechseln / Abschneiden / Hendtrucken / Vorschieben / Hengen / Außreissen / Sperren / Verstellen / Übergreiffen / Einlauffen / rc.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/55|1|lbl=Ⅰ.17v.1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Binding, Staying, Feeling.'''
+
| <p>'''Binding, Staying, Feeling.'''</p>
These are names for when the swords are in contact with each other. Staying is two moded, firstly when the swords stop each other, watch what One wants to fence with then and where you can attack your opponent if you will. Then there is the other with which one sends strikes, when you set yourself as if you sought to recover from a strike, only to slash quickly and come inward again with the short edge, thus back to the Before to strike with the long edge. Now mark the word “feeling” which means so much, as it therewith sends or finds, you will become aware how hard or soft on your sword he is, etc.
+
 
| '''Anbinden / Bleiben / Fülen.'''
+
<p>These are names for when the swords are in contact with each other. Staying is two moded, firstly when the swords stop each other, watch what One wants to fence with then and where you can attack your opponent if you will. Then there is the other with which one sends strikes, when you set yourself as if you sought to recover from a strike, only to slash quickly and come inward again with the short edge, thus back to the Before to strike with the long edge. Now mark the word “feeling” which means so much, as it therewith sends or finds, you will become aware how hard or soft on your sword he is, etc.</p>
HEist wann die Schwerdter an einander Rüren / Bleiben ist zweyerley / Erstlich wan die Schwerdter an einander gehalten / zusehen was der Mann will fechten / unnd wo er seinen gegenman anzugreiffen in willens. Darnach zum andern / welches mit streichen geschicht / wenn du dich stellest / als ob du zuckest einen streich zuerholen / und nur schlechts widerumb umbschnelst / und mit kurtzer schneid wider dahinein kompst / dahin du zuvor mit Langer schneid gehauwen. Hie merck das wort fülen welches soviel heist / als brüffen oder empfinden / damit du gewahr werden magst / ob er mit seinem Band hert oder weich an deinem Schwerdt ist / etc.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/55|2|lbl=Ⅰ.17v.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Travelling After'''
+
| <p>'''Travelling After'''</p>
This is an especially good handwork, and therein the need and will to know will be raised if you want to rise and become a Master at low cost, thus conduct yourself in Travelling After: When your opponent starts to move his sword above or below himself so as to prepare to strike, you rush at his targets and thus preemptively intercept his Strike, which then can be joined against as you come to want or need, with this one fences and sweeps away with your strike. Since you soon require better understanding, I will clarify this to you with an example.
+
 
| '''Nachreisen.'''
+
<p>This is an especially good handwork, and therein the need and will to know will be raised if you want to rise and become a Master at low cost, thus conduct yourself in Travelling After: When your opponent starts to move his sword above or below himself so as to prepare to strike, you rush at his targets and thus preemptively intercept his Strike, which then can be joined against as you come to want or need, with this one fences and sweeps away with your strike. Since you soon require better understanding, I will clarify this to you with an example.</p>
DIß ist ein sonder gut Handtarbeit / und darin wol geübt und das wol weiß zu brauchen / mag billich ein Meister gelobt werden / und helt sich mit dem Nachreisen also / Wann du (so dein gegenfechter entweders mit seinem Wehr zu hoch uber oder undersich / oder zu weit neben aus Hauwet) ihm zur Blösse nacheilest / unnd also sein Hauw zuvolfüren hinderst / welches denn füglich kann und mag gegen die gebraucht werden / so mit ihren häuwen weit schweiffig umb sich fechten / solches damit du es desto baß verstehen mögest / will ich dirs mit disem Exempel erkleren.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/55|3|lbl=Ⅰ.17v.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| When one fences against you, take on whatever part his sword takes, if leading first in the right Ox, that is in the high right quarter, thus you shall take off as soon as he changes his sword from there to the other side or off to seek a strike, move similarly and strike after it with cunning, and of course you’ll need to pick a strike and target, against which you close and soon you’ll want your displacement. However if he fences out of the Low Guard, thus mark that as soon as he drives out, (he fences from either left or right side), follow cunningly under his sword from below with the long edge and strike the next opening.
+
| <p>When one fences against you, take on whatever part his sword takes, if leading first in the right Ox, that is in the high right quarter, thus you shall take off as soon as he changes his sword from there to the other side or off to seek a strike, move similarly and strike after it with cunning, and of course you’ll need to pick a strike and target, against which you close and soon you’ll want your displacement. However if he fences out of the Low Guard, thus mark that as soon as he drives out, (he fences from either left or right side), follow cunningly under his sword from below with the long edge and strike the next opening.</p>
| Wann einer gegen dir Fechtet / so nim war in welchem theil er sein Schwerdt führet / fürt ers dann im rechten Ochsen / das ist im rechten Obern quatier / so soltu als bald unnd in dem er sein Schwerdt von dannen auff die ander seiten zu Wechseln abnimpt / oder nur zum streich auffzeucht / daselbs behendiglich und mit list hinein '''[XVIIIr]''' / und dich doch solcher häuw und stuck gebrauchen / auß welchn du gleich mit und als bald dein versatzung haben magst / Ficht er aber aus der Underhuten / so merck das du ihm (er Fecht von der Lincken oder Rechten seiten) als bald und in dem er aufffehrt / underhalb seinem Schwerdt listiglich mit der Langschneid nachfolgest / und der nechsten Blöß zu streichest.  
+
|
 +
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/55|4|lbl=Ⅰ.17v.4|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/56|1|lbl=Ⅰ.18r.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Slicing'''
+
| <p>'''Slicing'''</p>
Is a fundamental element of proper handwork, when you rush from your opponent with quick and agile blows, you can block and impede him better with no other move than with the slice, which you, though you will treasure it in all instances as special as here, will hold in reserve. You must however complete the slices thus: after you entangle your opponent’s sword with the bind, you shall strive thereon, feel if he would withdraw or flow off from the bind, as soon as he flows off, drive against him with the long edge on his arm, thrust the strong or quillons from you in the effort, let fly, and as he himself seeks to retrieve, strike then to the next opening.
+
 
| '''Schneiden.'''
+
<p>Is a fundamental element of proper handwork, when you rush from your opponent with quick and agile blows, you can block and impede him better with no other move than with the slice, which you, though you will treasure it in all instances as special as here, will hold in reserve. You must however complete the slices thus: after you entangle your opponent’s sword with the bind, you shall strive thereon, feel if he would withdraw or flow off from the bind, as soon as he flows off, drive against him with the long edge on his arm, thrust the strong or quillons from you in the effort, let fly, and as he himself seeks to retrieve, strike then to the next opening.</p>
ISt under der Handarbeit auch der Rechten kern stuck eines / dann so du von deinem gegenpart mit behenden und geschwinden stucken ubereilet / kanstu ihn mit keinem andern stuck besser stecken und hindern / dann mit dem schnit / welches du dir dann auch in allen stucken als ein sonders hiezu erfunden kleinot / im vorrath behalten solt / Du must aber das Schneiden also volbringen / nach dem du deines widerparts Schwerdt mit dem Band empfangen / soltu daran verharren / zufülen ob er vom Bandt abgehn oder umbschlagen wolt / als bald er umbschlegt / so fahr ihm mit der Langen schneiden auff sein Arm nach / stoß ihn mit der sterck oder schilt im ruck von dir / laß fliegen / und ehe er sich erholen mag / so hauwe der nechsten Blössen zu.  
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/56|2|lbl=Ⅰ.18r.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Slashing Around'''
+
| <p>'''Slashing Around'''</p>
Is named from hitting around with the sword, when you have bound from your right against his left, from this bind leave off again, strike or rush around to the other side.
+
 
| '''Umbschlagen.'''
+
<p>Is named from hitting around with the sword, when you have bound from your right against his left, from this bind leave off again, strike or rush around to the other side.</p>
HEist vom Schwerdt umbschlagen / wann du von deiner Rechten gegen seiner Lincken angebunden / vom selben Bandt wider abgehest / zur andern seiten umbschlegest oder zu schnellest.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/56|3|lbl=Ⅰ.18r.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Flowing Off'''
+
| <p>'''Flowing Off'''</p>
On whichever hand you bind on your opponent’s sword, so move while retrieving your hand, and let yourself flow off below you with the half edge, and twitch under to bring your riccasso high overhead to strike, and drive such to both sides.
+
 
| '''Ablauffen.'''
+
<p>On whichever hand you bind on your opponent’s sword, so move while retrieving your hand, and let yourself flow off below you with the half edge, and twitch under to bring your riccasso high overhead to strike, and drive such to both sides.</p>
ISt / von welcher Handt du dem Mann an sein Schwerdt bindest / so verkehr in dem es riert dein Hand / und laß mit halber schneid undersich ablauffen / und zuck under des dein Hefft ubersich in die höh zum streich / und solches treib zu beiden seiten.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/56|4|lbl=Ⅰ.18r.4}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Misleading'''
+
| <p>'''Misleading'''</p>
Remember this: when you show your intent, as if you mean to fence to one of your opponent’s openings, absolutely do not do so, but instead slash the strike unto another opening, to which you should come properly without injury, and thus Misleading enables many moves, such as facing with the Glancer Strike, Hacking, Flying, Beckoning, Off Flowing, Twitch, Circle and others. In addition, Misleading is not only performed with the sword, but also by presenting various initial stances, which are not yet more techniques, because techniques are the fencer’s distinction, toward which you direct yourself throughout fencing at every single distinction and habit which then shall be set upon with wrath. This quickly clears hands fenced slowly, thus Misleading likewise requires forms which will be directed in the work.
+
 
| '''[XVIIIv] Verführen.'''
+
<p>Remember this: when you show your intent, as if you mean to fence to one of your opponent’s openings, absolutely do not do so, but instead slash the strike unto another opening, to which you should come properly without injury, and thus Misleading enables many moves, such as facing with the Glancer Strike, Hacking, Flying, Beckoning, Off Flowing, Twitch, Circle and others. In addition, Misleading is not only performed with the sword, but also by presenting various initial stances, which are not yet more techniques, because techniques are the fencer’s distinction, toward which you direct yourself throughout fencing at every single distinction and habit which then shall be set upon with wrath. This quickly clears hands fenced slowly, thus Misleading likewise requires forms which will be directed in the work.</p>
HElt sich also / wann du dich mit geberden erzeigest / als ob du deiner gegenpart zu einer Blöß zufechten wollest / thust es aber doch nit / sondern schlechst den streich zu einer andern Blöß hinein / zu der du am füglichsten ohn schaden zukommen vermeinest / und ob aber schon vilerlei stuck so dem verführen zustendig / als der Schillerhauw mit dem gesicht / das Verfelen / Verfliegen / Wincken / Ablauffen /Verzuck / Zirckel und andere / auch dero wegen das Verführen nit allein mit dem Schwerdt / sonder auch mit den geberden mancherley hieraus entstehet / so seind doch dessen nit mehr art / als art und eigenschaft der Fechter seind / denn es richt sich durchaus nach eines jeden eigenschafft unnd gewonheit im Fechten / als da der zornig / einander sitsam / dieser geschwindt und hurtig / jhender langsam fichtet / also auch das Verführen gleicher gestalt gebraucht und in das werck gerichtet wirt.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/57|1|lbl=Ⅰ.18v.1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Flying Off'''
+
| <p>'''Flying Off'''</p>
Withdrawing thus is shown: when you in either pre-fencing or full work strike at your opponent’s opening, but he drives to intercept your strike in the air, do not allow him to put his blade onto your sword, but twitch off the strike with one flight in the air to another opening, which will work very well against this, follow only after your sword and your body will not come to be hurt.
+
 
| '''Verfliegen.'''
+
<p>Withdrawing thus is shown: when you in either pre-fencing or full work strike at your opponent’s opening, but he drives to intercept your strike in the air, do not allow him to put his blade onto your sword, but twitch off the strike with one flight in the air to another opening, which will work very well against this, follow only after your sword and your body will not come to be hurt.</p>
MUß also geschehen / wann du im zufechten oder voller arbeit deines widerparts Blöß zuhauwest / er aber dein streich in der lufft zu empfangen dir entgegen fehret / das du jn nit lassest mit seiner Klinge an dein Schwerdt rühren / sonder in der lufft solchen streich mit einem flug wider abzuckest / zu einer andern Blöß / welche arbet den gegen disen sehr nützlich / o nur dein Schwerdt nachreisen und nit den leib zu verletzen begirig.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/57|2|lbl=Ⅰ.18v.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Setting Aside'''
+
| <p>'''Setting Aside'''</p>
Now in all Fencing moves, as above were shown, two things are necessary, namely strikes, and strikes which clear or displace with the sword. So mark that this handwork is the proper clearing or displacing, with which you won’t address the strikes badly and not strike onward again, but move at the same time to address his opening during the withdrawal. As you come during pre-fencing into the Changer, and as he strikes to you then from Above, drive upward with the long edge against his strike, and step at the same time with your right foot against his left and offset him, then as soon as he glides, wind the short edge, and rush at him against his head.
+
 
| '''Absetzen.'''
+
<p>Now in all Fencing moves, as above were shown, two things are necessary, namely strikes, and strikes which clear or displace with the sword. So mark that this handwork is the proper clearing or displacing, with which you won’t address the strikes badly and not strike onward again, but move at the same time to address his opening during the withdrawal. As you come during pre-fencing into the Changer, and as he strikes to you then from Above, drive upward with the long edge against his strike, and step at the same time with your right foot against his left and offset him, then as soon as he glides, wind the short edge, and rush at him against his head.</p>
DIeweil alle Fechtstuck / wie oben angezeigt / zwey ding erfordern nemlich hauwen / und die häuw mit dem Schwerdt abtragen oder versetzen / so merck das hie diese Handtarbeit das recht abtragen oder versetzen ist / mit welchem du nit allein die streich schlecht empfahest / und nit herwider hauwest / sonder auch zugleich indem der absatz rühret zu seiner Blöß mit außtretten triffest / als kompstu im zufechten in Wechsel / Hauwet er dir als dann '''[XIXr]''' von Oben zu / so fahr ubersich mit Langer schneid gegen seinem streich / und trit zugleich mit dem Rechten fuß gegen seiner Lincken unnd setz jhm ab / gleich in dem es dann gliitzt / so verwendt die kurtze schneid / unnd schnell jhm gegen seinem Kopff.
+
|
 +
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/57|3|lbl=Ⅰ.18v.3|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/58|1|lbl=Ⅰ.19r.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Slinging'''
+
| <p>'''Slinging'''</p>
Is nothing other than how you let a strike fly in a Sling to your opponent’s head, for this put yourself in the Fool’s guard, and pull your sword back though close to your right, step with your right foot to your opponent while pulling your sword back to you, and sling your strike to his head. This Slinging Strike shall fly out even like a stone is thrown from a sling, whatever more you need note on Slinging you will find described in sections after here.
+
 
| '''Schlaudern.'''
+
<p>Is nothing other than how you let a strike fly in a Sling to your opponent’s head, for this put yourself in the Fool’s guard, and pull your sword back though close to your right, step with your right foot to your opponent while pulling your sword back to you, and sling your strike to his head. This Slinging Strike shall fly out even like a stone is thrown from a sling, whatever more you need note on Slinging you will find described in sections after here.</p>
ISt nichts anders dann so du einen Hauw in einem Schlauder dem Mann zum Kopff fliegen last / als schicke dich in die Hut des Olbers / und zeihe dein Schwerdt neben deiner Rechten zuruck durch / trit also in dem du dein Schwerdt zurück zeuchst mit deinem Rechten fuß zu jm / unnd Schlauder ihm deinen Hauw zum Kopff / Dieser Schlauderhauw sol eben daher fliegen wie ein stein auß einer Schlaudern geworffen wirdt / was aber sonst mehr von Schlaudern nötig / findestu in stucken hernach beschrieben.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/58|2|lbl=Ⅰ.19r.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Twitching'''
+
| <p>'''Twitching'''</p>
Twitching is one very good handwork with which you can masterly mislead your opponent, and which shall be operated thus: After you have bound against your opponent with the long edge or have struck in to an opening, handily twitch over yourself again as if you want to strike to the other side, however don’t drive ahead, but handily execute the strike with the short edge again onto the point, from which you are exited.
+
 
| '''Zucken.'''
+
<p>Twitching is one very good handwork with which you can masterly mislead your opponent, and which shall be operated thus: After you have bound against your opponent with the long edge or have struck in to an opening, handily twitch over yourself again as if you want to strike to the other side, however don’t drive ahead, but handily execute the strike with the short edge again onto the point, from which you are exited.</p>
MIt zucken welches ein sehr gut Handtarbeit ist / kanstu deinen gegenfechter meisterlich verführen / welches du also treiben solt / Nach dem du deinen Mann mit Langer schneiden angebunden oder eingehauwen hast / zu einer Blöß / so zuck behend wider ubersich als ob du auff die andere seiten hauwen wollest / fahr aber nit fort / sonder vollendt den Hauw mit kurtzer schneid behendt wider an den ort / von welchem du abgangen bist.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/58|3|lbl=Ⅰ.19r.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Doubling'''
+
| <p>'''Doubling'''</p>
Is a strike or move made double in this wise: Strike first from your right to his ear, as then when the swords glide together, thrust your sword’s pommel through under your right arm, driving at the same time out with both arms, and hit him with the the short edge behind his blade onto his head. This handwork will therefore be called Doubling, because through it a double or twofold strike will be accomplished, first with long and then with short edge.
+
 
| '''Doplieren.'''
+
<p>Is a strike or move made double in this wise: Strike first from your right to his ear, as then when the swords glide together, thrust your sword’s pommel through under your right arm, driving at the same time out with both arms, and hit him with the the short edge behind his blade onto his head. This handwork will therefore be called Doubling, because through it a double or twofold strike will be accomplished, first with long and then with short edge.</p>
ISt ein Hauw oder stuck doppel machen auff diese weiß / Hauwe erstlich von deiner Rechten zu seinem Ohr / als dann wann die Schwerdt zusamen glitschen / stoß dein Schwerdts Knopff under deinem Rechten Arm durch / fahr zugleich mit beiden Armen auff / und schlag ihn mit kurtzer schneiden hinder seiner klingen auff sein Kopff. Diese handtarbeit wirt derowegen Doplieren geheissen / dieweil dardurch ein Hauwe dopelt oder zwifacht volbracht wirt / erstlich mit Langer / denn mit halber schneidt.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/58|4|lbl=Ⅰ.19r.4}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Inverting'''
+
| <p>'''Inverting'''</p>
Inverting is: bind onto your opponent’s sword against his left, and just as the pommel moves under your right arm, thrust through, if he at the same time would come at your head in a strike against your right, push your blade or arms from you with crossed hands so as to ward him below you so that he cannot work onward, however make your required space to work.
+
 
| '''[XIXv] Verkehren.'''
+
<p>Inverting is: bind onto your opponent’s sword against his left, and just as the pommel moves under your right arm, thrust through, if he at the same time would come at your head in a strike against your right, push your blade or arms from you with crossed hands so as to ward him below you so that he cannot work onward, however make your required space to work.</p>
VErkehren ist / binde deinem widerpart gegen seiner Lincken an sein Schwerdt / unnd stoß in dem es rürt den Knopff under dein rechten Arm durch / entziehe jhm zugleich dein Kopff wol auß dem streich gegen deiner Rechten / truck volgends sein Kling oder Arm mit geschrenckten henden von dir / undersich damit du jhn zwingst das er nit mehr arbeiten kann / machst aber dir blatz nach deinem gefallen zu arbeiten.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/59|1|lbl=Ⅰ.19v.1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Clipping'''
+
| <p>'''Clipping'''</p>
Clipping is two moded, the first is when you, as just now was told, come at him in a flip his arm or blade, thus stopping his blade or arm with quillons stiff under you, and under this let the blade Clip to his head.
+
 
| '''Umbschnappen.'''
+
<p>Clipping is two moded, the first is when you, as just now was told, come at him in a flip his arm or blade, thus stopping his blade or arm with quillons stiff under you, and under this let the blade Clip to his head.</p>
UMbschnappen ist zweyerley / das eine / wann du wie jetzt bemelt jhm mit verkeren auff sein Arm oder Klingen kommen / so halt jm sein Klingen oder Arm / mit kreutzstangen steiff under dir / unnd laß under des die klingen umbschnappen seinem Kopff zu.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/59|2|lbl=Ⅰ.19v.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| However, the other is where he closes to you with a Loop under him, retreat with the left foot towards his right, and at the same time reach over his right arm with the pommel above, pull back under yourself, and let the sword edge come under his blade to clip against his head, such that your hands come to cross over each other.
+
| <p>However, the other is where he closes to you with a Loop under him, retreat with the left foot towards his right, and at the same time reach over his right arm with the pommel above, pull back under yourself, and let the sword edge come under his blade to clip against his head, such that your hands come to cross over each other.</p>
| Das ander / so er aber dich mit verkeren undersich getrungen hat / so weich jhm mit dem Lincken fuß gegen seiner Rechten / und greiff zugleich mit dem Knopff oben uber sein rechten Arm / ruck den undersich / und laß under seiner Klingen mit kurtzer schneid gegen seinem Kopff herfür umbschnappen / das dir dein hendt kreutzweiß uber einander kommen.  
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/59|3|lbl=Ⅰ.19v.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Feinting'''
+
| <p>'''Feinting'''</p>
Feinting can be wanted each time, however it will be useful and resorted to properly and in the suitable time which only the advancing fencer knows, thereby you will effect a false strike with advantage, that you seek to attain another from there, and take it soon. When you strike at one opening, and your opponent would displace you, don’t pull the strike but let it flow off nicely, and strike to another opening, as in this example. In advancing come into the right Wrath, and as soon as you can reach him, step and strike at the left ear unto his sword, however in the strike, even and then pull it, thus lift the pommel and let the blade miss and flow off near his left, and twitch over the head, as to then strike him on the other side, out over his right arm to his head.
 
| '''Fehlen.'''
 
FEhlen kann ein jeder wol / aber solches mit fug und zu gelegner zeit nützlich zugebrauchen / weis allein ein wolgeübter Fechter / Derowegen wiltu mit vortheil ein Fehlstreich thun / das du ein andern daraus erholen mögest / son nim war. Wann du zu einer Blöß einhauwest / und dir dein widerpart versetzen will / das du den Hauw nit rüren sonder ablauffen last / und hauwest zu einer andern Blös zu / als zu einem exempel. Im zugang komm in rechten Zorn / und als bald du jhn kanst erlangen / so trit und hauwe dem lincken Ohr zu biß an sein Schwerdt / in dem Hauw aber / ehe und denn es rüret / so erhebe den Knopff und laß die kling neben seiner Lincken fehl ablauffen / und zuck umb den kopff / als dann hauwe jm zur andern seiten / aussen uber sein rechten Arm zu seinem Kopff.
 
 
 
  
 +
<p>Feinting can be wanted each time, however it will be useful and resorted to properly and in the suitable time which only the advancing fencer knows, thereby you will effect a false strike with advantage, that you seek to attain another from there, and take it soon. When you strike at one opening, and your opponent would displace you, don’t pull the strike but let it flow off nicely, and strike to another opening, as in this example. In advancing come into the right Wrath, and as soon as you can reach him, step and strike at the left ear unto his sword, however in the strike, even and then pull it, thus lift the pommel and let the blade miss and flow off near his left, and twitch over the head, as to then strike him on the other side, out over his right arm to his head.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/59|4|lbl=Ⅰ.19v.4}}
 
<section begin="Zirckel"/>
 
<section begin="Zirckel"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword E.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword E.png|center|400px]]
| '''Circle'''
+
| <p>'''Circle'''</p>
When you stand in the bind before your opponent, and both you and he drive the swords foreward in the air overhead, but neither will give away an opening to the other, then the Circle is an especially good work model at need which you will execute thus: Strike with the half edge and crossed hands from above toward his right side forward through above, so that both your hands stay overhead, but in striking cross your right hand boldly over your left, thereby you will want to reach or graze his right ear with the half edge, the sword thus clips him with your arms under yourself, then step with the right foot to take on his right side or to bring yourself back, and strike a direct splitting strike to his head.
 
| '''[XXrv] Zirckel.'''
 
WAnn du im Bandt vor dem Mann stehest / unnd beide du und er die Schwerdter uber dem Kopff in den lüfften führen / aber keiner vor dem andern sich Bloß will geben / so ist der Zirckel ein ausbündige sonder gute arbeit zu gebrauchen / welchen soltu also machen / Hauwe mit halber schneid und geschrenckten henden von Oben / neben seiner Rechten seiten für uber durch / das dein beide hendt ob dem Haubt bleiben / im Hauwen aber schrenck dein Rechte hand dapffer uber dein Linkce / damit du jhm das Recht ohr wol mögest mit halber schneid erlangen oder schürpffen / wischt er als dann mit den Armen undersich dem Schwerdt nach / so trit mit dem Rechten fuß wol beseits auff sein Rechte seiten oder hindersich zu ruck / und hauwe ein geraden Scheitelhauw zu seinem kopff.
 
  
 +
<p>When you stand in the bind before your opponent, and both you and he drive the swords foreward in the air overhead, but neither will give away an opening to the other, then the Circle is an especially good work model at need which you will execute thus: Strike with the half edge and crossed hands from above toward his right side forward through above, so that both your hands stay overhead, but in striking cross your right hand boldly over your left, thereby you will want to reach or graze his right ear with the half edge, the sword thus clips him with your arms under yourself, then step with the right foot to take on his right side or to bring yourself back, and strike a direct splitting strike to his head.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/61|1|lbl=Ⅰ.20v.1}}
 
<section end="Zirckel"/><section begin="Rinde"/>
 
<section end="Zirckel"/><section begin="Rinde"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Rounds'''
+
| <p>'''Rounds'''</p>
The rounds are two things, Single and Double. The single round is when you twitch off your sword from your opponent’s blade or opening in a swing overhead, and let fly over in the air so that you make a round circle. The double round is this: when you so twitch strongly off from his sword, that it goes over your head two times in full swing overhead, one time to each side, thus both single and double rounds are very serviceable also to Leading On, such that you will see and drive farther onward.
 
| '''Rinde.'''
 
DEr Rinde seind zweyerley / Einfach und Doppelt / Einfache Rinde ist / wann du dein Schwerdt von deines gegenparts klingen oder Blöß in einem schwung uber dein Kopff abzuckest / und in der lufft last umbfliegen / also das du ein runden Zirckel machest. Doppel Rinde ist diese / wann du also starck von seinem Schwerdt abzuckest / das es zweymal in vollem schwung uber deinem Haubt umblaufft / zu jeder seiten einmal / welche Rind beide Einfach unnd Doppel sehr dienstlich auch zum verführen seind / wie du solches in den stucken weitleuffiger sehen und erfahren wirst.
 
  
 +
<p>The rounds are two things, Single and Double. The single round is when you twitch off your sword from your opponent’s blade or opening in a swing overhead, and let fly over in the air so that you make a round circle. The double round is this: when you so twitch strongly off from his sword, that it goes over your head two times in full swing overhead, one time to each side, thus both single and double rounds are very serviceable also to Leading On, such that you will see and drive farther onward.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/61|2|lbl=Ⅰ.20v.2}}
 
<section end="Rinde"/><section begin="Winden"/>
 
<section end="Rinde"/><section begin="Winden"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Winding'''
+
| <p>'''Winding'''</p>
The word Winding is known in good German as Twisting, whose work shall be done thus: when you have bound onto your opponent’s sword from your right against his left, then hold fast in the bind and wind the far part of your blade inward against his head, and then again out. So that you will be told how to always stay stiff onto his sword in the bind, such will be shown in this example.
+
 
| '''Winden.'''
+
<p>The word Winding is known in good German as Twisting, whose work shall be done thus: when you have bound onto your opponent’s sword from your right against his left, then hold fast in the bind and wind the far part of your blade inward against his head, and then again out. So that you will be told how to always stay stiff onto his sword in the bind, such will be shown in this example.</p>
DAs wörtlein Winden heißt auff gut Teutsch Wenden / welche arbeit soll also gemacht werden / wann du von deiner Rechten an deines widerparts Schwerdt gegen seiner Lincken hast angebunden / so bleib am Bandt fest / und wende jhm das vordertheil deiner klingen einwerdts gegen seinem Kopff / unnd wider heraus / doch das [XXIr] du alweg under des wie bemelt / steiff an seinem Schwerdt mit dem Bandt bleibest / wie solches hie in disem Exempel zusehen.  
+
|  
 +
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/61|3|lbl=Ⅰ.20v.3|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/62|1|lbl=Ⅰ.21r.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Strike once from the Roof, thus binding from your right with a hard traverse onto his sword, and just as it connects, thrust your pommel through under your right arm, and wind the short edge thus in a rush inward against his head, in this all but stay with the edge hard against his sword, if he would beware of the rush and displace, or if you feel that he will fall down to your openings from above, then pull the pommel from under your arm again to your left above you, and hit him again with the short edge through the traverse to his left ear.
+
| <p>Strike once from the Roof, thus binding from your right with a hard traverse onto his sword, and just as it connects, thrust your pommel through under your right arm, and wind the short edge thus in a rush inward against his head, in this all but stay with the edge hard against his sword, if he would beware of the rush and displace, or if you feel that he will fall down to your openings from above, then pull the pommel from under your arm again to your left above you, and hit him again with the short edge through the traverse to his left ear.</p>
| Hauwet einer von dach auff dich / so bindt von deiner Rechten mit einem Zwirch an sein Schwerdt / unnd in dem es glitscht / so stoß dein Knopff under deinem rechten arm durch / unnd wend also die kurtze schneidt in einem schnall einwerts gegen seinem Kopff / in disem allem aber bleib mit dem schnit hart an seinem Schwerdt / wirt er des schnals gewahr und versetzt / oder wirstu fülen das er dir von Oben vom Schwerdt will niderfallen zu der blöß so ruck den Knopff under deinem Arm wider herfür gegen deiner Lincken ubersich / unnd schlag jhm wider mit kurtzer schneiden durch die Zwirch zu seinem Lincken ohr.  
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/62|2|lbl=Ⅰ.21r.2}}
 
 
 
 
 
<section end="Winden"/><section begin="Durchwinden"/>
 
<section end="Winden"/><section begin="Durchwinden"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Winding Through'''
+
| <p>'''Winding Through'''</p>
If you bind with a Traverse Strike, as was described before here, wind the short edge inward against your opponent’s head, then step through under it with the right foot between you and him, against your opponent’s right side, and wind through at the same time with your hilt under your blade from your left side, and drive him with your pommel winding out over your right arm, step back with the right foot, and travel at the same time from your right side out under him, and slash in with the long edge to the head, thus have you not only wound through, but also wrenched over with the pommel.
 
| '''Durchwinden.'''
 
SO du mit einem Zwirchhauw angebunden / und wie hievor bemelt / die kurtze schneid gegen deines widerparts Kopff einwerts gewunden / so trit under des mit dem rechten Fuß zwischen dir unnd jhm durch / gegen des Manns Rechten seiten / und wende zugleich mit deinem Hefft under seiner klingen auff dein Lincke seiten durch / und fahr jhm mit deinem Knopff außwendig uber sein rechten Arm / trit mit dem rechten Fuß zu ruck / unnd reiß zugleich auff dein Rechte seiten undersich aus / und schlag jn damit mit Langer schneid auff den Kopff / also hastu nit allein durchgewendt / sonder mit dem Knopff ubergreiffen.
 
 
 
  
 +
<p>If you bind with a Traverse Strike, as was described before here, wind the short edge inward against your opponent’s head, then step through under it with the right foot between you and him, against your opponent’s right side, and wind through at the same time with your hilt under your blade from your left side, and drive him with your pommel winding out over your right arm, step back with the right foot, and travel at the same time from your right side out under him, and slash in with the long edge to the head, thus have you not only wound through, but also wrenched over with the pommel.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/62|3|lbl=Ⅰ.21r.3}}
 
<section end="Durchwinden"/><section begin="Wechseln"/>
 
<section end="Durchwinden"/><section begin="Wechseln"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Changes'''
+
| <p>'''Changes'''</p>
A skilled fencer will have Changes, so then be skilled at such and only Change at the right time, and only when you need, and not give away your openings without cause. However he who will be experienced in fencing will need the knowledge of Changes, for is it an artful work and belongs to fencing with all this, that while it only works against the sword and not against the body, the Changes are many. Change in opening from one side to the other, change before the attack from one stance to another. Remember in the attacks to change through against the strikes, thus in the pre-fencing strike from your right a direct Wrath or High strike against your opponent’s left side, strike him against the sword and not to his body, thus let the point flit under his sword with crossed hands with the strike, step and strike in to the other high target, see however that you carefully ensure that he does not attack or set upon you by following after, to this in the beginning come into the Long Point, and stretch likewise long from you, if he strikes at your sword, and will hit out or wind, then let the point drop under yourself through sinking, and work him to the other side, if he swipes after and will displace, then change through again, bite onward again to another opening or work to stand yet rightly, then after you can strike.
 
| '''Wechseln.'''
 
WEchseln will ein geübten Fechter haben / denn welcher ongeübt unnd nit zu rechter zeit Wechselt / der saumet sich nur / und gibt sich ohn ursach blos / wer aber im Fechten erfahren / und sich des Wechseln weiß zugebrauchen / dm ist es ein künstliche arbeit / und gehört gegen diese zu Fechten / die nur nach dem Schwerdt und nit nach dem leib arbeiten / Das Wechseln aber ist mancherley / Wechseln im zugang von einer seiten zur andern / Wechseln vor dem angriff von einem Leger in das ander / Item im angreiffen gegen den Hauwe durchwechseln / also im zufechten Hauw von deiner Rechten einen geraden Zorn oder Oberhauw / gegen deines widerparts Lincke sei'''[XXIv]'''ten / Hauwet er gegen dem Schwerdt und nit zum leib / so laß den ort sampt dem Hauw mit geschrenckten henden unden durch wischen / trit und hauw zur andern Ober Blöß lang hinein / sihe aber das du fürsichtig seiest / das er dich im Nachreisen nit erhasche oder dir ansetze / gleichfals im zugang komme in das Lang ort / und streck dasselbig lang von dir / Hauwet er gegen deinem Schwerdt / und will ausschlagen oder Winden / so laß den ort undersich durch sincken / und arbeit jhm zur andern seiten / wischt er jhm nach und will versetzen / so Wechsel wider durch / biß dir entweders ein Blös wirt oder dir sonst fügliche arbeit zuschlehet / darnach du hauwen könnest.
 
  
 +
<p>A skilled fencer will have Changes, so then be skilled at such and only Change at the right time, and only when you need, and not give away your openings without cause. However he who will be experienced in fencing will need the knowledge of Changes, for is it an artful work and belongs to fencing with all this, that while it only works against the sword and not against the body, the Changes are many. Change in opening from one side to the other, change before the attack from one stance to another.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/62|4|lbl=Ⅰ.21r.4}}
  
 +
|-
 +
|
 +
| <p>Remember in the attacks to change through against the strikes, thus in the pre-fencing strike from your right a direct Wrath or High strike against your opponent’s left side, strike him against the sword and not to his body, thus let the point flit under his sword with crossed hands with the strike, step and strike in to the other high target, see however that you carefully ensure that he does not attack or set upon you by following after, to this in the beginning come into the Long Point, and stretch likewise long from you, if he strikes at your sword, and will hit out or wind, then let the point drop under yourself through sinking, and work him to the other side, if he swipes after and will displace, then change through again, bite onward again to another opening or work to stand yet rightly, then after you can strike.</p>
 +
|
 +
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/62|5|lbl=Ⅰ.21r.5|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/63|1|lbl=Ⅰ.21v.1|p=1}}
 
<section end="Wechseln"/><section begin="Abschneiden"/>
 
<section end="Wechseln"/><section begin="Abschneiden"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Slicing Off'''
+
| <p>'''Slicing Off'''</p>
Slicing Off shall you drive thus: hold the sword with outstretched arms long from you, or sink into the Fool’s guard, strike your opponent then with a long strike from you, and thus slice away from you to both sides with the long edge, so as long as you keep your advantage, that you onward will come to work properly at need.
+
 
| '''Abschneiden.'''
+
<p>Slicing Off shall you drive thus: hold the sword with outstretched arms long from you, or sink into the Fool’s guard, strike your opponent then with a long strike from you, and thus slice away from you to both sides with the long edge, so as long as you keep your advantage, that you onward will come to work properly at need.</p>
ABschneiden soltu also treiben / halt das Schwerdt mit ausgestreckten Armen lang von dir / oder sencke dich in die Hut des Olbers / hauwet dann dein gegenmann mit langen Häuwen auff dich / so schneid dieselben mit Langer schneid von dir ab zu beiden seiten / so lang und vil biß du dein vortheil ersihest / das du zu anderer / dir mehr füglicher arbeit kommen mögest.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/63|2|lbl=Ⅰ.21v.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| In Slicing Off travelling after is also advantageous when done together with the slice, thus concerning this Liechtenauer spoke in a quote.  
+
| <p>In Slicing Off travelling after is also advantageous when done together with the slice, thus concerning this Liechtenauer spoke in a quote.</p>
 
 
:''Slice off the hardened /<br/>driven from both.''
 
 
 
That is cut the hard strike off from you from both sides. Apart than this, Slicing Off will be described more only after here in examples and other defenses.
 
| In disem Abschneiden ist das Nachreisen auch fein heimlich sampt dem Schnidt begriffen / darumb jhn den auch der Lichtenawer in einem Spruch verfasset da er spricht.
 
 
 
:''Schneidt ab die herten /<br/>on beiden geferten.''
 
 
 
Das ist schneid die harten streich von dir ab von beiden seiten / aber von disem Abschneiden wirt hernach in den Exempeln / und andern Wehren mehr geschrieben.
 
  
 +
:Slice off the hardened,<br/>driven from both.
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/63|3|lbl=Ⅰ.21v.3}}
  
 +
|-
 +
|
 +
| <p>That is cut the hard strike off from you from both sides. Apart than this, Slicing Off will be described more only after here in examples and other defenses.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/63|4|lbl=Ⅰ.21v.4}}
 
<section end="Abschneiden"/><section begin="Hendtrucken"/>
 
<section end="Abschneiden"/><section begin="Hendtrucken"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Hand Hitting'''
+
| <p>'''Hand Hitting'''</p>
Hand Hitting is almost the same as the Slice to the arm, of which is told above, and not otherwise shown, how to be done with the Over and Under cuts, unless you run one through with oafish hitting, so drive him under his strike with the Crown or other high displacement, or go under yourself by hanging, and catch his sword on your blade’s flat, and thus you come under his sword, yet pay attention when when he with his strike goes off from your defense again over you, that you follow after him with the strong of your sword, and take him with the hilt from below to drive the strong, that you trap him with both the strong and your blade, thrust at him with the hilt above you, and strike long against the opening.
 
| '''Hendtrucken.'''
 
HEndtrucken vergleicht sich fast mit dem Schneiden auff die Arm / von welchen doben ist meldung gethan / sintemal nit anderst geschicht / denn mit dem Ober und Underschnidt / Als uberlaufft dich einer mit Büffelschlegen / so underfahr jhm seine streich mit der Kron / oder sonst hoher versatzung / oder undergehe jhn mit verhengen / und fang jhm sein Schwerdt auff deiner klingen fleche / und so du jhm under sein Schwerdt kommen / so hab acht '''[XXIIr]''' wenn er mit seinem streich von deiner Wehr wider ubersich abgeht / das du ihm mit der sterck deines Schwerdts nach volgest / und fallest ihm mit dem Schild von Unden für die feust / das du sie ihm beide mit der sterck deiner Klingen fassest / stoß ihn mit dem Schild ubersich von dir / und Hauwe lang nach der Blösse.
 
 
 
  
 +
<p>Hand Hitting is almost the same as the Slice to the arm, of which is told above, and not otherwise shown, how to be done with the Over and Under cuts, unless you run one through with oafish hitting, so drive him under his strike with the Crown or other high displacement, or go under yourself by hanging, and catch his sword on your blade’s flat, and thus you come under his sword, yet pay attention when when he with his strike goes off from your defense again over you, that you follow after him with the strong of your sword, and take him with the hilt from below to drive the strong, that you trap him with both the strong and your blade, thrust at him with the hilt above you, and strike long against the opening.</p>
 +
|
 +
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/63|5|lbl=Ⅰ.21v.5|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/64|1|lbl=Ⅰ.22r.1|p=1}}
 
<section end="Hendtrucken"/><section begin="Verschieben"/>
 
<section end="Hendtrucken"/><section begin="Verschieben"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Deflecting'''
+
| <p>'''Deflecting'''</p>
When you stand in the right wrath, and you will be struck at, let the blade hang behind you, and send your hanging blade over your head and under his blade, that you catch his strike on your flat, and your thumbs stand broad across your hilt under you, to then wind or otherwise further work as you want, whatever you can best take onward.
 
| '''Verschieben.'''
 
WAnn du im rechten Zorn stehest / und auff dich gehauwen wirt / so laß die Kling hinder dir hangen / und schich mit hangender Kling also uber dein Haupt under seine Kling / das du sein streich auff deine fleche empfangest / und dein Daumen den breiten weg auff deinem Schilt undersich stehe / als dan magstu Winden oder sonst fügliche arbeit / wie dichs am besten dunckt fürnemen.
 
 
 
  
 +
<p>When you stand in the right wrath, and you will be struck at, let the blade hang behind you, and send your hanging blade over your head and under his blade, that you catch his strike on your flat, and your thumbs stand broad across your hilt under you, to then wind or otherwise further work as you want, whatever you can best take onward.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/64|2|lbl=Ⅰ.22r.2}}
 
<section end="Verschieben"/><section begin="Hengen"/>
 
<section end="Verschieben"/><section begin="Hengen"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Hanging'''
+
| <p>'''Hanging'''</p>
From the preceeding, Hanging is to be understood clearly, this you do thusly: When you stand in the Plough and your opponent strikes to you, drive your grip above you so that the blade hangs somewhat toward the ground, and take his strike thus on your blade’s flat, to then work with Winding to the next opening.
 
| '''Hengen.'''
 
HEngen ist auß dem vorigen klar zuverstehen / das mach also / Wan du im Pflug stehest / und dein widerpart auff dich Hauwet / so fahr mit deinem gefeß ubersich das die Kling etwas gegen der erden hang / unnd empfach damit seinen streich auff deiner Klingen fleche / als denn arbeite mit Winden / der nechste Blösse zu.
 
 
 
  
 +
<p>From the preceeding, Hanging is to be understood clearly, this you do thusly: When you stand in the Plough and your opponent strikes to you, drive your grip above you so that the blade hangs somewhat toward the ground, and take his strike thus on your blade’s flat, to then work with Winding to the next opening.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/64|3|lbl=Ⅰ.22r.3}}
 
<section end="Hengen"/><section begin="Außreissen"/>
 
<section end="Hengen"/><section begin="Außreissen"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Wrenching Out'''
+
| <p>'''Wrenching Out'''</p>
If you bind once from your right, overturn your sword in the bind, and pull out to your left side, so that you both stand close together in the meeting, thus endevour that you can come at him with the pommel from below and wrench over yourself, or you rush him from Above to grapple over the arm with the pommel, or to whatever way the winding wants to happen, then wrench out underneath, that you thereafter come farther to hear more.
 
| '''Außreissen.'''
 
BIndestu einem von deiner Rechten / so verkehr im Bandt dein Schwerdt / un reiß gegen deiner Lincken seiten auß / deßgleichen so ihr beide nahe bey samen im Bundt stehet / so befleißdich das du ihm mit dem Knopff von unden zwischen die Arm kom~en köñest / und ubersich außreissen / oder hettestu ihm von Oben mit dem Knopff uber die Arm griffen / oder auff was weg das mag geschehen gewunden / so reiß undersich auß / wie du denn hernach weiter im stuck hören wirst.
 
 
 
  
 +
<p>If you bind once from your right, overturn your sword in the bind, and pull out to your left side, so that you both stand close together in the meeting, thus endevour that you can come at him with the pommel from below and wrench over yourself, or you rush him from Above to grapple over the arm with the pommel, or to whatever way the winding wants to happen, then wrench out underneath, that you thereafter come farther to hear more.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/64|4|lbl=Ⅰ.22r.4}}
 
<section end="Außreissen"/><section begin="Sperren"/>
 
<section end="Außreissen"/><section begin="Sperren"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Blocking'''
+
| <p>'''Blocking'''</p>
Mark when one stands before you in the Changer or Fool’s guard, and cunningly drop with long edge upon his blade, and just as he glides or pulls, cross over your hands, and block him so that he can’t come out, or when he strikes in front of you, drop with crossed hands onto the blade and block him.
 
| '''[XXIIv] Sperren.'''
 
MErck wann einer im Wechsel oder Hut des Olbers für dir stehet / so fall ihm listiglich mit Langen schneid auff sein Kling / unnd in dem es glütscht oder rührt / so verschrenck die Hendt / unnd sperr ihn also das er nit außkommen mag / oder wann er vor dir auff streicht / so fall ihm mit geschrenckten Henden auff die Klingen und sperr ihn.
 
 
 
  
 +
<p>Mark when one stands before you in the Changer or Fool’s guard, and cunningly drop with long edge upon his blade, and just as he glides or pulls, cross over your hands, and block him so that he can’t come out, or when he strikes in front of you, drop with crossed hands onto the blade and block him.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/65|1|lbl=Ⅰ.22v.1}}
 
<section end="Sperren"/><section begin="Verstüllen"/>
 
<section end="Sperren"/><section begin="Verstüllen"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Forestalling'''
+
| <p>'''Forestalling'''</p>
Forestalling shall be driven thus: if one comes working unto you with all sorts of actions against the four targets, and strives then to move overhead, drop a cut onto his arm or his sword and let him not come further, especially not where he wants to, thus follow after him with the cut hard on his arm, and forestall thus his advance that he can’t work on, and as soon as you see your opportunity, thrust out with your edge and let fly to the next opening.
 
| '''Verstüllen.'''
 
DAs verstüllen soltu also treiben / kompt dir einer für der mit allerley arbeyt zu den Vier Blössen behendt arbeitet / und geschwindt solches uber dem Haupt machen will / so fall ihm mit dem schnit auff die Arm oder sein Schwerdt / und laß in nit wider abkommen / sondern wo er hin will / so volg im mit dem Schnit auff seinem Arm hart nach / und verstill im also sein lauff das er nit arbeiten mög / als bald du den dein gelegenheit ersehen / so stoß in mit dem Schnit von dir / und laß zur nechsten Blöß einfliegen.
 
  
 +
<p>Forestalling shall be driven thus: if one comes working unto you with all sorts of actions against the four targets, and strives then to move overhead, drop a cut onto his arm or his sword and let him not come further, especially not where he wants to, thus follow after him with the cut hard on his arm, and forestall thus his advance that he can’t work on, and as soon as you see your opportunity, thrust out with your edge and let fly to the next opening.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/65|2|lbl=Ⅰ.22v.2}}
 
<section end="Verstüllen"/><section begin="Ubergreiffen"/>
 
<section end="Verstüllen"/><section begin="Ubergreiffen"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Overgripping'''
+
| <p>'''Overgripping'''</p>
Overgripping is thus: Strike from your right to his upper left opening, however in the strike grip with the fingers out over the cross or hilt while holding the thumb on the haft, then with the left hand raise the pommel and slash in with hanging blade over or behind his displacement to the head.
 
| '''Ubergreiffen.'''
 
UBergreiffen ist also / Hauw von deiner Rechten zu seiner Obern Lincken Blöß / im Hauw aber greiff mit den Fingern uber das kreuz oder Schilt herauß / jedoch so behalt den Daumen an dem Hefft / unod? mit der Lincken Handt erheb den Knopff / und schlag in mit hangeter Klingen uber oder hinder seiner versatzung auff den Kopff.
 
  
 +
<p>Overgripping is thus: Strike from your right to his upper left opening, however in the strike grip with the fingers out over the cross or hilt while holding the thumb on the haft, then with the left hand raise the pommel and slash in with hanging blade over or behind his displacement to the head.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/65|3|lbl=Ⅰ.22v.3}}
 
<section end="Ubergreiffen"/><section begin="Einlauffen"/>
 
<section end="Ubergreiffen"/><section begin="Einlauffen"/>
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Charging In'''
+
| <p>'''Charging In'''</p>
Charging In is nothing other than a charge in under your sword, that both swords come together, beyond this belong grappling and throwing, so that you from here on will attain understanding, will I retain all until now, and now move on to the third section of my list.
+
 
| '''Einlauffen.'''
+
<p>Charging In is nothing other than a charge in under your sword, that both swords come together, beyond this belong grappling and throwing, so that you from here on will attain understanding, will I retain all until now, and now move on to the third section of my list.</p>
EInlauffen ist nichts anders denn einem under sein Schwerdt einlauffen / das beide Schwerdt zusamen rühren / Was ferner das Ringen und Werffen belangt / dieweil sich in stucken daß schicket davon verstendig zuhandlen / wil ichs auch biß dahin sparen / unnd jetzt zum dritten theil meines Zedels schreiten.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/65|4|lbl=Ⅰ.22v.4}}
 
<section end="Einlauffen"/>
 
<section end="Einlauffen"/>
 
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
| class="noline" | What the dear reader heard only up until now, on knowing how to engage your opponent with the strikes, moving also through the middle where you will want to come further in the handwork without damage, is meanwhile however not enough without the third, which will be making a good withdrawal. Thus I will give you proper and clear direction in Withdrawing in the following chapter.
+
| class="noline" | <p>What the dear reader heard only up until now, on knowing how to engage your opponent with the strikes, moving also through the middle where you will want to come further in the handwork without damage, is meanwhile however not enough without the third, which will be making a good withdrawal. Thus I will give you proper and clear direction in Withdrawing in the following chapter.</p>
| class="noline" | '''[XXIIIr]''' Bißher hastu dun günstiger liber Leser nit allein gehört / auff was weis du mit den Häuwen deinen gegenpart angreiffen / sonder auch durch was mittel du im ferner in der Handtarbeit ohn dein schaden zuckommen mögest / Dieweil aber solches nit genug wo nit zum dritten ein guter abzug gemacht wirt / will ich dir in volgenden Capitel von dem abzichen rechte und klare anleitung geben.
+
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/66|1|lbl=Ⅰ.23r.1}}
  
 
|}
 
|}
Line 1,199: Line 1,212:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>Figures</p>
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the 1570)}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
+
! <p>{{rating|C}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}</p>
+
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Of the Withdrawal<br/>Chapt. 6'''
+
| <p>'''Of the Withdrawal'''</p>
If, as has been said, one has started, and in nearly half the efforts is rebuffed in every action, thus indeed making all the same all a bad end, thus come back to the before and do it well, not to execute and downfall, and observe how daily, that now with this you shall not be opposed in fencing, that afterwards you will go on grasping this and have safety after hitting, with honour’s first test at last, which one would then overcome, thus I with this will show and clarify how the withdrawal shall be done.
+
 
| '''Von dem Abzug.<br/>Cap. 6.'''
+
<p>Chapter 6</p>
OB schon wie man sagt / wol haben angfangen / einen fast der halbe mühe in allen dingen entlediget / so mag doch gleichwol ein böses endt alles / so zuvor wol unnd gut gemacht / zü nicht machen und verderben / wie den teglich zusehen / dises nun damit es nit auch dir im Fechten begegnet / das du nach dem du wol angriffen unnd sicher nach getruckt hast / mit schanden auff die letz erst bestehst / welcher dann wol zuverhüten / will ich dir alhie wie der Abzug soll beschehen / eigentlich erkleren.
+
 
 +
<p>If, as has been said, one has started, and in nearly half the efforts is rebuffed in every action, thus indeed making all the same all a bad end, thus come back to the before and do it well, not to execute and downfall, and observe how daily, that now with this you shall not be opposed in fencing, that afterwards you will go on grasping this and have safety after hitting, with honour’s first test at last, which one would then overcome, thus I with this will show and clarify how the withdrawal shall be done.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/66|2|lbl=Ⅰ.23r.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| This then will be heeded in particular, that after every attack always know the three wisdoms of withdrawing, either at first before your opponent, or at the last after him, or even at the same time with him. If you would withdraw before him then exert yourself, that you drive out before you with the most wary moves, that he must shoot to drive high, just as he would then see what you would employ in front, strike through at the same time as the withdrawing stroke, and drive on away as you will then first be wary.
+
| <p>This then will be heeded in particular, that after every attack always know the three wisdoms of withdrawing, either at first before your opponent, or at the last after him, or even at the same time with him. If you would withdraw before him then exert yourself, that you drive out before you with the most wary moves, that he must shoot to drive high, just as he would then see what you would employ in front, strike through at the same time as the withdrawing stroke, and drive on away as you will then first be wary.</p>
| Da dann sonderlich wol zumercken / das du nach einem jeglichen gefochtenen sinck auff diese drey weis immer müst abziehen / entweders zu ersten vordem gegenman / oder zu letzt nach im / oder anch zugleich mit ihm. Wiltu vor ihm Abziehen so befleiß dich / das du ihn zuvor mit stucken der massen engstigest uñ aufftreibest / das er müß in die höch zur beschützung fahren / in dem er dann wil ersehen was du ferner arbeiten wollest / so streich als bald mit dem abzug Hauw durch / und fahr hin weg ehe und dann ers gewahr wirt.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/66|3|lbl=Ⅰ.23r.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| If you would withdraw after him, mark that this will be seen as two different concepts, firstly when you wait for your Opponent’s withdrawal, thus when he strikes away, that you cunningly follow after his withdrawal above his blade. The second is when you stall with faking, as if you would withdraw before him, however handle your strike artfully indeed and guardingly behind, thereby when he rushes against you, you strike a false strike to him and decline, so that you cover your weapon against him and can strike to an opening. However, when you want to withdraw at the same time as him, then place yourself that you can cover his blade by stepping out and away from the strike, and when he strikes away on his right, you will be on his left, where however he strikes from his left, you step out at his right, and at the same time as him, strike in.
+
| <p>If you would withdraw after him, mark that this will be seen as two different concepts, firstly when you wait for your Opponent’s withdrawal, thus when he strikes away, that you cunningly follow after his withdrawal above his blade. The second is when you stall with faking, as if you would withdraw before him, however handle your strike artfully indeed and guardingly behind, thereby when he rushes against you, you strike a false strike to him and decline, so that you cover your weapon against him and can strike to an opening. However, when you want to withdraw at the same time as him, then place yourself that you can cover his blade by stepping out and away from the strike, and when he strikes away on his right, you will be on his left, where however he strikes from his left, you step out at his right, and at the same time as him, strike in.</p>
| Woellestu aber nach ihm Abziehen / so merck das diß auff zweyerley weiß mag beschehen / erstlich wan du wartest auff des Mans abzug / also wann er abhauwet / das du im listiglich ober'''[XXIIIv]'''halb seiner Klingen mit deinem Abzug nachreisest. Zum andern wann du dich stellest mit geberden / als wöllestu vor ihm Abziehen / verhelst aber doch dein Hauw künstlich und verborgenlich zü ruck / damit wenn er dir nach eilet du ihn lassest fehlhauwen und verfallen / auff das du oberhalb seiner Wehr nach ihm zur Blöß Hauwen mögest. So du aber zugleich mit im Abzuziehen willens / so schick dich das du mit außtretten alweg mit dem Hauw oberhalb seiner Klingen seyest / unnd wann er von seiner Rechten abhauwet / du wol auff sein Lincke / wo er aber auff sein Lincke Hauwet / du auff sein Rechte außtrettest / unnd zugleich mit ihm einhauwest.
+
|
 +
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/66|4|lbl=Ⅰ.23r.4|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/67|1|lbl=Ⅰ.23v.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
| class="noline" | While you will bring all this with you, in this section you will be instructed on his point, such that enough can and will be retained.
+
| class="noline" | <p>While you will bring all this with you, in this section you will be instructed on his point, such that enough can and will be retained.</p>
| class="noline" | Weil aber alle stuck solches mit sich bringen / wirstu an seinem ort so von stucken gehandelt / solches gnügsam wol können vernemmen.
+
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/67|2|lbl=Ⅰ.23v.2}}
  
 
|}
 
|}
Line 1,234: Line 1,250:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>Figures</p>
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the 1570)}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
+
! <p>{{rating|C}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}</p>
+
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''A Lesson in Stepping<br/>Chapt. 7'''
+
| <p>'''A Lesson in Stepping'''</p>
Here a wisdom is now particularly needed, one not yet practiced in fencing, thus I will report on stepping and onward show that nothing is relied on as much as one step and, if one already is upon that reliance, that such a one marks what is said if he would learn well, in that as this is relied on so much, so it will be gained by experience as all artful fencing is to be gained. Where the proper steps are not used, the ancient Fencer commented and covered this as stated in his twelth rule:
 
  
:''He who steps after striking<br/>deserves less joy in his art.''
+
<p>Chapter 7</p>
  
That is that every strike must have its own step which shall occur at the same time as the strike, if you would do otherwise with the elements which you resort to, then step too early or too late, thus it happens around your play, and you thus bring yourself around your strike, thus learn to make the steps right so that your opponent cannot work as he really wants, bringing on a stop, particularly so that you upset his grounding or place as it were. In attacking now let yourself mark this, and position yourself as if you would make large and far steps, but actually stay closer with your feet correct, and attack him. So much is then built on from here. Since all of this must be learned and used in fencing, this must be known.
+
<p>Here a wisdom is now particularly needed, one not yet practiced in fencing, thus I will report on stepping and onward show that nothing is relied on as much as one step and, if one already is upon that reliance, that such a one marks what is said if he would learn well, in that as this is relied on so much, so it will be gained by experience as all artful fencing is to be gained. Where the proper steps are not used, the ancient Fencer commented and covered this as stated in his twelth rule:</p>
| '''Ein Ermanung von den Tritten.<br/>Cap. 7.'''
 
ES möchte hie einen wunder nemen unnd sonderlich den / der des Fechtens unerfahren / das ich von den Triten bericht thue / und vermeinen das daran nit vil gelegen wie einer trete unnd ob schon was daran gelegen / das solches einen der Marckt wie man sagt / wol wurde lehren / aber hieran ist so vil gelegen / das wie es denn die erfahrung gibt / alles Fechten vergebens wie künstlich es geschehe / wo nit die Trit recht darzü gebraucht werden / daher denn auch die alten Fechter so diß alles wol erwegen unnd erfahren / in ihrer zwölfften Regel setzen.
 
  
:''Wer Trit erst nach den Häuwen /<br/>Darff sich seiner kunst wenig frewen.''
+
:He who steps after striking<br/>deserves less joy in his art.
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/67|3|lbl=Ⅰ.23v.3}}
  
Derwegen ein jeder streich sein eigen Trit muß haben / welcher zugleich mit dem streich soll ge'''[XXIIIIr]'''schehen / wiltu anderst etwas mit deinen stucken welcher du dich gebrauchest außrichten / den Trittestu zu frü oder zu spat / so ist es umb dein stuck geschehen / unnd bringest dich also selbst umb deine Häuw / darumb so lerne du die Trit recht machen / damit deinem gegenfechter sein stuck nit wie er gern wolt / könne von stat bringen / sonder das du ihm das Erdrich? oder platz gleich sam abstelest. Im angreiffen nun laß dich also mercken / unnd stelle dich als woltestu grosse un weite tritt thun / so du doch in der warheit mit den Füssen nahet bleibest / hergegen aber wan er vermeinet du wollest gemach zu ihm tretten / so sey du geschwindt an ihm mit weiten tritten / und greiff ihn an / den es ist hier an sovil gelegen / das auch alle die so Fechten gelernt und dasselbig gebraucht / solches müssen bekennen.
+
|-
 +
|
 +
| <p>That is that every strike must have its own step which shall occur at the same time as the strike, if you would do otherwise with the elements which you resort to, then step too early or too late, thus it happens around your play, and you thus bring yourself around your strike, thus learn to make the steps right so that your opponent cannot work as he really wants, bringing on a stop, particularly so that you upset his grounding or place as it were. In attacking now let yourself mark this, and position yourself as if you would make large and far steps, but actually stay closer with your feet correct, and attack him. So much is then built on from here. Since all of this must be learned and used in fencing, this must be known.</p>
 +
|
 +
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/67|4|lbl=Ⅰ.23v.4|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/68|1|lbl=Ⅰ.24r.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
| class="noline" | The steps are done in three different ways, firstly backward and forward, what these are can’t be clarified much as one namely steps to or from someone. The other ones are the steps to the sides which are delineated through a triangle, namely thus: Stand in a straight line with your right foot before your opponent, and with the left behind the right step toward his left, this is the first. The second which is done double you do thus: Step as before with the right foot against his left, then follow with the left behind the right somewhat to the side to his left, and then again with the right farther to his left. The third type is the broken or stolen steps, these are accomplished thus, stand yourself as if you would step forward with your right foot, but as and when you go low, then step back with it behind the other foot. Since these are the same as described in Rapier, I will thus leave it for now.
+
| class="noline" | <p>The steps are done in three different ways, firstly backward and forward, what these are can’t be clarified much as one namely steps to or from someone. The other ones are the steps to the sides which are delineated through a triangle, namely thus: Stand in a straight line with your right foot before your opponent, and with the left behind the right step toward his left, this is the first. The second which is done double you do thus: Step as before with the right foot against his left, then follow with the left behind the right somewhat to the side to his left, and then again with the right farther to his left. The third type is the broken or stolen steps, these are accomplished thus, stand yourself as if you would step forward with your right foot, but as and when you go low, then step back with it behind the other foot. Since these are the same as described in Rapier, I will thus leave it for now.</p>
| class="noline" | Der Trit aber seind drey fürneme underscheidt / Erstlich hindersich und fürsich / was diese sein darff nit vil erklerens / wann nemlich einer zu oder vom Mann trit. Zum andern seind auch trit auff die seiten / welche werden durch den Triangel abgetheilt / memlich also. Stehe auff gerater Lini mit dem rechten Fuß vor dem gegenman / und trit mit dem Lincken hinder deim Rechten / gegen seiner Lincken / und diser ist der Einfach. Der ander so doppelt gemacht helt sich also / Trit wie vor mit dem rechten Fuß gegen seiner Lincken / folg denn mit dem Lincken hinder dem Rechten gegen seiner lincken etwas zur seiten / unnd dann zum dritten mit dem Rechten wider seiner Lincken zu. Zum dritte seind die gebrochne oder verstolene Tritt / die werden also volbracht / stell dich als woltestu mit dem einen Füß vortretten / ehe und den du in aber nider setzest / so trit wider mit im hindersich zuruck hinder den andern Fuß / Diese dieweil sie eigentlich in das Rappier gehören / so will ichs daselbest hin sparen.
+
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/68|2|lbl=Ⅰ.24r.2}}
  
 
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! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>Figures</p>
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the 1570)}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
+
! <p>{{rating|C}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}</p>
+
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Of Before, After, During, and Just As<br/>Chapt. 8.'''
+
| <p>'''Of Before, After, During, and Just As'''</p>
Up until now the proper Leading parts of all Fencing with the Sword, how many they were, how you named them, and how they shall be made and accomplished were actually clarified in good order, that from them now you can drive from your place as it were, and bring these elements into play.
+
 
| '''[XXIIIIv] Vom Vor / Nach / Gleich und Indeß.<br/>Cap. 8.'''
+
<p>Chapter 8</p>
NAch dem bißher die rechte Hauptstuck des gantzen Fechtens im Schwerdt / wie vil jr seind / wie sie geheissen / gemacht und volbracht sollen werden / eigentlich in guter ordnung erklert / so were nun an dem das du gleichsam auff den platz gefürt / solche stückle ins werck zubringen.
+
 
 +
<p>Up until now the proper Leading parts of all Fencing with the Sword, how many they were, how you named them, and how they shall be made and accomplished were actually clarified in good order, that from them now you can drive from your place as it were, and bring these elements into play.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/69|1|lbl=Ⅰ.24v.1}}
  
 
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|  
 
|  
| Meanwhile however your opponent has observed this as well, so be prepared, that you too can oppose all such, that is from noting how you know first with what opportunities you can approach him, then evaluate the opportunity and use it appropriately in the fight, which you practice daily, but at all times know that no element will ever be as good as intended, which is to be useful in the fight, if it is off track and not to proper time.
+
| <p>Meanwhile however your opponent has observed this as well, so be prepared, that you too can oppose all such, that is from noting how you know first with what opportunities you can approach him, then evaluate the opportunity and use it appropriately in the fight, which you practice daily, but at all times know that no element will ever be as good as intended, which is to be useful in the fight, if it is off track and not to proper time.</p>
| Dieweil aber dein gegenpart gleichfals disen bericht haben mag / den du gefasser / unnd dir solches alles auch kann begegnen / so ist von nöten das du zuvor wissest mit was gelegenheit du jme zukommen mögest / Dann wie vil an der gelegenheit / unnd sonderlich im Fechten gelegen / bezeigt die tägliche erfahrung / sintemal kein stuck es sey wie gut es jimmer wolle / wol mag nützlich gefochten werden / wo es nit angewendet wirt zu gelgner zeit.  
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/69|2|lbl=Ⅰ.24v.2}}
  
 
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|  
 
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| Thus because of this pay attention in all three parts to all things, namely in pre-fencing or the onset, in the middle or handwork, and following thereafter in withdrawing, to the Before, During, After, and Just As, which if not heeded will be of no help in fencing.
+
| <p>Thus because of this pay attention in all three parts to all things, namely in pre-fencing or the onset, in the middle or handwork, and following thereafter in withdrawing, to the Before, During, After, and Just As, which if not heeded will be of no help in fencing.</p>
| So hab nun derwegen acht in allen dreyen theilen eines jeden stucks / nemlich im zufechten oder angreiffen / im mittel oder handtarbeit / und hernach volgendt im abziehen auff das Vor / Gleich / Nach / und Indes / welcher brauch dir nit ein geringer behilff im Fechten sein wirt.  
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/69|3|lbl=Ⅰ.24v.3}}
  
 
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|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The Before is so named as you attack the opponent with your strikes first and then drive forward that he cannot come to his intended target, so you must displace with care, as he wants to shoot before you do.
+
| <p>The Before is so named as you attack the opponent with your strikes first and then drive forward that he cannot come to his intended target, so you must displace with care, as he wants to shoot before you do.</p>
| Das Vor wirt genenet so du den Mann mit deinem Hauwen am ersten angriffen / und ferner dahin treibest das er zu seinem fürnemen oder stuck nicht kommen kann / sonder mit versetzen sich engsten muß / damit er sich vor dir beschützen möge.  
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/69|4|lbl=Ⅰ.24v.4}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The During is when both you and your opponent bring forth your strikes at the same time, which is also a part of the expression “Just As”.
+
| <p>The During is when both you and your opponent bring forth your strikes at the same time, which is also a part of the expression “Just As”.</p>
| Das Gleich ist / wenn beide du und dein gegenpart eines sins zugleich mit einander ewer häw volbringet / welches auch im wort Indes verfast ist.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/69|5|lbl=Ⅰ.24v.5}}
  
 
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|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The After is, however, when you withdraw from your opponent as was outlined above, where you cannot accomplish your objective, in that between Before and After a stand off changes and ends, so that soon your opponent and soon again you, become the same. Whichever is in the After, that is striving so that he always must displace, shall think of the words “Just As”, and thereon not forget, that through them the Before will again be achieved, that he then can withdraw without damage, however he who does not pay attention to this, if he too soon undertakes to strive to you, will indeed never learn to fence well.
+
| <p>The After is, however, when you withdraw from your opponent as was outlined above, where you cannot accomplish your objective, in that between Before and After a stand off changes and ends, so that soon your opponent and soon again you, become the same. Whichever is in the After, that is striving so that he always must displace, shall think of the words “Just As”, and thereon not forget, that through them the Before will again be achieved, that he then can withdraw without damage, however he who does not pay attention to this, if he too soon undertakes to strive to you, will indeed never learn to fence well.</p>
| Das Nach aber ist / wenn du von deinem gegenman wie oben angezeigt ubereilet würst / das du dein fürnemen nicht magst volbringen / ist also zwischen dem Vor unnd Nach ein stetes ab'''[XXVr]'''wechseln und verenderung / den jetzo bald dein gegenpart / bald wider du / dasselbig bekommest. Welcher aber das Nach hat / das ist / dahin getrungen / das er jmmer versetzen muß / sol des worts Indes wol eingedenck sein / und dessen nicht vergessen / dann dardurch muß er das Vor wider ereilen / will er anderst ohn schaden abziehen / wer aber darauff achtung nicht gibt / ob er sich schon hefftig brauchet / wirt er doch nimmer etwas guts lernen Fechten.
+
|
 +
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/69|6|lbl=Ⅰ.24v.6|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/70|1|lbl=Ⅰ.25r.1|p=1}}
  
 
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| '''Just As'''
+
| <p>'''Just As'''</p>
The expression “Just As” has much meaning in that its origin is from the latin word “Intus” and is taken into fencing as such, which is applied in the Winding and similar work, however that this seem not only thus, you must hear what follows.
+
 
Indes.
+
<p>The expression “Just As” has much meaning in that its origin is from the latin word “Intus” and is taken into fencing as such, which is applied in the Winding and similar work, however that this seem not only thus, you must hear what follows.</p>
| '''Indes'''
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/70|2|lbl=Ⅰ.25r.2}}
Das wort Indes haben vil verstanden sam het es sein ursprung von dem Latinischen wörtlein Intus / und begreiffe das inwendig Fechten in sich / welches aus den Winden und dergleichen arbeit herkompt / aber das diß nit also sey / würstu folgends hören.
 
 
   
 
   
 
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| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
| class="noline" | The expression “Intus” and what it means I will let remain Latin, however the expression “Indes” (Just As) is a good German expression and has in itself an important meaning to handy application, that one always and quickly take care, as in when you at first slash to the left, to then at the same time observe the opening to the right, then thirdly on to make sure that you attain the observed opening, where or with what actions you want to come unto it, that you don’t then make openings for your opponent and take damage. Thus retain the meaning of “Just As” so that you observe sharply, which can be much observing and undertaking, also seek to learn faking to your opponent sufficiently, since he needs to have senses in his part, and similarly what Openings you will bring, and where you will be open. Then in all these things to which the expression “Just As” has meaning, stands the whole art of fencing (as Liechtenauer said) and where you don’t undertake such to carefully and securely drive all strikes, will you advance lightly to your damage, as then all fencers will observe, which one thus overpowers and (as one said) tops out and nullifies as wanted.
+
| class="noline" | <p>The expression “Intus” and what it means I will let remain Latin, however the expression “Indes” (Just As) is a good German expression and has in itself an important meaning to handy application, that one always and quickly take care, as in when you at first slash to the left, to then at the same time observe the opening to the right, then thirdly on to make sure that you attain the observed opening, where or with what actions you want to come unto it, that you don’t then make openings for your opponent and take damage. Thus retain the meaning of “Just As” so that you observe sharply, which can be much observing and undertaking, also seek to learn faking to your opponent sufficiently, since he needs to have senses in his part, and similarly what Openings you will bring, and where you will be open. Then in all these things to which the expression “Just As” has meaning, stands the whole art of fencing (as Liechtenauer said) and where you don’t undertake such to carefully and securely drive all strikes, will you advance lightly to your damage, as then all fencers will observe, which one thus overpowers and (as one said) tops out and nullifies as wanted.</p>
| class="noline" | Das wörtlein Intus was es bedeutet laß ich den Latinis bleiben / aber das wörtlein Indes ist ein gut Teutsch wörtlein / un hat in sich ein ernstliche vermanung zu behender bedechtlichkeit / das einer alweg und geschwindt besonnen sey / als wan du erstlich in dem du zur Lincken schlechst / zum andern auch zugleich mit zur Rechten die Blös sehest / Denn zum dreitten ebenso wol warnemest so du der ersehenen Blöß zueiles / wo oder mit was stucken man dir zukommen möge / auff das du dich nicht an deines widerparts Blösse vergreiffest / und des schaden nemest. Also ermanet dich das wörtlein Indes / das du ein scharpff gesicht habest / welches zumal vil ersehen und warnemen / auch an deines gegenmans geberde gnugsam erlernen mögest / was für stuck er zu gebrauchen im sinn habe / und was dieselbige für Blösse mit sich bringen / und wo sie sich eröffnen werden. Dann in disen dingen allen welcher dich das wörtlein Indes ermanet / stehetalle kunst des Fechten (wie Lichtenawer sagt) unnd wo du solches nit warnimst / bedacht und fürsichtig alle Häuw führest / wirst leichtlich zu deinem schaden anlauffen / wie dann an allen Fechteren zusehen / welche einen also uberpolderen und (wie man sagt) oben aus und nirgent an wollen.
+
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/70|3|lbl=Ⅰ.25r.3}}
  
 
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{{master subsection begin
 
{{master subsection begin
  | title = 9 - A Guide to the [Previous] Elements
+
  | title = 9 - A Guide to the Elements
 
  | width = 90em
 
  | width = 90em
 
}}
 
}}
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|-  
 
! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>Figures</p>
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the 1570)}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
+
! <p>{{rating|C}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}</p>
+
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''A Guide to the Elements, how you can and shall be successful from the elements previously clarified.<br/>Chapt. 9'''
+
| <p>'''A Guide to the Elements, how you can and shall be successful from the elements previously clarified.'''</p>
While up till now all these cited and clarified elements are actually nothing other than a start and elementary part of all Fencing with swords and shall be taken as such, then note how and when I sieze various elements from here before showing with what ease these shall be undertaken. Now you must retain all writings in your thoughts and memory, also know thoroughly what each and every art and distinction is, thus you will come to write a fully correct word, that from here on serviceable and heeded letters will flow orderly one to another from the quill. Thus shall you also retain the previously clarified elements, and that way you realise as often as you come to fence with someone, you will fail with anything other than this, thus success will come from taking note. However, just like every letter cannot be applied to each and every word, thus it is also impossible to undertake all the previously cited elements in every engagement.
+
 
| '''[XXVv] Anleitung auf die stuck / wie sie können und sollen aus den bißher erklehrten stücken gemacht werden.<br/>Cap. 9'''
+
<p>Chapter 9</p>
WEil diese bißher erzelte und erklerte stuck eigentlich nichts anders seind / denn ein anfang und Elemental daraus alle Fechtstuck des Schwerdts können genommen werden / so ist von nöten das ehe und denn ich etliche stuck hierauß ziehe / zuvor anzeig auff was weiß dis sol beschehen / Wie du denn nun alle Buchstaben wol must in dein gedechtnis und Memorj fassen / auch was eines jeden art und eigenschafft ist gründtlich wissen / so du ein recht wort wilt gantz schreiben / damit dir ddiesehierzu dienstlich und gehörige Buchstaben ordenlich nach einander in die feder fliessen. Also soltu auch die bißher erklerte stuck wol fassen / und dir dermassen einbilden / das so offt du mit einem zu Fechten kommest / dir als dann diese fürfallen / so dazumal von nöhten sein werden. Weil aber zu einem oder jeglichen wort nit alle Buchstaben können gebraucht werden / so ist auch unmöglich alle nun erzelte stuck zumal fürnemen wollen in jeglichem stuck.
+
 
 +
<p>While up till now all these cited and clarified elements are actually nothing other than a start and elementary part of all Fencing with swords and shall be taken as such, then note how and when I sieze various elements from here before showing with what ease these shall be undertaken. Now you must retain all writings in your thoughts and memory, also know thoroughly what each and every art and distinction is, thus you will come to write a fully correct word, that from here on serviceable and heeded letters will flow orderly one to another from the quill. Thus shall you also retain the previously clarified elements, and that way you realise as often as you come to fence with someone, you will fail with anything other than this, thus success will come from taking note. However, just like every letter cannot be applied to each and every word, thus it is also impossible to undertake all the previously cited elements in every engagement.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/71|1|lbl=Ⅰ.25v.1}}
  
 
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| Therefore you shall pay attention, as the situation requires, to how your opponent poses against you, and also observe the person, if they are quick or slow, large or small, and then know how to apply your work to him and how to oppose him. Just as every full fight, as was indicated above, is divided into three parts, namely the Pre-Fencing, the Middle, and the Withdrawal, these three parts are clarified in due order, and what is advised in every undertaking, thus in the beginning your first need is various strikes through the stances, with which you will best engage and overtake your opponent as intended, and in the first phase when you engage and close to him, or maybe come to be under his sword, then forward you must have still more moves with which to bring the part to its conclusion, which you then learn from the second section of this book, namely the Handwork, that you force ahead to all four openings, and he then cannot come to do damaging work to you, or similarly as when you have made it sufficiently ineffective.
+
| <p>Therefore you shall pay attention, as the situation requires, to how your opponent poses against you, and also observe the person, if they are quick or slow, large or small, and then know how to apply your work to him and how to oppose him. Just as every full fight, as was indicated above, is divided into three parts, namely the Pre-Fencing, the Middle, and the Withdrawal, these three parts are clarified in due order, and what is advised in every undertaking, thus in the beginning your first need is various strikes through the stances, with which you will best engage and overtake your opponent as intended, and in the first phase when you engage and close to him, or maybe come to be under his sword, then forward you must have still more moves with which to bring the part to its conclusion, which you then learn from the second section of this book, namely the Handwork, that you force ahead to all four openings, and he then cannot come to do damaging work to you, or similarly as when you have made it sufficiently ineffective.</p>
| Derhalben soltu acht haben wie es die sachen erfordert / wie sich dein widerpart gegen dir stellet / auch warnemen wie die person / ob sie geschwindt oder langsam / groß oder klein sey / unnd hiernach deine arbeit wissen zugebrauchen unnd jhm zubegegnen. Sintemal ein jegliches gantz Fechtstuck wie oben angezeigt / in drey theil abgesondert ist / nemlich in das zufechten Mittel und abziehen / unnd diese drey theil der ordnung nach erklert / was in einem jeden warzunemen angezeigt / so mustu im zugang durch die Leger erstlich etlich häuw brauchen / mit welchen du dein gegenpart am besten vermeinest anzugreiffen und zu ubereilen / un wenn du denn im ersten theil an'''[XXVIr]''griffen und zu jhm / oder villeicht under sein Schwerdt komen bist / so mustu ferner noch mehr stuck haben / damit das gantze stuck vollendt werde / welches du denn aus dem andern theil diß Buchs lernest / nemlich der Handtarbeit / auff das du jhn ferner zu allen vier Blössen tringest / unnd er dir zu keiner schädlichen arbeit kommen möge / oder dergleiche stuck wie du denn der alda überflüssig gnug hast.
+
|
 +
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/71|2|lbl=Ⅰ.25v.2|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/72|1|lbl=Ⅰ.26r.1|p=1}}
  
 
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| And in order to bring the engagement to its end, you must lastly add more letters to this word, and seek onward to the third section of this book, how the engagement shall be ended, and you withdraw without damage, or your opponent allowed one.
+
| <p>And in order to bring the engagement to its end, you must lastly add more letters to this word, and seek onward to the third section of this book, how the engagement shall be ended, and you withdraw without damage, or your opponent allowed one.</p>
| Und das du denn das stuck zu endt bringest / mustu letzlich mehr Buchstaben zu disem wort haben / unnd ferner im dritten theil des Buchs suchen / wie diß stuck möchte vollendt werden / und du ohne schaden könnest abziehen / oder deinem gegenfechter ein letz lassen.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/72|2|lbl=Ⅰ.26r.2}}
  
 
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| Because of this see that you then force the Middle Work, that you first come to withdraw though defense, as then much will be learned in various engagements, or you incite so that he strikes you away and then at the same time you strike over his sword while stepping out, and justifiably want to take and claim your withdrawal. So that with this you will understand it entirely, I will present an entire engagement in all three parts.
+
| <p>Because of this see that you then force the Middle Work, that you first come to withdraw though defense, as then much will be learned in various engagements, or you incite so that he strikes you away and then at the same time you strike over his sword while stepping out, and justifiably want to take and claim your withdrawal. So that with this you will understand it entirely, I will present an entire engagement in all three parts.</p>
| Derowegen so sihe das du in der Mittelarbeit jhn also trengest / das du ehe ers gewahr werde zum abzug kommest / wie denn in sonderlichen stucken vil davon gelehrt wirdt / oder jhn reitzest das er dir abhauwe / damit du jhm zuglich Oben uber sein Schwerdt mit austretten zuhauwest / unnd füglichen deinen abzug nehmen und holen mögest / solches damit du es gantz eigentlich verstehn mögest / will ich dir ein gantz stuck von allen dreyen dingen fürstellen.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/72|3|lbl=Ⅰ.26r.3}}
  
 
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| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
| class="noline" | In the pre-fencing come into the right Changer, pay attention that as soon as his sword shows bearing to strike, then before him nimbly strike through above you, and strike with a Traverse from your right at the same time as his, in the strike step on to his left side, if he drives his strike directly at your head, then hit with your Traverse to his left ear, however mark that he doesn’t strike straight to your head by winding his strike with the long edge against your Traverse in the displacement, thus pull the strike with a long Traverse nimbly to his right ear, step just then with your left foot to his right, now you have attacked out of the change with two traverse strikes to each side over against the other. This you take now from the first part to this attack, Forward you will step on to Middle work, then bring yourself to the other part thus, if he slashes from your sword over to the other side, then move after him with a cut against his arm, hit with the strong of your blade, or with your hilt in a jerk away from you, just as he still threatens from the thrust, and still has not yet reached you, then drive to rush out with crossed arms and slash him with the short edge over his right arm to his head; and so that when he reaches you from the thrust, but where he stops you and sweeps away through displacing, then let your sword fly off again, and traverse to his left ear while you step away with your left foot; or where he doesn’t go off or slash around, but stays with the cut or long edge outward, then loop your sword so that your half edge comes at his, ride his sword thus on your right side, but just then let it clip off into the air, so that your hands come together again crosswise high over your head, to then slash him as before, as he reaches from the ride with the short edge over his head, step back following with the left foot, and strike a high traversing middle strike with the long edge from your right to his half, and just as it glides, then pull off to your right with a high strike. Thus you see now how there’s always one part after the other, the application and ordering through must be conceived and executed together, which makes up an entire part of Fencing. Lastly mark here also that the entire engagement can be completed in two or three strikes, where you rush to engage in the first strike, and with the second strike off again and in this strike commit either to the first or last meeting, which needs to be undertaken correctly, or you will lead on there to a third strike. Namely engage with the first, follow after with a second, but when the proper time such must be shown, that you have something worth saying, then mark how one speaks such that you will learn yourself, after which you will learn all other parts in fencing and here on retain your lessons with diligence.
+
| class="noline" | <p>In the pre-fencing come into the right Changer, pay attention that as soon as his sword shows bearing to strike, then before him nimbly strike through above you, and strike with a Traverse from your right at the same time as his, in the strike step on to his left side, if he drives his strike directly at your head, then hit with your Traverse to his left ear, however mark that he doesn’t strike straight to your head by winding his strike with the long edge against your Traverse in the displacement, thus pull the strike with a long Traverse nimbly to his right ear, step just then with your left foot to his right, now you have attacked out of the change with two traverse strikes to each side over against the other. This you take now from the first part to this attack, Forward you will step on to Middle work, then bring yourself to the other part thus, if he slashes from your sword over to the other side, then move after him with a cut against his arm, hit with the strong of your blade, or with your hilt in a jerk away from you, just as he still threatens from the thrust, and still has not yet reached you, then drive to rush out with crossed arms and slash him with the short edge over his right arm to his head; and so that when he reaches you from the thrust, but where he stops you and sweeps away through displacing, then let your sword fly off again, and traverse to his left ear while you step away with your left foot; or where he doesn’t go off or slash around, but stays with the cut or long edge outward, then loop your sword so that your half edge comes at his, ride his sword thus on your right side, but just then let it clip off into the air, so that your hands come together again crosswise high over your head, to then slash him as before, as he reaches from the ride with the short edge over his head, step back following with the left foot, and strike a high traversing middle strike with the long edge from your right to his half, and just as it glides, then pull off to your right with a high strike. Thus you see now how there’s always one part after the other, the application and ordering through must be conceived and executed together, which makes up an entire part of Fencing. Lastly mark here also that the entire engagement can be completed in two or three strikes, where you rush to engage in the first strike, and with the second strike off again and in this strike commit either to the first or last meeting, which needs to be undertaken correctly, or you will lead on there to a third strike. Namely engage with the first, follow after with a second, but when the proper time such must be shown, that you have something worth saying, then mark how one speaks such that you will learn yourself, after which you will learn all other parts in fencing and here on retain your lessons with diligence.</p>
| class="noline" | Im zufechten komm in rechten Wechsel / hab acht so bald er sein Schwerdt auffzeucht zum streich / so streich behend vor jm ubersich durch / und Hauw mit einer Zwirch von deiner Rechten zugleich mit jhm eyn / im Hauw trit wol auff sein Lincke seiten / fehrt er mit seinem Hauw gerad zu deinem Kopff / so triffestu jhm mit der Zwirch an sein linkc Ohr / merckest du aber das er nit gerad zu deinem Kopff Hauwet / sonder verwendt sein Hauw mit Langer schneidt gegen deiner Zwirch zur versatzung / so Hauwe ehe es rürt mit langer Zwirch / behend zu seinem Rechten ohr / trit Indes mit deinem lincken Fus wol umb zu seiner Rechten / jetz hastu angriffen aus dem Wechsel mit zweyen Zwirchhäuwen / zu beiden seiten gegen einander uber. Diß nimstu nun aus dem ersten theil / zu disem angriff / Ferner wiltu zur Mittelarbeit tretten / so hilfft dir das ander '''[XXVIv]''' theil also / schlecht er von deinem Schwerdt umb zur andern seiten / so reiß jhm nach mit dem Schnit auff sein Arm / truck jhn mit der sterck deiner klingen / oder mit deinem Schilt in einem ruck von dir / in dem er vom stoß noch dammelt / und sich noch nit erholet hat / so fahr in eil also mit gekreuzigten armen auff / und schlag jhn mit kurtzer schneidt uber seim rechten Arm auff sein Kopff / und solches wie bemelt ehe er sich vom stoß erholet / wo er sich aber erhielte unnd zur versatzung auffwischte / so laß dein Schwerdt wider abfliegen / unnd zwirch mit einem abtrit deines lincken Fuß zu seinem Lincken ohr / oder wo er nit abgehet oder umbschlecht / sonder bleibt mit dem Schnit oder Langer Schneid darauff / so verkehr dein Schwerdt das dein halb schneidan sein komme / riß jhm also sein Schwerdt auß auff dein Rechte seiten / in dessen aber laß in der lufft umbschnappen / damit deine hende hohe uber dein haupt wider kreutzweiß zusamen kommen / als dann schlag jhn wie vor / ehe er sich vom riß erholet mit kurtzer schneid auff sein Kopff / volgendt trit mit dem Lincken fuß zu ruck / und Hauw ein uberzwerchen Mittelhauw / mit Langer schneiden von deiner Rechten zu seinem halß / und in dem es glützt / so ziehe zu seiner Rechten mit hohen streichen ab. Also sihestu nun wie jmmer ein stuck nach dem andern / der gelegenheit und notturft nach muß gebraucht und zusamen gesetzt werden / biß das ein gantz Fechtstuck gemacht werde. Hie merck aber letzlichen / das auch gantze stuck nur mit zweyen oder dreyen streichen können vollendt werden / als da du mit dem ersten streich in eil angreiffst / und mit dem andern wider abhauwest / und in disen streichen entweders mit dem ersten oder letzten triffst / mit welchen es am füglichsten mag beschehen / oder da du es mit dreien Häwen volfürest / mit dem ersten nemlich angreiffst / den andern nachfolgest / wenn aber / und zu welcher gelegner zeit solches muß beschehen / ist hie on not davon zu sagen / der Marck wie man spricht / wirt dich solches selbst wol leren / nach dem du alle andere Fechtstuck hierin begriffen mit fleiß erlernest.
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{{master subsection begin
 
{{master subsection begin
  | title = 10 - How one shall fence to the four Openings
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  | title = 10 - How One Shall Fence to the Four Openings
 
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! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>Figures</p>
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the 1570)}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
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! <p>{{rating|C}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}</p>
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! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
  
 
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword A.jpg|center|400px]]
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword A.png|center|400px]]
| '''How one shall fence to the four Openings<br/>Chapt. 10'''
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| <p>'''How one shall fence to the four Openings'''</p>
While up until now, artful reader, my attentive clarification of all servicable elements of sword fighting, such that each would be seriously raised by diligent practice, will be sufficient guide to understand all parts set after here, therefore I will now go forward to show, in one Stance after another, how one will behave therein and also how all fencing from it shall be. While forward you will come to judge all your strikes and actions from or against Man’s four divisions, following on you must similarly be prepared to address the four openings, necessary to go on to the onset of Fencing from the stances. That I properly report on this part, I will now set out and give the following example:
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| '''[XXVIIrv] Wie man nach den vier Blössen fechten sol.<br/>Cap. 10.'''
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<p>Chapter 10</p>
DIeweil nun bißher günstiger Leser / alle zum Schwerdt Fechten dienstlich stuck meines erachtens dermassen erklert / also das ein jeglicher dem ernst sein wirt / solches neben fleissiger übung zu erwegen / gnugsame anleitung alle nach gesetzte stuck zuverstehn haben wirt / derhalben will ich nun ferner ein Leger nach dem andern / wie man sich darinen verhalten und au deren einem jeden Fechten sol / anzeigen / Zuvor aber dieweil alle deine Häuw und stuck / auff oder gegen die vier theil des Manns gericht werden sollen / hergegen du auch derselbigen von gemelten vier theilen gewertig sein must / ist derhalben nötig zum eingang des Fechtens auß den Legern / das ich von disem stuck eigentlichen bericht / welches ich durch folgende Exempel dargeben und setzen will / und erstlich:
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<p>While up until now, artful reader, my attentive clarification of all servicable elements of sword fighting, such that each would be seriously raised by diligent practice, will be sufficient guide to understand all parts set after here, therefore I will now go forward to show, in one Stance after another, how one will behave therein and also how all fencing from it shall be. While forward you will come to judge all your strikes and actions from or against Man’s four divisions, following on you must similarly be prepared to address the four openings, necessary to go on to the onset of Fencing from the stances. That I properly report on this part, I will now set out and give the following example:</p>
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/75|1|lbl=Ⅰ.27v.1}}
  
 
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| In the pre-fencing when you come near to your opponent, then strike out in front of him from your right, through his face one time, twice, thrice, so that in the third strike before him (see that you keep your left foot forward) come into the long point, from there let the forward part of your blade flow off to your left, and just then with your blade level and sinking below you, pull back under it with your grip above you, step and strike first from your right against his left ear, as soon as the strike hits on, then quickly twitch to fly off again, and strike the second from below diagonally against his right arm, however in this strike keep your cross high over your head, and step to him with your left foot a little to his right together with your strike from below, and hit on with this as well, should you nimbly move your sword over you to your right, and thus from your right strike to his lower left opening, as the right is pulled or hit then twitch off again to over your head, and strike the fourth seriously against his right ear, from then traverse over and pull out. The first four Strikes shall be nimble and quick from one opening to another for your steps to be successful.
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| <p>In the pre-fencing when you come near to your opponent, then strike out in front of him from your right, through his face one time, twice, thrice, so that in the third strike before him (see that you keep your left foot forward) come into the long point, from there let the forward part of your blade flow off to your left, and just then with your blade level and sinking below you, pull back under it with your grip above you, step and strike first from your right against his left ear, as soon as the strike hits on, then quickly twitch to fly off again, and strike the second from below diagonally against his right arm, however in this strike keep your cross high over your head, and step to him with your left foot a little to his right together with your strike from below, and hit on with this as well, should you nimbly move your sword over you to your right, and thus from your right strike to his lower left opening, as the right is pulled or hit then twitch off again to over your head, and strike the fourth seriously against his right ear, from then traverse over and pull out. The first four Strikes shall be nimble and quick from one opening to another for your steps to be successful.</p>
| Im zufechten wann du kloffters nehe zum Man kommest / so streiche von deiner Rechten vor jhm auff / durch sein gesicht ein mal zwey drey / also das du im driten auffstreichen vor jm (doch das du mit deinm Linkcen fuß vor bleibest) in das Lang ort kommest / von dannen laß das vordertheil deiner klingen gegen deiner Lincken ablauffen / unnd in dem dein klingen eben im undersich sincekn ist / so ziehe under des dein hefft übersich / trit und hauwe den ersten von deiner Rechten gegen seinem Lincken ohr / als bald solcher Hauw antroffen / so bald zuck in einem flug wider ab / und hauwe den andern von Unden uberecke gegen seinem Rechten arm / zu solchem hauw aber bleib mit deinem kreutz hoch uber deinem Kopff / und trit mit deinem Lincken fuß zugleich mit solchem Underhauw / ein wenig gegen seiner Rechten zur seiten aus zu jhm / und so dieser auch antroffen / soltu behendt dein Schwerdt wider ubersich rucken gegen deiner Rechten / und also von deiner Rechten zu seiner Lincken undern Blösse hauwen / ehe das recht gerürt oder '''[XXVIIIr]''' getroffen so zuck wider ab umb dein Kopff / und hauwe den vierten schlims gegen seinem Rechten ohr / von dannen zwirch umb unnd zieh ab / Diese erste vier Häuw sollen behend unnd geschwint von einer Blöß zur andern sampt jhren tritten wolbracht werden.
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| However while in the onset there are three ways for your Sword or sword’s blade to hit and touch, firstly with the Long edge as was already taught, then with the Short, and lastly with the flat, therefore observe that you can also slash handily to all four openings with the short edge as well as you did before with the long, then still at the last with the flat, and similarly to what was shown before now with the half edge, fly freely from one opening to another, namely with the inward flat to the right, and slash with the outward (that is with reversed or inverted flat to his left).
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| <p>However while in the onset there are three ways for your Sword or sword’s blade to hit and touch, firstly with the Long edge as was already taught, then with the Short, and lastly with the flat, therefore observe that you can also slash handily to all four openings with the short edge as well as you did before with the long, then still at the last with the flat, and similarly to what was shown before now with the half edge, fly freely from one opening to another, namely with the inward flat to the right, and slash with the outward (that is with reversed or inverted flat to his left).</p>
| Dieweil aber das Schwerdt oder dein schwerdts klingen / im herführen zum hauwen fürnemlich auff dreyerley weiß antreffen und rühren mag / als erstlich mit Langer davon jetzt gelert / demnach mit kurtzer / und letzlichen mit der flech / derhalben will auch von nöten sein / das du die kurtze schneide eben als wol wie zu voren die Lange / behendiglich zu allen vier Blössenen führen könnest / demnoch auch zum letzsten mit der flech / gleichwol als wie jetz gemelt mit halber schneide / frey fliegendt von einer Blöß zur andern / nemlich mit der inwendigen flech zur Rechten / und mit der auswendigen das ist letzer oder ebichter flech zu seiner lincken) schlagen.
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword Segno.png|center]]
| However if you would become practiced in this, then you shall always change with the first strike, and when you first strike to his upper left opening, and then the second is to his lower right opening, and then further as taught above (as is shown by the outer digits in the printed figure), then you shall again strike first to his lower left, then a second to his upper right, and then further as the second set of digits in the previous figure show. The next strike is first struck to his upper right then to his lower left, then further as shown by the third set. The last strike is first struck to his right, then further as is shown by the inner digits, and first learn this as instructed with the long then with the half edge, then lastly with the flat as judged into the work. When you can do such, then follow ahead to the next part, namely that you must understand the four openings before the strikes just taught can be retained, or onward your sword’s blade will be held off and you will be repulsed with better countering strikes, these are thus the two Main Elements of Fencing, the Origins from which all other elements flow forth, onward follows the third, a large element which is and is named the Practice. One comes to the Practice thus: when you can lead your strikes from the stances to all of Man’s divisions, which in the First part of fencing must be taken in the Before thus into the work, and yet your opponent is the same, and is also nimble in the Second stage of displacing, working off or stopping you and your strikes, so that you cannot reach your chosen destination for your strikes, then we come thus to the Third part which is the Practice, which is the most cunning, and teach it as you did the strikes where you were aware, that while every point can be futile or pointless, twitch off closely and nimbly from there to strike again onward, or feint over to let it go off and then lead on to another opening. When he also displaces himself, then twitch off yourself as well, and thus let fly from one opening to another so long and much as you are able to reach to a hit. However, so that such lessons will be marked and understood , I will demonstrate with a few good examples so that my objective will be simply and distinctly taught, presented, and set out, with which the goodly Reader will sufficiently judge all secondary and ongoing elements, and thus can take understanding from it in the Middle work thus:  
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| <p>However if you would become practiced in this, then you shall always change with the first strike, and when you first strike to his upper left opening, and then the second is to his lower right opening, and then further as taught above (as is shown by the outer digits in the printed figure), then you shall again strike first to his lower left, then a second to his upper right, and then further as the second set of digits in the previous figure show. The next strike is first struck to his upper right then to his lower left, then further as shown by the third set. The last strike is first struck to his right, then further as is shown by the inner digits, and first learn this as instructed with the long then with the half edge, then lastly with the flat as judged into the work. When you can do such, then follow ahead to the next part, namely that you must understand the four openings before the strikes just taught can be retained, or onward your sword’s blade will be held off and you will be repulsed with better countering strikes, these are thus the two Main Elements of Fencing, the Origins from which all other elements flow forth, onward follows the third, a large element which is and is named the Practice. One comes to the Practice thus: when you can lead your strikes from the stances to all of Man’s divisions, which in the First part of fencing must be taken in the Before thus into the work, and yet your opponent is the same, and is also nimble in the Second stage of displacing, working off or stopping you and your strikes, so that you cannot reach your chosen destination for your strikes, then we come thus to the Third part which is the Practice, which is the most cunning, and teach it as you did the strikes where you were aware, that while every point can be futile or pointless, twitch off closely and nimbly from there to strike again onward, or feint over to let it go off and then lead on to another opening. When he also displaces himself, then twitch off yourself as well, and thus let fly from one opening to another so long and much as you are able to reach to a hit. However, so that such lessons will be marked and understood , I will demonstrate with a few good examples so that my objective will be simply and distinctly taught, presented, and set out, with which the goodly Reader will sufficiently judge all secondary and ongoing elements, and thus can take understanding from it in the Middle work thus:</p>
| Damit du aber solches dester geübter werdest / so soltu mit dem ersten hauw alwegen umbwechseln / also wann du einmal deinen ersten hauw zur Lincken obern Blöß / unnd den andern zu seiner Rechten undern Blöß / unnd also fürtan wie oben gelehrt (wie solches die ausserste ziffer in disem hiebey getrucktem Figürlein anzeigen) gehauwen hast / so soltu demnoch auch den ersten gegen seiner Lincken undern / den andern gegen seiner Rechten obern / und dann fürter wie die ander zal im gedachten Figürlein lehrt / darnach so hauwe den ersten zu seiner Rechten unden / den andern zu seiner Lincken oben / und also fürter wie dich die drit zal weist / zum letzten hauwe deinen ersten gegen seiner Rechten / und fürter wie solches die inere zal außweisset / unnd das alles lerne erstlich wie gemelt mit langer dan mit halber schneid / und letzlich mit der fleche in das werck richten / wandu nun solches wol kanst / so folget nu ferner das ander stuck / nemlich das du solche vier Blösse wissest vor solchen gelerte häuwen zu bewaren / und eintwederst die mit deiner schwerts klingen auffhaltest oder '''[XXVIIIv]''' welches besser mit gegen häuwen von dir abweisest / dises seind also die zwey Hauptstuck im Fechten / daraus alle ander stuck herfliessen un ist das Original / Ferner folget nun für das drit ein zufellig stuck welches eigentlich zu rede die Practick heißt und ist / welche Practick ist diese / wan du nun deine Häuw aus den Legern wol zu allen theilen des Mans führen kanst / welches das erste stuck im fechten so im Vor ins werck bracht werden muß / und aber dein gegenfechter ist gleich / und behend auch fertig mit dem andern stuck der versatzung / dir deine häuw im Nach abzuschaffen oder auff halten / damit du dein fürgenommen ziel mit solchen Häuwen nicht erreichen kanst / Derwegen kompt nun das dritte stuck das ist die Practick genant / welches ist der list / und lehrt dich wie du dein Häuw wo du gewahr wirst / das solche an einem ort vergeblich oder unfruchtbar seind / bald unnd behendig von dannen ehe dann solcher Hauw antrifft wider abzukest / oder fehl füruber gehen lassest / und den einer andern Blöß zuführest / will er daselbst auch versetzen / so zuck daselbst auch ab / und laß also verfliegen von einer Blös zur andern / so lang unnd vil biß du eine ereilen kanst zu treffen / Damit aber solches vom lernenden desterbas gemerckt und verstanden mag werden / will ich demselbigen zu gut etliche exempel so meines erachtens einfeltig unnd deutlich lehren / dargegen und setzen / aus welchen der gutherzig Leser gnugsamen bericht / allerley beyfellige und verführte stuck / so hievor in mitler arbeit erzelt / dieselbigen zuverstehn nehmen kann / also:
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| When you have struck as taught above in the Pre-Fencing, and have closed in the strike, then let the first and second hit on hard as above, then don’t let the third hit on, but twitch nimbly then hit off again in a backward flight, so that the fourth can thus hit on quickly.
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| <p>When you have struck as taught above in the Pre-Fencing, and have closed in the strike, then let the first and second hit on hard as above, then don’t let the third hit on, but twitch nimbly then hit off again in a backward flight, so that the fourth can thus hit on quickly.</p>
| Wann du im zufechten wie vor gelert auffgestrichen / und dich zum streich erholet hast / so lasse den ersten und den andern hart antreffen wie oben / den dritten aber lasse nicht antreffen / sonder verzuck den behend ehe dann solcher trifft wider ab in eim flug zu ruck / auff das du den vierten dester geschwinder und eher antreffen könnest.
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| Note: hit the first and twitch the second and the third in a quick flight, and let the fourth hit, still likewise launch the first and second bites to the Openings, and indeed twitch them off again and then lead into the next target, in this disengagement you can and also should attack with the first, changing off to things taught before in the numbered lessons, namely that you now twitch and feint from this then to another, and meanwhile still have care and attention where he would engage your own openings, that you then soon be on his sword with a bind, from this twitching now move farther on to Flowing Off and Missing and the like. Thus when you would lead a strike to the man’s now known sections, and yet then take care that he displaces such strikes, then don’t twitch off again, but (in that he is unaware of your observance) then close by the same side miss to let it fully flow off on over and strike nimbly to another opening, being first on the outside right (what you led with). Example:
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| <p>Note: hit the first and twitch the second and the third in a quick flight, and let the fourth hit, still likewise launch the first and second bites to the Openings, and indeed twitch them off again and then lead into the next target, in this disengagement you can and also should attack with the first, changing off to things taught before in the numbered lessons, namely that you now twitch and feint from this then to another, and meanwhile still have care and attention where he would engage your own openings, that you then soon be on his sword with a bind, from this twitching now move farther on to Flowing Off and Missing and the like. Thus when you would lead a strike to the man’s now known sections, and yet then take care that he displaces such strikes, then don’t twitch off again, but (in that he is unaware of your observance) then close by the same side miss to let it fully flow off on over and strike nimbly to another opening, being first on the outside right (what you led with). Example:</p>
| '''[XXIXr]''' Item triffe den ersten / unnd verzucke den andern und den dritten in einem geschwinden flug / unn lasse den vierten treffen / eben desgleichen trauwe den ersten unnd den andern biß an die Blösse / und verzucke doch solches wider ab / und führe den der andern nechsten Blösse eine zu / in dieser verzuckung kanstu / und solt sie auch mit dem ersten angreiffen / aller ding wie hievor in der ziffer gelehrt abwechseln / nemlich das du jetz an dieser dann an einer andern abzuckest unnd verfehlen lassest / und under des gleichwol fürsorg und auffmerckens habest / wo er dir jrgendt zur Blöß würde einfallen / das du jm bald von solchem verzucken mit dem Bandt an seinem schwerdt seyest / aus disem verzucken fleußt nun weiter das Ablauffen und Fehlen unnd dergleichen / Also wann du ein hauw dieser obgedachten theilen des Mans eine zuführest / und aber in dem du gewahr würst / das er solchen Hauw versetzen / so zuckest du gleichwol nicht wider ab / sonder (auf das er deines vermerckens nicht gewahr werde) so lasse neben der selben seiten vollen fehl füruber ablauffen / unnd Hauwe jhm behende zu einer andern Blöß / ehe dann ers recht (was du führest) innen wirt / Exempel:
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| As you have rebounded through the out stretching to the strikes as was taught above, then step and strike high from your right against his left ear, as soon as he clears this, nimbly let your blade sink below you with the half edge near your left side, and then pull your pommel and grip above you, and nimbly strike to his right ear with the short edge, so that your hands become crossed in this strike.
+
| <p>As you have rebounded through the out stretching to the strikes as was taught above, then step and strike high from your right against his left ear, as soon as he clears this, nimbly let your blade sink below you with the half edge near your left side, and then pull your pommel and grip above you, and nimbly strike to his right ear with the short edge, so that your hands become crossed in this strike.</p>
| So du dich durch das auffstreychen zum streich erholet hast / wie oben gelehret / so trit unnd hauwe von deiner Rechten hoch herein gegen seinem Lincken ohr / als bald er dem nach wischt so lasse behend dein klingen mit der halben schneide neben seiner Lincken undersich sincken / unnd ruck damit dein Knopff und Hefft ubersich / und hauwe ihm behend mit kurtzer schneide zu seinem Rechten ohr / also das dein hend in solchem hauw kreutzweiß kommen.
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/78|2|lbl=Ⅰ.29r.2}}
  
 
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| Note: let the first hit hard against his left ear, nimbly let the second flow off missing near his right as instructed before, and hit deep to his left ear, thus onto it nimbly (whereas you hit the first hard unto him) as well, letting it flow off to both sides, and still attack on to the next target as it opens, all these diagonally and with crossed arms as was taught, also against each other single and double, judged in the work against your need and opportunity. Then farther, as was taught, drive the blade in the full work first with the long edge then with the short, and also with the flat, against his sides in full flight to the high and low openings.
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| <p>Note: let the first hit hard against his left ear, nimbly let the second flow off missing near his right as instructed before, and hit deep to his left ear, thus onto it nimbly (whereas you hit the first hard unto him) as well, letting it flow off to both sides, and still attack on to the next target as it opens, all these diagonally and with crossed arms as was taught, also against each other single and double, judged in the work against your need and opportunity. Then farther, as was taught, drive the blade in the full work first with the long edge then with the short, and also with the flat, against his sides in full flight to the high and low openings.</p>
| Item las den ersten gegen seinem Lincken ohr hart antreffen / den andern lasse behend auff vorige weiß neben seinem Rechten fehl furuber lauffen / unnd triffe dieff zu seinem Lincken ohr / also magstu auch ( wo du den ersten mit jm hart eingehauwen hast) behend darauff / auff beiden seiten ablauffen lassen / und demnoch zu der nechsten Blöß so die offen ist einfallen / dises alles so bisher gelehrt kanstu uberecke und kreutzweiß / auch gegeneinander einfach unnd doppel / in das '''[XXIXv]''' werck richten / nach deinem gefallen und gelegenheit / weiter so lehre auch dein klingen in voller arbeit / erstlich mit Langer dann auch mit halber schneid / oder auch mit der flech / gegen seiner seiten zur obern und undern Blösse / in vollem flug behendiglichen zusamen führen / also.
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| In the first attack strike a long downstrike to his left ear, just as he glides then twitch both hands above you, so that your pommel will be under your right arm as you thrust through to him above you, and strike handily from below with the long edge to his left, just then step to him with your left foot behind your right and come through this strike to bring your grip high over your head. Onward again first strike an understrike with the long edge to his low opening while advancing your right foot, twitch handily near your right above you again, and strike the second from above also to his left while backstepping with your left behind your right as before, from which you will stand guarded behind your blade.
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| <p>In the first attack strike a long downstrike to his left ear, just as he glides then twitch both hands above you, so that your pommel will be under your right arm as you thrust through to him above you, and strike handily from below with the long edge to his left, just then step to him with your left foot behind your right and come through this strike to bring your grip high over your head. Onward again first strike an understrike with the long edge to his low opening while advancing your right foot, twitch handily near your right above you again, and strike the second from above also to his left while backstepping with your left behind your right as before, from which you will stand guarded behind your blade.</p>
| Im ersten angriff hauw ein Langen Oberhauw zu seinem Lincken ohr / in dem es glützt / so zuck beide hend ubersich / das dein Knopff under deinem Rechten arm im ubersich fahren durch gestossen werdt / unnd hauwe behend mit Langer schneiden von Unden auch zu seiner Lincken / trit in des mit deinem Lincken fus hinder deinen Rechten zu jhm / und komm mit deinem Hefft in solchem hauwen hoch uber deinem Haupt / Herwiderumb so hauwe den ersten einen Underhauw / mit einem zutrit deines rechten Fuß / zu seiner undern Blös mit Langer schneid / zuck behendt neben deiner Rechten wider ubersich / unnd hauwe den andern von Oben auch zu seiner Lincken mit einem abtritt deines lincken Fus / hinder deinem Rechten zu jhm wie vor / auff das du hinder deiner kling verdeckt standest.  
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/79|2|lbl=Ⅰ.29v.2}}
  
 
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword C.jpg|center|400px]]
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword C.png|center|400px]]
| Note: twitch with a high strike from the right with the half edge to his left, but in the air cross over your hands and slash with the half edge to his left ear, as is shown by the top two figures in illustration C, twitch your hands again thus crosswise over you, and slash again with a traverse from below to his left ear, then again onward strike the traverse from below to his left with an advance step, twitch nimbly near your left above you, and thrust through in this off-twitch with your pommel under your right arm, and quickly again with crossed arms from your high right into his left, in this way slash with the flat below and above on the one side, that goes to both sides, and mark when you will slash to the lower right opening, which will be with the flat, long or short, then your hands will cross, but when you slash to his hight righ opening, then your hands will not always be crossed, from here mark the following example:  
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| <p>Note: twitch with a high strike from the right with the half edge to his left, but in the air cross over your hands and slash with the half edge to his left ear, as is shown by the top two figures in illustration C, twitch your hands again thus crosswise over you, and slash again with a traverse from below to his left ear, then again onward strike the traverse from below to his left with an advance step, twitch nimbly near your left above you, and thrust through in this off-twitch with your pommel under your right arm, and quickly again with crossed arms from your high right into his left, in this way slash with the flat below and above on the one side, that goes to both sides, and mark when you will slash to the lower right opening, which will be with the flat, long or short, then your hands will cross, but when you slash to his hight righ opening, then your hands will not always be crossed, from here mark the following example:</p>
| Item zuck mit halber schneid von dem Rechten ein hohen streich zu seiner Lincken / aber in der lufft verschrenck dein hend / und schlag mit halber schneide zu seinem lincken ohr / wie du solches an den zweyen obern Bilder zur Lincken in der Figur so mit dem C. verzeichnet sehen kanst / zuck deine hende also kreutzweiß wider ubersich / unnd schlag mit einer zwirch wider von Unden zu seinem lincken Ohr / also auch herwiderumb Hauw die zwirch von Unden zu seiner Lincken mit einem zutrit / zuck behendt neben deiner Rechten ubersich / unnd stoß in solchem auffzucken dein Knopff under dein rechten Arm durch / und schnell also mit geschrenckten henden wider von deiner Rechten Oben hinein zu seiner Lincken / auff diese weise schlag es auch mit der flech Unden und Oben auff einer seiten zusamen / das gehet zu beiden seiten / und merck wann du zur Rechten undern Blöß schlechst / es sey flech / lang oder kurtz / so kommen dein hend kreutzweiß / aber wann du '''[XXXr]''' zu seiner Rechten obern Blösse schlechst / so kommen deine hende nicht alwegen kreutzweiß / hievon merck auff folgend Exempel.
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| Thus in advancing shoot through before him and slash with the half edge from your left to his right ear, without crossing your hands, but with your pommel staying out toward your left, twitch nimbly overhead to your right, and crossing your hands over in the air, slash with crossed hands to his lower right opening from your left, in all moves keep your pommel full behind your blade, stepping double steps out to your right, thus you can both slash with the flech and with the long edge, from below and above, near your right, as I taught you before, that you shall twitch and turn the strikes from one opening to another, thus you shall twitch and address both high and low openings on one side. Basically, when you drive a strike to his high openings, and notice that he does not strike, but your sword drives on to engage, see that you then not let your strike hit on, but lead your strike to his low opening, but where he does get under the strike, then drive your strike ahead against the strong of his blade. From this work grows winding at the Sword, namely when you have bound onto his sword from your right against his left, then stay stay hard on his blade, thrust your pommel through under your right arm unseen to him, stay thus forward on his sword, and then pull your pommel out again and wind your short edge out to his head. Thus you again find three edges and the flat, namely the outward and inward long edge, also the outward and inward short edge, and similarly the inward and outward flat, all on both sides.
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| <p>Thus in advancing shoot through before him and slash with the half edge from your left to his right ear, without crossing your hands, but with your pommel staying out toward your left, twitch nimbly overhead to your right, and crossing your hands over in the air, slash with crossed hands to his lower right opening from your left, in all moves keep your pommel full behind your blade, stepping double steps out to your right, thus you can both slash with the flech and with the long edge, from below and above, near your right, as I taught you before, that you shall twitch and turn the strikes from one opening to another, thus you shall twitch and address both high and low openings on one side. Basically, when you drive a strike to his high openings, and notice that he does not strike, but your sword drives on to engage, see that you then not let your strike hit on, but lead your strike to his low opening, but where he does get under the strike, then drive your strike ahead against the strong of his blade. From this work grows winding at the Sword, namely when you have bound onto his sword from your right against his left, then stay stay hard on his blade, thrust your pommel through under your right arm unseen to him, stay thus forward on his sword, and then pull your pommel out again and wind your short edge out to his head. Thus you again find three edges and the flat, namely the outward and inward long edge, also the outward and inward short edge, and similarly the inward and outward flat, all on both sides.</p>
| Also im zutritt schieß vor jhm durch / und schlag mit halber schneid / von deiner Lincken zu seinem rechten ohr nicht mit geschrenckten henden / sonder das dein Knopff gegen deiner Lincken aus steht / zuck behend wider ubersich gegen deiner Rechten / und verschrenck dein hende in der lufft / schlag jhm mit gekreutzigten henden zu seiner undern rechten Blöß / von deiner Lincken / in dem allem schaw das du mit dem Kopff wol hinder deiner kling / mit zwifachen tritten gegen seiner Rechten außtreten bist / also kanstu auch mit flech und Langer schneid / von unden unnd oben / neben seiner Rechten zusamen schlagen / wie ich dich nur vor gelert hab / das du die häw von einer Blöß zur andern verzucken und trauwen solt / also soltu hie auff einer seiten / auch die undern und obern Blöß zusamen trauwen und verzucken / Nemlich wann du jhm also ein haw zur obern Blösse führest / und merckest das er nicht hauwet / sonder deinem Schwerdt entgegen fehrt / das du als dann dein hauw nicht antreffen lassest / sonder dein klingen der undern Blöß zuführest / wo er aber under des hauwen wirt / so fahr mit deinem Hauw fürt doch gegen der sterck seiner klingen / Aus dieser arbeit erwachsen die winden am Schwerdt / nemlich wann du jhm an sein Schwerdt hast angebunden / von deiner Rechten gegen seiner Lincken / so bleib hart an seiner klingen / stoß dein Knopff jme unversehens under dein rechten Arm durch / bleib also ferner an seinem Schwerdt / und ruck als dann dein Knopff wider herfür / und windt jhm die kurtz schneiden außwendig zum Kopff / also findestu auch dreyerley schneid und flech / Nemlich außwendige und inwendige Lange schneide. Item außwendige und inwendige kurtze schneide / deßgleichen inwendig und auswendige flech / und das auff beiden seiten.
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| class="noline" | Thus you understand that the third part of fencing is nothing other than the right Practice, as was reported above, the first two Lead parts in fencing, which will be taught though Practice, where you change at every opportunity, namely in the first Lead Part with the stances and strikes, flowing off, changing through, flying off, and letting miss. That such strikes can be trapped with displacement and clearing, likewise in the second Lead Part, displacement, teach the Practice of how you displace, follow after him, cut, punch, etc. Therewith you will end the strikes that he sends to you, or at the least prevent them from reaching their intended destination. And that is the sum of all Practice, namely that you firstly engage your opposing fencer through the stances, with manly strikes and without damage to your target, by showing cunning and agile misleading as can be shown, and after you then engage him to break through with the obligatory or similar handwork, from which you either securely withdraw at your pleasure, or where he must retreat from you and you follow ahead after him. Since going forward such Practice will be needed and extended in many arts to be the same both in name and in fencing, as you found fully described before here in the handwork chapter, I will now drive further to describe fencing from the stances.
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| class="noline" | <p>Thus you understand that the third part of fencing is nothing other than the right Practice, as was reported above, the first two Lead parts in fencing, which will be taught though Practice, where you change at every opportunity, namely in the first Lead Part with the stances and strikes, flowing off, changing through, flying off, and letting miss. That such strikes can be trapped with displacement and clearing, likewise in the second Lead Part, displacement, teach the Practice of how you displace, follow after him, cut, punch, etc. Therewith you will end the strikes that he sends to you, or at the least prevent them from reaching their intended destination. And that is the sum of all Practice, namely that you firstly engage your opposing fencer through the stances, with manly strikes and without damage to your target, by showing cunning and agile misleading as can be shown, and after you then engage him to break through with the obligatory or similar handwork, from which you either securely withdraw at your pleasure, or where he must retreat from you and you follow ahead after him. Since going forward such Practice will be needed and extended in many arts to be the same both in name and in fencing, as you found fully described before here in the handwork chapter, I will now drive further to describe fencing from the stances.</p>
| class="noline" | Also verstehstu nun das das dritte stuck im Fechten davon oben gemelt nichts anders ist / dann [XXXv] ein rechte Practick / der zwey ersten Hauptstuck im Fechten / durch welche Practick gelehrt wirt / wie du solche nach zufelliger gelegenheit / nemlich im ersten Hauptstuck die Leger unnd Häuw verwandlen / ablauffen durchwechseln verfliegen unnd fehlen lasset / damit dem versetzer unnd abtrager solche Häuw entführet werden / desgleichen im andern Hauptstuck des versetzens / lert dich die Practick wie du jm deine versatzung entzuckest / jhm nachreisest / schnidest / truckest etc. Damit du jhn auch umb seine häuw das er die vergebens / oder auff das wenigest zu seinem fürgenomen ziel nicht volführe noch ende. Und ist das die summa aller Practick / nemlich das du erstlich deinen gegen gegenfechter durch die Leger / mit dem hauwen manliche unnd ohn schaden / zu seinem nachtheil / mit was listigkeit unnd behender verführung das geschehen kann / angreiffest / unnd nach dem du jhn als dann angriffen / jhne ferner mit obligender oder gleicher handtarbeit jhn also trengest / auff das du demnach zum dritten sicher nach deinem gefallen eintweders abziehest / oder wo er dir weichen müste / du jhm fürsichtig nach folgest / wie ferner aber solche Practick sich erstrecke und auff wie vilerley arth dieselbigen beide in den namen und im Fechten gebraucht werden / findestu hievor im Capitel von der handtarbeit weitleuffiger beschriben / will derwegen nun fürter das Fechten aus den Legern zu beschreiben furt fahren.
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! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>Figures</p>
! <p>{{rating|C|Draft Translation (from the 1570)}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
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! <p>{{rating|start}}<br/>by [[Mike Rasmusson]]</p>
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}</p>
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! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
  
 
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| '''Fencing from the Stances<br/>Chapt. 11'''
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| <p>'''Fencing from the Stances'''</p>
Since much now concerns the Stances, I will thus not keep you long in each for the same reason they were given still only half composed, but going onward, since you will need to know, when you present your sword and (while you are twitching off the guard he aimed to you) you would strike, as soon as you come out from the farthest point (where you have begun to pull back your sword), then from here on you should lead your sword against him again with agility, like how it will be handled from the Guard of the Roof, the Guard through which you bring about the Downstrike. Thus when you move to the Downstrike (to do such) you will then in the outermost point of this move come to be in the guard named Roof, you can now not only (just as you seek to strike) strike then and thus drive ahead with your Downstrike, but can also persist to stay. This is the reason, namely just that you not yet undertake any strike unplanned, but even as soon you have allowed the same considered strike to be drawn against them, you should now lead the strike on from even from here so that as you stay for only an eyeblink at the obvious outermost point, so consider ahead if your chosen strike can either still be led usably to fulfillment, or if through it you can attain a better opportunity applicable elsewhere, where you thus change to a second strike accordingly at the outermost point and thus conclude the Downstrike which you have drawn out with a Traverse. This is the underlying reason for the development of the Stances and is why you stay while in one Guard: to see what the other will take ahead (and then rightly know how to overtake his chosen part) and prevent such just by being certain to see here what his chosen part will be, and such waiting is a great art and experience. Because you now need to know onward how to engage your opponent’s oncoming strikes from the Roof with your Sword, I have set the following examples both of when he would strike, or stay and not strike.
 
| '''Auß den Legeren zufechten.<br/>Cap. 11.'''
 
SO vil nun aber die Leger belanget / so will ich nicht das mann in deren einem lang verharre / dann sie seind auch solcher ursach halben nicht erfunden noch außgetheilt worden / sonder '''[XXXIr]''' darumb / auff das du wissen mögest / wann du dein Schwerdt zum streich auffzeuchst unnd dir (dieweil du also im auffzucken die Bügen zu dir zeuchst) zu gehauwen würde / wie du als bald von dem eussersten ort (dahin du mit dem auffziehen deines Schwerdts ankomen bist) herwiderumb dein Schwerdt behendiglich gegen im herführen solt / als wie hie von der Hut des Tags gehandelt wirt / welche Hut sich durch den Oberhauw verursacht / Also wann du zum Oberhauw auffzeuchst (den zu thun) so wirt das eusserste ort dahin du mit solchem auffziehen kommest der Tag genant / wirt nun dir nicht bald (in dem du noch auffzuckest zum streich) darin gehauwen / so fahrestu mit deinem Oberhauw fürt / das aber auch von den erfahrnen biß weilen in deren einem verharret wirt / ist dis die ursach / nemlich das du nit allein kein hauw noch streich unbedacht fürnimest / sondern auch nach dem du schon zur selbigen vorbedachten streich auffgezogen und dich erholet hast / und jetzt eben den streich her führen solt / das du an dem selbigen eussersten ort noch ein kleine und schier nur ein augenbliche weil verharren solt / aldo noch ferner zubedencken / ob dein fürgenomener streich zu volführen nützlich sey / oder ob dir under des ein bessere gelegenheit fürgefallen oder zustendig worden were / auff das du denselbige noch also am eussersten ort zu einem andern haw verwandeln / und das du demnoch den Oberhauw / zu welchem du auffgezogen hast / mit einer Zwirch vollendest / Dises ist die fürnemste ursach der erfindung der Leger / unnd ist darumb dem der sich bisweilen in ein Leger Hut legert / zu sehen was des andern fürnemen sei (auff das er jm dester füglicher wisse in seinen eigen stucken zufangen) solches nicht gewert / allein das er zusehe und seines fürnemen gewiß sei / dan zu solchem warten gehöret kunst unnd grosse erfahrung. Damit du nun ferner wisses haben mögest / wie und auff was weiß du dein Schwerdt von Tag / gegen deines gegenparts herfliegenden streichen brauchen solt / hab ich die volgende Exempel beide wann er hauwet / oder nicht hauwen will setzen wollen.
 
  
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<p>Chapter 11</p>
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| '''The First Part'''
 
And firstly when you come before your opponent and, while striking out or otherwise pulling your sword back (to downstrike) to bring it high above you, he strikes just then to your left at your head, then burst full away from his strike against his left and somewhat toward him, and strike with an outward flat against his incoming strike to meet his sword strongly on the strong so that the forward part of your blade will swing inward over his sword to his head, which is then certainly hit. When you slash at the same time as him and your sword comes to be over his, to hit or not on his strike, then twitch your sword off over yourself again, and strike diagonally upward from below to his right arm, in this strike step out with your left foot full against his right side and arc yourself with your head fully behind your sword’s blade, from there nimbly twitch again upward and flit the short edge to his left ear, if you see that he will wipe against this, then don’t let the impact fail or flow off, but soon cross your hands in the air (the right over the left) and slash him with the short edge deep to his right ear and then traverse over and pull out. Mark here when he would nimbly follow after the Understrike just taught and thus would be hard onto the roof so that you can’t come to flow off, then pay attention just then if he would twitch off from your sword, then follow after him with a cut to the arm.
 
| '''[XXXIv] Das erst stuck.'''
 
UNd erstlich wann du für deinen Mann kommest / und aldo durch auffstreichen oder sonst mit auffziehen (zu einem Oberhauw) mit deinem Schwerdt in die höhe kommen werest / und er hauwet dir in dessen gegen deiner Lincken zum Kopff / so spring wol auß seinem Hauw gegen seiner Lincken / etwas zu jhm umb / und schlag mit außwendiger flech gegen seinem herfliegenden streich / das du sein Schwerdt in die sterck antreffest / unnd das also starck / auff das sich dein vordertheil deiner klingen in solchem schlag / über seinem Schwerdt zu seinem Kopff einschwinge / welche dann gewis triffst / wann du mit jhm zugleich schlechst / unnd doch mit deinem Schwerdt oberhalb des seinen kommest / auff solchen Hauw er hab getroffen oder nit / so zuck dein Schwerdt wider übersich ab / und hauwe übereck dargegen über / von Unden zu seinem Rechten Arm / in solchem Hauw trit mit deinem Lincken fuß wol aus gegen seiner Rechten / und bucke dich mit deinem Kopff wol hinder dein Schwerdts klingen / von dannen zucke behend wider übersich / und wincke jhm mit kurtzer schneide zu seinem Lincken ohr / ersihestu das er jhm nach wischet / so lasse nicht antreffen sonder fehl ablauffen / und verschrencke bald dein hend in der lufft (die Recht über die Lincke) und schlag jhm mit kurtzer schneide dieff zu seinem Rechten ohr / als bald Zwirch umb und ziech ab / unnd merck hie / wann er dir auff deinen obgelehrten Underhauw / so behend nach folgen / unnd so hart auff dem tach sein würde / also das du zu dem ablauffen nicht kommen kanst / so hab acht in dem er von deinem Schwerdt abzuckt / so folge jhm mit dein Schnit nach auff die arm.
 
  
|-
+
<p>Since much now concerns the Stances, I will thus not keep you long in each for the same reason they were given still only half composed, but going onward, since you will need to know, when you present your sword and (while you are twitching off the guard he aimed to you) you would strike, as soon as you come out from the farthest point (where you have begun to pull back your sword), then from here on you should lead your sword against him again with agility, like how it will be handled from the Guard of the Roof, the Guard through which you bring about the Downstrike. Thus when you move to the Downstrike (to do such) you will then in the outermost point of this move come to be in the guard named Roof, you can now not only (just as you seek to strike) strike then and thus drive ahead with your Downstrike, but can also persist to stay. This is the reason, namely just that you not yet undertake any strike unplanned, but even as soon you have allowed the same considered strike to be drawn against them, you should now lead the strike on from even from here so that as you stay for only an eyeblink at the obvious outermost point, so consider ahead if your chosen strike can either still be led usably to fulfillment, or if through it you can attain a better opportunity applicable elsewhere, where you thus change to a second strike accordingly at the outermost point and thus conclude the Downstrike which you have drawn out with a Traverse. This is the underlying reason for the development of the Stances and is why you stay while in one Guard: to see what the other will take ahead (and then rightly know how to overtake his chosen part) and prevent such just by being certain to see here what his chosen part will be, and such waiting is a great art and experience. Because you now need to know onward how to engage your opponent’s oncoming strikes from the Roof with your Sword, I have set the following examples both of when he would strike, or stay and not strike.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
| '''The Second Part'''
+
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/81|2|lbl=Ⅰ.30v.2|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf|82|lbl=Ⅰ.31r|p=1}}
However if he strikes at your left from below, then step quickly out to his left and strike with the long edge onto the strong of his sword, as soon as your sword moves or glides on his, twitch your sword high above yourself again and slash down with the short edge quickly and deeply to his left ear while stepping forward out to his left, he will then want to rush to displace and then drive above against it, so then strike nimbly with the long edge over again to his right ear and in this slashover step full against his right like before, yet stay with the cross high over your head, and mark as soon as he slashes over then fall further with a cut to his arm, if he is not hurt by this but would evade your work, then follow after him (staying on his arm), and when he makes the smallest extraction, then let fly to another opening and strike him away from you.
 
| '''Das ander stuck.'''
 
HAuwet er dir aber von Unden gegen deiner Lincken / so trit abermal gegen seiner Lincken aus / und hauwe mit Langer schneide Oben auff die sterck seines Schwerdts / als bald dein Schwerdt auff das seine rührt oder glitzt / so zuck dein Schwerdt wider übersich in die höh / und schlag mit kurtzer schneid in einem schnall wider nider / mit fernerm umbtretten gegen seiner Lincken zu seinem Lincken ohr / dieff hinein / das wirt er in solcher eil versetzen wollen / und dargegen übersich fahren / darumb hauwe behend mit Langer schneid / widerumb zu seinem Rechten or / in solchem umbschlagen trit wol gegen seiner Rechten wie vor / und bleib gleichwol mit dem kreutz hoch uber deinem '''[XXXIIr]''' Kopff / und merck als bald er umbschlecht / so fall jhm mit dem Schnit abermal auff die Arm / will er den auch nit leiden / sonder will sich ledig arbeiten / so volg jhm (auff seinen Armen bleibent) nach / und wann ers am wenigsten versihet / so laß abfliegen einer andern Blöß zu / und hauw dich von jhm ab.  
 
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''The Third Part'''
+
| <p>'''The First Part'''</p>
However, if he strikes to your right as you come to be in the High Guard, then step nimbly with your left foot to his right out of his strike, and at the same time fall from above with the long edge onto the strong of his sword and, just as you fall on his sword, thrust your pommel under your right arm, so that you slash at his head with crossed hands fully over or near his sword, if he drives above against your right then let the half edge nearly flow off and step under it full out to his left side, and strike with the long edge directly to his head from above, but twitch nimbly upward again and slash with a traverse from below to his left ear with an off set with your left foot, and then strike him away from you.
 
| '''Das drite stuck.'''
 
HAuwet er dir aber zu deiner Rechten / wann du also in die Oberhut ankomen bist / so trit behende mit deinem Linkcen fuß gegen seiner Rechten auß seinem Hauw / und falle jhm zugleich mit Langer schneide / Oben auff die sterck seines Schwerdts / und in dem du also auff sein Schwerdt fellest / so stoß dein knopff under deinem Rechten arm durch / also das du jhm mit geschrenckten henden die kurtze schneid wol über oder neben seinem Schwerdt zum Kopff schlagest / fehret er aber mit seinem Schwerdt übersich gegen seiner Rechten / so laß die halb schneide neben derselbigen ablauffen / und trit under des wol gegen seiner Lincken / zur seiten aus / unnd hauwe mit Langer schneid gerad von Oben zu seinem Kopff / zuch aber behend wider übersich / und schlage mit einer Zwirch von Unden zu seinem Lincken ohr mit einem abtrit deines Lincken fus / als dann hauwe dich von jhm ab / rc.
 
  
|-
+
<p>And firstly when you come before your opponent and, while striking out or otherwise pulling your sword back (to downstrike) to bring it high above you, he strikes just then to your left at your head, then burst full away from his strike against his left and somewhat toward him, and strike with an outward flat against his incoming strike to meet his sword strongly on the strong so that the forward part of your blade will swing inward over his sword to his head, which is then certainly hit. When you slash at the same time as him and your sword comes to be over his, to hit or not on his strike, then twitch your sword off over yourself again, and strike diagonally upward from below to his right arm, in this strike step out with your left foot full against his right side and arc yourself with your head fully behind your sword’s blade, from there nimbly twitch again upward and flit the short edge to his left ear, if you see that he will wipe against this, then don’t let the impact fail or flow off, but soon cross your hands in the air (the right over the left) and slash him with the short edge deep to his right ear and then traverse over and pull out. Mark here when he would nimbly follow after the Understrike just taught and thus would be hard onto the roof so that you can’t come to flow off, then pay attention just then if he would twitch off from your sword, then follow after him with a cut to the arm.</p>
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword G.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/83|1|lbl=Ⅰ.31v.1}}
| '''The Fourth Part'''
 
Mark in Pre-Fencing when you have come to hold your sword high above in the guard of the Roof to beware that he not then rush to strike, so that you can stay in the Before, cross your hands over your head, (the right over the left) so that it appears as if you would stab to his face, step under this toward him with your right foot and twitch your sword then to your left over your head and strike him thus with the short edge through a crafty traverse from your right to his left ear, twitch nimbly back off again and drive against his lower right opening with a long traverse, let it not stay but twitch above you again in the same flight and let the third flow off deep to his left ear with the short edge, and slash the short edge again with crossed hands into to his right ear, as soon as this hits, step back with the left foot and strike with the long edge from below to his left arm to be as shown by the figure fighting against the right in the left background of illustration G above, mark here when you step off in this Understrike if he would strike to your lower left opening, then step to him with your left foot and fall with crossed hands and the short edge onto his sword, strike him thus an Understrike as shown in the other figure fighting against the right in the just considered picture. Now mark further just as he then pulls his sword over himself again, then pull your sword with crossed hands full to your left and, just as he slashes again, take his oncoming strike from your left against his right with your outward flat, high traverse out strongly so that your sword flies overhead in full flight and your hands cross over each other in the air while your sword flies, then step full against his right, but still keep your hands high and let the half edge flow off in a twitch near his right ear (as this hits or grazes), and just then strike long with an off step. I have described this part in particular as still many good moves can be taken and be fought from here, therefore you should learn not just this alone, but think forward with diligence. Thus I will describe yet another part with a different start.
 
| '''Das vierde stuck.'''
 
MErck wann du also im zufechten mit deinem Schwerdt in die höhe komest / in die Hut des Tags / und wirst aldo gewahr das er dir nicht so eilends zuhauwet / also das du dein stuck im Vor wol anfangen kanst / so verschrencke deine hend ob deinem Kopff / (die Recht uber die Linck) also das es scheinet als woltestu im zu seinem gesichte stechen / trit under des mit deinem Rechten fus zu jhm / und zuck dein Schwerdt gleich mit / gegen deiner Lincken umb deinen Kopff / und hauwe jhm also von deiner Rechten mit kurtzer schneide durch ein Zwirch / krefftiglich zu seinem Lincken ohr / zuck behend wider ab zu ruck / und trauwe jhm mit langer Zwirch gegen seiner Rechten undern Blöß / laß aber nicht rühren / sonder verzuck in dem selbigen flug dein schwerdt wider ubersich / und laß zum dritten die kurtze schneid dieff gegen seinem Lincken ohr ablauffen / und schlage jhm demnoch mit geschrenckten henden die kurtz schneid zu seinem Rechten ohr dieff hinein / als bald solches trifft / so trit mit dem Lincken fuß zu ruck unnd '''[XXXIIIrv]''' Hauwe mit Langer schneide von Unden gegen seinem Lincken arm / so stehestu wie das Bild zur Lincken an der kleinern obern bossen gegen der Rechten handt / in der Figur G. anzeigt / hie mercke wann dir im abtretten ein solcher Underhauw nach deiner Lincken undern Blösse gehauwen würde / so trit mit dem Lincken fuß zu jhm / unnd fall jm mit geschrenckten henden und kurtzer schneide auff sein Schwerdt / steck jhm also den Underhauw wie solchs an dem andern Bild in obgedachten bossen gegen der Rechten handt zu sehen / Unnd merck weiter / in dem er als dann sein Schwerdt wider zu jhm ubersich zeucht / so rucke dein Schwerdt also mit kreutzigten henden vollen gegen deiner Lincken / und in dem er wider herschlecht / so nime jhm denselbigen herfliegenden Hauw mit deiner auswendiger flech / von deiner Lincken gegen seiner Rechten / überzwerch starck aus / also das dein Schwerdt oberhalb dem Kopff in vollem flug wider umbfliege / und das sich deine hend in der lufft wider ubereinander schrencken dieweil aber dein Schwerdt also Oben umbfleuget / so trit wol gegen seiner Rechten / bleib aber gleichwol mit den henden hoch / und laß die halb schneide durch ein Zürck neben seinem Rechten or (doch das dieselbige treffen oder anschürpffe) ablauffen / hauwe als dann mit einem abtrit lang nach / Diß stuck hab ich darumb so eigentlich beschriben dieweil sonst vil guter stuck hieraus genomen und gefochten können werden / derhalben magstu es nich allein sol lernen / sonder dem auch ferner fleissig nach dencken. Wie ich dir dan auf dise art noch ein stuck mit einem andern anfang setzen will / also.
 
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''A Second'''
+
| <p>'''The Second Part'''</p>
In the pre-fencing when you come into the Roof or High Guard, then let your blade sink down in front of you, as before, to your left side, and twitch over your head, step and strike a high traversing Middle Strike with the long edge against his left to his neck or throat, as soon as he withdraws, then twitch again over the head, and strike a second high Middle Strike traversing from your left against his right, again at his throat, as soon as it glides then strike the third, a high strike with the long edge direct from above. These three strikes shall go from one to another in a nimble flight. If you want more room then raise your pommel above to your left side, twitch thus overhead, and take your flat or short edge near your left from below through to his right against your right in a wrench out above him, so that your blade again flies over in the air, and strike with the half edge from above down with crossed hands feinting over near his right ear, you can reach further with the short edge by stepping ahead, thus let it engage and strike a strong wrath strike to his left side and following strike away from him. This is indeed a serious and strong sequence in that, since you have the Before, he can only defend.
 
| '''Ein anders.'''
 
IM zufechten so du in Tag oder Oberhut kommest / so laß die klingen vor dir undersich sincken wie vor / gegen deiner Lincken seiten / und zuck umb dein Kopff / trit unnd hauw einen uberzwerchen Mittelhauw / mit Langer schneid gegen seiner Lincken / zu seinem halß oder schlaff / als bald er riert / so zuck wider umb den Kopff / und hauw den andern auch ein Mittelhauw uberzwerch von deiner Lincken gegen seiner rechten / auch dem halß zu / so bald es glützt so hauw den dritten ein hohen streich mit Langer schneid gerad von Oben / Diese drey Häuw aber sollen in einem flug bhendt auff einander gohn / Mag dir denn mehr blatz werden so erhebe dein Knopff gegen deiner Lincken ubersich / zuck also umb den Kopff / und nim mit der flech oder kurtzer schneid / neben deiner Lincken von unden durch sein Rechte / gegen deiner Rechten in einem riss ubersich aus / das dein kling in den lufft wider umbflie'''[XXXIIIv]'''ge / und hauwe mit halber schneid von Oben nider mit geschrenckten henden neben seinem Rechten ohr füruber fehl / weiter kanstu jhn dann mit der kurtzen schneiden im füruber lauffen erreichen / so laß treffen / unnd hauw ein starcken Zornhauw zu seiner Lincken seiten nach / unnd hauw dich folgend von jhm wegk / Diß ist zwar ein fast ernsthaft und starck stuck / das dir keiner bald so du das Vor hast / wirt wehren können.
 
  
|-
+
<p>However if he strikes at your left from below, then step quickly out to his left and strike with the long edge onto the strong of his sword, as soon as your sword moves or glides on his, twitch your sword high above yourself again and slash down with the short edge quickly and deeply to his left ear while stepping forward out to his left, he will then want to rush to displace and then drive above against it, so then strike nimbly with the long edge over again to his right ear and in this slashover step full against his right like before, yet stay with the cross high over your head, and mark as soon as he slashes over then fall further with a cut to his arm, if he is not hurt by this but would evade your work, then follow after him (staying on his arm), and when he makes the smallest extraction, then let fly to another opening and strike him away from you.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Breaking the Roof Stance or Guard'''
+
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/83|2|lbl=Ⅰ.31v.2|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/84|1|lbl=Ⅰ.32r.1|p=1}}
If you are aware that after striking outward one can, in a little flight up over the head, stay in the Guard of the Roof, then come in the pre-fencing into the Guard of the Key, from there raise both hands thus crosswise over your head, and at the same time step to him with your right foot, and while stepping strike with the short edge near your right thigh strongly from below through your opponent’s Vertex line up above you, so that the sword is above your head, flying off with an upstrike from your left to your right, keep your hands high in the displacement, just as it connects then step nimbly with your right foot to his left and strike with the short edge in a swing to his left ear. From there upstrike twice with a walk, follow the slash with a traverse to his right ear, and just then step at the same time with your right foot backward to your left, thus the Traverse goes deeper. When this happens you can strike as soon as he does.
 
| '''Bruch auff das Leger oder Hut im tag.'''
 
Wirstu gewar das einer gern nach dem auffstreichen uber dem Haupt / ein wenig pflegt in der Hut des Tags zu verhauren / so kom im zufechten in die Hut des Schlüssels / von dannen erhebe beide hend also kreutzweiß uber dein Haupt / und trit zugleich mit dem Rechten fuß zu jhm / und im trit streich mit kurtzer schneid neben deinem Rechten schenckel durch des Mans scheidel Lini / starck von Unden auff übersich durch / also das das schwert oberhalb deinem Haupt / widerumb von deiner Lincken zu seiner Rechten zu einem Underhauw verfliege / bleibe demnach mit den henden hoch in der versatzung / in dem es rürt so trit behend mit dem Rechten fuß zu seiner Lincken / und hauw mit kurtzer schneid dieff zu seinem Lincken ohr in einem schwung hinein / von dannen hauwe in einem lauff zwen Underhäuw / folgends schlag mit einem Zwirchhauw zu seinem Rechten ohr / und trit In des zugleich mit deinem Rechten fuß hinder deinen Lincken zurück / so gehet die Zwirch desto dieffer / wann denn solches beschehen / so kanstu dich als bald von jhm hauwen.
 
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Or if he comes ahead to you going high, then pay attention then if he will go to the low guard, then follow him nimbly with two strong understrikes from both sides out of whatever guard or stance suits you, just as long as you strike nimbly from below. One to the other with the half edge in a nimble walk from both sides deep to the head, after this bind nimbly into his blade, if he goes off then follow after. If he stays then wind, wrench out and make your work onward to the next.
+
| <p>'''The Third Part'''</p>
| Oder kompt dir einer für der bald hoch auffgehet / so hab acht in dem er aus der undern Huten auffgehet / so folg jhm mit zweyen starcken Underhäuwen von beiden seiten behendt nach / aus was Huten oder Leger du willst / als bald hauw behend von Unden. Zum andern mit halber schneid behend in einem lauff von beiden seiten dieff zum Kopff / nach solchem binde jhm behend wider an sein klingen / geht er ab / so folge nach / bleibt er so Winde / reiß auß / und was dir für arbeit am nechsten werden mag.
+
 
 +
<p>However, if he strikes to your right as you come to be in the High Guard, then step nimbly with your left foot to his right out of his strike, and at the same time fall from above with the long edge onto the strong of his sword and, just as you fall on his sword, thrust your pommel under your right arm, so that you slash at his head with crossed hands fully over or near his sword, if he drives above against your right then let the half edge nearly flow off and step under it full out to his left side, and strike with the long edge directly to his head from above, but twitch nimbly upward again and slash with a traverse from below to his left ear with an off set with your left foot, and then strike him away from you.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/84|2|lbl=Ⅰ.32r.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword E.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword G.png|center|400px]]
| '''Wrath Guard'''
+
| <p>'''The Fourth Part'''</p>
When at the onset you come into the Wrath Guard, then step as soon as you can reach him and strike a quick Wrath Strike, which he must defend from, to his left ear. Nimbly follow the strike over with an Under Strike against his lower right opening, thus you have now attacked. Under this as and when he is reached for work and the arms show he will strike, then fall low with your sword onto his arm and behind his charge so that he can not come to work, as he will then not be able to rightly defend from this, then thrust to him with an incomplete shove from yourself, that he likewise shows that he would fall, and meanwhile slash to the next opening that you know you have, but if he reaches this and strikes you off, then be there again with the cut or displacement, and fall against his strike on the blade, if he goes off the blade again, then cut him on the arm again, but if he stays on your sword then thrust his sword aside with your hilt and nimbly let your sword fly again to the next opening and swing to him after your need. Thus now you shall fight with all elements of the sword to the body, and from the body to the sword, but where he would twitch or flow off from you, then always use the cut for help, and where you can’t cut, then there can be no useful fencing, but where you can do it rightly, then swing to him as you will. He who can break the cut himself, you will find less, but he who cannot rightly lead the cut will soon be broken.
 
| '''[XXXIIIIrv] Zornhut.'''
 
KOmpstu im zugang in die Zornhut / so trit als bald du jhn erlangen kanst / unnd hauw zu seinem Lincken ohr / ein geschwinden Zornhauw / welches er dann wehren mus / folgend hauw behend gegen uber zu seiner Rechten undern Blöß ein Underhauw / also hastu nun angriffen / under des ehe und dann er sich erholt zu arbeiten / und die Arm zum streich ansich zeucht / so fall jhm mit dem Schwerdt unden an sein arm / und hindere jhm also seinen lauff das er nicht arbeiten kann / ehe denn er aber dis recht gewahr wirt / so stoß jhn mit einem unversehenen ruck von dir / das er gleich dummelt als wolt er fallen / unnd schlag jhn dieweil zur nechsten Blös / die du denn gewiß hast / erholt er sich aber und hauwet auff dich her / so sey du mit dem absatz oder Schnit wider da / und fall jhm gegen seinem streich an die kling / gehet er wider von der klingen ab / so schneidestu jhm wider auff die arm / bleibt er aber an deinem Schwerdt / so stoß jhm sein Schwerdt mit deinem schildt beyseits aus / und laß dein Schwerdt behendt wider der nechsten Blös zufliegen / und von dannen behendt wider an sein Schwerdt / will er das Schwert nicht fangen lassen / so volg mit deinem Schwerdt aber nach auff seine Arm / damit zwingstu jhn nach deinem gefallen / Also soltu nun in allen stucken vom Schwerdt zum leib / und von dem leib zum Schwerdt / aber wo er dir zucken oder verfliegen wolt / so nim den Schnit alweg zuhilff / denn wer den Schnit nit kann / wirt das auch mit nutz nicht Fechten / wo du jhn aber recht machen kanst / so zwingestu jhn wie du wilt / es were dann das er den Schnit selbst brechen könde / deren wirstu wenig finden / wer aber den Schnit nit recht führen kann dem ist er bald gebrochen.
 
  
|-  
+
<p>Mark in Pre-Fencing when you have come to hold your sword high above in the guard of the Roof to beware that he not then rush to strike, so that you can stay in the Before, cross your hands over your head, (the right over the left) so that it appears as if you would stab to his face, step under this toward him with your right foot and twitch your sword then to your left over your head and strike him thus with the short edge through a crafty traverse from your right to his left ear, twitch nimbly back off again and drive against his lower right opening with a long traverse, let it not stay but twitch above you again in the same flight and let the third flow off deep to his left ear with the short edge, and slash the short edge again with crossed hands into to his right ear, as soon as this hits, step back with the left foot and strike with the long edge from below to his left arm to be as shown by the figure fighting against the right in the left background of illustration G above, mark here when you step off in this Understrike if he would strike to your lower left opening, then step to him with your left foot and fall with crossed hands and the short edge onto his sword, strike him thus an Understrike as shown in the other figure fighting against the right in the just considered picture. Now mark further just as he then pulls his sword over himself again, then pull your sword with crossed hands full to your left and, just as he slashes again, take his oncoming strike from your left against his right with your outward flat, high traverse out strongly so that your sword flies overhead in full flight and your hands cross over each other in the air while your sword flies, then step full against his right, but still keep your hands high and let the half edge flow off in a twitch near his right ear (as this hits or grazes), and just then strike long with an off step. I have described this part in particular as still many good moves can be taken and be fought from here, therefore you should learn not just this alone, but think forward with diligence. Thus I will describe yet another part with a different start.</p>
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword F.jpg|center|400px]]
+
|  
| rowspan="2" | If you stand in the right Wrath stance and your opponent strikes from his right to your left, then with a step of your right foot drive with displacement under his blade and over your head, and catch his strike on your flat with your thumb underneath, and the blade hanging below you somewhat to the ground, but as soon as in glides then step with the left foot to his right side, and wind the short edge under his sword inward to his head, as shown by the small middle figures in illustration L. When you have wound, then hold your sword with the short edge on his, and wrench the sword out following against your right above you, as shown by the small middle figures in illustration F, thus that your hands complete the wrench high in the air and crossed over, and slash in (keeping your hands high) with an inwinding flat to his lower right opening, as soon as he swipes against it in displacement, then don’t pull but twitch high again and strike a glide strike to his left ear, but in this strike let the blade swing in deep over your hands and fence quickly away from him.
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/84|3|lbl=Ⅰ.32r.3|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/86|1|lbl=Ⅰ.33r.1|p=1}}
| rowspan="2" | Stehestu im rechten Zornleger / und hauwet dein widerpart von seiner Rechten gegen deiner Lincken auff dich zu / so fahr mit verschieben under sein kling uber dein Haupt / und fang sein Hauw auff dein flech / das dein Daumen unden standt / unnd die kling neben deiner Lincken etwas gegen der erden undersich hang / mit einem zutrit deines Rechten fuß / in dem es aber glützt / so trit mit dem Lincken fuß auff sein rechte seiten / unnd windt jhm die kurtze schneid under sein Schwerdt einwerts zum Kopff / wie die kleinen mitlern bossen in der Figur L. anzeigen wenn du nun gewunden / so behalt dein Schwerdt mit kurtzer an dem seinen / und reiß folgents mit dem Schwert gegen deiner Rechten ubersich auß / wie dich solches die mitlern kleinen Bidler in der Figur F. lehren / also das '''[XXXVr]''' sich dein hend noch ende des risses in der lufft verschrecken / schlag jn (doch das dein hendt in der höh bleiben) mit inwendiger flech / zu seiner rechten undern Blös / als bald er jhm aber nachwischet zur versatzung / so laß nit rühren / sonder zuck wider ubersich / und hauw ein glützhauw zu seinem Lincken ohr / in solchem streich aber laß die kling uber dein hand dieff ein schwingen / und ficht dich also mit geschwindigkeit von jhm wegk.
 
  
 
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword F.jpg|center|400px]]
+
|  
 +
| <p>'''A Second'''</p>
  
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<p>In the pre-fencing when you come into the Roof or High Guard, then let your blade sink down in front of you, as before, to your left side, and twitch over your head, step and strike a high traversing Middle Strike with the long edge against his left to his neck or throat, as soon as he withdraws, then twitch again over the head, and strike a second high Middle Strike traversing from your left against his right, again at his throat, as soon as it glides then strike the third, a high strike with the long edge direct from above. These three strikes shall go from one to another in a nimble flight. If you want more room then raise your pommel above to your left side, twitch thus overhead, and take your flat or short edge near your left from below through to his right against your right in a wrench out above him, so that your blade again flies over in the air, and strike with the half edge from above down with crossed hands feinting over near his right ear, you can reach further with the short edge by stepping ahead, thus let it engage and strike a strong wrath strike to his left side and following strike away from him. This is indeed a serious and strong sequence in that, since you have the Before, he can only defend.</p>
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword A.jpg|center|400px]]
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|
| If your counterpart strikes to you from above, then step and strike to him from your right with a high traversing Middle Strike, thus also through and away from his long edge strike in flight so that your blade flies over with the half edge against his left ear but, as soon as you near it, flow off and twitch over your head from your right to your left, step and slash him with an inverted flat from your left to his right ear, high traversing through the middle line shown on the larger figure on the right of illustration A.
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/86|2|lbl=Ⅰ.33r.2|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/87|1|lbl=Ⅰ.33v.1|p=1}}
| Hauwet dein gegentheil von Oben auff dich / so trit und hauw jhm von deiner Rechten / mit einem uberzwerchen Mittelhauw seinen herfliegenden streich mit langer schneid von dir wegk auch durch / das dir dein klinge wider umbfliege mit halber schneide gegen seinem lincken Ohr / neben demselbigen las abermals ablauffen / unnd zuck als bald von deiner Rechten gegen deiner Lincken wider umb dein Haupt / trit unnd schlag jhm mit ebicher letzer flech von deiner Lincken zu seinem Rechten ohr / uberzwerch durch die Mittellinien / wie solche an dem grossern Bidld in der Figur A. zur rechten Handt zu sehen.
 
  
 
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| If it happens that he would not strike, then place yourself into the right Wrath stance and drive over your forward thigh thus: Stay standing with your left foot planted and strike seriously from your right over your left leg into the left Changer, from there travel over yourself again with the short edge through the strike line which you just travelled through from above so that your sword comes to your right shoulder again. Do this then once or thrice and, at the last when you see your opportunity, then drive the short edge in a move from your left above in the air over yourself and let it snap over thus into an upstrike to his lower right opening with your third step, and as this is then pulled right, then slash a deep one again with the short edge over your hand to his left ear, in this let your pommel snap full upward, thus letting it go deeper, then twitch over again and drive a strike to his lower right opening with two forward steps, and then as such is pulled right, then slash again over your hand with the short edge to his left ear, in this let your pommel snap upward thus making it go deeper, twitch over again and drive a strike to his right, yet still soon traverse again to his left with a back step and then pull out.
+
| <p>'''Breaking the Roof Stance or Guard'''</p>
| Im fall er aber nit hauwen wolt / so stelle dich in rechten Zorn / treib uber dein fürgesetzten schenckel also / Bleib mit deim lincken Fuß stehen / und hauwe von deienr Rechten schlims uber dein Linck bein in den lincken Wechsel / von dannen reiß mit kurtzer schneid wider ubersich durch die streich Linie / durch welche du von Oben her gehauwen hast / das dein Schwerdt wider an dein rechte Achsel komme / das thu denn ein mal oder drey / unnd zum letzten wann du dein gelegenheit ersehen / so fahr mit kurtzer schneid in einem riß von deiner Lincken Oben ubersich in die lufft / und laß also uber dein Haupt in der lufft zu einem Underhauw nach seiner rechten undern Blös umbschnappen mit einem zwifachen zutrit / und ehe dann solches recht griert / so schlag wider mit kurtzer schneid uber dein handt zu seinem Lincken ohr dieff ein / laß in solchem dein Knopff wol ubersich schnappen / so gehet es desto dieffer / zuck denn wider umb / und trauwe jhm zur Rechten ein Hauw / jedoch Zwirch bald wider mit einem abtrit zu seiner Lincken / und ziehe denn ab.
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 +
<p>If you are aware that after striking outward one can, in a little flight up over the head, stay in the Guard of the Roof, then come in the pre-fencing into the Guard of the Key, from there raise both hands thus crosswise over your head, and at the same time step to him with your right foot, and while stepping strike with the short edge near your right thigh strongly from below through your opponent’s Vertex line up above you, so that the sword is above your head, flying off with an upstrike from your left to your right, keep your hands high in the displacement, just as it connects then step nimbly with your right foot to his left and strike with the short edge in a swing to his left ear. From there upstrike twice with a walk, follow the slash with a traverse to his right ear, and just then step at the same time with your right foot backward to your left, thus the Traverse goes deeper. When this happens you can strike as soon as he does.</p>
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/87|2|lbl=Ⅰ.33v.2}}
  
 
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| In the pre-fencing strike into the the right Wrath and, as soon as your opponent goes off, then raise your hands high over your head and let your point shoot forward toward his face as if you would stab, but twitch off again and slash with inverted hands or reversed flat from your lower right out to his left ear or arm together with a retreating step. If he then strikes from above at the same time as you, then nimbly twitch over after the swords meet and slash diagonally deep to his upper right opening with an inward flat so that your hands become crossed, yet then pull out to yourself again as if you would strike to his left but don’t, rather twitch off again without engaging and strike thus with the short edge in a circle to his right ear so that the short edge grazes his ear. During this keep your hands high above you and step around with the circle then step back and strike a direct vertex strike to his head, then twitch nimbly upward again with a high traversing cross. That is, come over your head into the Crown, from there traverse to both sides, the first on the right with the long edge, the other to the left with the short edge, keeping your thumb always under the ricasso, and pull off.
+
| <p>Or if he comes ahead to you going high, then pay attention then if he will go to the low guard, then follow him nimbly with two strong understrikes from both sides out of whatever guard or stance suits you, just as long as you strike nimbly from below. One to the other with the half edge in a nimble walk from both sides deep to the head, after this bind nimbly into his blade, if he goes off then follow after. If he stays then wind, wrench out and make your work onward to the next.</p>
| Im zufechen verhauw dich in rechten Zorn / unnd so bald dein gegenfechter auffgehet / so erheb dein hend in die höh uber dein Haupt / unnd las jhm den vordern ort gegen seinem gesicht schiessen / als woltestu stechen / zuck aber wider an dich / und schlag mit ebichter handt oder auswendiger flech / sampt einem abtrit von deiner Rechten unden auff zu seinem lincken ohr oder arm / Hauwet er dann zugleich von Oben mit dir ein / so zuck behend nach dem die Scherdt getroffen wider umb / und schlag mit inwendiger flech / das dein hend kreutzweis kommen / ubereck zu seiner Rechten obern Blös dieff hinein / als denn ziehe wider an dich / als wollestu zu seiner Lincken hauwen / [XXXVv] thu es aber nit / sonder zuck ungetroffen wider ab / unnd hauw also mit kurtzer schneid in einem Zirckel zu seinem rechten ohr / das die kurtze schneide an seinem ohr schürpffe / und dein hend under des hoch uber deinem Haupte bleiben / aber in dem der Zirckel umblaufft / so trit zu ruck und hauw ein geraden Scheidelhauw zu seinem Kopff / zuck den behend wider ubersich mit uberzwerchem kreutz / das ist / komm mit der Kron uber dein Haupt / von dannen Zwirch zu beiden seiten / den ersten zur Rechten mit langer schneid / den andern zur Lincken mit kurtzer schneid / das dein Daumen alweg unden auff deinem schildt bleib / und zeich ab.
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/87|3|lbl=Ⅰ.33v.3}}
  
 
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword E.png|center|400px]]
| '''Rule'''
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| <p>'''Wrath Guard'''</p>
When you stand in the Right or Left Wrath, and one strikes to you from below committing to your right or left opening, then strike high outward with the long edge and, just as it engages, then shoot the point on his sword inward to his face, just then drive off with your hands and work to the next opening with elements of going before or after.
+
 
| '''Regel.'''
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<p>When at the onset you come into the Wrath Guard, then step as soon as you can reach him and strike a quick Wrath Strike, which he must defend from, to his left ear. Nimbly follow the strike over with an Under Strike against his lower right opening, thus you have now attacked. Under this as and when he is reached for work and the arms show he will strike, then fall low with your sword onto his arm and behind his charge so that he can not come to work, as he will then not be able to rightly defend from this, then thrust to him with an incomplete shove from yourself, that he likewise shows that he would fall, and meanwhile slash to the next opening that you know you have, but if he reaches this and strikes you off, then be there again with the cut or displacement, and fall against his strike on the blade, if he goes off the blade again, then cut him on the arm again, but if he stays on your sword then thrust his sword aside with your hilt and nimbly let your sword fly again to the next opening and swing to him after your need. Thus now you shall fight with all elements of the sword to the body, and from the body to the sword, but where he would twitch or flow off from you, then always use the cut for help, and where you can’t cut, then there can be no useful fencing, but where you can do it rightly, then swing to him as you will. He who can break the cut himself, you will find less, but he who cannot rightly lead the cut will soon be broken.</p>
WEnn du im Rechten oder Lincken Zorn stehest / und einer dir von unden eintweder zur rechten oder lincken Blöß zuhauwet / so hauw mit Langer schneid Oben darauff / und in dem es trifft so schieß jhm den ort auff seinem Schwerdt hinein zum gesicht / fahr in des auff mit den henden / und arbeit zu der nechsten Blöß / mit vor oder nach gehenden stucken.
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/89|1|lbl=Ⅰ.34v.1}}
  
 
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword L.png|center|400px]]
| '''Left Wrath Stance'''
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| rowspan="2" | <p>If you stand in the right Wrath stance and your opponent strikes from his right to your left, then with a step of your right foot drive with displacement under his blade and over your head, and catch his strike on your flat with your thumb underneath, and the blade hanging below you somewhat to the ground, but as soon as in glides then step with the left foot to his right side, and wind the short edge under his sword inward to his head, as shown by the small middle figures in illustration L. When you have wound, then hold your sword with the short edge on his, and wrench the sword out following against your right above you, as shown by the small middle figures in illustration F, thus that your hands complete the wrench high in the air and crossed over, and slash in (keeping your hands high) with an inwinding flat to his lower right opening, as soon as he swipes against it in displacement, then don’t pull but twitch high again and strike a glide strike to his left ear, but in this strike let the blade swing in deep over your hands and fence quickly away from him.</p>
When at the onset you come into the Left Wrath stance, then drive over the right thigh, as above with the left, one strike, two, three, yet then step and strike from your low left out strongly through your right upward, so that your sword flies over in the air in an upstrike toward your right, then twitch over your head and strike a strong traverse to his left ear, onward quickly crosswise and high traverse to all four openings: to his left over the hand, be it high or low, that is reversed or inverted with the hand, and on his right with an inward flat, that is under the hand.
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| rowspan="2" |
| '''Lincke Zornhut.'''
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/89|2|lbl=Ⅰ.34v.2|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/90|1|lbl=Ⅰ.35r.1|p=1}}
KUmmestu im zugang in die Lincke Zornhut / so treib uber den rechten Schenckel / wie doben uber den Lincken / ein Hauw zwen drey / als dann tritt und hauw von deiner Lincken undne auff durch sein Rechte / starck ubersich durch / das dein Schwerdt in der lufft wider zu einem Underhauw wider umbfliege / gegen seiner Rechten / zuck als dann umb den Kopff / unnd hauw ein starcken Zwirchhauw zu seinem Lincken ohr / schnell fürder kreutzweis unnd uberzwerch zu allen vier Blössen / auf seiner Lincken uber die hand / es sei Unden oder Oben / das ist mit ebichter oder letzer handt / und auff sein Rechte mit inwendiger flech / das ist under der handt.
 
  
 
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| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword Cuts.jpg|center]]
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword F.png|center|400px]]
| '''With the Ox'''
 
I hope you have taken and judged how you will apply your strikes and elements against your opponent’s four openings with sufficient guidance from the parts taught up to now, also how at times how you should apply a wind, cut, note the flowing off, circle, and flying off with stepping, which are not counted alone as such from this, indeed pre-fencing from all other stances shall also be understood. So now, because the Ox is an especially good stance to engage your opponent, I will give a short lesson and rules on how you shall engage your opponent in the Before, rush, and force displacement from it.
 
| '''[XXXVIr] Der Ochs mit.'''
 
AUß disen bißher gelerten stucken / hoffe ich du habest genugsame anleitung / und bericht zu nemmen / wie du deine häuw und stuck gegen des Manns vier Blössen anschicken / auch wie du bißweilen ein winden / Schnit / Item ein Ablauffen / Zirckel und ein verfliegen damit lauffen lassen solt / welches aber nicht allein auß disen in welchen solches erzelt / sonder sol auch von allen andern Legern den mehrertheil zufechten verstanden werden. Derwegen dieweil der Ochs ein sonderlich gut Leger dein widerpart anzugreiffen / will ich in disem / wie du den Mann im Vor angreiffen / ubereilen / und dir zuversetzen zwingen solt / ein kurtze lehr und regel geben
 
  
 
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| And mark now the first, that you have four available attacks from either side, driven forth through the four leading lines as was explained and made apparent in the initial chapter, the lines being the correct paths for all strikes which would be driven and struck from you to your opponent.
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword A.png|center|400px]]
| Und merck für das erste / das du von einer jeden seiten vier fürnemer angrif hast / nach außweisung der vier Haupt linien / wie solches anfangs des Capitels augenscheinlich zusehen fürgestelt / welche Lini sein die rechten strassen aller Häuw so von dir gegen deinem gegenfechter geführet und gehauwen werden.
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| <p>If your counterpart strikes to you from above, then step and strike to him from your right with a high traversing Middle Strike, thus also through and away from his long edge strike in flight so that your blade flies over with the half edge against his left ear but, as soon as you near it, flow off and twitch over your head from your right to your left, step and slash him with an inverted flat from your left to his right ear, high traversing through the middle line shown on the larger figure on the right of illustration A.</p>
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/90|2|lbl=Ⅰ.35r.2}}
  
 
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| The first of two is when you approach against your opponent with the Plunge Strike, which plunges as you hold your point toward him, and hold it steady (as was taught above) so that your thrust is obviously indicated, from which as soon as you can reach your opponent to attack, be it from below or above, wrathful or high traverse, as is shown through the lines, you will now attack through them from one side striking either high traverse or diagonally against him, be it with long or short edge or with the flat. This you bring on forcefully and nimbly Before him, and must force unto him so that he can not come to other work without your leave, then if he would soon try to work against you, then you will already be at his throat with travelling after, cuts, hits, and similar work following, with which you let no work be accomplished, thus now from this lesson’s elementary basis, an example of how to judge this in both attacking and travelling after will be given:
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| <p>If it happens that he would not strike, then place yourself into the right Wrath stance and drive over your forward thigh thus: Stay standing with your left foot planted and strike seriously from your right over your left leg into the left Changer, from there travel over yourself again with the short edge through the strike line which you just travelled through from above so that your sword comes to your right shoulder again. Do this then once or thrice and, at the last when you see your opportunity, then drive the short edge in a move from your left above in the air over yourself and let it snap over thus into an upstrike to his lower right opening with your third step, and as this is then pulled right, then slash a deep one again with the short edge over your hand to his left ear, in this let your pommel snap full upward, thus letting it go deeper, then twitch over again and drive a strike to his lower right opening with two forward steps, and then as such is pulled right, then slash again over your hand with the short edge to his left ear, in this let your pommel snap upward thus making it go deeper, twitch over again and drive a strike to his right, yet still soon traverse again to his left with a back step and then pull out.</p>
| Derhalben wann du mit dem Sturtzhauw gegen deinem Mann zugehst / welcher Sturtz so du also den ort gegen dem Mann haltest und still heltest der (wie oben gelehrt) von wegen seines zeigenden stoß genant wirt / aus welchem du nun so bald dein gegen fechter erlangen / angreiffen kanst / es sey von Under oder Oben / schlims oder uberzwerch / wie solches die Lini zugegen anzeigen / zu welcher Lini du nun von einer seiten angreiffest / gegen derselbigen soltu auch uberzwerch oder ubereck dargegen Hauwen / es sey mit Langer oder halber schneide / oder mit der flech / So du sie jhm Vor gewaltig und behend volbringest / zwingest du jhn das er dir andere arbeit ohn sein danck auch zulassen mus / dann ob er schon dargegen zufechten sich arbeitet / so bistu jhm doch schon auff dem hals / mit nachreisen / schneiden / trucken und dergleichen nach zufolgen / damit du jhn zu keiner volkommenen arbeit kommen lassest / also seind auch bißher gelehrte stuck auff disen grund / beide im angreiffen und im nachfechten gerichtet / Exempel.
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/90|3|lbl=Ⅰ.35r.3}}
  
 
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword K.jpg|center|400px]]
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| In the pre-fencing when you have come into the guard of the Ox through a plunge, then strike (as soon as you can reach him) a serious and forceful Wrath Strike from your right to his left ear with a long right foot step, as soon as the strike touches or hits, then almost twitch off again and strike over against his left arm, also with the long edge, but with this strike step with your left foot to his right and take your head out to the side behind your blade, just then he may be ready either to strike or otherwise with his sword stretched out ahead to displace, so at first let your blade hang behind you from your right arm, and meanwhile twitch your grip over your head to your right and take his blade (he is stretched out from striking or displacing) with your long edge or flat and strongly and forcefully high traverse out from your right to his left so that you break out fully with your blade, and in this outward stride let your blade fly above again in a traverse over your head against his left ear, from there twitch your sword over your head again and strike a strong strike swinging in to his right ear with the flat outward, in a flat strike as shown by the larger figure on the right hand side of illustration K, also mark diligently that you step fully out with the left foot to his right side in this strike, from this flatstrike or Bounce Strike twitch your sword high over your head, keeping your hands high, and let the blade fly over with the long edge to his right arm, and yet don’t impact, but traverse nimbly to his left ear while stepping back with the right foot, and sign off. This play, when you have arranged it thus, gives you thus the cut held (as taught above) in reserve, with which you can make more room, either in fencing the full play, or onward in taking another part.
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| <p>In the pre-fencing strike into the the right Wrath and, as soon as your opponent goes off, then raise your hands high over your head and let your point shoot forward toward his face as if you would stab, but twitch off again and slash with inverted hands or reversed flat from your lower right out to his left ear or arm together with a retreating step. If he then strikes from above at the same time as you, then nimbly twitch over after the swords meet and slash diagonally deep to his upper right opening with an inward flat so that your hands become crossed, yet then pull out to yourself again as if you would strike to his left but don’t, rather twitch off again without engaging and strike thus with the short edge in a circle to his right ear so that the short edge grazes his ear. During this keep your hands high above you and step around with the circle then step back and strike a direct vertex strike to his head, then twitch nimbly upward again with a high traversing cross. That is, come over your head into the Crown, from there traverse to both sides, the first on the right with the long edge, the other to the left with the short edge, keeping your thumb always under the ricasso, and pull off.</p>
| Wann du im zufechten durch den Sturtz in die Hut des Ochsens kommest / so hauwe (als bald du jhn erlangen kanst) einen gewaltigen Zornhauw von deiner Rechten schlims gegen seinem Lincken ohr / mit einem weiten zutrit deines Rechten fußes / als bald der Hauw immer rühret oder trifft / so bald zucke wider umb und hauwe dar'''[XXXVIv]'''gegen uber zu seinem lincken Arm / auch mit Langer schneide / zu solchem Hauw aber trit wol mit deinem Lincken gegen seiner Rechten / und nim dein Kopff wol mit beiseits aus / hinder dein klingen / in dem wirt er villeicht fertig sein / eintweders zuhauwen oder sonst sein Schwerdt fürsich ausstrecken zu versetzen / Derhalben so laß dein klingen von seinem rechten Arm hinder dir abhangen / und zucke dieweil gleichwol dein Heft umb dein Kopff gegen deiner Rechten / und nime jhm sein klingen (er führe die im herhauwen / oder zu versatzung ausgestreckt) mit deiner Langen schneide oder flech / gewaltig und starck von deiner Rechten gegen seiner Lincken uberzwerch aus / also das du mit deiner klingen gantz durch brechest / unnd laß also dein klingen in solchem außnehmenden lauff / in einem flug mit einer Zwirch wider Oben umb deinen Kopff gegen seinem lincken ohr fliegen / von dannen zuck dein Schwerdt wider umb dein Kopff / und hauwe mit außwendiger fleche / einen starcken eingeschwungenen streich / außwendig zu seinem rechten ohr / Wie du solchen flechstreich an dem grossern Bild zur Rechten hand in der Figur K. fürgemalt sihest / auch merck fleissig das du mit dem lincken Fuß in solchem streich wol auß / auff sein rechte seiten trettest / von solchen flechstreich oder Brellhauw zucke dein Schwerdt hoch über dein Kopff / behalt also die hendt in solcher höhe / und laß die klingen umbfliegen mit Langer schneid zu seinem rechten Arm / und doch nicht rühren / sonder Zwirch behendt mit einem abtrit deines rechten Fuß / gegen seinem lincken Ohr / und zeich ab. Dises stuck wann es dir schon gesteckt würde / so hast du doch (wie oben gelehrt) den Schnit im vorraht / mit welchem du dir wider blatz machen kanst / eintweder das stuck vollen auß zufechten / oder ein ander stuck für zu nehmen.
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/90|4|lbl=Ⅰ.35r.4|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/91|1|lbl=Ⅰ.35v.1|p=1}}
  
 
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| Note that in the onset when you can reach your opponent from the Ox, as was just taught, then twitch your sword over your head and slash a strong and well aimed high traverse from your right with the flat outward to his left ear, yet from there twitch over your head and slash with an outward flat from the other side, also high traversing here. After these two strikes fence to what you think is a good opportunity. Thus you can always attack crosswise and against each other, which also leads out of fencing.
+
| <p>'''Rule'''</p>
| Item wann du deinen gegenman auß dem Ochssen im zugang wie jetzt gelehrt / erlangen kanst / so zuck dein Schwerdt umb dein Kopff / und schlage mit außwendiger flech von deiner Rechten / starck und gerichts uberzwerch zu seinem Lincken ohr / von dannen zuck abermal behendiglich umb dein Kopff / und schlage mit außwendiger flech von der andern seiten / auch uberzwerch her gegen / nach disen zweyen Häuwen ficht nach gelegenheit was dich gut dunckt. Also kanstu alwegen kreutzweiß und gegen einander angreiffen / wie auch fürter auß fechten.
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<p>When you stand in the Right or Left Wrath, and one strikes to you from below committing to your right or left opening, then strike high outward with the long edge and, just as it engages, then shoot the point on his sword inward to his face, just then drive off with your hands and work to the next opening with elements of going before or after.</p>
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/91|2|lbl=Ⅰ.35v.2}}
  
 
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| At times you can also, as opportunity allows, attack seriously from one side high traversing to the other, and this on one side somewhat with the long edge, on the other with the short edge or flat. At the last thus also mark where one would be rushed in this guard, so that you cannot bring any element into the before, then shoot forward just then into his face with a step forward in the long point, and in this shooting forward turn the long edge against his oncoming strike and, as soon as you engage, wind on his sword to the next opening.
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| <p>'''Left Wrath Stance'''</p>
| Auch kanstu bißweilen wann es die gelegenheit gibt / von einer seiten schlims / von der andern uberzwerch angreiffen / und das an einer seiten etwan mit langer / von der andern mit kurtzer oder flech dargegen. Zum letsten so merck auch wo dich einer in dieser Hut ubereilen würde / also das du zu keinem stuck im Vor kommen kanst / so schiesse jm den vordern ort in sein gesicht / mit einem zutrit in das Lang ort / und in solchem fürtschieben so wende die Lange schneid gegen seinem herfliegenden Haw / als bald du den entpfangen / so winde an sein schwert der nechsten Blöß zu.
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 +
<p>When at the onset you come into the Left Wrath stance, then drive over the right thigh, as above with the left, one strike, two, three, yet then step and strike from your low left out strongly through your right upward, so that your sword flies over in the air in an upstrike toward your right, then twitch over your head and strike a strong traverse to his left ear, onward quickly crosswise and high traverse to all four openings: to his left over the hand, be it high or low, that is reversed or inverted with the hand, and on his right with an inward flat, that is under the hand.</p>
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/91|3|lbl=Ⅰ.35v.3}}
  
 
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword C.jpg|center|400px]]
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| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword Cuts.png|center]]
| '''Unicorn'''
+
| <p>'''With the Ox'''</p>
Note, come into the pre-fencing with your left foot forward and strike upward from your right with the short edge, one time, twice, through in front of your face, and the third time stay in the long point with your sword thus stretched out in front of you, turn the long edge above you toward your right so that your pommel goes through under your right arm and your hands cross over one another, drive thus upward with crossed hands, thus you stand in the Unicorn, as was told of before, from then strike ahead (seeing that your left foot stays forward) with two consecutive upstrikes, the first from your right, the other from your left, both hard upward near his body so that in the second upstrike your hands cross over again as before. Drive thus nimbly upward flying off again into the Unicorn, raise your left foot somewhat up, then soon set it quickly down again, with such faking and displays you pull him in so that he then strikes to your left opening, yet just as he strikes then let your blade sink down in front of you, and then twitch your sword over your head, strike thus with the long edge high traversing from your right (with an advancing step of the same foot) against his oncoming strike, such that you catch his strike in the high traverse on the strong of your sword, as soon as the swords glide together, then burst with your right foot still forward against his left side, and raise your sword above you rushing a bit from his blade. Yet while you (as was told) drive a bit above you, then thrust your pommel through under your right arm so that your hands become crossed, quickly and nimbly with an inward flat oe short edge (with the next intended step out to his left) behind his sword to his head, as the small figures on the left side of illustration C show, you thus expose your left opening, he will rush to do the same, thus do no more then pull your pommel out from under your right arm again, and wind your sword into the long point so that your long edge turns to stand against his blade, thus you stand in direct displacement, as is shown by the other smaller figures in the same illustration,
 
| '''[XXXVIIv] Einhorn.'''
 
ITem im zufechten kome mit deinem lincken Fus vor / und streich mit kurtzer schneide von deiner Rechten ubersicht / ein mal zwey durch sein gesicht / unnd das dritemal bleib in dem Langenort / mit deinem Schwerdt vor dir außgestreckt aldo / wende die Lange schneid ubersich gegen deiner Rechten / also das dein Knopff under deinem rechten Arm durch / und dein hendt kreutzweis uber einander kommen / fahre also mit geschrenckten henden ubersich / so stehestu wie hievor vom Einhorn gesagt / von dannen hauwe ferner (doch das dein lincker Fuß alzeit vor bleibe) zwen Underhäuw zusamen / den ersten von deiner Rechten / den andern von deiner Lincken alle beide hart neben deinem leib ubersicht / also das deine hend mit dem andern Underhauw wider kreutzsweis wie vor kommen / Fahr also behend ubersich wider in das Einhorn / mit sochem auffliegen / erhebe deinen lincken Fus etwas ubersich / doch setze den bald wider nider / mit solchen geberden und Ceremonien reitzestu jn / das er dester ehe deiner lincken Blöß zuhauwet / in dem er aber herhauwet / so laß dein klinge vor dir undersich sincken / und zuck gleich mit deinem schwert umb dein Kopff / hauwe also mit Langer schneid uberzwerch von deiner Rechten (mit einem zutrit desselben fus) gegen seinem herkommenen streich / also das du jhm sein streich auff die sterck deiner klingen von uberzwerch auffangest / als bald die Schwerdter zusamen glützen / so spring mit deinem rechten Fuß noch ferner gegen seiner lincken umb / und erhebe dein Schwerdt eilents ein wenig ubersich von seiner klingen / Dieweil du aber (wie gemelt) ein wenig ubersich fahrest / so stoß under des dein Schwerdts knopff under deinem rechten Arm durch / das dein hend kreutzweiß kommen / schnell aslo behendiglich mit der inwendigen flech oder kurtzer schneid (mit nechst gemeltem austrit gegen seiner Lincken) hidner seinem Schwerdt auff seinem Kopff / wie an den kleinern bossen zur Lincken hand in der Figur C. zusehen / damit Blössestu deine Lincke seiten / will er derselbigen zu eilen / so thu nit mehr dann ziehe deinen Knopff under deinem rechten Arm wider herfür / und verwende dein Schwerdt in das Langort das die Lange schneid gegen seiner klingen gekehrt stand / so stehestu in gerader versatzung / wie solches die andern kleinern Bilder zur Rechten in gedachter Figur außweisen /  
 
  
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<p>I hope you have taken and judged how you will apply your strikes and elements against your opponent’s four openings with sufficient guidance from the parts taught up to now, also how at times how you should apply a wind, cut, note the flowing off, circle, and flying off with stepping, which are not counted alone as such from this, indeed pre-fencing from all other stances shall also be understood. So now, because the Ox is an especially good stance to engage your opponent, I will give a short lesson and rules on how you shall engage your opponent in the Before, rush, and force displacement from it.</p>
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword D.jpg|center|400px]]
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/92|1|lbl=Ⅰ.36r.1}}
| or when you have crossed the half edge inward toward his head with crossed hands, so that you have given an opening on your left side, if he rushes (as described before) to fence the same way, then keep your hands crossed, pull your head full to the right, and shoot to him with your blade fully over his, the closer to his hilt the better, thus wrench his blade out to your left, as is shown by the small figures on the right hand side of illustration D, and, when this wrench out comes near your left side, drive out with your hands and slash over them with the hald edge deep to his left ear, after which you come nimbly with your long edge onto his sword after pulling out at your pleasure.
 
| oder wann du jhn also mit geschrenckten henden die halb schneide einwerts gegen seinem Kopff geschrenckt hast / damit du dann dein lincke seiten bloß geben / ficht er dann (wie vor gemelt) derselbigen eilents zu / so behalt deine hendt also kreutzweis / und entziehe jhm dein Kopff wol gegen deiner Rechten / und schiesse jhm mit deiner klingen wol uber die seine / jhe neher bey seinem Schilt jhe '''[XXXVIIIr]''' besser / reisse jhm also sein klingen gegen deiner Lincken auß / wie du in der Figur so mit dem D. verzeichnet / in den kleinern Bilder zur Rechten hand sihest / und wann du mit solchem ausreissen nahet zu deiner Lincken kommest / so fahr mit den henden auff und schlag mit halber schneide uber dein hand / wider zu seinem lincken ohr dieff hinein / nach solchem komme jhm behend mit Langer schneid wider an sein Schwerdt / so stehestu im Langen ort demnach ziehe ab nach deinem gefallen.  
 
  
 
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword I.jpg|center|400px]]
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| <p>And mark now the first, that you have four available attacks from either side, driven forth through the four leading lines as was explained and made apparent in the initial chapter, the lines being the correct paths for all strikes which would be driven and struck from you to your opponent.</p>
| Or when you thus come to be in the Unicorn in front of your opponent, then mark Just As he strikes from above to let your blade drive over your head and bind on his sword from your right high traversing to your left and, as soon as he goes off above from this, then let your blade snap over again so that your right hand comes over your left and fall forward to his arms with the short edge and crossed hands while he is still driving off, as is shown by the outermost figures on the right hand of illustration I, then thrust away forcefully out from your left side with your hilt and strike nimbly when he shows his next opening, or follow after him until you can have your advantage.
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/92|2|lbl=Ⅰ.36r.2}}
| Oder wann du also vor deinem gegenman in das Einhorn komen bist / so merck in dem er herhauwet von Oben / so laß deine klingen umb deinen Kopff verfahren / und bind jhm von deiner Rechten uberzwerch gegen seiner Lincken an sein Schwerdt / und als bald er von dem selbigen ubersich abgeht / so laß dein klingen wider umb schnappen / also das dein Rechte hand uber die Lincke komme / und fall jhm mit kurtzer schneid und geschrenckten henden dieweil er noch also im auffahren ist / vornen für die Arm / wie an dem eussersten kleinen Bild in der Figur mit dem I. verzeichnet gegen der Rechten hand sehen kanst / stoß in also mit deinem Schilt gewaltig von dir gegen deiner Lincken zur seiten aus / und hauwe behend dieweil er dummelt der nechsten Blöß zu / oder hal jn also mit nach folgen auff / biß du deinen vortheil haben kanst.
 
  
 
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| Note when you have flown out to both sides and come into the Unicorn above you, if your opponent then strikes from his right to the left of your head, then step with your right foot toward his left well away from his strike, and then drop onto the strong of his sword (such that your hands stay crosswise) with the short edge above. This requires an offstep every time which shall be completed at the same time as his oncoming strike, and just as the swords glide together in this way, just then let the short edge snap off again up from his sword, and hit him with it over his hands to his head, after this strike with the long edge and an outstep. From this Unicorn you can also fence and attack rightly and well with the understrike and the thwart, as many good plays shall also go onward similarly when you consider it afterward.
+
| <p>The first of two is when you approach against your opponent with the Plunge Strike, which plunges as you hold your point toward him, and hold it steady (as was taught above) so that your thrust is obviously indicated, from which as soon as you can reach your opponent to attack, be it from below or above, wrathful or high traverse, as is shown through the lines, you will now attack through them from one side striking either high traverse or diagonally against him, be it with long or short edge or with the flat. This you bring on forcefully and nimbly Before him, and must force unto him so that he can not come to other work without your leave, then if he would soon try to work against you, then you will already be at his throat with travelling after, cuts, hits, and similar work following, with which you let no work be accomplished, thus now from this lesson’s elementary basis, an example of how to judge this in both attacking and travelling after will be given:</p>
| Item wann du also zu beiden seiten auff geflüglet / unnd in die höh zum Einhorn ankommen bist / hauwet er dein widerpart als dann von seiner Rechten gegen deiner Lincken zum Kopff / so trit abermal mit deinem rechten Fuß gegen seiner Lincken wol auß seinem streich / und falle jhm also (doch das deine hend kreutzweiß bleiben) mit kurtzer schneide Oben auff die sterck seines Schwerdts / Ddieseraufffall sampt gemeltem außtrit / sollen mit einander zugleich gegen seiner herfliegenden klingen volbracht werden / und in dem die Schwerdter auff solche weiß zusamen glützen / als bald laß die kurtze schneide wider von seinem Schwerdt ab umbschnappen / und schlag jn mit solcher uber die hand auff sein Kopff / oder brich mit solchem aufffallen / gegen deiner Lincken undersich durch / und zucke demnach dein hefft wider ubersich umb dein Kopff / hauwe mit einem außtrit mit Langer schneide nach. Auß disem Einhorn kanstu auch füglich und wol mit den Underhäuwen und der Zwürch angreiffen und Fechten / wie auch sonst vil guter stuck / deren du selber weiter nach dencken solt.
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/92|3|lbl=Ⅰ.36r.3}}
  
 
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword K.png|center|400px]]
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| <p>In the pre-fencing when you have come into the guard of the Ox through a plunge, then strike (as soon as you can reach him) a serious and forceful Wrath Strike from your right to his left ear with a long right foot step, as soon as the strike touches or hits, then almost twitch off again and strike over against his left arm, also with the long edge, but with this strike step with your left foot to his right and take your head out to the side behind your blade, just then he may be ready either to strike or otherwise with his sword stretched out ahead to displace, so at first let your blade hang behind you from your right arm, and meanwhile twitch your grip over your head to your right and take his blade (he is stretched out from striking or displacing) with your long edge or flat and strongly and forcefully high traverse out from your right to his left so that you break out fully with your blade, and in this outward stride let your blade fly above again in a traverse over your head against his left ear, from there twitch your sword over your head again and strike a strong strike swinging in to his right ear with the flat outward, in a flat strike as shown by the larger figure on the right hand side of illustration K, also mark diligently that you step fully out with the left foot to his right side in this strike, from this flatstrike or Bounce Strike twitch your sword high over your head, keeping your hands high, and let the blade fly over with the long edge to his right arm, and yet don’t impact, but traverse nimbly to his left ear while stepping back with the right foot, and sign off. This play, when you have arranged it thus, gives you thus the cut held (as taught above) in reserve, with which you can make more room, either in fencing the full play, or onward in taking another part.</p>
 
|  
 
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| '''Key'''
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/92|4|lbl=Ⅰ.36r.4|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/93|1|lbl=Ⅰ.36v.1|p=1}}
This guard is named the Key since all other elements and stances can be broken from this stance just as well as that which can happen from others where you will actually need more force to do so than in this one, and since a key is a small instrument which, without particular effort or force, can enter a big strong castle where otherwise a man must use great force, thus from this weak stance (as it may seem) all other elements will be broken artfully and delicately without special effort, and basically that’s the story. In the pre-fencing put yourself in this guard and, even as how to fence in such forms as the Unicorn was told before, it stands against your opponent’s guards, left or right, high or low, thus stab to him from the Key before yourself directly to his face into the Long Point, the stab of which he (if he doesn’t want to be hit) must defend from. On whichever side he then hits out from, then let your blade then swipe away with intent as he hits out to it, drive over your head and strike him to the same side that he struck out from, if he swipes after it, then don’t let it hit, but let it fly off to another opening, and strike away from him as he seeks for another opening.
 
| '''[XXXVIIIv] Schlüssel.'''
 
DIse Hut wirt darumb Schlüssel genant / dieweil auß disem Leger alle ander stuck unnd Leger gebrochen werden können / dann ob solches wol aus andern auch geschehen kann / so mustu doch merh gewalts darzu brauchen / dann in disem / und wie ein Schlüssel ein klein Instrument ohn sondere mühe / ein groß starck Schloß darzu man sonst grossen gewalt haben müste / auff thut / also werden und können auch auß disem schwachen Leger (darfür es angesehen wirt) alle andere stuck ohn sondere müh künstlich und zierlich gebrochen werden / und geschicht das ohngefehrlich auff solche weiß / Jim zufechten schicke dich in ddieseHut / unnd das eben auff solche form wie du dich ins Einhorn heivor gemelt gefochten hast / es legere sich dann dein gegenpart zur Rechten oder Lincken / in der obern oder undern Huten eine / so stich jhm auß dem Schlüssel gerichts für dir hin zu seinem gesicht in das Langort / welchen stich er dir (ob er nicht getroffen werden will) wehren muß / von welcher seiten er dir den als dan außschlecht / so laß dein klingen mit willen den weg dahin er die mit seinem außschlagen hin gewisen hat / umb deinen Kopff fahren / und hauwe jhm eben zu derselbigen seiten von welcher er dir außgeschlagen hat hinein / wischt er jhm aber nach / so magstu nit antreffen / sonder verfliegen lassen zu einer andern Blös / und ehe er sich des versicht dich gegen einer andern Blös von jhm wegk hauwen.
 
  
 
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| Don’t go to other stances with your opponent, but force them out from you by striking, if he strikes just then from above or from below, from the right or from the left, then mark just as he strikes in, then shoot your Long Point in front of you into his face, and at the same time as shooting forward twist your long edge against his oncoming strike, when you have caught his strike on the strong of your long edge, then stay hard on his blade and wind in nimbly outward to his head, but if he goes nimbly off from your sword striking to the other side, then strike or rush him (while his sword is still driving out) to his head or arms, hurry soon after this to bind again on his sword and think of travelling after, slices, wrenches out, and misleading.
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| <p>Note that in the onset when you can reach your opponent from the Ox, as was just taught, then twitch your sword over your head and slash a strong and well aimed high traverse from your right with the flat outward to his left ear, yet from there twitch over your head and slash with an outward flat from the other side, also high traversing here. After these two strikes fence to what you think is a good opportunity. Thus you can always attack crosswise and against each other, which also leads out of fencing.</p>
| Zum andern legert sich aber dein widerpart nicht / sonder tringt auff dich mit häuwen / er hauwe als dann von Oben oder von Unden / von Rechter oder von Lincker / so mercke in dem er herhauwet / so schiesse den Langenort für dir hin / abermal gegen seinem gesicht / und wende zugleich in solchem fürtschieben die Lang schneid gegen seinem herfliegenden hauw / wann du nun seinen hauw auff dein Lange schneide in die sterck empfangen hast / so bleib hart an seiner klingen / und winde behendiglich hinein / und außwerts zu seinem Kopff / geht er aber behend von deiner klingen ab / gegen der andern seiten zuhauwen / so hauwe oder schnelle jhm (dieweil er sein Schwerdt noch also herumb führt) zu seinem Kopff oder Armen / eile demnach bald wider mit dem Band an sein Schwerdt und gedenck des Nachreises / Schneides /Ausreisses / Verführens alle zeit.
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/93|2|lbl=Ⅰ.36v.2}}
  
 
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| Basically from this forward Guard you fence elements in the Before and shall attack through it, thus you can take off to the elements to which one breaks the High Guard acting from this Key.
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| <p>At times you can also, as opportunity allows, attack seriously from one side high traversing to the other, and this on one side somewhat with the long edge, on the other with the short edge or flat. At the last thus also mark where one would be rushed in this guard, so that you cannot bring any element into the before, then shoot forward just then into his face with a step forward in the long point, and in this shooting forward turn the long edge against his oncoming strike and, as soon as you engage, wind on his sword to the next opening.</p>
| Was du aber uhngefehrlich aus dieser Hut für stuck im Vor Fechten und dardurch angreiffen solt / das kanstu abnemen an dem stuck welches hievor zu einem bruch auff die Oberhut / aus disem Schlüssel gesetzt ist.
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/93|3|lbl=Ⅰ.36v.3}}
  
 
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword F.jpg|center|400px]]
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword C.png|center|400px]]
| '''Hanging Point'''
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| <p>'''Unicorn'''</p>
In the pre-fencing strike forcefully from your left above you through toward his face in a sweep, once, twice, and the third time don’t let your sword swing out before your face but twist it into the Hanging Point, as shown on the right hand side of figure F and as taught before, and do this a number of times until you see your opportunity to attack with an element, but if your opponent strikes to you during this (while you stand thus in the Hanging Point) from above, or high traverse, or from below to your fingers, or against your head on the left, then step soon out to your left with the left foot behind the right, and twitch at the same time as he strikes, your sword thus hangs from above you against your right shoulder, from here step and strike at the same time as him left to his head, pull the pommel hard to your inward arm in this strike onto the flat, then swing your blade on forcefully to his head. hold your pommel thus hard on your arm and wrench thus out above you with outstretched blade to your left, let this wrench thus fly over your head and traverse strike strong to his left.
+
 
| '''[XXXIXrv] Hangetort.'''
+
<p>Note, come into the pre-fencing with your left foot forward and strike upward from your right with the short edge, one time, twice, through in front of your face, and the third time stay in the long point with your sword thus stretched out in front of you, turn the long edge above you toward your right so that your pommel goes through under your right arm and your hands cross over one another, drive thus upward with crossed hands, thus you stand in the Unicorn, as was told of before, from then strike ahead (seeing that your left foot stays forward) with two consecutive upstrikes, the first from your right, the other from your left, both hard upward near his body so that in the second upstrike your hands cross over again as before. Drive thus nimbly upward flying off again into the Unicorn, raise your left foot somewhat up, then soon set it quickly down again, with such faking and displays you pull him in so that he then strikes to your left opening, yet just as he strikes then let your blade sink down in front of you, and then twitch your sword over your head, strike thus with the long edge high traversing from your right (with an advancing step of the same foot) against his oncoming strike, such that you catch his strike in the high traverse on the strong of your sword, as soon as the swords glide together, then burst with your right foot still forward against his left side, and raise your sword above you rushing a bit from his blade. Yet while you (as was told) drive a bit above you, then thrust your pommel through under your right arm so that your hands become crossed, quickly and nimbly with an inward flat oe short edge (with the next intended step out to his left) behind his sword to his head, as the small figures on the left side of illustration C show, you thus expose your left opening, he will rush to do the same, thus do no more then pull your pommel out from under your right arm again, and wind your sword into the long point so that your long edge turns to stand against his blade, thus you stand in direct displacement, as is shown by the other smaller figures in the same illustration,</p>
IM zufechten so streich gewaltiglich von deienr Lincken übersich gegen seim gesicht durch / in einem raht ein mal zwey / und das dritte mal aber laß alwegen dein Schwerdt vor deinem gesicht verschwingen / oder verwende in das Hangetort / wie dich das Bild zur Rechten hand in der Figur mit dem F. hie zu gegen lehrt / unnd das thu ein mal etlich biß das du dein gelegenheit ersihest / mit einem stuck an zugrieffen / hauwet er dein gegenpart aber under des (dieweil du also in dem Hangeten ort stehest) auff dich von Oben / uberzwerch / oder von Unden oder auch nach deinen Fingern / gegen deiner Lincken zum Kopff / so trit bald mit deinem Lincken fuß hinder deinem Rechten / gegen seiner Lincken aus / und zucke zugleich in dem er hauwet / dein Schwerdt also hanget ubersich gegen deiner rechten Achsel / von derselbigen hauwe zugleich mit jhm / in obgelehrtem trit gegen seiner Lincken zum Kopff / in solchem Hauw verzeihe dein knopff / starck zu deinem inwendigen Arm an die flechs / so schwingt sich dein kling dester gewaltiger zu seinem Kopff / behalt also dein knopff hart an deinem Arm / und reiß also mit ausgestreckter klingen gegen deiner Lincken ubersich aus / laß also in disem riß umb deinen Kopff fliegen / und Zwirch gegen seiner Lincken starck hinein.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/95|1|lbl=Ⅰ.37v.1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 +
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword D.png|center|400px]]
 +
| <p>or when you have crossed the half edge inward toward his head with crossed hands, so that you have given an opening on your left side, if he rushes (as described before) to fence the same way, then keep your hands crossed, pull your head full to the right, and shoot to him with your blade fully over his, the closer to his hilt the better, thus wrench his blade out to your left, as is shown by the small figures on the right hand side of illustration D, and, when this wrench out comes near your left side, drive out with your hands and slash over them with the hald edge deep to his left ear, after which you come nimbly with your long edge onto his sword after pulling out at your pleasure.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
| But if he strikes to your right side from above, then catch his strike on your blade’s flat and step out to his right, or stay with your blade (just as the blades have struck together) on the side and wind the short edge inwards to his head, twist nimbly with the sword into the Long Point from the wind, such that you smite his after work away from you, but if he fences in to you from below your blade to your right ear, away from what happens, then twist yet again into the long point with the long edge below, thus setting aside his blade, yet while you displace at the same time also step nimbly with the left foot to his right and thrust your pommel (just as the parry is about to engage) through under your right arm, thus raise your sword high with crossed hands, and hit again nimbly upward with the half edge to his right ear, if he displaces this then let the blade flow off near your right, and step back again with your left foot and meanwhile with your back step strike a forceful middle strike, traverse over to his left ear or arm, then pull out. What would be fenced further is easily taken onward from here.
+
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/95|2|lbl=Ⅰ.37v.2|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/96|1|lbl=Ⅰ.38r.1|p=1}}
| Hauwet er aber gegen deiner Rechten von Oben / so fange sein streich auff dein flache klinge / unnd trit aus gegen seiner Rechten / oder bleib mit deiner klingen (in dem die Schwerdter zusamen gerührt haben) an der seinen und winde jhm die kurtze schneide einwerts zu seinem Kopff / verwende behend mit dem Schwerdt aus dem winden in das Lang ort / also das du jhm sein nach arbeit mit Langer schneide von dir abweisest / ficht er dir aber under deiner klingen hinein zu deinem Rechten ohr / auff was weg das geschehe / so verwende abermal dein Schwert in das Lang ort / die Lang schneid undersich / so setztu jhm also sein kling ab / dieweil du aber so absetzest / dieselbige weil trit auch mit deinem Lincken fus behendiglich gegen seiner Rechten / und stoß under des dein knopff (in dem der absatz gleich noch rührt) under deinen rechten Arm durch / erhebe also dein Schwerdt mit geschrenckten henden in die höhe / und schlag behend mit halber schneid wider nider zu seinem rechten ohr / versetzt er solches / so las die klingen neben seiner Rechten ablauffen / und trit mit deinem Lincken fuß wider zu ruck / unnd hauwe dieweil du abtrits einen gewaltigen Mittelhauw / uberzwerch zu seinem Lincken ohr oder armen / demnoch zieh ab / was weiter hieraus zufechten / ist aus disem leicht ab zunehmen.
 
  
 
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|-  
|  
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword I.png|center|400px]]
| '''Iron Door'''
+
| <p>Or when you thus come to be in the Unicorn in front of your opponent, then mark Just As he strikes from above to let your blade drive over your head and bind on his sword from your right high traversing to your left and, as soon as he goes off above from this, then let your blade snap over again so that your right hand comes over your left and fall forward to his arms with the short edge and crossed hands while he is still driving off, as is shown by the outermost figures on the right hand of illustration I, then thrust away forcefully out from your left side with your hilt and strike nimbly when he shows his next opening, or follow after him until you can have your advantage.</p>
This Iron Door is actually (as said above) the Barrier Guard, from which you fence thus: if he strikes one from above, then drive thus out with crossed hands and catch his strike on the strong of your blade, just as he then takes his sword off your blade from this strike, then strike him (while his arms pull over himself) with a forceful upstrike to his arms, as soon as he tries to clear off then fence to his head.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/96|2|lbl=Ⅰ.38r.2}}
| '''[XLr] Eisenport.'''
 
DIse Eiseneport ist eigentlich (wie oben gemelt) die Schranckhut / aus welcher ficht also / Hauwet einer auff dich von Oben / so fahre also mit gekreutzigten henden auff / und fang jhm sein hauw auff di sterck deiner klingen / in dem er als dann sein Schwerdt von gemeltem Hauw von deiner klingen wider abnimpt / so hauwe ihm (dieweil er die Arm ubersich zeuhet) mit Underhäuwen gewaltiglich nach seinen Armen zu / so bald er herab fellet so ficht jhm zum Kopff.
 
  
 
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| Note, displace his high strike as before, and just as the swords glide together then wind the short edge nimbly inward to his right ear, then wind again to his left side nimbly over him with your pommel through below, and with a back step strike long to the left of his head. However where he would fence to you from below, then fall from above with the long edge onto his sword into the Long Point. The Iron Door or Barrier Guard breaks out the Key, namely stab toward his face forcing him above himself, and then fence after him (just as he drives overhead) from below.
+
| <p>Note when you have flown out to both sides and come into the Unicorn above you, if your opponent then strikes from his right to the left of your head, then step with your right foot toward his left well away from his strike, and then drop onto the strong of his sword (such that your hands stay crosswise) with the short edge above. This requires an offstep every time which shall be completed at the same time as his oncoming strike, and just as the swords glide together in this way, just then let the short edge snap off again up from his sword, and hit him with it over his hands to his head, after this strike with the long edge and an outstep. From this Unicorn you can also fence and attack rightly and well with the understrike and the thwart, as many good plays shall also go onward similarly when you consider it afterward.</p>
| Item versetze seinen Oberhauw wie vor / unnd in dem die Schwerdter auff einander glützen / so winde behendiglichen die kurtze schneid einwerts zu seinem Rechten ohr / unnd winde demnach behende wider mit deinem knopff unden durch / gegen seiner Lincken seiten ubersich / und hauwe mit einem abtrit lang gegen seiner Lincken zum Kopff. Wo er dir aber von Unden Fechten würde / so fall mit Langer schneid oben auff sein Schwerdt in das Lang ort / Diese Eisenport oder Schranckhut brich auß dem Schlüssel / nemlich stich jhm gegen seinem gesicht damit zwingestu jhn ubersich / als dann ficht jhm von Unden (in dem er ubersich fehrt) nach.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/96|3|lbl=Ⅰ.38r.3|p=1}}
  
 
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| '''Close Guard'''
+
| <p>'''Key'''</p>
From the Close Guard you will fence into the Arc Strike; as you have been struck to an opening when you hold yourself in the right Close Guard, then step springing with your right foot to his left well away from his strike, and strike with crossed hands above and behind his blade to his head, twitch nimbly (where you don’t want to wrench out to your left) above him with crossed hands and hit strongly with the outward flat from below to his left ear; however where he won’t strike, then fence such as you will learn from the Middle Guard following this.
+
 
| '''Nebenhut.'''
+
<p>This guard is named the Key since all other elements and stances can be broken from this stance just as well as that which can happen from others where you will actually need more force to do so than in this one, and since a key is a small instrument which, without particular effort or force, can enter a big strong castle where otherwise a man must use great force, thus from this weak stance (as it may seem) all other elements will be broken artfully and delicately without special effort, and basically that’s the story. In the pre-fencing put yourself in this guard and, even as how to fence in such forms as the Unicorn was told before, it stands against your opponent’s guards, left or right, high or low, thus stab to him from the Key before yourself directly to his face into the Long Point, the stab of which he (if he doesn’t want to be hit) must defend from. On whichever side he then hits out from, then let your blade then swipe away with intent as he hits out to it, drive over your head and strike him to the same side that he struck out from, if he swipes after it, then don’t let it hit, but let it fly off to another opening, and strike away from him as he seeks for another opening.</p>
AUß dieser Nebenhut soltu fürnemlich die Krumphäuw Fechten / als hauwet dir einer der Blös zu / wann du in der rechten Nebenhut dich verhaltest / so trit sprungs weiß mit deinem rechten Fus wol aus seinem hauw gegen seiner Lincken / und hauwe mit verschrenckten henden oberhalb hinder seiner klingen zum Kopff / zuck behend (wo du gegen deiner Lincken nicht ausreissen wilt) mit geschrenckten henden ubersich / und schlag mit der auswendigen flech starck umb / von Unden zu seinem Lincken ohr / wo er aber nicht hauwen wolt / so ficht auff solche weiß wie du in der Mittelhut folgends gelert wirst.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/97|1|lbl=Ⅰ.38v.1}}
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 +
|
 +
| <p>Don’t go to other stances with your opponent, but force them out from you by striking, if he strikes just then from above or from below, from the right or from the left, then mark just as he strikes in, then shoot your Long Point in front of you into his face, and at the same time as shooting forward twist your long edge against his oncoming strike, when you have caught his strike on the strong of your long edge, then stay hard on his blade and wind in nimbly outward to his head, but if he goes nimbly off from your sword striking to the other side, then strike or rush him (while his sword is still driving out) to his head or arms, hurry soon after this to bind again on his sword and think of travelling after, slices, wrenches out, and misleading.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/97|2|lbl=Ⅰ.38v.2}}
 +
 
 +
|-
 +
|
 +
| <p>Basically from this forward Guard you fence elements in the Before and shall attack through it, thus you can take off to the elements to which one breaks the High Guard acting from this Key.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/97|3|lbl=Ⅰ.38v.3}}
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword F.png|center|400px]]
 +
| <p>'''Hanging Point'''</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>In the pre-fencing strike forcefully from your left above you through toward his face in a sweep, once, twice, and the third time don’t let your sword swing out before your face but twist it into the Hanging Point, as shown on the right hand side of figure F and as taught before, and do this a number of times until you see your opportunity to attack with an element, but if your opponent strikes to you during this (while you stand thus in the Hanging Point) from above, or high traverse, or from below to your fingers, or against your head on the left, then step soon out to your left with the left foot behind the right, and twitch at the same time as he strikes, your sword thus hangs from above you against your right shoulder, from here step and strike at the same time as him left to his head, pull the pommel hard to your inward arm in this strike onto the flat, then swing your blade on forcefully to his head. hold your pommel thus hard on your arm and wrench thus out above you with outstretched blade to your left, let this wrench thus fly over your head and traverse strike strong to his left.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/99|1|lbl=Ⅰ.39v.1}}
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 +
|-
 +
|
 +
| <p>But if he strikes to your right side from above, then catch his strike on your blade’s flat and step out to his right, or stay with your blade (just as the blades have struck together) on the side and wind the short edge inwards to his head, twist nimbly with the sword into the Long Point from the wind, such that you smite his after work away from you, but if he fences in to you from below your blade to your right ear, away from what happens, then twist yet again into the long point with the long edge below, thus setting aside his blade, yet while you displace at the same time also step nimbly with the left foot to his right and thrust your pommel (just as the parry is about to engage) through under your right arm, thus raise your sword high with crossed hands, and hit again nimbly upward with the half edge to his right ear, if he displaces this then let the blade flow off near your right, and step back again with your left foot and meanwhile with your back step strike a forceful middle strike, traverse over to his left ear or arm, then pull out. What would be fenced further is easily taken onward from here.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/99|2|lbl=Ⅰ.39v.2}}
 +
 
 +
|-
 +
|
 +
| <p>'''Iron Door'''</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>This Iron Door is actually (as said above) the Barrier Guard, from which you fence thus: if he strikes one from above, then drive thus out with crossed hands and catch his strike on the strong of your blade, just as he then takes his sword off your blade from this strike, then strike him (while his arms pull over himself) with a forceful upstrike to his arms, as soon as he tries to clear off then fence to his head.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/100|1|lbl=Ⅰ.40r.1}}
 +
 
 +
|-
 +
|
 +
| <p>Note, displace his high strike as before, and just as the swords glide together then wind the short edge nimbly inward to his right ear, then wind again to his left side nimbly over him with your pommel through below, and with a back step strike long to the left of his head. However where he would fence to you from below, then fall from above with the long edge onto his sword into the Long Point. The Iron Door or Barrier Guard breaks out the Key, namely stab toward his face forcing him above himself, and then fence after him (just as he drives overhead) from below.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/100|2|lbl=Ⅰ.40r.2}}
 +
 
 +
|-
 +
|
 +
| <p>'''Close Guard'''</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>From the Close Guard you will fence into the Arc Strike; as you have been struck to an opening when you hold yourself in the right Close Guard, then step springing with your right foot to his left well away from his strike, and strike with crossed hands above and behind his blade to his head, twitch nimbly (where you don’t want to wrench out to your left) above him with crossed hands and hit strongly with the outward flat from below to his left ear; however where he won’t strike, then fence such as you will learn from the Middle Guard following this.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/100|3|lbl=Ⅰ.40r.3}}
  
 
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<p>You will learn of the Middle Guard later with the Dusack, whereas that will be done with one hand, here you shall place yourself in it with two hands. Then even if in the beginning I was not well disposed to set this here, I can indeed (since from nothing else can the Ward of the Roses be taught onward) otherwise not go forward, then mark when one comes ahead to you so that his sword is stretched out before him in the long point or else driving in direct displacement, then drive with your blade around in a circle from the middle guard right over around his, so that you come right back to the same middle guard with your blade, from there swing the weak forcefully out to him over his arm to his head, or as he then (just as you would would drive over his blade through the roses) meanwhile would fall from above down to your opening, then take his blade outward with the half edge, namely on the second time you come to be in the middle guard, then as quickly as he has not yet come to reach your opening, you come around just then with the Roses, with which you have enough time to come to the described out, after this you still take him outward, then let flow over in a curve in the air over your head (by which you mislead him) through a circle to the next opening.</p>
 
<p>You will learn of the Middle Guard later with the Dusack, whereas that will be done with one hand, here you shall place yourself in it with two hands. Then even if in the beginning I was not well disposed to set this here, I can indeed (since from nothing else can the Ward of the Roses be taught onward) otherwise not go forward, then mark when one comes ahead to you so that his sword is stretched out before him in the long point or else driving in direct displacement, then drive with your blade around in a circle from the middle guard right over around his, so that you come right back to the same middle guard with your blade, from there swing the weak forcefully out to him over his arm to his head, or as he then (just as you would would drive over his blade through the roses) meanwhile would fall from above down to your opening, then take his blade outward with the half edge, namely on the second time you come to be in the middle guard, then as quickly as he has not yet come to reach your opening, you come around just then with the Roses, with which you have enough time to come to the described out, after this you still take him outward, then let flow over in a curve in the air over your head (by which you mislead him) through a circle to the next opening.</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/101|1|lbl=1.40va}}
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/101|1|lbl=Ⅰ.40v.1}}
  
 
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| <p>Or as you have struck to the left into the Middle Guard in pre-fencing, and your counterpart strikes below this to you from above, then step well out from his strike to his right side, and throw your short edge above or outside his right arm to his head, and in this throw in let your blade shoot well in, either to his head or above both his arms, then nimbly twitch your sword upward again and strike him strongly with the long edge from your left above to his right arm, from there fence to him onward as with previous and following elements at your pleasure, and meanwhile since the Roses can also be fenced rightly from the Long Point, just as I set forth the previous element, I will describe it with the Long Point as well thus:</p>
 
| <p>Or as you have struck to the left into the Middle Guard in pre-fencing, and your counterpart strikes below this to you from above, then step well out from his strike to his right side, and throw your short edge above or outside his right arm to his head, and in this throw in let your blade shoot well in, either to his head or above both his arms, then nimbly twitch your sword upward again and strike him strongly with the long edge from your left above to his right arm, from there fence to him onward as with previous and following elements at your pleasure, and meanwhile since the Roses can also be fenced rightly from the Long Point, just as I set forth the previous element, I will describe it with the Long Point as well thus:</p>
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/101|2|lbl=1.40vb}}
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/104|4|lbl=1.42rd|p=1}} '''[XLIIv]''' damit zwingestu jhn das er gehlingen ubersich fehrt / als bald er solch es thut / so lasse dein Lincke hand vom knopff ab / und laß dein klingen gegen seiner Rechten von Unden auff in einer hand umb schnappen / und setze jhm den vordern ort an sein Brust / greiff in des dein knopff wider an / wie du solches an den kleinern Bilder zur Rechten hand mit dem F. hievor sehen kanst / stoß jhn also mit verkehrter hand von dir / laß als bald dein knopff wider ab / und dein Schwerdt umb dein Kopff fahren / und hauwe lang mit angreiffung des knopffs nach / dergleichen stuck soltu gegen die welche gern einlauffen gebrauchen.
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{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/104|4|lbl=Ⅰ.42r.4|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/105|1|lbl=Ⅰ.42v.1|p=1}}
  
 
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| Item vermerckestu das dein gegenfechter gern und bald hoch aufffehrt / so streich abermal gewaltig vor jm auf / und als bald du gewahr wirst das er ubersich fehrt / so hauwe jhm dieweil er noch im auffziehen ist / uberzwerch von deiner Rechten gegen seinem lincken Arm / so bald der antrifft / so bald schlage widerumb mit inwendiger flech zu seinem Rechten ohr / in einem schwung gar dieff.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/105|2|lbl=Ⅰ.42v.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Brechfenster.'''
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/105|3|lbl=Ⅰ.42v.3}}
ISt eigendtlich der Oberhut zugetheilt / welche wirt allein im bundt (nach dem du dem Mann under sein Schwerdt komen bist) gebraucht / von der lenge aber dieweil du des Manns orthe und klingen noch für dir sihest / solt du der hut müssig gehen / dann du bist niergen sicher darinen / aber so bald du dem Mann under sein Schwerdt komen bist / so ist es der fürnemsten Huten eine / der brauch dich also.
 
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
| Wann du nun under des Manns Schwerdt komen / also das du dein Schwerdt uber deinem Kopff in gemeltem Brechfenster führen must / damit du dann beide deine Arm unnd finger Blos dargibst / derhalben so bald er von Oben dir zu den fingern hauwet / so trit wol aus seinem streich / einer seiten zu / gilt gleich zu welcher es sey / und hauwe mit einer Zwirch gegen seinem herfliegenden streich / also wirstu jhm nicht allein sein Hauw nach bey deinem Schilt auff die sterck deiner klingen aufffangen / sondern (wo er anders sein Hauw unabgezuckt volführen will) triffest jhn auch mit dem eusseren theil deiner klingen zugleich sein Kopff / Hauwet er dir aber zu deiner Armen einem / so hauwe abermals von derselbigen seiten gegen welchem Arm er dir hauwen will / mit einer Zwirch von Unden / ubersich gegen seinem herfliegenden Hauw / und merck fleissig in dem er sein Schwerdt wider '''[XLIIIrv]''' wider auffzeucht / so hauwe ihm dieweil mit Zwirchhäuwen ubersich oder uberzwerch in sein Arm / als bald er wider herab felt / so fang ihm sein klingen wider auff dein uberzwerche klingen / oder schilt auff.
+
|  
 +
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/105|4|lbl=Ⅰ.42v.4|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/106|1|lbl=Ⅰ.43r.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
| Zwircht er aber oder hauwet von Unden / so hauwe jhm oben auff sein klingen / oder schauw das du jhm mit der Zwirch zu voren under sein klingen komest / wo er dir aber mit der Zwirch under die deine komen wehre / so laß dein klingen wol uber seiner abhangen / und truck die also mit deinem Schildt undersich von dir / magst jhn also hinder seiner klingen mit halber schneid seinen Kopff erlangen / oder nach dem du jhm sein klingen undersich von dir gestossen umbschlagen / auch kanstu jm ubergreiffen also.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/106|2|lbl=Ⅰ.43r.2}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="3" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword M.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| rowspan="3" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword M.png|center|400px]]
 
|  
 
|  
| Hauwet einer von Oben so hauwe demselbigen von deiner Lincken von Unden entgegen mit Langer schneide / und in dem er sein Schwerdt wider von dem deinen abnimpt / und also mit seinen Armen ubersich fehrt / so greiffe dieweil mit deinen fingern uber dein kreutz in die klingen / und fahr jhm mit deiner klingen uber beide arm / wie du solches an den zweyen under Bildern in hienach getruckter Figur sihest / seiss also auff dein Rechte seiten aus / wiltu so magst du jhn werffen also / Trit mit deinem Rechten hinder seinen Rechten / unnd faß jhn mit deiner kurtzen schneide bey seinem hals / unnd stosse in des deinen knopff oberhalb deinem rechten Arm / gegen deiner Rechten von dir / wirff jhn also gegen deiner Lincken uber dein recht bein an rucken.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/106|3|lbl=Ⅰ.43r.3}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Item Zwircht dir einer zu deinem Lincken ohr / so fall jhm mit Langer schneid oben auff die mitte seiner klingen / in dem du aber also darauff fellest / so greiff mit deinen fingern obermal uber deinem kreutz in die klingen / und leg jhm die kurtz schneid hinder seiner klingen auff sein Kopff / davon besihe die grossern Bilder in jetzgedachter Figur / stoß also dein knopff von dir / auff das du jhn haltest das er nicht ledig werde / du habest jhn dann gewundt / reist er sich aber under deiner klingen herfür / so flog jhm behendiglich nach / und greiff jhm abermals uber sein beide arm wie vor / Oder in dem er her Zwircht / so fang jhm sein Zwirch auff dein hangete klingen / unnd greiff mit deiner Lincken hand in sein Schilt und kreutz / winde jhm die von dir aus / wie dir solches die kleinern obern bossen auch in jetz gedachter Figur zur rechten Handt anzeigen.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/106|4|lbl=Ⅰ.43r.4}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Und letzlich so mercke / so offt du mit einer Zwirch gegen einem Oberhauw anbindest / so winde jhm die kurtz schneid einwerts zum Kopff / her widerumb so dir aber einer also einwinden würde / so merck eben in dem er die kurtz schneid aus der Zwirch einwerts wendet gegen deinem Lincken ohr / so wende die Lang schneid ubersich gegen seiner klingen / so stehestu im alten Schilhauw davon oben gemelt / und triffestu jhn auff sein Kopff / das geht wie '''[XLIIIIr]''' die andern stuck all zu beiden seiten / dann er wende gegen deiner Rechten oder Lincken hinein / so blöst er sein ander seiten / derhalben kanstu jhm den Kopff mit gegen winden leichtlich treffen / dann wan er einwerts windet / so winde du auswerts / so triffestu und fehlet er / merck so du also einem einwindest / und wirst under des gewahr das er dir wie nechst gelehrt gegen winden will / so wende gleichwol furt / im winden aber reiss mit deiner halben schneide auff die seiten gegen welcher du eingewunden hast aus / laß dein klingen umbschnappen / oder ficht ander stuck / Dieser winden seindt achterley welche hin unnd wider in stucken gnugsam angeregt / was aber weiter von gemelten winden an einem andern ort weiter gehandelt werden.
+
|  
 +
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/106|5|lbl=Ⅰ.43r.5|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/108|1|lbl=Ⅰ.44r.1|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
| class="noline" | Also bistu nun bißher in disen ersten und andern theils disses Schwerdt fechtens / eigentlichen underrichtet worden / beide von des Manns und denn auch von des Schwerdts theilung / folgents vom zufechten / Mittelarbeiten und Abziehen / neben andern notwendigen stucken und lehren / sampt den Exempeln im andern theil so aus dem ersten gezogen / was ferner andere hie zu notwendige stuck belanget / wirstu im folgenden Buch vom Schwerdt fechten gnugsam bescheidt finden / sovil ich dißmal zuschreiben für hab.
+
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/108|2|lbl=Ⅰ.44r.2}}
  
 
|}
 
|}
 
{{master subsection end}}
 
{{master subsection end}}
  
<p style="width:100%;">The long sword material in the [[Joachim Meyers Fäktbok (MS A.4º.2)|Lund manuscript]] closely mirrors the "Third Part" of Meyer's ''[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens]]'', so they are both included in the compilation below. Though the current translation is based on the Lund, in the future we will expand it with a full translation of both, footnoting the differences.</p>
+
<p style="width:95%; margin-left: 2em;">The long sword material in the [[Joachim Meyers Fäktbok (MS A.4º.2)|Lund manuscript]] closely mirrors the "Third Part" of Meyer's ''[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens]]'', so they are both included in the compilation below. Though the current translation is based on the Lund, in the future we will expand it with a full translation of both, footnoting the differences.</p>
  
 
{{master subsection begin
 
{{master subsection begin
  | title = Third Part/Lund
+
  | title = Third Part of the Sword/Lund Sword Chapter
 
  | width = 120em
 
  | width = 120em
 
}}
 
}}
Line 1,752: Line 1,795:
 
! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>Figures</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B|Complete Translation (from the Lund)}}<br/>by [[Kevin Maurer]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B|Complete Translation (from the Lund)}}<br/>by [[Kevin Maurer]]</p>
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}</p>
+
! <p>[[Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meyer)|1570 Transcription]]{{edit index|Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf}}<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
 
! <p>[[Joachim Meyers Fäktbok (MS A.4º.2)|Lund Transcription]]{{edit index|Joachim Meyers Fäktbok (MS A.4º.2)}}</p>
 
! <p>[[Joachim Meyers Fäktbok (MS A.4º.2)|Lund Transcription]]{{edit index|Joachim Meyers Fäktbok (MS A.4º.2)}}</p>
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 +
| <p>'''Sword Fencing'''</p>
 +
 +
<p>Firstly will each one of the actions in Fencing be divided into three parts which are particularly good to note. In the Sword this is namely attacking, followed by the withdrawal or other than to the first to reach it, send your attacks through the Guards and Hew like they follow afterwards here, however to the other parts and the middle work, this will be reprinted with the handworks, and a mixture of convenient cuts. Onwards to the last, or the withdrawal, how orderly each one will hereafter be diligently written and taught.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
| '''[XLIIIIv] Das dritte theil vom Schwerdt / in welchem der folgende Zedel mit vil schönen und geschwinden stucken erklert wirt / welchen dan ein kunst liebender Fechter mit nutz lesen und sich darinnen üben kann.'''
 
Merck wiltu künstlich Fechten lehrn /<br/>
 
Solt du mit fleiß den Zedel hörn /<br/>
 
Ein Fechter sol sich halten fein / <br/>
 
Kein Rumer / spiler / sauffer sein /<br/>
 
Auch nit Gottslestern noch Schweren /<br/>
 
Unnd sich nit schemen zu lehren /<br/>
 
Gottsfürchtig / Züchtig / darzu still /<br/>
 
Sonderlich den tag er Fechten will /<br/>
 
Sey messig / erzeig den Alten ehr /<br/>
 
Unnd dem Weibs bild / auch weiter hör /<br/>
 
Aller tugendt ehr und manlichheit /<br/>
 
Der solt dich fleissen alle zeit /<br/>
 
Auff das du dienen könst mit ehren /<br/>
 
Keyser / König / Fürsten und Herren /<br/>
 
Auch nützlich seyest dem Vatterlandt /<br/>
 
Und nicht der Edlen kunst ein schandt /<br/>
 
Indes / das wort / auch Schwech und Sterck /<br/>
 
Das Vor und Nach auch fleissig merck /<br/>
 
Brieff Weich und Hert / das fühlen lern /<br/>
 
Trit mit streich / es sey nach oder fern /
 
 
Die theilung halt in guter hut /<br/>
 
Vor grossen zorn auch dich behut /<br/>
 
Der Huten und der Häuw nim war /<br/>
 
Das jhr Bruch dir sey offenbar /<br/>
 
Ober / Zorn / Mittel / auch Under /<br/>
 
Aus den treib all deine wunder /<br/>
 
Als Schieler / Scheidler / Krump / und Zwer /<br/>
 
Unnd was mehr stuck nach deim beger /<br/>
 
Schauw das der erst seyst auff dem Blan /<br/>
 
Ehe sich dein Mann legt / greiff jhn an /<br/>
 
Indes nim war / versteh mich recht /<br/>
 
Ihn triff / ehe er sein Leger schlecht /<br/>
 
Es kom dir für was Leger gut /<br/>
 
Im Nach jhn triffst aus freyem muth /<br/>
 
Dein Häuw führ gewaltig von deim leib /<br/>
 
Zu den vier Blöß dein arbeit threib /<br/>
 
So du Krumphauwst / fahr auff behend /<br/>
 
Geschrenckt den ort wirff auff sein hend /<br/>
 
Den Zürckel laß zur Rechtenrühren /<br/>
 
Halt dein hend hoch / wilt jhn verführen /
 
 
'''[XLVr]''' Wann du ihm hauwest Krump zur sterck /<br/>
 
Durchwendt / Uberlauff damit merck /<br/>
 
Des knopffs verführen solt gedenken /<br/>
 
Mit Zeckrur / Schnellen werft ihn krencken /<br/>
 
Mit krump trit wol / wilt du versetzen /<br/>
 
Das uberschrenken thüt ihn letzen<br/>
 
Krump zun flechen wilt dich stercken /<br/>
 
Wiet ihn schwechst / solt fleissig mercken /<br/>
 
Als baldts rührt und glützet Oben /<br/>
 
Zuck ab zur Blöß / wilt ihn betoben<br/>
 
Auch so du recht durchiessen wilt /<br/>
 
Krump / Kurtz / durchwechßle an sein Schilt /<br/>
 
Merck so er dich mit Krump wolt irren /<br/>
 
Bleib am Schwerdt / recht den krieg thü füren/<br/>
 
Mit Winden / Schneiden / und was mehr /<br/>
 
Mit verfliegen laß dich nit zu ferr? /<br/>
 
Auch schnell die schwech zum rechten dar /<br/>
 
Zwifach schnellen / mit Schilt dich bewar /<br/>
 
Und deins Mans Schilt sterck verwindt /<br/>
 
Indes stoß ab / und schlag geschwindt /<br/>
 
Den Schielhauw soltu weißlich machen /<br/>
 
Mit Winden kanst ihn auch zwifachen /<br/>
 
Die Zwürch solt du auch halten werdt /<br/>
 
Damit gantz wirt dein kunst im Schwerdt /<br/>
 
Dann alles was er ficht vom tag /<br/>
 
Solchs dir die Zwürch versetzen mag /
 
 
Im angriff treib die Zwürch mit sterck /<br/>
 
Verführen / Fellen / auch mit merck /<br/>
 
Zum Pflug und Ochssen sey behendt /<br/>
 
Ihm trauw die Zwürch bald wider endt /<br/>
 
Merck was für Zwürch mitsprung wirt gfürt /<br/>
 
Auch fehlest mit / noch wünschen rürht /<br/>
 
Doppel solt den Fehler machen /<br/>
 
Deßgleichen Trit und Schnit zwifachen /<br/>
 
Vom Schwerdt zum Leib / damit verkehr /<br/>
 
Zweymal oder Schnit in die Wehr /<br/>
 
Nachreisen ist außbindig güt /<br/>
 
Mit Schneiden / Winden dich behnt /<br/>
 
Bey zweymal / oder darint?en / <br/>
 
Verfliegen laß / damit begüne /<br/>
 
Und zu all vier enden treib die treffen /<br/>
 
Die zucken lern / wilt du sie effen /<br/>
 
Abschneiden / Schlaudern / bring auch mit /<br/>
 
Die herten gfehrt weiß ab mit Schnit /<br/>
 
Verlaß dich nit zuvil auf d Kron /<br/>
 
Du bringst sonst von ihr spot und hon /<br/>
 
Den Langen ort durch streich mit gewalt /<br/>
 
Damit all harte gfert auff halt /<br/>
 
Sich thu all Hauw und stuck recht brechen /<br/>
 
Ob du dich an deim part wilt rechen<br/>
 
Die hengen thu weißlichen bringen /<br/>
 
Greiff nit zur unzeit wiltu Ringen /
 
 
'''[XLVv]''' Wilt du auch wissen der Meyster kern /<br/>
 
Zu allen stucken recht tretten lern.
 
 
Versetzest nit vil / ist desta freyer /<br/>
 
Darvor verwarndt dich Joachim Meyer.
 
 
|  
 
|  
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 +
| <p>Secondly one should note the Vor and Nach (Before and After), Weak and Strong. The Before is when you drive with your Stücken so that he cannot come to his senses, especially by positioning yourself close, and how he defends before your Stücken and these same would like to break and bar, with this, he runs off the Vor to you.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Eingang in das dritte Buch.'''
 
Nach dem ich guthertziger Leser bewilliget / disen meinen Fecht zedel welchen ich auß rechtem grunde der Alten zusamen gesetzt / gebessert un in ein rechte ordnung gebracht / hab ich den (damit meniglich dester mehr nutz darauß haben möcht) durch vil schöner und geschwinder stuck und Exempel auch etwas zu erkleren / unnd den zu verstehn ein kleine anleitung geben wollen / dan sie dermassen reich von stucken / un aller hand geschwindigkeit / also das wo du sie nach solcher anleitung erwigest / jhe lenger ihe mehr stuck hierauß erlernen wirst können / dan das die Reimen ohn außlegung nicht vil nutzen / ist offenbar an andern außgangenen Fechtbüchlein / und solt aber wissen das der erste theil solcher Reimen in meinem bishergelehrten Fechten gnugsam erklärt / derwegen an disem meinen anhab nemen / also.
 
 
|  
 
|  
 
 
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Sword Fencing'''
+
| <p>The after is, when you have been rushed upon by your opponent how it is reported next and above. Thus you should respond Indes quickly with convenient work, with this, you are strongest on his Stücken, when you lay on with your work in the Vor, and in this you are crowded so that you must displace him after, thus is a constant changing with the Vor and Nach, now you have it, then he does, But he who does not pay attention to it, he will nonetheless never learn to fence.</p>
 
 
Firstly will each one of the actions in Fencing be divided into three parts which are particularly good to note. In the Sword this is namely attacking, followed by the withdrawal or other than to the first to reach it, send your attacks through the Guards and Hew like they follow afterwards here, however to the other parts and the middle work, this will be reprinted with the handworks, and a mixture of convenient cuts. Onwards to the last, or the withdrawal, how orderly each one will hereafter be diligently written and taught.
 
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
Line 1,881: Line 1,820:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Secondly one should note the Vor and Nach (Before and After), Weak and Strong. The Before is when you drive with your Stücken so that he cannot come to his senses, especially by positioning yourself close, and how he defends before your Stücken and these same would like to break and bar, with this, he runs off the Vor to you.
+
| <p>'''Divisions of the sword to the Weak and Strong'''</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>The Sword is firstly divided in two parts, namely from the grip to the middle of the Blade which is known as the Strong, from the middle to the most forward, is the Weak furthermore is the sword divided in four parts how the figure below this shows.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
Line 1,887: Line 1,828:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The after is, when you have been rushed upon by your opponent how it is reported next and above. Thus you should respond Indes quickly with convenient work, with this, you are strongest on his Stücken, when you lay on with your work in the Vor, and in this you are crowded so that you must displace him after, thus is a constant changing with the Vor and Nach, now you have it, then he does, But he who does not pay attention to it, he will nonetheless never learn to fence.
+
| <p>With the inward part, that is the haft, and [with it] the work with the pommel and cross and haft will be understood, in the next part, thereafter will the work with cutting and pushing and what belongs to the Strong be understood, to the third part of the sword should be noted the alterable work of the Weak and Strong after opportunity and liking. Which alone is extremely weak for you to work properly to the Openings.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
|  
+
| rowspan="2" | [[File:MS A.4º.2 06v.jpg|400px|center]]
| '''Divisions of the sword to the Weak and Strong'''
+
| <p>'''Hard and Soft'''</p>
  
The Sword is firstly divided in two parts, namely from the grip to the middle of the Blade which is known as the Strong, from the middle to the most forward, is the Weak furthermore is the sword divided in four parts how the figure below this shows.
+
<p>Thus you shall mark in the binding of the swords, as you shall feel if he has become hard or soft in the bind, with the cut.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
|  
+
| <p>Item If he is yet again, strong or weak, and is usually more watchful of the weak binding before the strong, how hereafter in the fencing it can be seen. With this however the Sword fencing and the following written stuck is more understandable thus as I explain my Zedel according to the rules, as I want the words to have understanding so I have named the order; the Beginning, Middle and End.</p>
| With the inward part, that is the haft, and [with it] the work with the pommel and cross and haft will be understood, in the next part, thereafter will the work with cutting and pushing and what belongs to the Strong be understood, to the third part of the sword should be noted the alterable work of the Weak and Strong after opportunity and liking. Which alone is extremely weak for you to work properly to the Openings.
 
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
Line 1,907: Line 1,847:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Hard and Soft'''
+
| <p>'''Follow the Sword Zedel'''</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>'''The Four Main guards'''</p>
  
Thus you shall mark in the binding of the swords, as you shall feel if he has become hard or soft in the bind, with the cut.
+
<p>From the Roof, Fool, Ox, Plow</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
Line 1,915: Line 1,857:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Item If he is yet again, strong or weak, and is usually more watchful of the weak binding before the strong, how hereafter in the fencing it can be seen. With this however the Sword fencing and the following written stuck is more understandable thus as I explain my Zedel according to the rules, as I want the words to have understanding so I have named the order; the Beginning, Middle and End.
+
| <p>'''The Eight Secondary Guards'''</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>Long-point, Iron-door, Hanging Point, Speak-window, Key, Side Guard, Barrier Guard, Wrath Guard</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
Line 1,921: Line 1,865:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Follow the Sword Zedel'''
+
| <p>'''The Five Master-Cuts'''</p>
  
'''The Four Main guards'''
+
<p>Wrath Cut, Crooked cut, Thwart Cut, Squinter cut, Scalper</p>
 
 
From the Roof, Fool, Ox, Plow
 
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
Line 1,931: Line 1,873:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''The Eight Secondary Guards'''
+
| <p>'''The Six Covert Cuts'''</p>
  
Long-point, Iron-door, Hanging Point, Speak-window, Key, Side Guard, Barrier Guard, Wrath Guard
+
<p>Blinding cut, Bouncing cut, Short cut, Knuckle cut, Clashing cut, Wind cut</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
Line 1,939: Line 1,881:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''The Five Master-Cuts'''
+
| <p>'''Handworks in the Sword'''</p>
  
Wrath Cut, Crooked cut, Thwart Cut, Squinter cut, Scalper
+
<p>Bind On, Remain, Cut, Strike Around, Travel After, Snap Around, Run Off, Doubling, Leading, Flying, Feeling, Circle, Looping, Winding, Winding Through, Reverse, Change Through, Run over, Set Off, Cut Off, Pull, Hand Press, Displace, Hanging, Blocking, Barring, Travel out, Grab over, Weak pushing</p>
 
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|  
 
|  
 
|  
Line 1,947: Line 1,889:
 
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|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''The Six Covert Cuts'''
+
| <p>'''From the Four Openings and Divisions'''</p>
  
Blinding cut, Bouncing cut, Short cut, Knuckle cut, Clashing cut, Wind cut
+
<p>Firstly will the opponent be divided in two sections, namely left and Right, how the Lines in the figure above is shown, thereafter in two more divisions namely under and over, the above two openings would be the Ox, to divide the under two, the Plow.</p>
 
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Line 1,955: Line 1,897:
 
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|-  
 
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|  
| '''Handworks in the Sword'''
+
| <p>Whose use should one should thus firstly note, in which division he leads his sword under or above, to the right or the Left/ when you have seen that, thus attack against him at once from above, it is about the location, otherwise, take a general example of this:</p>
 
 
Bind On, Remain, Cut, Strike Around, Travel After, Snap Around, Run Off, Doubling, Leading, Flying, Feeling, Circle, Looping, Winding, Winding Through, Reverse, Change Through, Run over, Set Off, Cut Off, Pull, Hand Press, Displace, Hanging, Blocking, Barring, Travel out, Grab over, Weak pushing
 
 
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Line 1,963: Line 1,903:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''From the Four Openings and Divisions'''
+
| <p>In Zufechten, thus both of you have come together, and you see that he leads his sword to his right in the high opening, in Ox or Wrath-guard, thus attack in to his lower left opening, if not, then it is much more important that you provoke him to meet you. As soon as this clashes, or will, thus pull around your head and strike him high to the opening from which he came. This is namely to his right ear, with the half edge and crossed hands. This is the correct Squinter cut.</p>
 
 
Firstly will the opponent be divided in two sections, namely left and Right, how the Lines in the figure above is shown, thereafter in two more divisions namely under and over, the above two openings would be the Ox, to divide the under two, the Plow.
 
 
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Line 1,971: Line 1,909:
 
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|-  
 
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|  
| Whose use should one should thus firstly note, in which division he leads his sword under or above, to the right or the Left/ when you have seen that, thus attack against him at once from above, it is about the location, otherwise, take a general example of this:
+
| <p>'''Another'''</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>Thus when one holds his Sword to the left in Zufechten, then go through before him from your right and hew with strength to his right, as soon as he swipes after to the strike thus pull a looping to the left opening, if he swipes after this, however, thus allow it to fly around again, thus drive each opening to the other, crosswise and against one another after your opportunity.</p>
 
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Line 1,977: Line 1,917:
 
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|-  
 
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|  
| In Zufechten, thus both of you have come together, and you see that he leads his sword to his right in the high opening, in Ox or Wrath-guard, thus attack in to his lower left opening, if not, then it is much more important that you provoke him to meet you. As soon as this clashes, or will, thus pull around your head and strike him high to the opening from which he came. This is namely to his right ear, with the half edge and crossed hands. This is the correct Squinter cut.
+
| <p>It is every fencer's [desire] that he quickly knows from all strikes, to which opening the cut is coming, Indes quickly there and follow after, if I however can decide, then I want to instruct about the displacing upwards in hanging.</p>
 
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Line 1,983: Line 1,923:
 
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|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Another'''
+
| <p>It is stated in the ancient Verses, who often displaces, will often be injured.</p>
 +
|
 +
|
 +
 
 +
|-
 +
|
 +
| <p>'''Item''' Liechtenauer said in his secret verses, that displacing hurts you, if you wish it on yourself, therefore shall every fencer know that he is to be the first with attacking and following, then to every fencer that is known to watch and wait on another, from this he shall come to no harm, or at the least, if he does not fight much.</p>
 +
|
 +
|
  
Thus when one holds his Sword to the left in Zufechten, then go through before him from your right and hew with strength to his right, as soon as he swipes after to the strike thus pull a looping to the left opening, if he swipes after this, however, thus allow it to fly around again, thus drive each opening to the other, crosswise and against one another after your opportunity.
+
|-
 +
|
 +
| <p>A proper fencer, who does not displace much, will have the greatest advantage. Thus, when he strikes you also strike, when he thrusts you also thrust, when he steps you also step. Where two equal strikes come together, thus they bring you to displacing, when however one will cut from above, and then next he goes against with a Thwart, thus he sets off, and steps with one another, thus simultaneously should one have a step out, with the same cut and therein with advantage also pay attention to his openings. Thus should every fencer know that he is soon attentive how it is also shown above, that where two good fencers have come together, which I have attentively married together in the illustrations.</p>
 
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Line 1,991: Line 1,941:
 
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|-  
 
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|  
| It is every fencer's [desire] that he quickly knows from all strikes, to which opening the cut is coming, Indes quickly there and follow after, if I however can decide, then I want to instruct about the displacing upwards in hanging.
+
| <p>Thus have I put forth a short and summary knowledge of sword-fighting and all noteworthy devices and also the translations of which the divisions that are obscured, are clarified in measure and thereafter it enters and then next goes in three divisions, namely how it was previously reported, Onset or Attacking, Pressing After or the middle work, the last is to Withdraw or end and therefore so that one may better understand I will shortly reiterate.</p>
 
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|-  
 
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|  
| It is stated in the ancient Verses, who often displaces, will often be injured.
+
| <p>Thus, to the attacks have I put forth the Guards in which one should not delay, or wait in them, but rather as a result must your necessary courage with whose reported cuts, go once or twice to your opportunity, so that he must then engage and that the Vor has escaped Him, thus to another opening should one work after with various offensive handworks, beholding with the Vor, as such handworks are stated above as a three in one handwork, thus to crowd and close so that one may come to the withdraw without shame.</p>
 
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Line 2,003: Line 1,953:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Item''' Liechtenauer said in his secret verses, that displacing hurts you, if you wish it on yourself, therefore shall every fencer know that he is to be the first with attacking and following, then to every fencer that is known to watch and wait on another, from this he shall come to no harm, or at the least, if he does not fight much.
+
| <p>'''Of this, I will give an example'''</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>If one fights against you in the Guard of the Roof, thus you come in Zufechten into the Side Guard, you must above all not wait in that long, then when he bears witness to the strike and as soon as he brings his sword into the air, thus lay on against him with a Thwart strike, instantly as it clashes, thus cut quickly again around with the long Thwart, to the other side of his sword, that is now attacking, if he strikes around, thus you cut after, if he displaces, then deceive him with the weak, so that you cut him in the after.</p>
 
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Line 2,009: Line 1,961:
 
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|-  
 
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|  
| A proper fencer, who does not displace much, will have the greatest advantage. Thus, when he strikes you also strike, when he thrusts you also thrust, when he steps you also step. Where two equal strikes come together, thus they bring you to displacing, when however one will cut from above, and then next he goes against with a Thwart, thus he sets off, and steps with one another, thus simultaneously should one have a step out, with the same cut and therein with advantage also pay attention to his openings. Thus should every fencer know that he is soon attentive how it is also shown above, that where two good fencers have come together, which I have attentively married together in the illustrations.
+
| <p>If he is hard thus you are soft<br/>If he cuts, so you counter,<br/>If he displaces, then you cut</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>Thirdly; also have instant attention for your opportunity to Withdraw.</p>
 
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|  
 
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Line 2,015: Line 1,969:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Thus have I put forth a short and summary knowledge of sword-fighting and all noteworthy devices and also the translations of which the divisions that are obscured, are clarified in measure and thereafter it enters and then next goes in three divisions, namely how it was previously reported, Onset or Attacking, Pressing After or the middle work, the last is to Withdraw or end and therefore so that one may better understand I will shortly reiterate.
 
 
|  
 
|  
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/109|1|lbl=Ⅰ.44v.1}}
 
|  
 
|  
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Thus, to the attacks have I put forth the Guards in which one should not delay, or wait in them, but rather as a result must your necessary courage with whose reported cuts, go once or twice to your opportunity, so that he must then engage and that the Vor has escaped Him, thus to another opening should one work after with various offensive handworks, beholding with the Vor, as such handworks are stated above as a three in one handwork, thus to crowd and close so that one may come to the withdraw without shame.
 
 
|  
 
|  
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/109|2|lbl=Ⅰ.44v.2}}
 
|  
 
|  
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Of this, I will give an example'''
+
|  
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/110|1|lbl=Ⅰ.45r.1}}
 +
|
  
If one fights against you in the Guard of the Roof, thus you come in Zufechten into the Side Guard, you must above all not wait in that long, then when he bears witness to the strike and as soon as he brings his sword into the air, thus lay on against him with a Thwart strike, instantly as it clashes, thus cut quickly again around with the long Thwart, to the other side of his sword, that is now attacking, if he strikes around, thus you cut after, if he displaces, then deceive him with the weak, so that you cut him in the after.
+
|-
 +
|
 
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 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/110|2|lbl=Ⅰ.45r.2}}
 
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|  
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| If he is hard thus you are soft<br/>If he cuts, so you counter,<br/>If he displaces, then you cut
+
|  
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/111|1|lbl=Ⅰ.45v.1}}
 +
|
  
Thirdly; also have instant attention for your opportunity to Withdraw.
+
|-
 +
|
 
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|  
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/111|2|lbl=Ⅰ.45v.2}}
 
|  
 
|  
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''See that you are the first on the field;<br/>Before your opponent adopts a posture, lay on against him.'''
+
| <p>See that you are the first on the field;<br/>Before your opponent adopts a posture, lay on against him.</p>
  
Thus note that when you wish to fight with someone, then see that you are the first to be in place so that you can act in a timely manner in your intended Stück, then you shall forcefully continue against him with cuts that he cannot send himself into a guard or Stück But rather you shall show that you will rush over him with sudden stepping before he realizes it. How it is then further clarified by the following Rhyme.
+
<p>Thus note that when you wish to fight with someone, then see that you are the first to be in place so that you can act in a timely manner in your intended Stück, then you shall forcefully continue against him with cuts that he cannot send himself into a guard or Stück But rather you shall show that you will rush over him with sudden stepping before he realizes it. How it is then further clarified by the following Rhyme.</p>
| '''Shauw das der erst seist auff dem plan /<br/>Ehe er sich Legert greiff ihn an.'''
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/111|3|lbl=Ⅰ.45v.3}}
 
Das ist / wann du mit einem Fechten wilt / so schauw das du der erst bey ihm seyest auff dem blatz / damit du dich in deim fürgenomene stuck bey zeyt schicken mögest / als dann soltu mit Häuwen und in triten dermassen anhalten / das er nit zeit oder Blatz möge haben sich in ein Leger oder stuck zuschicken nach seinem gefallen / unnd solt in also ehe und denn ers gewar wirt mit verborgenen tritten ubereilen / wie du denn solches in nachfolgenden Reimen / wie es zuwegen zubringen gnugsam kanst abnemen.
 
 
|  
 
|  
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Pay heed to Instantly, understand me rightly,<br/>Hit him before he adopts his posture.'''
+
| <p>Pay heed to Instantly, understand me rightly,<br/>Hit him before he adopts his posture.</p>
  
This is when you are in the Zufechten and he is just about to you, then note when he acts as if he will adopt a posture, then do not allow him to rest or come to it, but rather always attack first, and as he is choosing a posture, lay on at once to the next opening, and position yourself as if you would to cut strongly, but do not do this, rather allow it to fail or flit to another opening, then as soon as you are at the midway part of your sword on his Sword, do not await, but rather, Thwart, Strike Around, Wrench Out, Slice, Wind, and what other types of work there may be.
+
<p>This is when you are in the Zufechten and he is just about to you, then note when he acts as if he will adopt a posture, then do not allow him to rest or come to it, but rather always attack first, and as he is choosing a posture, lay on at once to the next opening, and position yourself as if you would to cut strongly, but do not do this, rather allow it to fail or flit to another opening, then as soon as you are at the midway part of your sword on his Sword, do not await, but rather, Thwart, Strike Around, Wrench Out, Slice, Wind, and what other types of work there may be.</p>
| '''In des hab acht / versteh mich recht /<br/>Ihn Triff ehe er sein Leger schlecht.'''
+
|
 
+
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/111|4|lbl=Ⅰ.45v.4|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/112|1|lbl=Ⅰ.46r.1|p=1}}
Solches solt du also verstehn / wenn du im zufechten bist / so hab acht wann er sich stelt als wöll er sich Legern / '''[XLVIr]''' so laß in nit Ruhen oder dazu komen / sondern ficht immer furt vor im durch / in dem er aber seines Legers wil acht und war nemen / so greiff ahn / stracks der nechsten Blös zu / und stelle dich als ob du starck hauwen wollest / laß aber fehl gahn / oder verfliegen / und greiff zu einer andern Blöß an / als bald du dann mit deiner klingen zum halben theil darinen / oder an sein Schwerdt komen bist / so feyre nit / sonder Zwirch oder schlag umb / oder reiss aus / oder Schneid / oder Windt / oder threib was für arbeit dir mögen am füglichsten zu handen komen.
 
 
|  
 
|  
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword G.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword G.png|center|400px]]
| '''For you no guard will come so good<br/>In the after you strike out freely, boldly'''
+
| <p>For you no guard will come so good<br/>In the after you strike out freely, boldly</p>
  
But it makes you wonder, as such, how can there be still many good Guards, and hence, you yourself have seen taught here many good techniques, answer, it is true, there are many good Guards and will be fought from a number of good and beautiful techniques. As I have included several in this book for you. However this rhyme teaches you that it is always better to not settle into a guard. It guards you not at all, to show someone with your guard, what you will do amid the fight, that may your cutting through not be brought so far.  
+
<p>But it makes you wonder, as such, how can there be still many good Guards, and hence, you yourself have seen taught here many good techniques, answer, it is true, there are many good Guards and will be fought from a number of good and beautiful techniques. As I have included several in this book for you. However this rhyme teaches you that it is always better to not settle into a guard. It guards you not at all, to show someone with your guard, what you will do amid the fight, that may your cutting through not be brought so far.</p>
  
In this, learn from the rhyme, when you should do it. Namely in the After that is when you should take him, when he keeps his guard, or stays in a guard, then cut him to the opposite opening, as soon as he goes towards your strike with his displacing, and is out of his Guard, and whether it connects or doesn’t connect, then pull around your head and strike, especially to the part or quarter Line from where he has struck from.
+
<p>In this, learn from the rhyme, when you should do it. Namely in the After that is when you should take him, when he keeps his guard, or stays in a guard, then cut him to the opposite opening, as soon as he goes towards your strike with his displacing, and is out of his Guard, and whether it connects or doesn’t connect, then pull around your head and strike, especially to the part or quarter Line from where he has struck from.</p>
  
'''Of this I will give to you an example'''
+
<p>Of this I will give to you an example:</p>
  
When one stands before you in the right Wrath guard in the Zufechten, as soon as you note that he will remain in the Wrath guard, thus cut through to him, still that you are not too close, and in cutting through, allow your sword to fly around in the air, so that you would come into the right Ochs, but before you complete this, or when you have sent this gesture, then step quickly, before he will properly defend, and cut to his left, from under so that your hands remain high, with this you force him, that he must leave his guard to displace, or with a step back, cut in at the same time as you, as soon as the swords connect, pull around the head and cut with crossed hands to his right ear with a Schielhau, in an arc, to where his departure has made him open, how the Figure shows, it is a lofty attack or onset, in which you should take great heed to the steps, and the body should well follow the cuts.
+
<p>When one stands before you in the right Wrath guard in the Zufechten, as soon as you note that he will remain in the Wrath guard, thus cut through to him, still that you are not too close, and in cutting through, allow your sword to fly around in the air, so that you would come into the right Ochs, but before you complete this, or when you have sent this gesture, then step quickly, before he will properly defend, and cut to his left, from under so that your hands remain high, with this you force him, that he must leave his guard to displace, or with a step back, cut in at the same time as you, as soon as the swords connect, pull around the head and cut with crossed hands to his right ear with a Schielhau, in an arc, to where his departure has made him open, how the Figure shows, it is a lofty attack or onset, in which you should take great heed to the steps, and the body should well follow the cuts.</p>
  
When you threaten to cut to a place, then you can readily deceive him, therefore in such attacks you must take the ground, as it were, and in your approach act as if you would step small and tight and before he is aware step broadly forth to the attack, allow yourself at first to be seen taking large steps, in this he takes notice, and will meet you quickly in earnest, to get there before you, thus withhold your step and do it moderately, so that he is otherwise in this you take your advantage, and as soon as you see it, that you are quickly at him again with broad stepping.
+
<p>When you threaten to cut to a place, then you can readily deceive him, therefore in such attacks you must take the ground, as it were, and in your approach act as if you would step small and tight and before he is aware step broadly forth to the attack, allow yourself at first to be seen taking large steps, in this he takes notice, and will meet you quickly in earnest, to get there before you, thus withhold your step and do it moderately, so that he is otherwise in this you take your advantage, and as soon as you see it, that you are quickly at him again with broad stepping.</p>
| '''Für dich kein Leger kompt so gut /<br/>Im Nach jhn triffst aus freyem muth.'''
+
|
Hie möchte einer fragen wie solches zuverstehn / dieweil sovil guter Leger seindt / unnd auch hin unnd wider vil stuck aus denselbigen angezeigt und gelehrt worden / hierauff solt du mercken ob schon vil guter Leger seind / und auch schöne und gute stuck aus etlichen Legern gefochten werden können / wie jhr denn etlich auch hierin angezeigt und begriffen / so lehrest du doch aus disen Reimen / das allweg besser sey es Leger sich einer gar nit / sintemal aus den Legern leichtlich dein gegenmann kann abnehmen / was für stuck du zufechten im sinn habest / welches aber aus den häuwen nit mag also vermerckt werden / uber das lernestu hieraus wie du (wenn einer vor dir in einem Leger stehet) jhn treffen oder zur Blös komen solt / welches alles durch das Nach mag zuwegen bracht werden / das versteh also / Wenn dein gegenfechter in einem Leger stehet / so hauw gegen uber zur andern Blös / als bald er (dein hauw zuversetzen) aus seinem Leger gehet / so zuck ehe es recht rührt (oder welches besser gar nit rührt) umb den Kopff / und schlag eben zu disem theil oder quatier hinein / von welchem er dir zubegegnen abgangen / aber auff das solches noch desto leichter sey / will ich dir des ein Exempel setzen / Nemlich so bald du im zufechten merckest das er sich in die Zornhut legert / so hauw von deiner Lincken gegen deiner Rechten vor jm durch / doch das du jm nit so nach seiest / im durchhauwen aber laß dein Schwerdt in der lufft umbschiessen / sam du aus dem rechten Ochssen stechen wollest / ehe du aber solches recht zeigest / und mit geberden dich dazu schickest / so trit in eil / und hauw von Unden zu seiner Lincken ein / das deine hend hoch bleiben / damit zwingestu jn das er dir eintweder auß seinem Leger versetzen / oder mit einem abtrit zugleich einhauwen muß / hauwet er denn / so merck als bald die Schwerdter zusamen rühren / so zuck umb den Kopff / und hauw in einem schwung mit geschrecnkten henden die kurtz schneid zu seinem rechten ohr '''[XLVIIr]''' ein / wie diese Figur außseiset / in disem angreiffen oder Fechten / welches gar ein lustig stuck ist / soltu der trit gar wol warnemen / und den leib den häuwen nach wol mit gehen lassen / wann du in einem ort truwest zuschlagen / denn dardurch kanstu ein gar bald verführen / must derowegen in solchem angreiffen jhm das erdtrich abstehlen / und im zugang dich stellen als trettest du nahe und enge trit / ehe erß denn gewar wirt / so trittest du weit zum angreiffen / hergegen laß dich anfencklichen mit grossen tritten mercken / so es denn dein widerpart acht nimpt / und will dir mit ernst begegnen in eil dir vor zukommen / so verhalt als denn dein trit und thu gemach / biß er sich vergebens verzabelt / in dem nimstu deines vortheils war / so bald du dein vorthel ersihest / so bistu in eil mit weiten triten bei jm.
+
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/112|2|lbl=Ⅰ.46r.2|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/114|1|lbl=Ⅰ.47r.1|p=1}}
 
|  
 
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|  
| '''The cuts you send powerfully from your body<br/>To the four openings carry out your work'''
+
| <p>The cuts you send powerfully from your body<br/>To the four openings carry out your work</p>
  
In this rhyme two things are realized, firstly, to the cutting secondly, to the four openings of the Man, to which the cuts will be cut, and note that you cut all cuts with outstretched arms, and with this reach far to the man, also as soon as a cut from one side fails, thus you should quickly cut to the opposite side.
+
<p>In this rhyme two things are realized, firstly, to the cutting secondly, to the four openings of the Man, to which the cuts will be cut, and note that you cut all cuts with outstretched arms, and with this reach far to the man, also as soon as a cut from one side fails, thus you should quickly cut to the opposite side.</p>
| '''Die Häuw führ gewaltig von dem leib /<br/>Zu den vier Blös dein arbeit threib.'''
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/114|2|lbl=Ⅰ.47r.2}}
In disen Reimen wirt gelehrt wie du deine häuw gewaltig unnd lang / zu allen vier enden das ist zu allen vier Blössen frey fliegent / sampt dem Leib welchen du wol mit wie oben gemelt nehmen / führen solt.
 
 
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|-  
 
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|  
| '''Item''' If however you step up and are going strong, thus cut quickly around to the other side, also when you will cut to an opening, thus note that as soon as he goes to displace your cut, thus do not allow them to connect, (where it is useful to you) but rather pull free your sword and let it fly around again and strike to another opening, reach far from you with the cuts, and you must step correctly with this, thus fine changing and changing through on the shield comes to you, and so you won’t be harmed see that you cut to the body and not to the sword, from the Second part of this rhyme the verses teach this, also I will write further of this in 38 rhymes, and still more of the same.
+
| <p>'''Item''' If however you step up and are going strong, thus cut quickly around to the other side, also when you will cut to an opening, thus note that as soon as he goes to displace your cut, thus do not allow them to connect, (where it is useful to you) but rather pull free your sword and let it fly around again and strike to another opening, reach far from you with the cuts, and you must step correctly with this, thus fine changing and changing through on the shield comes to you, and so you won’t be harmed see that you cut to the body and not to the sword, from the Second part of this rhyme the verses teach this, also I will write further of this in 38 rhymes, and still more of the same.</p>
 
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Line 2,095: Line 2,053:
 
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| '''When you Krumphau go up quickly<br/>Throw the point with crossed hands'''
+
| <p>When you Krumphau go up quickly<br/>Throw the point with crossed hands</p>
  
Note the Crooked cuts are many, and that all cuts that are done with hands put crosswise or crossed, will be known as Crooked cuts.
+
<p>Note the Crooked cuts are many, and that all cuts that are done with hands put crosswise or crossed, will be known as Crooked cuts.</p>
  
Hence the one, Schieler is also counted among the Crooked Cuts and it applies equally to the long or short edges, thus it is a Krumphau when you hold your hands crosswise.
+
<p>Hence the one, Schieler is also counted among the Crooked Cuts and it applies equally to the long or short edges, thus it is a Krumphau when you hold your hands crosswise.</p>
| '''So du Krumphauwst far auff behendt /<br/>Geschrenckt / den ort wirff auff die hendt.'''
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/114|3|lbl=Ⅰ.47r.3}}
Die Krumphäuw werden auff mancherley art gefochten / denn alle Häuw so mit geschrenckten oder gekreutzigten henden gehauwen / werden Krumphäuw genent / daher denn auch der eine Schieler zun Krumphäuwen gezelt wirt / es gilt auch gleich sie geschehen mit halber oder gantzer schneid / wann du die hend kreutzweiß fürest.
 
 
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|  
| And firstly when one will cut straight to your head, from his right, thus step with your right foot well out from his strike, to his left, so that you avoid his strike with a spring to his left and likewise cut from your right with crossed hands, against his cut, thus you come with your blade between his head and sword, on his short edge, which is facing him, and when it connects, then step further around to his left side with your right foot, and displace or transfer your sword's blade from his, onto his arm, between his head and sword, in this you will have seen the opening, to which the you may cut and see that you don't wait long but rather allow your cuts to fly quickly to the openings.
+
| <p>And firstly when one will cut straight to your head, from his right, thus step with your right foot well out from his strike, to his left, so that you avoid his strike with a spring to his left and likewise cut from your right with crossed hands, against his cut, thus you come with your blade between his head and sword, on his short edge, which is facing him, and when it connects, then step further around to his left side with your right foot, and displace or transfer your sword's blade from his, onto his arm, between his head and sword, in this you will have seen the opening, to which the you may cut and see that you don't wait long but rather allow your cuts to fly quickly to the openings.</p>
| Erstlichen aber merck wann dir einer von seiner Rechten von Oben stracks zum Kopff hauwet / so trit mit dem Rechten fuß / wol auß seinem streich auff sein Lincke / das du seinen streich in einem sprung auff seine lincke seiten erwischest / und Hauw mit geschrenckten henden von deiner Rechten gegen seinem Hauw / so komstu mit deiner Schwerdts klingen zwischen sein Haupt und Schwerdt auff sein halbe schneid / die dann gegen jhm stehet / in dem es rührt / so trit fürbaß mit deinem Rechten gegen seiner Lincken seiten umb unnd versetz / oder transferier mit deiner klingen von seiner klingen / zwischen seinem Kopff und Schwerdt auff sein Arm / truck also mit geschrenckten henden in einem ruck sein Arm undersich / under disen wirstu gewißlich ein Blöß finden zu welcher du hauwe
+
 
 +
<p>Item Note when you approach him in the Zufechten, then see when he shows his arm will strike, thus cross your hands while in the air yet that they remain high, and throw the point at his hand or arms, that is the weak or the furthest part of the blade, and that should happen when he goes up to strike, and before he is ready, thus be on his blade, with a Thwart cut, for such techniques should fly and go quickly.</p>
 +
|
 +
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/114|4|lbl=Ⅰ.47r.4|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/115|1|lbl=Ⅰ.47v.1|p=1}}
 
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| <br/>
 
'''Item''' Note when you approach him in the Zufechten, then see when he shows his arm will strike, thus cross your hands while in the air yet that they remain high, and throw the point at his hand or arms, that is the weak or the furthest part of the blade, and that should happen when he goes up to strike, and before he is ready, thus be on his blade, with a Thwart cut, for such techniques should fly and go quickly.
 
| '''[XLVIIv] SEITENWECHSEL'''
 
magst nach gelegenheit / und solt dich hiemit so bald du die Blöß ersehen nicht lang saumen. Ferner wann du im zufechten zu deinem widerpart kommest / so schauw in dem er seine Arm auffzeucht zum streich / so verschrenck dieweil deinen hend in der lufft / und wirff ihm den ort das ist die schwech oder eussertheil deiner klingen auff sein hendt oder Arm / diß aber merck wie bemelt / sol geschehen in dem er zum streich auffzeucht / und ehe er damit fertig soltu ihm mit einer Zwirch schon wider an seiner klingen sein / denn solche stuck sollen fliegend und geschwindt zugehen.
 
 
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| [[File:MS A.4º.2 12v.jpg|400px|center]]
 
| [[File:MS A.4º.2 12v.jpg|400px|center]]
| '''Allow the Circle to connect to the right<br/>Hold your hands high, you will deceive him'''
+
| <p>Allow the Circle to connect to the right<br/>Hold your hands high, you will deceive him</p>
 
 
The Circle also comes from the Crooked Cuts and is a particularly good technique for deception, compared to others, because it does not just run off, unlike other deceptive techniques, like ablauffen and the like, but rather when one does it correctly and strikes the Circle very hard with the short edge in running by.
 
  
This Stück goes thus, (after you have come under his sword in the attack) when your stay in the bind, and drive your sword over the head, as soon as he gives a little room, so that he is not binding on the sword, but rather drives his sword then high above you, then cross your hands in the air, and cut from above with the short edge thus put crosswise, down to his right ear, so that whether your Blade hits or not, it runs around in a circle by his right arm, and in this keep your hands high above your head, as soon as he slips after the Circle, then step with your left foot well on to his right side, and cut in at his head with the Long edge, over his right arm, behind his blade, take your body and head well away from his strike with a step to your left side.
+
<p>The Circle also comes from the Crooked Cuts and is a particularly good technique for deception, compared to others, because it does not just run off, unlike other deceptive techniques, like ablauffen and the like, but rather when one does it correctly and strikes the Circle very hard with the short edge in running by.</p>
| '''Den Zürckel laß zur Rechten rührn /<br/>Bhalt hoch dein hendt / wilt jhn verführn.'''
 
  
Zürckel kompt auch auß den Krumphäuwen / unnd ist ein sonderlich gut stuck zum verführen für andern / damit es nit lehr oder vergebens und ungerührt (wie ander verführende stuck / als da ist Ablauffen Verfliegen und dergleichen ablaufft) sonder so man jn recht macht / trifft der Zürckel mit der halben schneid im fürlauff sehr hart. Diß stuck aber treib also / wenn du (nach dem du mit dem ahngriff under sein Schwerdt komen) vor einem im bund stehest / und dein Schwerdt in der höhe ob dem Haupt führest / so bald er dir blatz lasset und dir nit nach deim Schwerdt bindt / sonder füret sein Schwerdt mit dem ort auch hoch / so verschrenck dein hendt in der lufft / und Hauwe mit kurtzer schneid also geschrenckt von oben nider zu seinem rechten Ohr / das demnach dein klinge sie treff oder nit / neben seinem rechten arm furuber in einem zirckel herumb lauff / und behalt in dessen gleichwol die hend hoch uber deinem Haupt / so bald er dem Zirckel nachwischt / so trit mit deinem Lincken fuß wol auff sein rechte seiten auß / unn Hauw mit Langerschneid hinder seiner klingen uber sein Rechten arm zum Kopff / nim den leib sampt dem trit wol auß / auff dein lincke seiten / mit deim Haupt auß seinem streich.
+
<p>This Stück goes thus, (after you have come under his sword in the attack) when your stay in the bind, and drive your sword over the head, as soon as he gives a little room, so that he is not binding on the sword, but rather drives his sword then high above you, then cross your hands in the air, and cut from above with the short edge thus put crosswise, down to his right ear, so that whether your Blade hits or not, it runs around in a circle by his right arm, and in this keep your hands high above your head, as soon as he slips after the Circle, then step with your left foot well on to his right side, and cut in at his head with the Long edge, over his right arm, behind his blade, take your body and head well away from his strike with a step to your left side.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/115|2|lbl=Ⅰ.47v.2}}
 
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword K.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| [[File:Meyer 1570 Sword K.png|center|400px]]
| '''A good Stück from the Circle'''
+
| <p>'''A good Stück from the Circle'''</p>
  
When you stand before one in this same work, how you have previously been taught, thus pay attention when your advantage will come, then step aside at once with your left foot out to your left side, and cut with a circle to his right while you are stepping but that in running past to the right, it grazes, and also with this Circle, step through with your right foot between you and him, in to his right side, with this stepping through, cut a Zwerchhau from your right to his left, forwards to the face Indes spring well out to his right and cut him long after to his head.
+
<p>When you stand before one in this same work, how you have previously been taught, thus pay attention when your advantage will come, then step aside at once with your left foot out to your left side, and cut with a circle to his right while you are stepping but that in running past to the right, it grazes, and also with this Circle, step through with your right foot between you and him, in to his right side, with this stepping through, cut a Zwerchhau from your right to his left, forwards to the face Indes spring well out to his right and cut him long after to his head.</p>
| '''Ein gut stuck auß dem Zürckel.'''
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/115|3|lbl=Ⅰ.47v.3}}
 
 
Wann du wie vor bemelt in gleicher arbeti vor dem Mann stehest / so hab acht wenn dir die gelegenheit wirt / so trit mit deinem Lincken fuß auff dein lincke seiten beseits auß / und Hauw zugleich mit dem trit ein Zirckel zu seinem Rechten furuber / doch das es im furuber lauffen zur Rechten anschürff und treffe / und trit zugleich in solchem Zirckel mit deinem rechten fuß zwischen dir und jhm auff sein Rechte seiten durch / unnd im durchtreten Hauw ein Zwirchhaw von deiner Rechten gegen seiner Lincken vornen zum gesicht / wie du an den obern bossen in dieser Figur so mit dem K. verzeichnet sehen kanst / in des spring wol auß auff sein Rechte / und Haw jm lang nach zu seim Kopff.
 
 
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| [[File:MS A.4º.2 14r.jpg|400px|center]]
 
| [[File:MS A.4º.2 14r.jpg|400px|center]]
| '''With the Crooked step well if you want to displace<br/>The crossing over, does him harm'''
+
| <p>With the Crooked step well if you want to displace<br/>The crossing over, does him harm</p>
 
 
This is when you cut in Crooked at the same time as him, with your strike you should step well out from his strike, so that you have your head behind your blade, well from his strike. The second part teaches you that when you have bound on his sword with a Crooked cut, that you nimbly cross over where you have the opportunity and then snap around or wind the quick snap to his head, or wrench out, allow it to overrun.
 
| '''[XLVIIIrv] Mit Krump trit wol wiltu versetzen /<br/>Das uberschrencken thut jhn letzen.'''
 
  
Solches soll also verstanden werden / wenn du Krump mit einhauwest / so trit zugleich mit dem Hauw wol auß seinem streich / das du dein Kopff hinder deiner klingen auß seinem streich entziehest. Zum andern wenn du also mit einem Krumphauw an sein Schwerdt gebunden hast / das du behend (wo du gelegenheit darzu haben magst) uberschrenckest / folgends umbschnappest / oder die schnellen nach seinem Kopff windest / oder ausreissest / oder lassest uberlauffen und dergleichen.
+
<p>This is when you cut in Crooked at the same time as him, with your strike you should step well out from his strike, so that you have your head behind your blade, well from his strike. The second part teaches you that when you have bound on his sword with a Crooked cut, that you nimbly cross over where you have the opportunity and then snap around or wind the quick snap to his head, or wrench out, allow it to overrun.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/117|1|lbl=Ⅰ.48v.1}}
 
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| [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword O.jpg|center|400px]]
+
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Meyer 1570 Longsword O.jpg|center|400px]]
| '''A Stück from the Reversing'''
+
| <p>'''A Stück from the Reversing'''</p>
  
Note in Zufechten that you pay attention when he goes up before you, then step and cut a Crooked from your left to or above his right arm, with this Crooked cut step well to him, and reverse your sword and wrench downwards and out to your right side If he may work further, thus drive with the pommel from inside, between both of his arms, allow your left hand to release from the grip and grab your sword blade and wrench out upwards, how this figure shows.
+
<p>Note in Zufechten that you pay attention when he goes up before you, then step and cut a Crooked from your left to or above his right arm, with this Crooked cut step well to him, and reverse your sword and wrench downwards and out to your right side If he may work further, thus drive with the pommel from inside, between both of his arms, allow your left hand to release from the grip and grab your sword blade and wrench out upwards, how this figure shows.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/117|2|lbl=Ⅰ.48v.2}}
 +
|
  
'''Counter''' - let go the left hand, and allow him to wrench without avail, Indes drive after his upwards pressing, with your slice to his arms, do not allow him to come to any further work, nor to cut freely, when you see your advantage, at once, allow your sword to fly to the next opening.
+
|-
| '''Ein fein stuck aus dem verkeren.'''
+
| <p>'''Counter''' - Let go the left hand, and allow him to wrench without avail, Indes drive after his upwards pressing, with your slice to his arms, do not allow him to come to any further work, nor to cut freely, when you see your advantage, at once, allow your sword to fly to the next opening.</p>
 
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/117|3|lbl=Ⅰ.48v.3}}
MErck im zufechten hab acht / wenn dein widerpart für dir auffgehet / so trit unnd Hauw von deiner Lincken mit kurtzer schneid und geschrenckten henden zu oder uber den Rechten arm / aber in disem Krumphauw trit wol zu jhm / verkehr dein Schwerdt / unnd reiss undersich auß / auff dein Rechte seiten / arbeitet er ubersich mit den Armen also das du jhn nit undersich zwingen magst / so fahr mit dem knopff von inwendig zwischen sein beide Arm / laß dein Lincke hand vom Hefft / greiff damit dein Schwerdts klingen und reiss ubersich auß wie die Figur mit dem O. anzeiget. Des Bruch also / laß die Linckhand ledig also das er vergeblich außreißt / in des fahr seinem ubersich rucken nach / mit dem Schnit auff sein Arm / und laß jhn ferner zu keiner arbeit kommen noch ledig werden / du habst dann deinen vortheil ersehen / demnach so laß zur nechsten Blöß fliegen.
 
 
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| [[File:MS A.4º.2 15r.jpg|400px|center]]
 
| [[File:MS A.4º.2 15r.jpg|400px|center]]
| '''Cut Crooked to his Flat<br/>And you will Weaken the Master'''
+
| <p>Cut Crooked to his Flat<br/>And you will Weaken the Master</p>
  
This is a lesson how you shall weaken one's incoming strike, and goes thus, In Zufechten pay attention when he cuts in at you from his right, then step well out from his strike and cut with crossed hands and the Long edge onto the strong of his sword's blade, on the Flat, thereby you weaken him, so that he can barely recover for another strike, then before he recovers you are on his head with winding and flicking.
+
<p>This is a lesson how you shall weaken one's incoming strike, and goes thus, In Zufechten pay attention when he cuts in at you from his right, then step well out from his strike and cut with crossed hands and the Long edge onto the strong of his sword's blade, on the Flat, thereby you weaken him, so that he can barely recover for another strike, then before he recovers you are on his head with winding and flicking.</p>
  
The Counter you should mark that when one meets you with a crooked cut, to your on coming strike, to weaken you, then change through nimbly under his blade and work to his side from which he sent his Crooked cut.
+
<p>The Counter you should mark that when one meets you with a crooked cut, to your on coming strike, to weaken you, then change through nimbly under his blade and work to his side from which he sent his Crooked cut.</p>
| '''Krump zun flechen wilt dich stercken /<br/>Wie du jhn schwechst solt fleissig mercken.'''
+
|
 
+
{{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/117|4|lbl=Ⅰ.48v.4|p=1}} {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/119|1|lbl=Ⅰ.49v.1|p=1}}
Solchs ist ein lehr wie du dem Mann sein herkommenden streich schwechen solt / diß soltu aber also treiben / im zufechten hab acht wann dein gegenfechter dir von seiner Rechten zuhauwet / so trit wol auß seinem streich / und Hauw mit geschrenckten henden und Langer schneid auff die sterck seiner klingen in die flech / damit schwechest du '''[XLIXrv]''' jhn also / das er sich kaum zu einem andern erholen mag / denn ehe er sich erholet kanstu jhm mit verwenden oder schnellen / auff seinem Kopff sein. Den Bruch aber soltu hierin also machen / Merckestu das dir einer mit einem Krumphauw begegnet / auff dein herkomenden streich dich zuschwechen / so Wechsel behend udner seiner klingen durch / und arbeit jhm zu der seiten / von welcher er den Krumphauw her bracht hat.
 
 
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| '''When first they connect and clash above<br/>Pull away to the openings you will confuse him'''
+
| <p>When first they connect and clash above<br/>Pull away to the openings you will confuse him</p>
 
 
This is a very good rhyme that admonishes you earnestly to pay attention to the openings that fall before you. For it is known that you go at him correctly in the After, thus you have very often whenever the swords connect or two strike and clash together above, there is an opening below. You will not fail to note this through several Stück.
 
| '''Als bald es rührt und glützt oben /<br/>Zuck ab zur Blöß wilt jhn betoben.'''
 
  
Dise vers seind sehr notwendig zumercken / sintemal sie dich ernstlich acht zuhaben vermahnen auff die fürfallende Blöß / dann hie ist gewiß wann du der sachen recht nachgehest / das du so offt es rührt oder zwen streich oben zusamen gliitzen / du unden ein Blöß ereilen kanst / solches wirt dir nit fehlen / diß aber damit du es desto baß verstehn könnest / so merck solchs durch diese nachfolgende exempel und stuck also.
+
<p>This is a very good rhyme that admonishes you earnestly to pay attention to the openings that fall before you. For it is known that you go at him correctly in the After, thus you have very often whenever the swords connect or two strike and clash together above, there is an opening below. You will not fail to note this through several Stück.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/119|2|lbl=Ⅰ.49v.2}}
 
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| Note in Zufechten send yourself into the Wrath Guard, as soon as you can get him, then step and cut in with him from your right a powerful high cut, when this clashes, then strike around nimbly with a Thwart to his left ear, with a back-step of your left foot, behind your right, thus you likewise hit twice, or complete two strikes before he completes one.
+
| <p>Note in Zufechten send yourself into the Wrath Guard, as soon as you can get him, then step and cut in with him from your right a powerful high cut, when this clashes, then strike around nimbly with a Thwart to his left ear, with a back-step of your left foot, behind your right, thus you likewise hit twice, or complete two strikes before he completes one.</p>
| Im zufechten als bald du dir trauwest den Mann zuerlangen / so trit und Hauw mit jhm von deiner Rechten ein gewaltigen Oberhauw hinein / in dem es gliitzt so schlag behend umb wider zu seinem Lincken ohr / unnd trit under des mit deinem Lincken fuß hinder dein Rechten / so triffst du gleich zweymal / oder volbringest zwen streich auff einer seiten ehe denn er einen.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/119|3|lbl=Ⅰ.49v.3}}
 
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| '''Item''' If one cuts at you from above like before, then cut from your lower left against his strike, so that you catch his High cut up in the air, as soon as it connects then cut with the forward short edge and crossed hands in a Circle, to his right ear and that you swiftly go almost at the same time, namely that when the blades connect together, thus you shall hit down from above with the short edge.
+
| <p>'''Item''' If one cuts at you from above like before, then cut from your lower left against his strike, so that you catch his High cut up in the air, as soon as it connects then cut with the forward short edge and crossed hands in a Circle, to his right ear and that you swiftly go almost at the same time, namely that when the blades connect together, thus you shall hit down from above with the short edge.</p>
| Deßgleichen Hauwet einer von Oben wie vor auf dich / so Hauw von deiner Lincken von Unden gegen seinem streich / das du sein Oberhauw hoch in der lufft mit geschrenckten henden auff dein Schwerdt fangest / als bald es gliitzt / so Hauw mit dem vordern kurtzen ort / also mit geschrenckten henden von seinem Schwerdt / in einem Zürckel zu seinem rechten Ohr / diß aber soll geschwindt schier zugleich geschehen / also das in dem die klingen zusamen rühren / auch gleich mit die halb schneid von Oben nider treffen.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/119|4|lbl=Ⅰ.49v.4}}
 
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| '''Item''' In the Onset act as if you would cut from above; but as soon as you note that he slips upwards against your cut, at once turn your High Cut into a Low Cut before it actually connects above, this is the Simultaneous Failer.
+
| <p>'''Item''' In the Onset act as if you would cut from above; but as soon as you note that he slips upwards against your cut, at once turn your High Cut into a Low Cut before it actually connects above, this is the Simultaneous Failer.</p>
| Ferner stell dich im zugang mit geberden sam du von Oben wollest Hauwen / so bald du aber vermerckest das er dem Hauw ubersich entgegen wischet / so verwindt dein Oberhauw in ein Underhaw / ehe denn es oben recht rühret / welches ein rechter fehler ist / und triffest jhm also das Linck ohr ehe ers gewahr wirt.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/119|5|lbl=Ⅰ.49v.5}}
 
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| '''Item''' If he cuts from below, thus fall on it with your long edge from above when it clashes, then pull back nimbly and strike to the next opening in one motion, or strike around from his sword with the flat in a winding flick to the next opening.
+
| <p>'''Item''' If he cuts from below, thus fall on it with your long edge from above when it clashes, then pull back nimbly and strike to the next opening in one motion, or strike around from his sword with the flat in a winding flick to the next opening.</p>
| Letzlich Hauwet dein widerpart von Unden / so fall mit deiner Langen schneid oben darauff / in dem es gliitzt so schlag behend der nechsten Blöß zu in einem flug / oder schlag mit der flech von seinem Schwerdt umb / in einem gewundenen schnall auch der nechsten Blöß zu.
+
| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/119|6|lbl=Ⅰ.49v.6}}
 
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| [[File:MS A.4º.2 16v.jpg|400px|center]]
 
| [[File:MS A.4º.2 16v.jpg|400px|center]]
| rowspan="2" | '''When you cut crooked at his strong<br/>Be sure to wind through and overrun with it'''
+
| rowspan="2" | <p>When you cut crooked at his strong<br/>Be sure to wind through and overrun with it</p>
 
 
This is when you cut a Crooked cut at one, and he holds off hard so that you cannot cross over, or have other work from above, thus wind under and through with the pommel, and cast the pommel to the other side over his blade or arm from the outside, and wrench downwards and strike in with the long edge deep to his head, or cast the pommel in between both of his hands, how this figure reveals.
 
 
 
The next is a counter to the under-cut, if one cuts an under-cut to you low. Then cut with your long edge so that you have your hands crooked or crosswise, above on his strong. Then when this clashes, thrust the blade right in before you, and in thrusting forth, wind the short edge to flick it around at his face or head. If he drives up and defends against your flick, then drive up also, pull around your head, and strike him to another opening.
 
| rowspan="2" | '''[Lr] Wann du jhm Hauwest Krump zur sterck /<br/>Durchwendt / Uberlauff damit merck.'''
 
  
Wann du einem ein Krumphauw zuhauwest / und er hart widerhalt / also das du jhn mit uberschrencken oder anderer arbeit Oben nichts haben magst / so wend mit dem knopff unden durch / und greiff mit demselben jm auff der andern seiten aussen uber sein klingen oder Arm / unnd reiss undersich / schlag jhn mit Langer schneid im riss auff sein Kopff / oder greiff mit dem knopff zwischen sein beide hend / wie in der Figur hievor getruckt an den zwen bossen gegen der Lincken hand zu sehen. Bruch. Hauwet einer ein Underhauw auff dich / so Hauw mit Langer schneid / das du dein hendt krum oder kreutzweiß habest / oben auff die sterck seiner klingen / in dem es dan gliitzt so schieb die kling gerichts für dir hin / unnd im fürtscheiben so winde die kurtze schneid in einem schnall umb zu seinem gesicht oder auff sein Kopff / fehret er auff und wehrt dir dein schnall / so fahr auch auff / unnd zuck umb dein Kopff / und schlag jhm zu seiner undern Blöß.
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<p>This is when you cut a Crooked cut at one, and he holds off hard so that you cannot cross over, or have other work from above, thus wind under and through with the pommel, and cast the pommel to the other side over his blade or arm from the outside, and wrench downwards and strike in with the long edge deep to his head, or cast the pommel in between both of his hands, how this figure reveals.</p>
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| rowspan="2" | {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/120|1|lbl=Ⅰ.50r.1}}
 
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Line 2,225: Line 2,168:
 
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| '''The Pommel deception, you shall remember<br/>With Flicking and Quickening you will vex him'''
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| <p><br/></p>
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<p>The next is a counter to the under-cut, if one cuts an under-cut to you low. Then cut with your long edge so that you have your hands crooked or crosswise, above on his strong. Then when this clashes, thrust the blade right in before you, and in thrusting forth, wind the short edge to flick it around at his face or head. If he drives up and defends against your flick, then drive up also, pull around your head, and strike him to another opening.</p>
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/120|2|lbl=Ⅰ.50r.2}}
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This is when you cut in with a Crooked Cut to his strong, if he opposes or displaces high, then wind through below with the pommel, and act as if you would grab over with the pommel, as I have already taught; and before he realizes it, then quickly flick the short edge back in at him, again on the same line, to whichever side you first did the Crooked Cut.
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| '''Des Knopffs verführens solt gedencken /<br/>Mit Zeckrur / Schnellen würst jhn krenken.'''
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| <p>The Pommel deception, you shall remember<br/>With Flicking and Quickening you will vex him</p>
  
Ist sovil / wenn du in einem Krumphauw einhauwest zu seiner Rechte / und er widerhelt oder versetzt hoch / so windt mit dem knopff unden durch / und stelle dich mit geberden als wolstu wie vor gelehrt / mit dem knopff ubergreiffen / ehe und denn er sich solches versicht / so Schnell jhm die kurtze schneide daselbst wider hinein / zu welcher seiten du erst den Krumphauw gethan hast.
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<p>This is when you cut in with a Crooked Cut to his strong, if he opposes or displaces high, then wind through below with the pommel, and act as if you would grab over with the pommel, as I have already taught; and before he realizes it, then quickly flick the short edge back in at him, again on the same line, to whichever side you first did the Crooked Cut.</p>
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/120|3|lbl=Ⅰ.50r.3}}
 
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| '''Item''' In the Zufechten, lay on against your opponent with a powerful horizontal Middle Cut strongly at his left ear. Quickly pull your pommel around your head, and threaten him with it as if you would thrust at his other side with the pommel, and if he wishes to slip after and displace the thrust then flick back at his left ear with the short edge, and in flicking, step with your left foot back behind your right.
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| <p>'''Item''' In the Zufechten, lay on against your opponent with a powerful horizontal Middle Cut strongly at his left ear. Quickly pull your pommel around your head, and threaten him with it as if you would thrust at his other side with the pommel, and if he wishes to slip after and displace the thrust then flick back at his left ear with the short edge, and in flicking, step with your left foot back behind your right.</p>
| Item greiff im zufechten dein gegenmann mit einem gewaltigen uberzwerch Mittelhauw / starck zum Lincken ohr an / zuck behend dein knopff umb dein Kopff / und trauw jhm damit / als ob du jhm mit dem Knopff zur andern seiten stossen wolst / und in dem er dir hie entgegen wischt den stoß zuversetzen / so schnell jhn mit der kurtzen schneid wider zu seinem Lincken ohr / und im schnall trit mit deinem Lincken fuß zu ruck hinder dein Rechten / und Hauwe dich von jhm.
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| {{section|Page:Gründtliche Beschreibung der Kunst des Fechtens (Joachim Meÿer) 1570.pdf/120|4|lbl=Ⅰ.50r.4}}
 
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| '''Also you will then correctly shoot through<br/>Crooked, Short, change through on his shield'''
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| <p>Also you will then correctly shoot through<br/>Crooked, Short, change through on his shield</p>
 
 
This is a proper master's technique, when you are in the Zufechten, then send yourself into the right Wrath; as soon as he brings his sword in the air, then strike a free High Cut at him, and in the air, cross your hands so that the right hand comes crosswise over the left, and cut then through crooked with the short edge against his cut, in this, step with a double step well out to his right, and cut with the long edge at his right ear, or use changing through to come onto his shield against his right; then work with winding, slicing, and whatever other work arises for you.
 
| '''[Lv] Auch so du recht durchschiessen wilt /<br/>Krumb / Kurtz / Durchwechsel an sein Schilt.'''
 
  
Diß ist ein recht artig Meister stücklein / wenn du im zufechten bist so schick dich in rechten Zorn / als bald er sein Schwerdt in die lufft bringt / so Hauw ein freyen Oberhauw zu jhm / volführe den aber nit / sonder verschrenck in der lufft deine hend / das die Rechte hand uber die Lincke kom / und Hauw also mit kurtzer schneid Krump gegen seinem Hauw listiglich durch / in dessen trit wol mit einem zwifachen trit auff sein Rechte aus / unnd Hauw mit Langer schneid zu seinem Rechten ohr / oder kom mit dem durchwechseln an sein Schilt gegen seiner Rechten / alda arbeit mit Winden / Schneiden und was dir für arbeit werden mag.
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<p>This is a proper master's technique, when you are in the Zufechten, then send yourself into the right Wrath; as soon as he brings his sword in the air, then strike a free H