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Difference between revisions of "George Silver"

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| birthdate            = ca. 1550s-early 1560s
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| birthdate            = ca. 1550s-early 60s
 
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| language            = [[language::English]]
| nationality          = British{{#set:nationality=British}}
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| nationality          = English{{#set:nationality=English}}
 
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  | [[Paradoxes of Defence (Additional MS 34192)|Additional MS 34192]] (1599)
 
  | [[Paradoxes of Defence (Additional MS 34192)|Additional MS 34192]] (1599)
 
  | [[Bref Instructions vpõ My Pradoxes of Defence (Sloane MS No.376)|Sloane MS No.376]] (ca.1605)
 
  | [[Bref Instructions vpõ My Pradoxes of Defence (Sloane MS No.376)|Sloane MS No.376]] (ca.1605)
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| [[Bref instructions upon my Paradoxes of defence (MS 1086)|MS 1086]] (1801-1940)
 
}}
 
}}
 
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| principal manuscript(s)=
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'''George Silver''' (ca.1550s- early 1560s - 1620s) was a [[century::16th century|16th - 17th century]] British nobleman and fencing enthusiast. He was likely born in the 1550s or early 1560s, the eldest of four brothers; apparently at least one of them, Toby, was also an accomplished swordsman. Silver is described as a gentleman in his treatise, and the fencing historian Aylward claims that he was eleventh in descent from Sir Bartholomew Silver, who was knighted by Edward II <ref>J.D. Aylward, The English Master at Arms from the Twelfth to the Twentieth Century. London 1956, p. 62</ref>. On March 24th 1580 (1579 in the old calendar then in use in England), he was married to Mary Haydon in London, England. <ref>Ibid, p. 63</ref>
+
'''George Silver''' (ca.1550s- early 1560s - 1620s) was a [[century::16th century|16th - 17th century]] English nobleman and fencing enthusiast. He was likely born in the 1550s or early 1560s, the eldest of four brothers; apparently at least one of them, Toby, was also an accomplished swordsman. Silver is described as a gentleman in his treatise, and the fencing historian Aylward claims that he was eleventh in descent from Sir Bartholomew Silver, who was knighted by Edward II <ref>J.D. Aylward, The English Master at Arms from the Twelfth to the Twentieth Century. London 1956, p. 62</ref>. On March 24th 1580 (1579 in the old calendar then in use in England), he was married to Mary Haydon in London, England. <ref>Ibid, p. 63</ref>
  
Silver's martial lineage is unknown, but as a member of the gentry he was not affiliated with the lower class [[London Masters of Defence]] and would not have been a [[fencing master]] himself as the latter were classed as vagrants under the relevant act of 1529 <ref>Ibid. p. 19</ref>. In spite of this, he was possessed of strong opinions about the proper method of fencing and was strongly opposed to the contemporary Continental fencing traditions. He was particularly critical of the Italian masters who had set up schools in London, including [[Rocco Bonetti]] and [[Vincentio Saviolo]]. He and Toby went so far as to challenge Saviolo to a public fencing match to demonstrate the superiority of his British arts, but even though they placarded London, Southwark, and Westminster with the challenge, and had it carried to Saviolo personally on the appointed day, Silver states that no formal match occurred.<ref>George Silver, Paradoxes of Defence, London 1599, pp. 66-67</ref> Silver challenged Saviolo to fence him at ten weapons, beginning with the single rapier and rapier and dagger, which suggests that Silver had at least a passing familiarity with those weapons.<ref>Ibid, p. 66</ref>
+
Silver's martial lineage is unknown, but as a member of the gentry he was not affiliated with the lower class [[London Masters of Defence]] and would not have been a [[fencing master]] himself as the latter were classed as vagrants under the relevant act of 1529 <ref>Ibid. p. 19</ref>. In spite of this, he was possessed of strong opinions about the proper method of fencing and was strongly opposed to the contemporary Continental fencing traditions. He was particularly critical of the Italian masters who had set up schools in London, including [[Rocco Bonetti]] and [[Vincentio Saviolo]]. He and Toby went so far as to challenge Saviolo to a public fencing match to demonstrate the superiority of English arts, but even though they placarded London, Southwark, and Westminster with the challenge, and had it carried to Saviolo personally on the appointed day, Silver states that no formal match occurred.<ref>George Silver, Paradoxes of Defence, London 1599, pp. 66-67</ref> Silver challenged Saviolo to fence him at ten weapons, beginning with the single rapier and rapier and dagger, which suggests that Silver had at least a passing familiarity with those weapons.<ref>Ibid, p. 66</ref>
  
In 1599, Silver published a treatise entitled ''[[Paradoxes of Defence (George Silver)|Paradoxes of Defence]]'' and dedicated it to Robert Devereux, the Earl of Essex and also Saviolo's patron. Silver uses "paradox" in the sense of heresy and in this work he speaks against the wildly popular [[rapier]], detailing what he sees as its inherent flaws as well as those of the foreign fencing styles that emphasize it. A second volume, entitled ''[[Bref Instructions vpõ My Pradoxes of Defence (Sloane MS No.376)|Brief Instructions upon My Paradoxes of Defence]]'' and explaining his own British fencing style, was written at a later date. The manuscript is undated but refers to Great Britain and so must have been written after James I's introduction of that term in late 1604. Bref Instructions remained unpublished for unknown reasons.
+
In 1599, Silver published a treatise entitled ''[[Paradoxes of Defence (George Silver)|Paradoxes of Defence]]'' and dedicated it to Robert Devereux, the Earl of Essex and also Saviolo's patron. Silver uses "paradox" in the sense of heresy and in this work he speaks against the wildly popular [[rapier]], detailing what he sees as its inherent flaws as well as those of the foreign fencing styles that emphasize it. A second volume, entitled ''[[Bref Instructions vpõ My Pradoxes of Defence (Sloane MS No.376)|Brief Instructions upon My Paradoxes of Defence]]'' and explaining his own English fencing style, was written at a later date. The manuscript is undated but refers to Great Britain and so must have been written after James I's introduction of that term in late 1604. Bref Instructions remained unpublished for unknown reasons.
  
 
Silver's activities after the publication of his book are unclear. Aylward claims that he was alive in 1622, when he was visited (a kind of audit of people claiming noble or gentlemanly status) by Cooke, Clarenceux King-of-Arms. <ref>J.D. Aylward, The English Master at Arms from the Twelfth to the Twentieth Century, London 1956, p. 62</ref> However, Robert Cooke died in 1593. The Clarenceux King-of Arms in 1622 was William Camden, but as he became paralyzed in 1622 and died in 1623 it is doubtful whether he visited Silver either.<ref>S. Hand, Swordplay in the Age of Shakespeare, In Press</ref>
 
Silver's activities after the publication of his book are unclear. Aylward claims that he was alive in 1622, when he was visited (a kind of audit of people claiming noble or gentlemanly status) by Cooke, Clarenceux King-of-Arms. <ref>J.D. Aylward, The English Master at Arms from the Twelfth to the Twentieth Century, London 1956, p. 62</ref> However, Robert Cooke died in 1593. The Clarenceux King-of Arms in 1622 was William Camden, but as he became paralyzed in 1622 and died in 1623 it is doubtful whether he visited Silver either.<ref>S. Hand, Swordplay in the Age of Shakespeare, In Press</ref>
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! id="thin" | <p>Images<br/></p>
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! <p>Illustrations<br/></p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B|Completed Modernization}}<br/>by [[Steve Hick]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B|Completed Modernization}}<br/>by [[Steve Hick]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Michael Chidester]]</p>
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| [[File:Silver 1.jpg|300px|center]]
 
| [[File:Silver 1.jpg|300px|center]]
 
| '''To the right honorable, my singular good lord, Robert, Earl of Essex and Ewe, Earl Marshall of England, Viscount Hereford, Lord Ferrers of Chartley, Bourchier and Louaine, Master of the Queens Majesty's horse, & of the Ordinance, Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, Knight of the most Noble order of the Garter, and one of her highness most honorable Privy Council.'''
 
| '''To the right honorable, my singular good lord, Robert, Earl of Essex and Ewe, Earl Marshall of England, Viscount Hereford, Lord Ferrers of Chartley, Bourchier and Louaine, Master of the Queens Majesty's horse, & of the Ordinance, Chancellor of the University of Cambridge, Knight of the most Noble order of the Garter, and one of her highness most honorable Privy Council.'''
Fencing (Right honorable) in this new fangled age, is like our fashions, every day a change, resembling the chameleon, who alters himself into all colors save white. So fencing changes into all wards save the right. That it is so, experience teaches us, why it is so, I doubt not but your wisdom does conceive. There is nothing permanent that is not true, what can be true that is uncertain? How can that be certain, that stands upon uncertain grounds? The mind of man a greedy hunter after truth, finding the seeming truth but changing, not always one, but always diverse, forsakes the supposed, to find out the assured certainty, and searching everywhere save where it should, meets with all save what it would. Who seeks & finds not, seeks in vain. Who seeks in vain, must if he will find seek again, yet all in vain. Who seeks not what he would, as he should, and where he should, as in other things (Right Honorable), so in fencing: the mind desirous of truth, hunts after it, and hating falsehood, flies from it, and therefore having missed it once, it assays the second time. If then he thrives not, he tries another way. When he has failed, he adventures on the third & if all these fail him, yet he never fails to change his weapon, his fight, his ward, if by any means he may compass what he most affects, for because men desire to find out a true defence for themselves in their fight, therefore they seek it diligently, nature having taught us to defend ourselves, and Art teaching us how, and because we miss it in one way, we change to another. But though we often chop and change, turn and return, from ward to ward, from fight to fight, in this constant search, yet we never rest in any, and that because we never find the truth, and therefore we never find it, because we never seek it in that weapon where it may be found. For, to seek for a true defence in an untrue weapon, is to angle on the earth for fish, and to hunt in the sea for hares. Truth is ancient though it seems an upstart. Our forefathers were wise, though our age accounts them foolish, valiant though we repute them cowards. They found out the true defences for their bodies in short weapons by their wisdom, they defended themselves and subdued their enemies, and those weapons with their valor.{{ref|1|1}} And (Right Honorable) if we have this true defence, we must seek it where is is, in short swords, short staves, the half pike, partisans, glaives, or such like weapons of perfect lengths, not in long swords, long rapiers, nor frog pricking poniards: for if there is no certain grounds for defence, why do they teach it? If there be, why have they not found it? Not because it is not so. To say so, were to gainsay the truth. But because it is not certain in those weapons which they teach. To prove this, I have set forth these my Paradoxes, different I confess from the main current of our outlandish teachers, but agreeing I am well assured to the truth, and tending as I hope to the honor of our English nation. The reason which moved me to adventure so great a task, is the desire I have to bring the truth to light, which has a long time lain hidden in the cave of contempt, while we like degenerate sons, have forsaken our forefathers virtues with their weapons, and have lusted like men sick of a strange ague, after the strange vices and devices of Italian, French, and Spanish fencers, little remembering, that these apish toys could not free Rome from Brennius's sack, not France from the King Henry the Fifth his conquest. To this desire to find out truth the daughter of time, begotten of Bellona, I was also moved, that by it I might remove the great loss of our English gallants, which we daily suffer by these imperfect fights, wherein none undertake the combat, be his cause never so good, his cunning never so much, his strength and agility never so great, but his virtue was tied to fortune Happy man, happy dolt, kill or be killed is the dreadful issue of the devilish imperfect fight. If the man were now alive, which beat the masters for the scholars fault, because he had no better instructed him, these Italian fencers could not escape his censure, who teach us offense, not defence, and to fight, as Diogenes' scholars were taught to dance, to bring their lives to an end by Art. Was Ajax a coward because he fought with a seven folded buckler, or are we mad to go naked into the field to try our fortunes, not our virtues. Was Achilles a runaway, who wore that well tempered armor, or are we desperate, who care for nothing but to fight, and learn like the the pygmies, with bodkins, or weapons of like defence? Is it valorous for a man to go naked against his enemy? Why then did the Lacedemonians punish him as desperate, whom they rewarded for his valor with a laurel crown? But that which is most shameful, they teach men to butcher one another here at home in peace, wherewith they cannot hurt their enemies abroad in war.{{ref|2|2}} For, you honor well knows, that when the battle is joined, there is no room for them to draw their bird-spits, and when they have them, what can they do with them? Can they pierce his corslet with the point? Can they unlace his helmet, unbuckle his armor, hew asunder their pikes with a Stocata, a Reversa, a Dritta, a Stramason or other such tempestuous terms? No, these toys are fit for children, not for men, for straggling boys of the camp, to murder poultry, not for men of honor to try the battle with their foes. Thus I have (Right Honorable) for the trial of the truth, between the short sword and the long rapier, for the saving of the lives of our English gallants, who are sent to certain death by their uncertain fights, & for abandoning of that mischievous and imperfect weapon, which serves to kill our friends in peace, but cannot much hurt our foes in war, have I at this time given forth these Paradoxes to the view of the world. And because I know such strange opinions had need of stout defence, I humbly crave your Honorable protection, as one in whom the true nobility of our victorious ancestors has taken up residence. It will suit to the rest of your Honors most noble complements, to maintain the defence of their weapons whose virtues you profess. It agrees with your Honorable disposition, to receive with favor what is presented with love. It sorts well with your Lordship's high authority, to weigh with reason, what is fit for marshal men. It is an unusual point of your Honor, which wins your Lordship love in your country, to defend the truth in whomsoever, and it adds a supply to that which your Lordship have of late begun to your unspeakable honor and inestimable benefit, to reduce the wearing of swords with hilts over the hands,{{ref|3|3}} to the Roman discipline, no longer then they might draw them under their arms, or over their shoulders. In all or any of these respects, I rest assured that your Lordship will vouchsafe to receive with favor and maintain with honor these Paradoxes of mine, which if they be shrouded under so safe a shield, I will not doubt but to maintain with reason among the wise, and prove it by practice upon the ignorant, that there is no certain defence in the rapier, and that there is great advantage in the short sword against the long rapier, or all manner of rapiers in general, of what length soever. And that the short staff has the advantage against the long staff of twelve, fourteen, sixteen or eighteen feet long, or of what length soever. And against two men with their swords and daggers, or two rapiers, poniards & gauntlets, or each of them a case of rapiers, which whether I can perform or not, I submit for trial to your Honors martial censure, being at all times ready to make it good, in what manner, and against what man soever it shall stand upon your Lordship's good liking to appoint. And so I humbly commend this book to your Lordship's wisdom to peruse, and your Honor to the Highest to protect in all health and happiness now and ever  
+
Fencing (Right honorable) in this new fangled age, is like our fashions, every day a change, resembling the chameleon, who alters himself into all colors save white. So fencing changes into all wards save the right. That it is so, experience teaches us, why it is so, I doubt not but your wisdom does conceive. There is nothing permanent that is not true, what can be true that is uncertain? How can that be certain, that stands upon uncertain grounds? The mind of man a greedy hunter after truth, finding the seeming truth but changing, not always one, but always diverse, forsakes the supposed, to find out the assured certainty, and searching everywhere save where it should, meets with all save what it would. Who seeks & finds not, seeks in vain. Who seeks in vain, must if he will find seek again, yet all in vain. Who seeks not what he would, as he should, and where he should, as in other things (Right Honorable), so in fencing: the mind desirous of truth, hunts after it, and hating falsehood, flies from it, and therefore having missed it once, it assays the second time. If then he thrives not, he tries another way. When he has failed, he adventures on the third & if all these fail him, yet he never fails to change his weapon, his fight, his ward, if by any means he may compass what he most affects, for because men desire to find out a true defence for themselves in their fight, therefore they seek it diligently, nature having taught us to defend ourselves, and Art teaching us how, and because we miss it in one way, we change to another. But though we often chop and change, turn and return, from ward to ward, from fight to fight, in this constant search, yet we never rest in any, and that because we never find the truth, and therefore we never find it, because we never seek it in that weapon where it may be found. For, to seek for a true defence in an untrue weapon, is to angle on the earth for fish, and to hunt in the sea for hares. Truth is ancient though it seems an upstart. Our forefathers were wise, though our age accounts them foolish, valiant though we repute them cowards. They found out the true defences for their bodies in short weapons by their wisdom, they defended themselves and subdued their enemies, and those weapons with their valor.{{ref|1|1}} And (Right Honorable) if we have this true defence, we must seek it where is is, in short swords, short staves, the half pike, partisans, glaives, or such like weapons of perfect lengths, not in long swords, long rapiers, nor frog pricking poniards: for if there is no certain grounds for defence, why do they teach it? If there be, why have they not found it? Not because it is not so. To say so, were to gainsay the truth. But because it is not certain in those weapons which they teach. To prove this, I have set forth these my Paradoxes, different I confess from the main current of our outlandish teachers, but agreeing I am well assured to the truth, and tending as I hope to the honor of our English nation. The reason which moved me to adventure so great a task, is the desire I have to bring the truth to light, which has a long time lain hidden in the cave of contempt, while we like degenerate sons, have forsaken our forefathers virtues with their weapons, and have lusted like men sick of a strange ague, after the strange vices and devices of Italian, French, and Spanish fencers, little remembering, that these apish toys could not free Rome from Brennius's sack, not France from the King Henry the Fifth his conquest. To this desire to find out truth the daughter of time, begotten of Bellona, I was also moved, that by it I might remove the great loss of our English gallants, which we daily suffer by these imperfect fights, wherein none undertake the combat, be his cause never so good, his cunning never so much, his strength and agility never so great, but his virtue was tied to fortune Happy man, happy dolt, kill or be killed is the dreadful issue of the devilish imperfect fight. If the man were now alive, which beat the masters for the scholars fault, because he had no better instructed him, these Italian fencers could not escape his censure, who teach us offense, not defence, and to fight, as Diogenes' scholars were taught to dance, to bring their lives to an end by Art. Was Ajax a coward because he fought with a seven folded buckler, or are we mad to go naked into the field to try our fortunes, not our virtues. Was Achilles a runaway, who wore that well tempered armor, or are we desperate, who care for nothing but to fight, and learn like the the pygmies, with bodkins, or weapons of like defence? Is it valorous for a man to go naked against his enemy? Why then did the Lacedemonians punish him as desperate, whom they rewarded for his valor with a laurel crown? But that which is most shameful, they teach men to butcher one another here at home in peace, wherewith they cannot hurt their enemies abroad in war.{{ref|2|2}} For, your honor well knows, that when the battle is joined, there is no room for them to draw their bird-spits, and when they have them, what can they do with them? Can they pierce his corslet with the point? Can they unlace his helmet, unbuckle his armor, hew asunder their pikes with a Stocata, a Reversa, a Dritta, a Stramason or other such tempestuous terms? No, these toys are fit for children, not for men, for straggling boys of the camp, to murder poultry, not for men of honor to try the battle with their foes. Thus I have (Right Honorable) for the trial of the truth, between the short sword and the long rapier, for the saving of the lives of our English gallants, who are sent to certain death by their uncertain fights, & for abandoning of that mischievous and imperfect weapon, which serves to kill our friends in peace, but cannot much hurt our foes in war, have I at this time given forth these Paradoxes to the view of the world. And because I know such strange opinions had need of stout defence, I humbly crave your Honorable protection, as one in whom the true nobility of our victorious ancestors has taken up residence. It will suit to the rest of your Honors most noble complements, to maintain the defence of their weapons whose virtues you profess. It agrees with your Honorable disposition, to receive with favor what is presented with love. It sorts well with your Lordship's high authority, to weigh with reason, what is fit for marshal men. It is an unusual point of your Honor, which wins your Lordship love in your country, to defend the truth in whomsoever, and it adds a supply to that which your Lordship have of late begun to your unspeakable honor and inestimable benefit, to reduce the wearing of swords with hilts over the hands,{{ref|3|3}} to the Roman discipline, no longer then they might draw them under their arms, or over their shoulders. In all or any of these respects, I rest assured that your Lordship will vouchsafe to receive with favor and maintain with honor these Paradoxes of mine, which if they be shrouded under so safe a shield, I will not doubt but to maintain with reason among the wise, and prove it by practice upon the ignorant, that there is no certain defence in the rapier, and that there is great advantage in the short sword against the long rapier, or all manner of rapiers in general, of what length soever. And that the short staff has the advantage against the long staff of twelve, fourteen, sixteen or eighteen feet long, or of what length soever. And against two men with their swords and daggers, or two rapiers, poniards & gauntlets, or each of them a case of rapiers, which whether I can perform or not, I submit for trial to your Honors martial censure, being at all times ready to make it good, in what manner, and against what man soever it shall stand upon your Lordship's good liking to appoint. And so I humbly commend this book to your Lordship's wisdom to peruse, and your Honor to the Highest to protect in all health and happiness now and ever  
  
 
<br/><br/>Your Honors in all duty,
 
<br/><br/>Your Honors in all duty,
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| class="noline" |  
| Jeronimo: this gallant was valiant, and would fight indeed, and did, as you shall hear. He being in a coach with a wench that he loved well, there was one Cheese, a very tall man, in his fight natural English, for he fought with his sword and dagger, and in rapier fight had no skill at all. This Cheese having a quarrel to Jeronimo, overtook him upon the way, himself being on horseback, did call to Jeronimo, and bade him come forth of the coach or he would fetch him, for he was come to fight with him. Jeronimo presently went forth of the coach and drew his rapier and dagger, put himself into his best ward or Stocata, which ward was taught by himself and Vincentio, and by them best allowed of, to be the best ward to stand upon in fight for life, either to assault the enemy, or stand and watch his coming, which ward it should seem he ventured his life upon, but howsoever with all the fine Italianated skill Jeronimo had, Cheese with his sword within two thrusts ran him into the body and slew him. Yet the Italian teachers will say, that an Englishman cannot thrust straight with a sword, because the hilt will not suffer him to put the forefinger upon the blade, nor to hold the pommel in the hand, whereby we are of necessity to hold fast the handle in the hand. By reason whereof we are driven to thrust both compass and short, whereas with the rapier they can thrust both straight and much further than we can with the sword, because of the hilt. And these are the reasons they make against the sword.
+
| class="noline" | Jeronimo: this gallant was valiant, and would fight indeed, and did, as you shall hear. He being in a coach with a wench that he loved well, there was one Cheese, a very tall man, in his fight natural English, for he fought with his sword and dagger, and in rapier fight had no skill at all. This Cheese having a quarrel to Jeronimo, overtook him upon the way, himself being on horseback, did call to Jeronimo, and bade him come forth of the coach or he would fetch him, for he was come to fight with him. Jeronimo presently went forth of the coach and drew his rapier and dagger, put himself into his best ward or Stocata, which ward was taught by himself and Vincentio, and by them best allowed of, to be the best ward to stand upon in fight for life, either to assault the enemy, or stand and watch his coming, which ward it should seem he ventured his life upon, but howsoever with all the fine Italianated skill Jeronimo had, Cheese with his sword within two thrusts ran him into the body and slew him. Yet the Italian teachers will say, that an Englishman cannot thrust straight with a sword, because the hilt will not suffer him to put the forefinger upon the blade, nor to hold the pommel in the hand, whereby we are of necessity to hold fast the handle in the hand. By reason whereof we are driven to thrust both compass and short, whereas with the rapier they can thrust both straight and much further than we can with the sword, because of the hilt. And these are the reasons they make against the sword.
 
'''FINIS'''
 
'''FINIS'''
| ''Ieronimo'' this gallant was valiant, and would fight indeed, and did, as you ſhall heare. He being in a Coch with a wench that he loued well, there was one ''Cheeſe'', a verie tall man, in his fight naturall Engliſh, for he fought with his Sword and Dagger, and in Rapier-fight had no skill at all. This ''Cheeſe'' hauing a quarrell to ''Ieronimo'', ouertooke him vpon the way, himſelfe being on horſebacke, did call to ''Ieronimo'', and bad him come forth of the Coch or he would fetch him, for he was come to fight with him. ''Ieronimo'' preſently went forth of the Coch and drew his Rapier and dagger, put himſelf into his beſt ward or ''Stocata'', which ward was taught by himſelfe and ''Vincentio'', and by them beſt allowed of, to be the beſt ward to ſtand vpon in fight for life, either to aſſault the enemie, or ſtand and watch his comming, which ward it ſhould ſeeme he ventured his life vpon, but howſoeuer with all the fine Italienated skill ''Ieronimo'' had, ''Cheeſe'' with his Sword within two thruſtes ran him into the bodie and ſlue him. Yet the Italian teachers will ſay, that an Engliſhmā cannot thruſt ſtraight with a Sword, becauſe the hilt will not ſuffer him to put the forefinger ouer the Croſſe, nor to put the thumbe vpon the blade, nor to hold the pummell in the hand, whereby we are of neceſſitie to hold faſt the handle in the hand : by reaſon whereof we are driuen to thruſt both compaſſe and ſhort, whereas with the Rapier they can thruſt both ſtraight and much further then we can with the Sword, becauſe of the hilt: and theſe be the reaſons they make againſt the Sword.
+
| class="noline" | ''Ieronimo'' this gallant was valiant, and would fight indeed, and did, as you ſhall heare. He being in a Coch with a wench that he loued well, there was one ''Cheeſe'', a verie tall man, in his fight naturall Engliſh, for he fought with his Sword and Dagger, and in Rapier-fight had no skill at all. This ''Cheeſe'' hauing a quarrell to ''Ieronimo'', ouertooke him vpon the way, himſelfe being on horſebacke, did call to ''Ieronimo'', and bad him come forth of the Coch or he would fetch him, for he was come to fight with him. ''Ieronimo'' preſently went forth of the Coch and drew his Rapier and dagger, put himſelf into his beſt ward or ''Stocata'', which ward was taught by himſelfe and ''Vincentio'', and by them beſt allowed of, to be the beſt ward to ſtand vpon in fight for life, either to aſſault the enemie, or ſtand and watch his comming, which ward it ſhould ſeeme he ventured his life vpon, but howſoeuer with all the fine Italienated skill ''Ieronimo'' had, ''Cheeſe'' with his Sword within two thruſtes ran him into the bodie and ſlue him. Yet the Italian teachers will ſay, that an Engliſhmā cannot thruſt ſtraight with a Sword, becauſe the hilt will not ſuffer him to put the forefinger ouer the Croſſe, nor to put the thumbe vpon the blade, nor to hold the pummell in the hand, whereby we are of neceſſitie to hold faſt the handle in the hand : by reaſon whereof we are driuen to thruſt both compaſſe and ſhort, whereas with the Rapier they can thruſt both ſtraight and much further then we can with the Sword, becauſe of the hilt: and theſe be the reaſons they make againſt the Sword.
 
'''FINIS.'''
 
'''FINIS.'''
  
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{{master begin
 
{{master begin
 
  | title = ''Brief Instructions upon My Paradoxes of Defence''
 
  | title = ''Brief Instructions upon My Paradoxes of Defence''
  | width = 84em
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}}
 
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{| class="floated master"
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{| class="master"
 
|-  
 
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! id="thin" | <p>Images<br/></p>
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! <p>Illustrations</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B|Completed Modernization}}<br/>by [[Steve Hick]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B|Completed Modernization}}<br/>by [[Steve Hick]]</p>
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Jonathan Miller]]</p>
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! <p>[[Bref Instructions vpõ My Pradoxes of Defence (Sloane MS No.376)|London Transcription]] (ca. 1605)<br/>by [[Jonathan Miller]]</p>
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! <p>[[Bref instructions upon my Paradoxes of defence (MS 1086)|Leuven Transcription]] (1800s)<br/></p>
  
 
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| '''''Bref Instructions Vpõ My Pradoxes Of Defence for the true handling of all Mann<sup>r</sup> of weapons together w<sup>t</sup> the fower grownds & the fower gou<sup>r</sup>nors w<sup>ch</sup> gouernours are left out in my pradoxes w<sup>t</sup>out the knowledge of w<sup>ch</sup> no Man can fight saf'''''
 
| '''''Bref Instructions Vpõ My Pradoxes Of Defence for the true handling of all Mann<sup>r</sup> of weapons together w<sup>t</sup> the fower grownds & the fower gou<sup>r</sup>nors w<sup>ch</sup> gouernours are left out in my pradoxes w<sup>t</sup>out the knowledge of w<sup>ch</sup> no Man can fight saf'''''
 
By George Silver ''Gentleman''
 
By George Silver ''Gentleman''
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| '''To The Reader.'''
 
| '''To The Reader.'''
 
For as much as in my padoxes of Defence I haue admonyſhed Men to take heede of falſe teachers of Defence, yet once againe in these my bref inſtructions I do the lyke, becauſe Diuers have wryten books treating of the noble ſcience of Defence, wherin they rather teach offence then Defence, rather ſhewing men therby how to be ſlayne than to defend them ſelves frõ the Dang<sup>r</sup> of their enemys, as we may dayly ſe to the great grief & ouerthrowe of many braue gentlemen & gallent of o<sup>r</sup> ever victorious nation of great brytaine, And therforefor the great loue & Care y<sup>t</sup> I haue for the well Doing & p<sup>r</sup>ſ,vation of my Countrymen, ſeeing their Dayly ruens & vtter> ou<sup>r</sup>throw of Diu<sup>rs </sup> gallant gent: & others w<sup>ch</sup> trust only to that Impfyt fyght of y<sup>t</sup> Rapior, yeaſe although they Deyly ſe their owne ou<sup>r</sup>throwes & ſlaughter therby, yet becaus they are trayned vp therin, they thinke & do fully pſwade them ſelues that ther is no fight ſo excellent & wher as amongſt div<sup>r</sup>s other their oppynyons y<sup>t</sup> leadeth them to this errous on of y<sup>t</sup> cheifeſt is, becauſe ther be ſo many ſlayne w<sup>t</sup> theſe weapons & therfore they hold them ſo exelent but theſe thinges do cheifly happen, firſt becauſe their fyght is Imprfyt for that they vſe nether the prfyt gronds of true fyght, nether yet the 4 gou<sup>r</sup>nors w<sup>t</sup>out w<sup>ch</sup> no man can fight ſaf, nether do they vſe such other rules w<sup>ch</sup>are required in the right vſe of prfyt defence, and also their weapons for y<sup>e</sup> most prte beinge of an Imprfyt length, muſt of neceſſytie make an Imprfyt Defence becauſe they Cannot vſe them in due tyme & place, for had theſe valerous mynded men the right prfection of the true fyght w<sup>t</sup> the ſhort ſword, & alſo of other weapons of pryft length, I know y<sup>t</sup> men would com ſaffer out of the field frõ ſuch bloddye bankets & that ſuch would be their prfections her in, that it would ſaue many 100 mens lyues. But how ſhould men lerne prfection out of ſuch rules as are nothing els but very Imprfectiõ it ſelf. And as it is not fyt for a man w<sup>ch</sup> deſyreth y<sup>e</sup> clere lyght of the Day to go downe into the bottom of a deepe & Darke Dungion, belyvinge to fynd it there, ſo is it as Impoſſyble for men to fynd the prfyt knowledge of this noble ſcience wher as in all their teachings every thinge is attempted & acted vpõ Imprfyt rules, for ther is but one truth in all things, w<sup>ch</sup> I wiſh very hartely were taught & practysed here amongſt vs, & y<sup>t</sup> thoſe Imprfyt & murtherous kynde of falſe fyghts might be by them abolyſhed. Leaue now to quaf & gull any Longer of that fylthy brynyſh puddle, seeing yõ may now drink of y<sup>t</sup> freſh & clere ſprynge.
 
For as much as in my padoxes of Defence I haue admonyſhed Men to take heede of falſe teachers of Defence, yet once againe in these my bref inſtructions I do the lyke, becauſe Diuers have wryten books treating of the noble ſcience of Defence, wherin they rather teach offence then Defence, rather ſhewing men therby how to be ſlayne than to defend them ſelves frõ the Dang<sup>r</sup> of their enemys, as we may dayly ſe to the great grief & ouerthrowe of many braue gentlemen & gallent of o<sup>r</sup> ever victorious nation of great brytaine, And therforefor the great loue & Care y<sup>t</sup> I haue for the well Doing & p<sup>r</sup>ſ,vation of my Countrymen, ſeeing their Dayly ruens & vtter> ou<sup>r</sup>throw of Diu<sup>rs </sup> gallant gent: & others w<sup>ch</sup> trust only to that Impfyt fyght of y<sup>t</sup> Rapior, yeaſe although they Deyly ſe their owne ou<sup>r</sup>throwes & ſlaughter therby, yet becaus they are trayned vp therin, they thinke & do fully pſwade them ſelues that ther is no fight ſo excellent & wher as amongſt div<sup>r</sup>s other their oppynyons y<sup>t</sup> leadeth them to this errous on of y<sup>t</sup> cheifeſt is, becauſe ther be ſo many ſlayne w<sup>t</sup> theſe weapons & therfore they hold them ſo exelent but theſe thinges do cheifly happen, firſt becauſe their fyght is Imprfyt for that they vſe nether the prfyt gronds of true fyght, nether yet the 4 gou<sup>r</sup>nors w<sup>t</sup>out w<sup>ch</sup> no man can fight ſaf, nether do they vſe such other rules w<sup>ch</sup>are required in the right vſe of prfyt defence, and also their weapons for y<sup>e</sup> most prte beinge of an Imprfyt length, muſt of neceſſytie make an Imprfyt Defence becauſe they Cannot vſe them in due tyme & place, for had theſe valerous mynded men the right prfection of the true fyght w<sup>t</sup> the ſhort ſword, & alſo of other weapons of pryft length, I know y<sup>t</sup> men would com ſaffer out of the field frõ ſuch bloddye bankets & that ſuch would be their prfections her in, that it would ſaue many 100 mens lyues. But how ſhould men lerne prfection out of ſuch rules as are nothing els but very Imprfectiõ it ſelf. And as it is not fyt for a man w<sup>ch</sup> deſyreth y<sup>e</sup> clere lyght of the Day to go downe into the bottom of a deepe & Darke Dungion, belyvinge to fynd it there, ſo is it as Impoſſyble for men to fynd the prfyt knowledge of this noble ſcience wher as in all their teachings every thinge is attempted & acted vpõ Imprfyt rules, for ther is but one truth in all things, w<sup>ch</sup> I wiſh very hartely were taught & practysed here amongſt vs, & y<sup>t</sup> thoſe Imprfyt & murtherous kynde of falſe fyghts might be by them abolyſhed. Leaue now to quaf & gull any Longer of that fylthy brynyſh puddle, seeing yõ may now drink of y<sup>t</sup> freſh & clere ſprynge.
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| O that men for their defence would but give their mind to practice the true fight indeed and learn to bear true British wards for their defence, which if they had it in perfect practice, I speak it of my own knowledge that those imperfect Italian devices with rapier and poniard would be clean cast aside and of no account of all such as blind affections do not lead beyond the bounds of reason. Therefore for the very zealous and unfeigned love that I bear unto your high and royal person my countrymen pitying their causes that so may brave men should be daily murdered and spoiled for want of true knowledge of this noble science and as some imagine to be, only the excellence of the rapier fight, and where as my paradoxes of defence is to the most sort as a dark riddle in many things therein set down, therefore I have now this second time taken pains to write these few brief instructions there upon where by they may better attain to the truth of this science and laying open here all such things as was something intricate for them to understand in my paradoxes and therefore yet I have the full perfection and knowledge of the perfect use of all manner of weapons, it does embolden me here to write for the better instruction of the unskillful.
 
| O that men for their defence would but give their mind to practice the true fight indeed and learn to bear true British wards for their defence, which if they had it in perfect practice, I speak it of my own knowledge that those imperfect Italian devices with rapier and poniard would be clean cast aside and of no account of all such as blind affections do not lead beyond the bounds of reason. Therefore for the very zealous and unfeigned love that I bear unto your high and royal person my countrymen pitying their causes that so may brave men should be daily murdered and spoiled for want of true knowledge of this noble science and as some imagine to be, only the excellence of the rapier fight, and where as my paradoxes of defence is to the most sort as a dark riddle in many things therein set down, therefore I have now this second time taken pains to write these few brief instructions there upon where by they may better attain to the truth of this science and laying open here all such things as was something intricate for them to understand in my paradoxes and therefore yet I have the full perfection and knowledge of the perfect use of all manner of weapons, it does embolden me here to write for the better instruction of the unskillful.
 
| O that men for their Defence would but geve their mynde to practiſe the true fyght in deed, & lerne to bere true brytiſh wards for thire defence, w<sup>ch</sup> yf they had it in prfyt practyſe, I ſpeak it of myne owne knowledge y<sup>t</sup> thoſe Imprfyt Italyon Devyſes w<sup>t</sup> rapyor & poynardwould be clene caſt aſyde & of no account of al ſuch as blind offections do not lead beyond the bonds of reaſon. Therfore for the verye zealous & unfayned loue y<sup>t</sup> I beare vnto yo<sup>r</sup> high & royal prſon my Cuntrymen pyttiing their cauſes y<sup>t</sup> ſo many braue men ſhould bedayly murthered, & spoyled for want of true knowledge of this noble ſcience & not as ſom Imagyn to be, only y<sup>e</sup> excelence of y<sup>e</sup> rapior fyght, & wher as my padoxes of defence is to the most sorte as a darke ryddle in many things ther in ſet downe, therfore I have now this ſecond tyme taken ſom paynes to write theſe few breef Inſtructions ther uppõ wher by they may the better attayne to the truth of this ſcyence & laying open here all ſuch things as was ſom thinge Intrycat for them to vnd<sup>r</sup>ſtand in my p<sup>r</sup>doxes & therfor y<sup>t</sup> I haue the fulprfectiõ & knowledge of the prfyt vſe of all mann<sup>r</sup> of weapons, it Doth embolden me here in to wryte for the better Inſtructiõ of the Vnſkylfull.
 
| O that men for their Defence would but geve their mynde to practiſe the true fyght in deed, & lerne to bere true brytiſh wards for thire defence, w<sup>ch</sup> yf they had it in prfyt practyſe, I ſpeak it of myne owne knowledge y<sup>t</sup> thoſe Imprfyt Italyon Devyſes w<sup>t</sup> rapyor & poynardwould be clene caſt aſyde & of no account of al ſuch as blind offections do not lead beyond the bonds of reaſon. Therfore for the verye zealous & unfayned loue y<sup>t</sup> I beare vnto yo<sup>r</sup> high & royal prſon my Cuntrymen pyttiing their cauſes y<sup>t</sup> ſo many braue men ſhould bedayly murthered, & spoyled for want of true knowledge of this noble ſcience & not as ſom Imagyn to be, only y<sup>e</sup> excelence of y<sup>e</sup> rapior fyght, & wher as my padoxes of defence is to the most sorte as a darke ryddle in many things ther in ſet downe, therfore I have now this ſecond tyme taken ſom paynes to write theſe few breef Inſtructions ther uppõ wher by they may the better attayne to the truth of this ſcyence & laying open here all ſuch things as was ſom thinge Intrycat for them to vnd<sup>r</sup>ſtand in my p<sup>r</sup>doxes & therfor y<sup>t</sup> I haue the fulprfectiõ & knowledge of the prfyt vſe of all mann<sup>r</sup> of weapons, it Doth embolden me here in to wryte for the better Inſtructiõ of the Vnſkylfull.
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| And I have added to these my brief instructions certain necessary admonitions which I wish every man not only to know but also to observe and follow, chiefly all such as are desirous to enter into the right usage and knowledge of their weapons and also I have thought it good to annex here unto my paradoxes of defence because in these my brief instructions, I have referred the reader to divers rules therein set down.
 
| And I have added to these my brief instructions certain necessary admonitions which I wish every man not only to know but also to observe and follow, chiefly all such as are desirous to enter into the right usage and knowledge of their weapons and also I have thought it good to annex here unto my paradoxes of defence because in these my brief instructions, I have referred the reader to divers rules therein set down.
 
| And I haue added to theſe my breef Inſtructions c<sup>r</sup>taine neceſarie admonytions w<sup>ch</sup> I wiſh every man not only to know, but alſo to obſ<sup>r</sup>ve & follow, Chiefly al ſuch as are deſyrous to enter into the right vſage & knowledge of their weapons, & alſo I haue thought it good to Annexe here vnto my p<sup>r</sup>doxes of Defence because in theſe my bref Inſtructions, I haue referred y<sup>e</sup> reader to div<sup>r</sup>s rules ther in ſet down.
 
| And I haue added to theſe my breef Inſtructions c<sup>r</sup>taine neceſarie admonytions w<sup>ch</sup> I wiſh every man not only to know, but alſo to obſ<sup>r</sup>ve & follow, Chiefly al ſuch as are deſyrous to enter into the right vſage & knowledge of their weapons, & alſo I haue thought it good to Annexe here vnto my p<sup>r</sup>doxes of Defence because in theſe my bref Inſtructions, I haue referred y<sup>e</sup> reader to div<sup>r</sup>s rules ther in ſet down.
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| This I have written for an infallible truth and a note of remembrance to our gallant gentlemen & others of our brave minded nation of Great Britain, which here be minded to defend themselves and to win honor in the field by their actions of arms and single combats.
 
| This I have written for an infallible truth and a note of remembrance to our gallant gentlemen & others of our brave minded nation of Great Britain, which here be minded to defend themselves and to win honor in the field by their actions of arms and single combats.
 
| This haue I wryten for an Infallible truth & a note of remembrance to o<sup>r</sup> gallant gent: & others of o<sup>r</sup> brave mynded Nation of great bryttaine, w<sup>ch</sup> bere a mynde to defend them ſelues & to wyn honour in the feeld by their Actions of armes & ſyngle Combats.
 
| This haue I wryten for an Infallible truth & a note of remembrance to o<sup>r</sup> gallant gent: & others of o<sup>r</sup> brave mynded Nation of great bryttaine, w<sup>ch</sup> bere a mynde to defend them ſelues & to wyn honour in the feeld by their Actions of armes & ſyngle Combats.
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| And know that I write not this for vainglory, but out of an entire love that I owe unto my native countrymen, as one who laments their losses, sorry that so great an error should be so carefully nourished as a serpent in their bosoms to their utter confusion, as of long time have been seen, whereas they would but seek the truth here in they were easily abolished, therefore follow the truth and fly ignorance.
 
| And know that I write not this for vainglory, but out of an entire love that I owe unto my native countrymen, as one who laments their losses, sorry that so great an error should be so carefully nourished as a serpent in their bosoms to their utter confusion, as of long time have been seen, whereas they would but seek the truth here in they were easily abolished, therefore follow the truth and fly ignorance.
 
| And know y<sup>t</sup> I write not this for vaineglorie, but out of An entyre loue y<sup>t</sup> I owe vnto my natyve Cuntrymen, as on who lamentith their Loſſes, ſorrye y<sup>t</sup> ſo great an errour ſhould be ſo Carefully noryſhed as a ſ<sup>r</sup>pant in their boſoms to their vtt<sup>r</sup> confusfyõ, as of long tymehaue byn ſeene, wher as yf they would but ſeeke the truth her in they were eaſyly abolyshed, therfore follow the truth & fly Ignorance.
 
| And know y<sup>t</sup> I write not this for vaineglorie, but out of An entyre loue y<sup>t</sup> I owe vnto my natyve Cuntrymen, as on who lamentith their Loſſes, ſorrye y<sup>t</sup> ſo great an errour ſhould be ſo Carefully noryſhed as a ſ<sup>r</sup>pant in their boſoms to their vtt<sup>r</sup> confusfyõ, as of long tymehaue byn ſeene, wher as yf they would but ſeeke the truth her in they were eaſyly abolyshed, therfore follow the truth & fly Ignorance.
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| And conſyd<sup>r</sup> y<sup>t</sup> learnyng hath no greater enemye than Ignorance, nether can the vnſkylfull euer Judge the truth of my arte to them unknowen, beware of raſh Judgement & accept my labours as thankfully as I beſtow them willingly, cenſuer me Justly, let no man Diſpiſe myworke herin Cauſeles, & ſo I refere my ſelf to the cenſuer of ſuch as are skylful herin & ſo I cõmyt yõ to the prtection of the almyghty Jehovah.
 
| And conſyd<sup>r</sup> y<sup>t</sup> learnyng hath no greater enemye than Ignorance, nether can the vnſkylfull euer Judge the truth of my arte to them unknowen, beware of raſh Judgement & accept my labours as thankfully as I beſtow them willingly, cenſuer me Justly, let no man Diſpiſe myworke herin Cauſeles, & ſo I refere my ſelf to the cenſuer of ſuch as are skylful herin & ſo I cõmyt yõ to the prtection of the almyghty Jehovah.
 
:yo<sup>rs </sup> in al loue & fryendly Affectiõ,<br/>George Syluer.
 
:yo<sup>rs </sup> in al loue & fryendly Affectiõ,<br/>George Syluer.
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| '''''Admonytions To The Gentlemen & Brave Gallants Of Great Britaine Against Quarrels & Braules Writen By George Siluer. Gent.'''''
 
| '''''Admonytions To The Gentlemen & Brave Gallants Of Great Britaine Against Quarrels & Braules Writen By George Siluer. Gent.'''''
 
Wheras I have declaired in my prdoxes of defence of the falſe teachinge of the noble ſcyence of defence vſed here by the Italyon fencers willing men therin to take heed how they trusted ther vnto w<sup>t</sup> ſuffytient reaſons & profs why.
 
Wheras I have declaired in my prdoxes of defence of the falſe teachinge of the noble ſcyence of defence vſed here by the Italyon fencers willing men therin to take heed how they trusted ther vnto w<sup>t</sup> ſuffytient reaſons & profs why.
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| And whereas there was a book written by Vincentio an Italian teacher whose ill using practices and unskillful teaching were such that it has cost the lives of many of our brave gentlemen and gallants, the uncertainty of whose false teaching does yet remain to the daily murdering and overthrow of many, for he and the rest of them did not teach defence but offence, as it does plainly appear by those that follow the same imperfect fight according to their teaching or instructions by the orders from them proceeding, for be the actors that follow them never so perfect or skillful therein one or both of them are either sore hurt or slain in their encounters and fights, and if they allege that we use it not rightly according to the perfection thereof, and therefore cannot defend ourselves, to which I answer if themselves had any perfection therein, and that their teaching had been a truth, themselves would not have been beaten and slain in their fights, and using of their weapons, as they were.
 
| And whereas there was a book written by Vincentio an Italian teacher whose ill using practices and unskillful teaching were such that it has cost the lives of many of our brave gentlemen and gallants, the uncertainty of whose false teaching does yet remain to the daily murdering and overthrow of many, for he and the rest of them did not teach defence but offence, as it does plainly appear by those that follow the same imperfect fight according to their teaching or instructions by the orders from them proceeding, for be the actors that follow them never so perfect or skillful therein one or both of them are either sore hurt or slain in their encounters and fights, and if they allege that we use it not rightly according to the perfection thereof, and therefore cannot defend ourselves, to which I answer if themselves had any perfection therein, and that their teaching had been a truth, themselves would not have been beaten and slain in their fights, and using of their weapons, as they were.
 
| And wher as ther was a booke wryten by Vincentio an Italiõ teacher whoſe yll vſinge practiſes & vnſkylfull teaching were ſuch y<sup>t</sup> it hath coſt the lyves of many of o<sup>r</sup> brave gentlemen & gallants, the vnc<sup>r</sup>taintye of whoſe falſe teaching doth yet remayne to y<sup>e</sup> daylymurthering & ouer throw of many, for he & the reſt of them did not teach Defence but offence, as it doth playnlye appere by thoſe y<sup>t</sup> follow the ſame Imprfyt fyght according to their teaching or inſtructiõs by the orders from them prceedinge, for be the actors y<sup>t</sup> follow them neuer so prfyt or ſkylfull therin one or both of them are eyther ſore hurt of ſlaine in their Incountrs & fyghts, & yf they alledge y<sup>t</sup> we vſe it not rightly according to y<sup>e</sup> prfectiõ therof, & therfore cannot defend o<sup>r</sup> ſelues, to w<sup>ch</sup> I anſwer yf themſelues had had anyprfection therin, & that their teaching had byn a truth, themſelues would not have byn beaten & ſlayne in their fyghts, & vſing of their weapons, as they were.
 
| And wher as ther was a booke wryten by Vincentio an Italiõ teacher whoſe yll vſinge practiſes & vnſkylfull teaching were ſuch y<sup>t</sup> it hath coſt the lyves of many of o<sup>r</sup> brave gentlemen & gallants, the vnc<sup>r</sup>taintye of whoſe falſe teaching doth yet remayne to y<sup>e</sup> daylymurthering & ouer throw of many, for he & the reſt of them did not teach Defence but offence, as it doth playnlye appere by thoſe y<sup>t</sup> follow the ſame Imprfyt fyght according to their teaching or inſtructiõs by the orders from them prceedinge, for be the actors y<sup>t</sup> follow them neuer so prfyt or ſkylfull therin one or both of them are eyther ſore hurt of ſlaine in their Incountrs & fyghts, & yf they alledge y<sup>t</sup> we vſe it not rightly according to y<sup>e</sup> prfectiõ therof, & therfore cannot defend o<sup>r</sup> ſelues, to w<sup>ch</sup> I anſwer yf themſelues had had anyprfection therin, & that their teaching had byn a truth, themſelues would not have byn beaten & ſlayne in their fyghts, & vſing of their weapons, as they were.
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| And therefore I prove where a man by their teaching can not be safe in his defence following their own ground of fight then is their teaching offence and not defence, for in true fight against the best no hurt can be done. And if both have the full perfection of true fight, then the one will not be able to hurt the other at what perfect weapon so ever.
 
| And therefore I prove where a man by their teaching can not be safe in his defence following their own ground of fight then is their teaching offence and not defence, for in true fight against the best no hurt can be done. And if both have the full perfection of true fight, then the one will not be able to hurt the other at what perfect weapon so ever.
 
| And therfore I proue wher a man by their teaching can not be ſaf in his defence following their owne grounde of fyght then is their teaching offence & not defence, for in true fyght againſt the beſt no hurt can be don. And yf both haue the full prfection of true fyght, then one will not be able to hurt the other at what prfyt weapon ſo ever.
 
| And therfore I proue wher a man by their teaching can not be ſaf in his defence following their owne grounde of fyght then is their teaching offence & not defence, for in true fyght againſt the beſt no hurt can be don. And yf both haue the full prfection of true fyght, then one will not be able to hurt the other at what prfyt weapon ſo ever.
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| For it cannot be said that if a man go to the field and cannot be sure to defend himself in fight and to come safe home, if God be not against him whether he fight with a man of skill or no skill it may not be said that such a man is master of the noble science of defence, or that he has the perfection of the true fight, for if both have the perfection of their weapons, if by any device, one should be able to hurt the other, there were no perfection in the fight of weapons, and this firmly hold in your mind for a general rule, to be the hayth(?) and perfection of the true handling of all manner of weapons.
 
| For it cannot be said that if a man go to the field and cannot be sure to defend himself in fight and to come safe home, if God be not against him whether he fight with a man of skill or no skill it may not be said that such a man is master of the noble science of defence, or that he has the perfection of the true fight, for if both have the perfection of their weapons, if by any device, one should be able to hurt the other, there were no perfection in the fight of weapons, and this firmly hold in your mind for a general rule, to be the hayth(?) and perfection of the true handling of all manner of weapons.
 
| For it cannot be ſayd y<sup>t</sup> yf a man go to the feld & cannot be ſure to defend him ſelf in fight & to com ſaf home, yf goid be not againſt him whither he fyght w<sup>t</sup> a man of ſkyll of no ſkil it may not be ſaid y<sup>t</sup> ſuch a man is Mast<sup>r</sup> of the Noble ſcyence of defence, or that he hath the prfection of true fyght; for yf both haue the prfection of their weapons, yf by any Device, on ſhould be able to hurt the other, ther were no prfection in the fyght of weapons, & this firmely hold in yo<sup>r</sup> mynd for a generall rule, to be the hayth & prfection of the true handling of al maner of weapons.
 
| For it cannot be ſayd y<sup>t</sup> yf a man go to the feld & cannot be ſure to defend him ſelf in fight & to com ſaf home, yf goid be not againſt him whither he fyght w<sup>t</sup> a man of ſkyll of no ſkil it may not be ſaid y<sup>t</sup> ſuch a man is Mast<sup>r</sup> of the Noble ſcyence of defence, or that he hath the prfection of true fyght; for yf both haue the prfection of their weapons, yf by any Device, on ſhould be able to hurt the other, ther were no prfection in the fyght of weapons, & this firmely hold in yo<sup>r</sup> mynd for a generall rule, to be the hayth & prfection of the true handling of al maner of weapons.
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| And also whereas that said Vincentio in that same book has written discourses of honor and honorable quarrels, making many reasons to prove means and ways to enter the field and combat, both for the lie and other disgraces, all which diabolical devices tends only to villainy and destruction as hurting, maiming and murdering or killing.
 
| And also whereas that said Vincentio in that same book has written discourses of honor and honorable quarrels, making many reasons to prove means and ways to enter the field and combat, both for the lie and other disgraces, all which diabolical devices tends only to villainy and destruction as hurting, maiming and murdering or killing.
 
| And alſo wheras y<sup>t</sup> ſaid Vincentio in y<sup>t</sup> ſame booke hath written diſcours of honour & honorable quarrels making many reaſons to prve meanes & ways to enter y<sup>e</sup> feeld &cõbat, both for the lye & other diſgraces, al w<sup>ch</sup> diabolicall devyces tendeth only to villayne &diſtruction as hurtynge, Maymynge & Murtheringe or kyllinge.
 
| And alſo wheras y<sup>t</sup> ſaid Vincentio in y<sup>t</sup> ſame booke hath written diſcours of honour & honorable quarrels making many reaſons to prve meanes & ways to enter y<sup>e</sup> feeld &cõbat, both for the lye & other diſgraces, al w<sup>ch</sup> diabolicall devyces tendeth only to villayne &diſtruction as hurtynge, Maymynge & Murtheringe or kyllinge.
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| Animating the minds of young gentlemen and gallants to follow those rules to maintain their honors and credits, but the end thereof for the most part is either killing or hanging or both to the utter undoing and great grief of themselves and their friends, but then to late to call it again. They consider not the time and place that we live in, nor do not thoroughly look into the danger of the law 'til it be too late, and for that in divers other countries in these things they have a larger scope than we have in these our days.
 
| Animating the minds of young gentlemen and gallants to follow those rules to maintain their honors and credits, but the end thereof for the most part is either killing or hanging or both to the utter undoing and great grief of themselves and their friends, but then to late to call it again. They consider not the time and place that we live in, nor do not thoroughly look into the danger of the law 'til it be too late, and for that in divers other countries in these things they have a larger scope than we have in these our days.
 
| Annymating y<sup>e</sup> mynds of yonge gentlemen & gallants to follow those rules to maintaine their honors & credits, but the end ther of for the moſt prte is eyther kyllinge or hanginge or both to their vtter vndoinge & great gref of themſelues, & their friends, but then to late to call it againe. they conſyder not the tyme & place that we lyue in, nor do not throughly looke into the danger of the lawe til it be too late, & for that in diuers other cuntryes in theſe things they have a larger ſcope than we have in these our dayes.
 
| Annymating y<sup>e</sup> mynds of yonge gentlemen & gallants to follow those rules to maintaine their honors & credits, but the end ther of for the moſt prte is eyther kyllinge or hanginge or both to their vtter vndoinge & great gref of themſelues, & their friends, but then to late to call it againe. they conſyder not the tyme & place that we lyue in, nor do not throughly looke into the danger of the lawe til it be too late, & for that in diuers other cuntryes in theſe things they have a larger ſcope than we have in these our dayes.
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| Therefore it behooves us not upon every abuse offered whereby our blood shall be inflamed, or our choler kindled, presently with the sword or with the stab, or by force of arms to seek revenge, which is the proper nature of wild beasts in their rage so to do, being void of the use of reason, which thing should not be in men of discretion so much to Degenerate, but he that will not endure an injury, but will seek revenge, then he ought to do it by civil order and proof, by good and wholesome laws, which are ordained for such causes, which is a thing far more fit and requisite in a place of so civil a government as we live in, then is the other, and who so follow these my admonitions shall be accounted as valiant a man as he that fights and far wiser. For I see no reason why a man should adventure his life and estate upon every trifle, but should rather put up divers abuses offered unto him, because it is agreeable to the laws of God and our country.
 
| Therefore it behooves us not upon every abuse offered whereby our blood shall be inflamed, or our choler kindled, presently with the sword or with the stab, or by force of arms to seek revenge, which is the proper nature of wild beasts in their rage so to do, being void of the use of reason, which thing should not be in men of discretion so much to Degenerate, but he that will not endure an injury, but will seek revenge, then he ought to do it by civil order and proof, by good and wholesome laws, which are ordained for such causes, which is a thing far more fit and requisite in a place of so civil a government as we live in, then is the other, and who so follow these my admonitions shall be accounted as valiant a man as he that fights and far wiser. For I see no reason why a man should adventure his life and estate upon every trifle, but should rather put up divers abuses offered unto him, because it is agreeable to the laws of God and our country.
 
| Therfore it behoveth vs not upõ euery abuſe offered wher by o<sup>r</sup> bloud ſhalbe Inflamed, or o<sup>r</sup> choler kindled p<sup>r</sup>ſently w<sup>t</sup> the ſword of w<sup>t</sup> the ſtabb, or by force of Armes to ſeeke Reuenge, w<sup>ch</sup> is the propre nature of wild beaſts in their rage ſo to do, being voyde of the vſe of reaſon, w<sup>ch</sup> thinge ſhould not be in Men of diſcreatiõ ſo much to Degenerate, but he y<sup>t</sup> wil not endure an Iniurye, but will seeke revenge, then he ought to do it by Cyvill Order & prof, by good & holſom lawes, w<sup>ch</sup> are ordayned for ſuch Cauſes, w<sup>ch</sup> is a thinge far more fyt& requiſted in a place of ſo Cyvell a gou<sup>r</sup>nment as we lyve in, then is the other, & who ſo follow<sup>t</sup> these my Admonycions ſhalbe accounted as valyent a Man as he y<sup>t</sup> fyghteth & farr wyſer. for I ſee no reaſon why a Man ſhould adventure hys lyf & esftate vpõ every tryfle, but ſhould rather put vp diu<sup>r</sup>s abuſes offerd vnto him, becauſe it is agreeable both to the Lawes of god & o<sup>r</sup> Cuntrye.
 
| Therfore it behoveth vs not upõ euery abuſe offered wher by o<sup>r</sup> bloud ſhalbe Inflamed, or o<sup>r</sup> choler kindled p<sup>r</sup>ſently w<sup>t</sup> the ſword of w<sup>t</sup> the ſtabb, or by force of Armes to ſeeke Reuenge, w<sup>ch</sup> is the propre nature of wild beaſts in their rage ſo to do, being voyde of the vſe of reaſon, w<sup>ch</sup> thinge ſhould not be in Men of diſcreatiõ ſo much to Degenerate, but he y<sup>t</sup> wil not endure an Iniurye, but will seeke revenge, then he ought to do it by Cyvill Order & prof, by good & holſom lawes, w<sup>ch</sup> are ordayned for ſuch Cauſes, w<sup>ch</sup> is a thinge far more fyt& requiſted in a place of ſo Cyvell a gou<sup>r</sup>nment as we lyve in, then is the other, & who ſo follow<sup>t</sup> these my Admonycions ſhalbe accounted as valyent a Man as he y<sup>t</sup> fyghteth & farr wyſer. for I ſee no reaſon why a Man ſhould adventure hys lyf & esftate vpõ every tryfle, but ſhould rather put vp diu<sup>r</sup>s abuſes offerd vnto him, becauſe it is agreeable both to the Lawes of god & o<sup>r</sup> Cuntrye.
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| Why should not words be answered with words again, but if a man by his enemy be charged with blows then may he lawfully seek the best means to defend himself and in such a case I hold it fit to use his skill and to show his force by his deeds, yet so, that his dealing be not with full rigor to the others confusion if possible it may be eschewed.
 
| Why should not words be answered with words again, but if a man by his enemy be charged with blows then may he lawfully seek the best means to defend himself and in such a case I hold it fit to use his skill and to show his force by his deeds, yet so, that his dealing be not with full rigor to the others confusion if possible it may be eschewed.
 
| Why ſhould not words be Anſwered w<sup>t</sup> words againe, but yf a Man by his enemye be charged w<sup>t</sup> blowes then may he Lawfully ſeeke the beſt meanes to defend him self, & In ſuch a Caſe I hold it fyt to vſe his ſkyll & to ſhow his force by his Deeds, yet ſo, y<sup>t</sup> his dealyngebe not w<sup>t</sup> full Rygour to the others conſuſyon yf poſſyble it may be eſchewed.
 
| Why ſhould not words be Anſwered w<sup>t</sup> words againe, but yf a Man by his enemye be charged w<sup>t</sup> blowes then may he Lawfully ſeeke the beſt meanes to defend him self, & In ſuch a Caſe I hold it fyt to vſe his ſkyll & to ſhow his force by his Deeds, yet ſo, y<sup>t</sup> his dealyngebe not w<sup>t</sup> full Rygour to the others conſuſyon yf poſſyble it may be eſchewed.
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| Also take heed how you appoint the field with your enemy publicly because our laws do not permit it, neither appoint to meet him in private sort lest you wounding him he accuse you of felony saying you have robbed him, etc. Or he may lay company close to murder you and then report he did it himself valiantly in the field.
 
| Also take heed how you appoint the field with your enemy publicly because our laws do not permit it, neither appoint to meet him in private sort lest you wounding him he accuse you of felony saying you have robbed him, etc. Or he may lay company close to murder you and then report he did it himself valiantly in the field.
 
| Alſo take heed how yõ appoynt the field w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> Enemye publickly because o<sup>r</sup> Lawes do not prmyt yt, neyther appoint to meet him in pryvat ſort lest yõ wounding him he accuſe yõ of fellownye ſaying you have robbed him &c. Or he may laye companye cloſely to Murtheryou & then to report he dyd it him ſelf valyently in the feld.
 
| Alſo take heed how yõ appoynt the field w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> Enemye publickly because o<sup>r</sup> Lawes do not prmyt yt, neyther appoint to meet him in pryvat ſort lest yõ wounding him he accuſe yõ of fellownye ſaying you have robbed him &c. Or he may laye companye cloſely to Murtheryou & then to report he dyd it him ſelf valyently in the feld.
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| Also take heed of your enemy's stratagems, lest he find means to make you look aside upon something, or cause you to show whether you have on a privy coat, and so when you look from him, he hurt or kill you.
 
| Also take heed of your enemy's stratagems, lest he find means to make you look aside upon something, or cause you to show whether you have on a privy coat, and so when you look from him, he hurt or kill you.
 
| Alſo take heed of thyne Enemyes Stratagems, leſt he fynd Meanes to make yõ to looke a syde vpõ ſomthing, of cauſe yõ to ſhew whether yõ have on a p<sup>r</sup>vye Coat, & ſo when you Looke from him, he hurt or kyll you.
 
| Alſo take heed of thyne Enemyes Stratagems, leſt he fynd Meanes to make yõ to looke a syde vpõ ſomthing, of cauſe yõ to ſhew whether yõ have on a p<sup>r</sup>vye Coat, & ſo when you Looke from him, he hurt or kyll you.
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| Take not arms upon every light occasion, let not one friend upon a word or trifle violate another but let each man zealously embrace friendship, and turn not familiarity into strangeness, kindness into malice, nor love into hatred, nourish not these strange and unnatural alterations.
 
| Take not arms upon every light occasion, let not one friend upon a word or trifle violate another but let each man zealously embrace friendship, and turn not familiarity into strangeness, kindness into malice, nor love into hatred, nourish not these strange and unnatural alterations.
 
| Take not armes vpõ every light occaſyon, let not one fryend vpon a word or a tryfle violate another but let ech man zealouſly embrace fryendſhyp, & turne not famylyaritie into ſtrangnes, kyndnes into mallice, nor loue into hatred, noriſh not theſe ſtrange & vnnaturall Alterations.
 
| Take not armes vpõ every light occaſyon, let not one fryend vpon a word or a tryfle violate another but let ech man zealouſly embrace fryendſhyp, & turne not famylyaritie into ſtrangnes, kyndnes into mallice, nor loue into hatred, noriſh not theſe ſtrange & vnnaturall Alterations.
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| Do not wickedly resolve one to seek to the other's overthrow, do not confirm to end your malice by fight because for the most part it ends by death.
 
| Do not wickedly resolve one to seek to the other's overthrow, do not confirm to end your malice by fight because for the most part it ends by death.
 
| Do not wyckedly reſolue one to ſeeke the others ou<sup>r</sup>throwe, do not confyrme to end thy Mallice by fight becauſe for the moſt prte y<sup>t</sup> endeth by Death.
 
| Do not wyckedly reſolue one to ſeeke the others ou<sup>r</sup>throwe, do not confyrme to end thy Mallice by fight becauſe for the moſt prte y<sup>t</sup> endeth by Death.
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| Consider when these things were most used in former ages they sought not so much by envy the ruin and destruction one of another, they never took trial by sword but in the defence of innocence to maintain blotless honor.
 
| Consider when these things were most used in former ages they sought not so much by envy the ruin and destruction one of another, they never took trial by sword but in the defence of innocence to maintain blotless honor.
 
| Conſyder when theſe things were moſt vſed in former Ages they ſought not ſo much by envye the ruen & diſtruction on of another. they never tooke tryall by ſword but in defence of Innocencye to maintayne blotleſs honour.
 
| Conſyder when theſe things were moſt vſed in former Ages they ſought not ſo much by envye the ruen & diſtruction on of another. they never tooke tryall by ſword but in defence of Innocencye to maintayne blotleſs honour.
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| Do not upon every trifle make an action of revenge, or of defence.
 
| Do not upon every trifle make an action of revenge, or of defence.
 
| Do not vpon Euery tryfle make an Action of revenge, or of Defyance.
 
| Do not vpon Euery tryfle make an Action of revenge, or of Defyance.
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| Go not into the field with your friend at his entreaty to take his part but first know the manner of the quarrel how justly or unjustly it grew, and do not therein maintain wrong against right, but examine the cause of the controversy, and if there be reason for his rage to lead him to that mortal resolution.
 
| Go not into the field with your friend at his entreaty to take his part but first know the manner of the quarrel how justly or unjustly it grew, and do not therein maintain wrong against right, but examine the cause of the controversy, and if there be reason for his rage to lead him to that mortal resolution.
 
| Go not into the feeld w<sup>t</sup> thy fryend at his Intreatye to take his prte but firſt know y<sup>e</sup> mann<sup>r</sup> of y<sup>e</sup> quarrell how Juſtly or vniuſtlye it grow, & do not ther in maintaine wronge againſt ryght, but examyne the cauſe of the contravercye, & yf ther be reaſon for his rage to lead him to y<sup>t</sup> mortall reſolution.
 
| Go not into the feeld w<sup>t</sup> thy fryend at his Intreatye to take his prte but firſt know y<sup>e</sup> mann<sup>r</sup> of y<sup>e</sup> quarrell how Juſtly or vniuſtlye it grow, & do not ther in maintaine wronge againſt ryght, but examyne the cauſe of the contravercye, & yf ther be reaſon for his rage to lead him to y<sup>t</sup> mortall reſolution.
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| Yet be the cause never so just, go not with him neither further nor suffer him to fight if possible it may be by any means to be otherwise ended and will him not to enter into so dangerous an action, but leave it until necessity requires it.
 
| Yet be the cause never so just, go not with him neither further nor suffer him to fight if possible it may be by any means to be otherwise ended and will him not to enter into so dangerous an action, but leave it until necessity requires it.
 
| Yet be the cauſe neuer ſo Juſt, go not w<sup>t</sup> him neyther further nor ſuffer him to fight yf poſſyble it may by any meanes be otherwyſe ended & wyll him not to enter into so dangerous an action, but leaue it till necceſytie requireth it.
 
| Yet be the cauſe neuer ſo Juſt, go not w<sup>t</sup> him neyther further nor ſuffer him to fight yf poſſyble it may by any meanes be otherwyſe ended & wyll him not to enter into so dangerous an action, but leaue it till necceſytie requireth it.
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| And this I hold to be the best course for it is foolishness and endless trouble to cast a stone at every dog that barks at you. This noble science is not to cause one man to abuse another injuriously but to use it in their necessities to defend them in just causes and to maintain their honor and credits.
 
| And this I hold to be the best course for it is foolishness and endless trouble to cast a stone at every dog that barks at you. This noble science is not to cause one man to abuse another injuriously but to use it in their necessities to defend them in just causes and to maintain their honor and credits.
 
| And this I hold to be the beſt Courſe for it is fooliſhness & endleſſe troble to caſt a ſtone at euery Dogge y<sup>t</sup> barks at you. this noble ſcyence is not to cauſe on man to abuſe another iniuriosſlye but to vſe it in their neceſſyties to defend them in their Juſt Cauſes & tomaintaine thier honour & Credits.
 
| And this I hold to be the beſt Courſe for it is fooliſhness & endleſſe troble to caſt a ſtone at euery Dogge y<sup>t</sup> barks at you. this noble ſcyence is not to cauſe on man to abuſe another iniuriosſlye but to vſe it in their neceſſyties to defend them in their Juſt Cauſes & tomaintaine thier honour & Credits.
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| Therefore fly all rashness, pride and doing of injury all foul faults and errors herein, presume not upon this, and thereby to think it lawful to offer injury to any, think not yourself invincible, but consider that often a very wretch has killed a tall man, but he that has humanity, the more skillful he is in this noble science, the more humble, modest and virtuous he should show himself both in speech and action, no liar, no vaunter nor quarreller, for these are the causes of wounds, dishonor and death.
 
| Therefore fly all rashness, pride and doing of injury all foul faults and errors herein, presume not upon this, and thereby to think it lawful to offer injury to any, think not yourself invincible, but consider that often a very wretch has killed a tall man, but he that has humanity, the more skillful he is in this noble science, the more humble, modest and virtuous he should show himself both in speech and action, no liar, no vaunter nor quarreller, for these are the causes of wounds, dishonor and death.
 
| Therfore flye al raſhnes, pryde, & doynge of Iniurie all foule faults & errours herin, p<sup>r</sup>ſume not on this, & therbye to think it lawfull to offer Iniurye to Anye, think not yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf Invincible, but conſyder y<sup>t</sup> often a verye wretch hath kylled a taule man, but he y<sup>t</sup> hathhumanytie, the more skylful he is in this noble ſcience, the more humble, modeſt, & V<sup>r</sup>tuous he ſhould ſhew him ſelf both in ſpeech & Action, no lyer, no vaunter nor quarreller, for theſe are the cauſes of Wounds, Diſhonour & Death.
 
| Therfore flye al raſhnes, pryde, & doynge of Iniurie all foule faults & errours herin, p<sup>r</sup>ſume not on this, & therbye to think it lawfull to offer Iniurye to Anye, think not yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf Invincible, but conſyder y<sup>t</sup> often a verye wretch hath kylled a taule man, but he y<sup>t</sup> hathhumanytie, the more skylful he is in this noble ſcience, the more humble, modeſt, & V<sup>r</sup>tuous he ſhould ſhew him ſelf both in ſpeech & Action, no lyer, no vaunter nor quarreller, for theſe are the cauſes of Wounds, Diſhonour & Death.
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| If you talk with great men of honorable quality with such chiefly have regarde to frame your speeches and answers so reverently, that a foolish word, or forward answer give no occasion of offence for often they breed deadly hatred, cruel murders and extreme ruin etc.
 
| If you talk with great men of honorable quality with such chiefly have regarde to frame your speeches and answers so reverently, that a foolish word, or forward answer give no occasion of offence for often they breed deadly hatred, cruel murders and extreme ruin etc.
 
| Yf you talke w<sup>t</sup> great men of honourable qualitie w<sup>t</sup> ſuch chiefly haue regarde to frame yo<sup>r</sup> ſpeeches & Anſwer ſo reverent, y<sup>t</sup> a fooliſh word, or froward Anſwer geve no occaſyon of offence for often they breed Deadly hatred, Cruell murthers & extreem ruens &c.
 
| Yf you talke w<sup>t</sup> great men of honourable qualitie w<sup>t</sup> ſuch chiefly haue regarde to frame yo<sup>r</sup> ſpeeches & Anſwer ſo reverent, y<sup>t</sup> a fooliſh word, or froward Anſwer geve no occaſyon of offence for often they breed Deadly hatred, Cruell murthers & extreem ruens &c.
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Vale.
 
Vale.
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# Tyme
 
# Tyme
 
# Place.
 
# Place.
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| The reason whereof these 4 grounds or principals be the first and chief, are the following, because through judgment, you keep your distance, through distance you take your time, through time you safely win or gain the place of your adversary, the place being won or gained you have time safely either to strike, thrust, ward, close, grip, slip or go back, in which time your enemy is disappointed to hurt you, or to defend himself, by reason that he has lost his place, the reason that he has lost his true place is by the length of time through the numbering of his feet, to which he is out of necessity driven to that will be agent.
 
| The reason whereof these 4 grounds or principals be the first and chief, are the following, because through judgment, you keep your distance, through distance you take your time, through time you safely win or gain the place of your adversary, the place being won or gained you have time safely either to strike, thrust, ward, close, grip, slip or go back, in which time your enemy is disappointed to hurt you, or to defend himself, by reason that he has lost his place, the reason that he has lost his true place is by the length of time through the numbering of his feet, to which he is out of necessity driven to that will be agent.
 
| The reaſon wherof theſe 4 grownds or p<sup>r</sup>nciples be the fyrſt & cheefeſt, are the followinge, becauſe through Judgement, yõ kepe yo<sup>r</sup> dyſtance, through Diſtance yõ take yo<sup>r</sup> Tyme, through Tyme yõ ſafly wyne or gayne the Place of yo<sup>r</sup> adu<sup>r</sup>ſarie, the Place beinge woon orgayned yõ haue tyme ſafly eyther to ſtryke, thruſt, ward, cloze, grype, ſlyp or go back, in the w<sup>ch</sup> tyme yo<sup>r</sup> enemye is diſapoynted to hurt yõ, or to defend himself, by reason that he hath loſt his true Place, the reaſon y<sup>t</sup> he hath loſt his True place is by the length of Tymethrough the numb<sup>r</sup> of his feet to w<sup>ch</sup> he is of neceſſytie Dryven to y<sup>t</sup> wilbe Agent.
 
| The reaſon wherof theſe 4 grownds or p<sup>r</sup>nciples be the fyrſt & cheefeſt, are the followinge, becauſe through Judgement, yõ kepe yo<sup>r</sup> dyſtance, through Diſtance yõ take yo<sup>r</sup> Tyme, through Tyme yõ ſafly wyne or gayne the Place of yo<sup>r</sup> adu<sup>r</sup>ſarie, the Place beinge woon orgayned yõ haue tyme ſafly eyther to ſtryke, thruſt, ward, cloze, grype, ſlyp or go back, in the w<sup>ch</sup> tyme yo<sup>r</sup> enemye is diſapoynted to hurt yõ, or to defend himself, by reason that he hath loſt his true Place, the reaſon y<sup>t</sup> he hath loſt his True place is by the length of Tymethrough the numb<sup>r</sup> of his feet to w<sup>ch</sup> he is of neceſſytie Dryven to y<sup>t</sup> wilbe Agent.
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#
 
#
 
# The third & fourth gou<sup>r</sup>ners is a tywfold mynd when yõ preſs in on yo<sup>r</sup> enemye, for as yõ have a mynd to go forwarde, so you muſt have at y<sup>t</sup> inſtant a mynd to fly backwarde vpõ any action y<sup>t</sup> ſhalbe offered or don by yo<sup>r</sup> adu<sup>r</sup>ſarie.
 
# The third & fourth gou<sup>r</sup>ners is a tywfold mynd when yõ preſs in on yo<sup>r</sup> enemye, for as yõ have a mynd to go forwarde, so you muſt have at y<sup>t</sup> inſtant a mynd to fly backwarde vpõ any action y<sup>t</sup> ſhalbe offered or don by yo<sup>r</sup> adu<sup>r</sup>ſarie.
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1. Fyrſt when you com into the feeld to encounter w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> Enemy, obſyve wel the ſcope, Evenness & vneunnes of yo<sup>r</sup> grounde, put yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf in redynes w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> weapon, before yo<sup>r</sup> enemye Com w<sup>t</sup>in diſtance, ſet the ſvnn in his face travers yf poſſible yõ can ſtillremembrynge yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors.
 
1. Fyrſt when you com into the feeld to encounter w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> Enemy, obſyve wel the ſcope, Evenness & vneunnes of yo<sup>r</sup> grounde, put yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf in redynes w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> weapon, before yo<sup>r</sup> enemye Com w<sup>t</sup>in diſtance, ſet the ſvnn in his face travers yf poſſible yõ can ſtillremembrynge yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors.
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# The ſecond is to ward, & Aft<sup>r</sup> to ſtrike of thruſt from y<sup>t</sup>, remembringe yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors
 
# The ſecond is to ward, & Aft<sup>r</sup> to ſtrike of thruſt from y<sup>t</sup>, remembringe yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors
 
# The thyrd is to ſlippe alyttle backe & to ſtrike or thruſt after hym
 
# The thyrd is to ſlippe alyttle backe & to ſtrike or thruſt after hym
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| But ever remember that in the first motion of your adversary towards you, that you slide a little back so shall you be prepared in due time to perform any of the 3 actions aforesaid by disappointing him of his true place whereby you shall safely defend yourself & endanger him.
 
| But ever remember that in the first motion of your adversary towards you, that you slide a little back so shall you be prepared in due time to perform any of the 3 actions aforesaid by disappointing him of his true place whereby you shall safely defend yourself & endanger him.
 
| but euer remember y<sup>t</sup> in the fyrſt motion of your Adverſarye towarde yõ, y<sup>t</sup> yõ ſlyde a lyttle back ſo ſhall yõ be p<sup>r</sup>pred in due tyme to prforme anye of the iij Actions Aforeſaid, by diſdappointynge him of his true place, wherebyyõ ſhall ſaflye defend yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf & endanger him.
 
| but euer remember y<sup>t</sup> in the fyrſt motion of your Adverſarye towarde yõ, y<sup>t</sup> yõ ſlyde a lyttle back ſo ſhall yõ be p<sup>r</sup>pred in due tyme to prforme anye of the iij Actions Aforeſaid, by diſdappointynge him of his true place, wherebyyõ ſhall ſaflye defend yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf & endanger him.
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| Remember also that if through fear or policy, he strike or thrust short, & therewith go back, or not go back, follow him upon your twofold governors, so shall your ward & slip be performed in like manner as before, & you yourself still be safe.
 
| Remember also that if through fear or policy, he strike or thrust short, & therewith go back, or not go back, follow him upon your twofold governors, so shall your ward & slip be performed in like manner as before, & you yourself still be safe.
 
| remember alſo y<sup>t</sup> yf through fear or polyſye, he strike or thuſt ſhort, & ther w<sup>t</sup> go back, or not go back, follow him vpon yo<sup>r</sup> twofold gou<sup>r</sup>nors, ſo ſhall yo<sup>r</sup> warde & ſlype be prformed in lyke mann<sup>r</sup> as before, & yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf ſtil be ſaf.
 
| remember alſo y<sup>t</sup> yf through fear or polyſye, he strike or thuſt ſhort, & ther w<sup>t</sup> go back, or not go back, follow him vpon yo<sup>r</sup> twofold gou<sup>r</sup>nors, ſo ſhall yo<sup>r</sup> warde & ſlype be prformed in lyke mann<sup>r</sup> as before, & yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf ſtil be ſaf.
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| 3. Keep your distance & suffer not your adversary to win or gain the place of you, for if he shall so do, he may endanger to hurt or kill you. Know what the place is, when one may strike or thrust home without putting in of his foot.
 
| 3. Keep your distance & suffer not your adversary to win or gain the place of you, for if he shall so do, he may endanger to hurt or kill you. Know what the place is, when one may strike or thrust home without putting in of his foot.
 
| 3. Kepe yo<sup>r</sup> dyſtance & ſuffer not yo<sup>r</sup> adu<sup>r</sup>ſarie to wyn or gayne the place of you, for yf he ſhall ſo do, he may endanger to hurt or kyll you. Know y<sup>t</sup> the place is, when on may ſtryke or thruſt home w<sup>t</sup>out puttinge in of his foot.
 
| 3. Kepe yo<sup>r</sup> dyſtance & ſuffer not yo<sup>r</sup> adu<sup>r</sup>ſarie to wyn or gayne the place of you, for yf he ſhall ſo do, he may endanger to hurt or kyll you. Know y<sup>t</sup> the place is, when on may ſtryke or thruſt home w<sup>t</sup>out puttinge in of his foot.
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| It may be objected against this last ground, that men do often strike & thrust at the half sword & the same is perfectly defended, where to I answer that the defence is perfectly made by reason that the warder has true space before the striker or thruster is in force or entered into his action.
 
| It may be objected against this last ground, that men do often strike & thrust at the half sword & the same is perfectly defended, where to I answer that the defence is perfectly made by reason that the warder has true space before the striker or thruster is in force or entered into his action.
 
| Yt may be obiected againſt thys laſt ground, y<sup>t</sup> men do often ſtrike & thruſt at the half ſword, & yet the ſame is prfytly defended, wher to ansfwer y<sup>t</sup> that defence is prfytly made by reason y<sup>t</sup> the warder hath his true ſpace before the ſtryker or thruſter is in his force or entred into his action.
 
| Yt may be obiected againſt thys laſt ground, y<sup>t</sup> men do often ſtrike & thruſt at the half ſword, & yet the ſame is prfytly defended, wher to ansfwer y<sup>t</sup> that defence is prfytly made by reason y<sup>t</sup> the warder hath his true ſpace before the ſtryker or thruſter is in his force or entred into his action.
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| Therefore always do prevent both blow & thrust, the blow by true space, & the thrust by narrow space that is true crossing it before the same come in to their full force, otherwise the hand of the agent being as swift as the hand of the patient, the hand of the agent being the first mover, must of necessity strike or thrust that part of the patient which shall be struck or thrust at because the time of the hand to the time of the hand, being of like swiftness the first mover has the advantage.
 
| Therefore always do prevent both blow & thrust, the blow by true space, & the thrust by narrow space that is true crossing it before the same come in to their full force, otherwise the hand of the agent being as swift as the hand of the patient, the hand of the agent being the first mover, must of necessity strike or thrust that part of the patient which shall be struck or thrust at because the time of the hand to the time of the hand, being of like swiftness the first mover has the advantage.
 
| Therfor alwaies do p<sup>r</sup>vent both blow & thruſt, the blow by true ſpace, & the thruſt by narrow ſpace y<sup>t</sup> is true croſſinge it before the ſame com into their full force, other wyſe the hand of the Agent beinge as ſwyft as y<sup>e</sup> hand of the patient, the hand of y<sup>e</sup> Agent beinge the fyrsft mou<sup>r</sup>, muſt of necessytie ſtrike of thruſt y<sup>t</sup> prte of y<sup>e</sup> patient w<sup>ch</sup> ſhalbe ſtryken or thruſt at becauſe the tyme of y<sup>t</sup> hand to the tyme of y<sup>e</sup> hand, beinge of lyke ſwyftnes the fyrſtmou<sup>r</sup> hath y<sup>e</sup> aduantage.
 
| Therfor alwaies do p<sup>r</sup>vent both blow & thruſt, the blow by true ſpace, & the thruſt by narrow ſpace y<sup>t</sup> is true croſſinge it before the ſame com into their full force, other wyſe the hand of the Agent beinge as ſwyft as y<sup>e</sup> hand of the patient, the hand of y<sup>e</sup> Agent beinge the fyrsft mou<sup>r</sup>, muſt of necessytie ſtrike of thruſt y<sup>t</sup> prte of y<sup>e</sup> patient w<sup>ch</sup> ſhalbe ſtryken or thruſt at becauſe the tyme of y<sup>t</sup> hand to the tyme of y<sup>e</sup> hand, beinge of lyke ſwyftnes the fyrſtmou<sup>r</sup> hath y<sup>e</sup> aduantage.
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| 4. When your enemy shall press upon you, he will be open in one place or other, both at single & double weapon, or at least he will be to weak in his ward upon such pressing, then strike or thrust at such open or weakest part that you shall find nearest.
 
| 4. When your enemy shall press upon you, he will be open in one place or other, both at single & double weapon, or at least he will be to weak in his ward upon such pressing, then strike or thrust at such open or weakest part that you shall find nearest.
 
| 4. When yo<sup>r</sup> enemy ſhall preſs vpon you, he wilbe Open in one place or other, both at ſyngal & dubble weapon, or at the leaſt he wilbe to weake in his ward vpon ſuch p<sup>r</sup>ſſinge, then ſtrike or thruſt at such open or weakeſt prte y<sup>t</sup>yo ſhal fynd neereſt.
 
| 4. When yo<sup>r</sup> enemy ſhall preſs vpon you, he wilbe Open in one place or other, both at ſyngal & dubble weapon, or at the leaſt he wilbe to weake in his ward vpon ſuch p<sup>r</sup>ſſinge, then ſtrike or thruſt at such open or weakeſt prte y<sup>t</sup>yo ſhal fynd neereſt.
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| 5. When you attempt to win the place, do it upon guard, remembering your governors, but when he presses upon you & gains you the place, then strike or thrust at him in his coming in.
 
| 5. When you attempt to win the place, do it upon guard, remembering your governors, but when he presses upon you & gains you the place, then strike or thrust at him in his coming in.
 
| 5. When yõ attempt to wyn the place, do it vpon gard, remembringe yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors, but when he p<sup>r</sup>ſſeth vpõ yõ & gayneth yõ The place, then ſtrike of thruſt at him in his cõmynge in
 
| 5. When yõ attempt to wyn the place, do it vpon gard, remembringe yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors, but when he p<sup>r</sup>ſſeth vpõ yõ & gayneth yõ The place, then ſtrike of thruſt at him in his cõmynge in
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| Or if he shall strike or thrust at you, then ward it & strike or thrust at him from your ward, & fly back instantly according to your governors, so shall you escape safely, for that first motion of the feet backward is more swift, than the first motion of the feet forward, where by your regression will be more swift, than his course in progression to annoy you, the reason is, that in the first motion of his progression his number & weight is greater than yours are, in your first motion of your regression, nevertheless all men know that the continual course of the feet forward is more swift than the continual course of the feet backwards.
 
| Or if he shall strike or thrust at you, then ward it & strike or thrust at him from your ward, & fly back instantly according to your governors, so shall you escape safely, for that first motion of the feet backward is more swift, than the first motion of the feet forward, where by your regression will be more swift, than his course in progression to annoy you, the reason is, that in the first motion of his progression his number & weight is greater than yours are, in your first motion of your regression, nevertheless all men know that the continual course of the feet forward is more swift than the continual course of the feet backwards.
 
| Or yf he ſhal ſtryke or thruſt at yõ, then Ward it, & ſtryke of thruſt at him from yo<sup>r</sup> warde, & fly backe Inſtantly accordinge to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors, ſo ſhall yõ eſcape ſaflie, for that the fyrſt Motion of the feete forwarde, wher byyo<sup>r</sup>regreſſyon wilbe more ſwyfter, then his courſe in prgreſſyon to Anoye you, the reaſon is, that in the fyrſt motyon of his prgreſſyon his Numb<sup>r</sup> & Waight is greater then yo<sup>r</sup>s are, in yo<sup>r</sup> firſt motyon of yo<sup>r</sup> regreſſyon, neu<sup>r</sup>theleſsal men knowe that the cõtynual courſe of the feet forwarde is more ſwyft then the Contynuall Courſe of y<sup>e</sup> feet backwards.
 
| Or yf he ſhal ſtryke or thruſt at yõ, then Ward it, & ſtryke of thruſt at him from yo<sup>r</sup> warde, & fly backe Inſtantly accordinge to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors, ſo ſhall yõ eſcape ſaflie, for that the fyrſt Motion of the feete forwarde, wher byyo<sup>r</sup>regreſſyon wilbe more ſwyfter, then his courſe in prgreſſyon to Anoye you, the reaſon is, that in the fyrſt motyon of his prgreſſyon his Numb<sup>r</sup> & Waight is greater then yo<sup>r</sup>s are, in yo<sup>r</sup> firſt motyon of yo<sup>r</sup> regreſſyon, neu<sup>r</sup>theleſsal men knowe that the cõtynual courſe of the feet forwarde is more ſwyft then the Contynuall Courſe of y<sup>e</sup> feet backwards.
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| 6. If your enemy lies in the variable fight, & strikes or thrusts at you then be sure to keep your distance & strike or thrust at such open part of him as are nearest unto you, at the hand, arm, head or leg of him, & go back withal.
 
| 6. If your enemy lies in the variable fight, & strikes or thrusts at you then be sure to keep your distance & strike or thrust at such open part of him as are nearest unto you, at the hand, arm, head or leg of him, & go back withal.
 
| 6. yf yo<sup>r</sup> enemye lye in varyable fyght, & ſtryke or thruſt at yõ then be ſure to kepe yo<sup>r</sup> Diſtance & ſtrike or thruſt at ſuch open prte of him as are neereſt vnto you, viz, at the hand, Arme, hed, or legg of himm, & go back w<sup>t</sup> all,
 
| 6. yf yo<sup>r</sup> enemye lye in varyable fyght, & ſtryke or thruſt at yõ then be ſure to kepe yo<sup>r</sup> Diſtance & ſtrike or thruſt at ſuch open prte of him as are neereſt vnto you, viz, at the hand, Arme, hed, or legg of himm, & go back w<sup>t</sup> all,
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| 7. If 2 men fight at the variable fight, & if within distance, they must both be hurt, for in such fight they cannot make a true cross, not have time truly to judge, by reason that the swift motion of the hand, being a swifter mover, then the eye deceives the eye, at what weapon soever you shall fight withal, as in my paradoxes of defence in the --- chapter thereof does appear.
 
| 7. If 2 men fight at the variable fight, & if within distance, they must both be hurt, for in such fight they cannot make a true cross, not have time truly to judge, by reason that the swift motion of the hand, being a swifter mover, then the eye deceives the eye, at what weapon soever you shall fight withal, as in my paradoxes of defence in the --- chapter thereof does appear.
 
| 7. yf ij men fight at varyable fyght. & yf w<sup>t</sup>in disftance, they must both be hurt, for in ſuch fight they Cannot make a true Croſſe, nor haue tyme trulye to Judge, by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> the ſwyft motyon of the hand, beinge a ſwyfter moue<sup>r</sup>, then the eye Deceyveth the eye, at what weapon soeuer you ſhal fyght w<sup>t</sup>all, as in my pradoxes of defence in the chapter therof doth appere.
 
| 7. yf ij men fight at varyable fyght. & yf w<sup>t</sup>in disftance, they must both be hurt, for in ſuch fight they Cannot make a true Croſſe, nor haue tyme trulye to Judge, by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> the ſwyft motyon of the hand, beinge a ſwyfter moue<sup>r</sup>, then the eye Deceyveth the eye, at what weapon soeuer you ſhal fyght w<sup>t</sup>all, as in my pradoxes of defence in the chapter therof doth appere.
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| 8. Look to the grip of your enemy, & upon his slip take such ward as shall best fit your hand, from which ward strike or thrust, still remembering your governors.
 
| 8. Look to the grip of your enemy, & upon his slip take such ward as shall best fit your hand, from which ward strike or thrust, still remembering your governors.
 
| 8. Looke to the grype of yo<sup>r</sup> Enemye, & vpõ his ſlype take ſuch a warde as ſhal beſt fyt your hand, from w<sup>ch</sup> warde ſtrike or thruſt, sftil remembrynge yo<sup>r</sup> gouernors,
 
| 8. Looke to the grype of yo<sup>r</sup> Enemye, & vpõ his ſlype take ſuch a warde as ſhal beſt fyt your hand, from w<sup>ch</sup> warde ſtrike or thruſt, sftil remembrynge yo<sup>r</sup> gouernors,
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| 9. If you can indirect your enemy at any kind of weapon, then you have the advantage, because he must move his feet to direct himself again, & you in the mean time may strike or thrust at him, & fly out safe, before he can offer anything at you, his time will be so long.
 
| 9. If you can indirect your enemy at any kind of weapon, then you have the advantage, because he must move his feet to direct himself again, & you in the mean time may strike or thrust at him, & fly out safe, before he can offer anything at you, his time will be so long.
 
| 9. yf yõ can Indirect yo<sup>r</sup> enemye at any kynde of weapon, then yõ haue the aduantage, becauſe he muſt moue his feet to direct him ſelf Againe, & yõ in the meane tyme may ſtike or thruſt at him, & fly out faſt, before he can offer anything at you, his tyme wilbe ſo longe.
 
| 9. yf yõ can Indirect yo<sup>r</sup> enemye at any kynde of weapon, then yõ haue the aduantage, becauſe he muſt moue his feet to direct him ſelf Againe, & yõ in the meane tyme may ſtike or thruſt at him, & fly out faſt, before he can offer anything at you, his tyme wilbe ſo longe.
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| 10. When you shall ward blow & thrust, made at your right or left part, with any kind of weapon, remember to draw your hind foot a little circularly, from that part to which the same shall be made, whereby you shall stand the more apt to strike or thrust from it.
 
| 10. When you shall ward blow & thrust, made at your right or left part, with any kind of weapon, remember to draw your hind foot a little circularly, from that part to which the same shall be made, whereby you shall stand the more apt to strike or thrust from it.
 
| 10. When you ſhal Ward blow of thruſt, made at yo<sup>r</sup> right or left prte, w<sup>t</sup> any kynd of weapon, rememb<sup>r</sup> to Draw yo<sup>r</sup> hynde foot a lyttle c<sup>r</sup>culerlye, from that prte to w<sup>ch</sup> the fame ſhalbe made, wher by yõ ſhall make yo<sup>r</sup> defence the more prfyt, & ſhal ſtand the more Apt to strike or thuſt from yt.
 
| 10. When you ſhal Ward blow of thruſt, made at yo<sup>r</sup> right or left prte, w<sup>t</sup> any kynd of weapon, rememb<sup>r</sup> to Draw yo<sup>r</sup> hynde foot a lyttle c<sup>r</sup>culerlye, from that prte to w<sup>ch</sup> the fame ſhalbe made, wher by yõ ſhall make yo<sup>r</sup> defence the more prfyt, & ſhal ſtand the more Apt to strike or thuſt from yt.
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1. Open fyght is to Carrye yo<sup>r</sup> hand & hylt a loft aboue yo<sup>r</sup> hed, eyther w<sup>t</sup> poynt vpright, or point backwards w<sup>ch</sup> is beſt, yet vse that w<sup>ch</sup> yõ ſhall fynd moſt apteſt, to ſtrike, thruſt, or ward.
 
1. Open fyght is to Carrye yo<sup>r</sup> hand & hylt a loft aboue yo<sup>r</sup> hed, eyther w<sup>t</sup> poynt vpright, or point backwards w<sup>ch</sup> is beſt, yet vse that w<sup>ch</sup> yõ ſhall fynd moſt apteſt, to ſtrike, thruſt, or ward.
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| 2. Guardant fight in general is of 2 sorts, the first is true guardant fight, which is either perfect or imperfect.
 
| 2. Guardant fight in general is of 2 sorts, the first is true guardant fight, which is either perfect or imperfect.
 
| 2. Gardant fyght in gen<sup>r</sup>all is of ij ſorts, y<sup>e</sup> fyrsft is true gardant fyght, w<sup>ch</sup> is eyther prfyt or Imprfyt.
 
| 2. Gardant fyght in gen<sup>r</sup>all is of ij ſorts, y<sup>e</sup> fyrsft is true gardant fyght, w<sup>ch</sup> is eyther prfyt or Imprfyt.
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| The perfect is to carry your hand & hilt above your head with your point down towards your left knee, with your sword blade somewhat near your body, not bearing out your point but rather declining it a little towards your said knee, that your enemy cross not your point & so hurt you, stand bolt upright in his fight, & if he offers to press in then bear your head & body a little backward.
 
| The perfect is to carry your hand & hilt above your head with your point down towards your left knee, with your sword blade somewhat near your body, not bearing out your point but rather declining it a little towards your said knee, that your enemy cross not your point & so hurt you, stand bolt upright in his fight, & if he offers to press in then bear your head & body a little backward.
 
| The prfyt is to carry yo<sup>r</sup> hand & hylt aboue yo<sup>r</sup> hed w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt doune to wards yo<sup>r</sup> left knee, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword blade ſomewhat neer yo<sup>r</sup> bodye, not bearing out your poynt, but rather declyninge in a lyttle towards yo<sup>r</sup> ſaid knee,y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> enemye croſe not yo<sup>r</sup> poynt & ſo hurt you, ſtand bolt vpright in this fyght, & yf he offer to preſſe in then bere yo<sup>r</sup> hed & body a lyttle backwarde.
 
| The prfyt is to carry yo<sup>r</sup> hand & hylt aboue yo<sup>r</sup> hed w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt doune to wards yo<sup>r</sup> left knee, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword blade ſomewhat neer yo<sup>r</sup> bodye, not bearing out your poynt, but rather declyninge in a lyttle towards yo<sup>r</sup> ſaid knee,y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> enemye croſe not yo<sup>r</sup> poynt & ſo hurt you, ſtand bolt vpright in this fyght, & yf he offer to preſſe in then bere yo<sup>r</sup> hed & body a lyttle backwarde.
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Line 1,155: Line 1,205:
 
| The imperfect is when you bear your hand & sword hilt perfect high above your head, as aforesaid, but leaning or stooping forward with your body & thereby your space will be wide on both sides to defend the blow struck at the left side of your head or too wide to defend a thrust from the right side of the body.
 
| The imperfect is when you bear your hand & sword hilt perfect high above your head, as aforesaid, but leaning or stooping forward with your body & thereby your space will be wide on both sides to defend the blow struck at the left side of your head or too wide to defend a thrust from the right side of the body.
 
| The Imprfyt is when yõ bere yo<sup>r</sup> hand & ſword hylt prfyt hayth aboue yo<sup>r</sup> hed, as aforeſayd but leanynge or ſtoopinge forwarde w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> body & therby yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace wilbe to Wyde on both ſyds to defend the blow ſtryken at the feft ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed or to wyde to defend a thruſt from the ryght ſyde of the body,
 
| The Imprfyt is when yõ bere yo<sup>r</sup> hand & ſword hylt prfyt hayth aboue yo<sup>r</sup> hed, as aforeſayd but leanynge or ſtoopinge forwarde w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> body & therby yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace wilbe to Wyde on both ſyds to defend the blow ſtryken at the feft ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed or to wyde to defend a thruſt from the ryght ſyde of the body,
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Line 1,160: Line 1,211:
 
| Also it is imperfect, if you bear your hand & hilt as aforesaid, bearing your point too far out from your knee, so that your enemy may cross, or strike aside your point, & thereby endanger you.
 
| Also it is imperfect, if you bear your hand & hilt as aforesaid, bearing your point too far out from your knee, so that your enemy may cross, or strike aside your point, & thereby endanger you.
 
| Alſo it is Imprfyt, yf yõ bere yo<sup>r</sup> hand & hylt as aforeſayd, berynge yo<sup>r</sup> poynt to farr out from yo<sup>r</sup> kneee, ſo y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> enemy May Croſ, of ſtrike Aſyde yo<sup>r</sup> poynt, & therby endanger you,
 
| Alſo it is Imprfyt, yf yõ bere yo<sup>r</sup> hand & hylt as aforeſayd, berynge yo<sup>r</sup> poynt to farr out from yo<sup>r</sup> kneee, ſo y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> enemy May Croſ, of ſtrike Aſyde yo<sup>r</sup> poynt, & therby endanger you,
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| The second is the bastard guardant fight which is to carry your hand & hilt below your head, breast high or lower with your point downward toward your left foot, this bastard guardant ward is not to be used in a fight, except it be to cross your enemy's ward at his coming in to take the grip of him or such advantage, as in divers places of the sword fight is set forth.
 
| The second is the bastard guardant fight which is to carry your hand & hilt below your head, breast high or lower with your point downward toward your left foot, this bastard guardant ward is not to be used in a fight, except it be to cross your enemy's ward at his coming in to take the grip of him or such advantage, as in divers places of the sword fight is set forth.
 
| The ſecond is baſtard gardant fyght w<sup>ch</sup> is to Carrye yo<sup>r</sup> hand & hylt below yo<sup>r</sup> hed, breſt hye or lower w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt downwarde towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left foote, this baſtard gardant ward is not to be vsed in fyght, ecept it be to Crosseyo<sup>r</sup> enemyes Ward at his comynge in to take the grype of him of ſuch other aduantage, as in diu<sup>r</sup>s placs or y<sup>e</sup> ſword fyght is ſet forth.
 
| The ſecond is baſtard gardant fyght w<sup>ch</sup> is to Carrye yo<sup>r</sup> hand & hylt below yo<sup>r</sup> hed, breſt hye or lower w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt downwarde towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left foote, this baſtard gardant ward is not to be vsed in fyght, ecept it be to Crosseyo<sup>r</sup> enemyes Ward at his comynge in to take the grype of him of ſuch other aduantage, as in diu<sup>r</sup>s placs or y<sup>e</sup> ſword fyght is ſet forth.
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Line 1,170: Line 1,223:
 
| 3. Close fight is when you cross at the half sword either above at the forehand ward that is with the point high, & hand & hilt low, or at the true or bastard guardant ward with both your points down.
 
| 3. Close fight is when you cross at the half sword either above at the forehand ward that is with the point high, & hand & hilt low, or at the true or bastard guardant ward with both your points down.
 
| 3. Cloſe fyght is when yõ Croſ at y<sup>e</sup> half ſword eyther aboue at forehand wardy<sup>t</sup> is w<sup>t</sup> poynt hye, & hande & hylt lowe, or at true or baſtard gardant ward w<sup>t</sup> both yo<sup>r</sup> poynts doun.
 
| 3. Cloſe fyght is when yõ Croſ at y<sup>e</sup> half ſword eyther aboue at forehand wardy<sup>t</sup> is w<sup>t</sup> poynt hye, & hande & hylt lowe, or at true or baſtard gardant ward w<sup>t</sup> both yo<sup>r</sup> poynts doun.
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Line 1,175: Line 1,229:
 
| 4. Close is all manner of fights wherein you have made a true cross at the half sword with your space very narrow & not crossed, is also close fight.
 
| 4. Close is all manner of fights wherein you have made a true cross at the half sword with your space very narrow & not crossed, is also close fight.
 
| Cloſe is all mann<sup>r</sup> of fyghts wherin yõ have made a true Croſe at the half ſword w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace very narrow & not Croſt, is alſo cloſe fyght.
 
| Cloſe is all mann<sup>r</sup> of fyghts wherin yõ have made a true Croſe at the half ſword w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace very narrow & not Croſt, is alſo cloſe fyght.
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Line 1,188: Line 1,243:
 
# Mountanta: is to Carrye yo<sup>r</sup> rapier pummell in the palm of yo<sup>r</sup> hand reſting it on yo<sup>r</sup> lyttle fynger w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand belowe & ſo movnynge it vp a loft, & ſo to com in w<sup>t</sup> a thruſt vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> Enemyes face or breſt, as out of y<sup>e</sup>Imbrocata.
 
# Mountanta: is to Carrye yo<sup>r</sup> rapier pummell in the palm of yo<sup>r</sup> hand reſting it on yo<sup>r</sup> lyttle fynger w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand belowe & ſo movnynge it vp a loft, & ſo to com in w<sup>t</sup> a thruſt vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> Enemyes face or breſt, as out of y<sup>e</sup>Imbrocata.
 
# Paſſata: is eyther to paſs w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> Stocata, or to carrye yo<sup>r</sup> ſword or rapior hylt by yo<sup>r</sup> right flanke, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt directly againſt yo<sup>r</sup> Enemyes belly, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> left foote forwarde, extendinge fourth yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup> hand w<sup>t</sup> the poynt of yo<sup>r</sup> dagger forwarde as yõ do yo<sup>r</sup>ſword, w<sup>t</sup> narrow ſpace between yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & dagg<sup>r</sup> blade, & ſo to make yo<sup>r</sup> paſſage vpon him.
 
# Paſſata: is eyther to paſs w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> Stocata, or to carrye yo<sup>r</sup> ſword or rapior hylt by yo<sup>r</sup> right flanke, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt directly againſt yo<sup>r</sup> Enemyes belly, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> left foote forwarde, extendinge fourth yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup> hand w<sup>t</sup> the poynt of yo<sup>r</sup> dagger forwarde as yõ do yo<sup>r</sup>ſword, w<sup>t</sup> narrow ſpace between yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & dagg<sup>r</sup> blade, & ſo to make yo<sup>r</sup> paſſage vpon him.
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Line 1,193: Line 1,249:
 
| Also any other kind of variable fight or lying whatsoever a man can devise not here expressed, is contained under this fight.
 
| Also any other kind of variable fight or lying whatsoever a man can devise not here expressed, is contained under this fight.
 
| Alſo any other kynd of varyable fyght or lyeinge whatſoeuer a man can deviſe not here expreſſed, is cōtayned vnder this fight.
 
| Alſo any other kynd of varyable fyght or lyeinge whatſoeuer a man can deviſe not here expreſſed, is cōtayned vnder this fight.
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1. Yf yo<sup>r</sup> enemye lye a loft, eyther in the open or true gardant fight, & then ſtrike at the left ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed or body yo<sup>r</sup> beſt ward to defend yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf, is to bere it w<sup>t</sup> true gardant ward & yf he ſtrike & com in to the cloze, or to take the grype of you yõ may then ſafly take the grype of him as it appereth in the chapter of the grype,
 
1. Yf yo<sup>r</sup> enemye lye a loft, eyther in the open or true gardant fight, & then ſtrike at the left ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed or body yo<sup>r</sup> beſt ward to defend yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf, is to bere it w<sup>t</sup> true gardant ward & yf he ſtrike & com in to the cloze, or to take the grype of you yõ may then ſafly take the grype of him as it appereth in the chapter of the grype,
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Line 1,209: Line 1,267:
 
| 2. But if he does strike & not come in, then instantly upon your ward, uncross & strike him either on the right or left side of the head, & fly out instantly.
 
| 2. But if he does strike & not come in, then instantly upon your ward, uncross & strike him either on the right or left side of the head, & fly out instantly.
 
| 2. but yf he do ſtryke & not com in, then inſtantly vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> ward, vncroſe & ſtrike him either on the right or left ſyde of y<sup>e</sup> hed, & fly out inſtantly.
 
| 2. but yf he do ſtryke & not com in, then inſtantly vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> ward, vncroſe & ſtrike him either on the right or left ſyde of y<sup>e</sup> hed, & fly out inſtantly.
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Line 1,214: Line 1,273:
 
| 3. If you bear this with forehand ward, be sure to ward his blow, or keep your distance, otherwise he shall deceive you with every false, still endangering your head, face, hand, arms, body, & bending knee, with blow or thrust. Therefore keep well your distance, because you can very hardly discern (being within distance), by which side of your sword he will strike, nor at which of those parts aforesaid, because of the swift motion of the hand deceives the eye.
 
| 3. If you bear this with forehand ward, be sure to ward his blow, or keep your distance, otherwise he shall deceive you with every false, still endangering your head, face, hand, arms, body, & bending knee, with blow or thrust. Therefore keep well your distance, because you can very hardly discern (being within distance), by which side of your sword he will strike, nor at which of those parts aforesaid, because of the swift motion of the hand deceives the eye.
 
| 3. Yf yõ bere this w<sup>t</sup> forhand ward, be ſure to ward his blowe, or kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, otherwuſe he ſhall decue you w<sup>t</sup> euery falſe, ſil endanggeringe yo<sup>r</sup> hed, face, hand, Armes, bodye, & bendynge knee, w<sup>t</sup> blow or thruſt. Therforekepe well yo<sup>r</sup> dyſtance, becauſe yõ can very hardly deſerne (being w<sup>t</sup>in dyſtance), by w<sup>ch</sup> ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword he will ſtryke, nor at w<sup>ch</sup> of thoſe prts aforeſayd, becauſe the ſwyft motion of y<sup>e</sup> hand deveyveth the eye,
 
| 3. Yf yõ bere this w<sup>t</sup> forhand ward, be ſure to ward his blowe, or kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, otherwuſe he ſhall decue you w<sup>t</sup> euery falſe, ſil endanggeringe yo<sup>r</sup> hed, face, hand, Armes, bodye, & bendynge knee, w<sup>t</sup> blow or thruſt. Therforekepe well yo<sup>r</sup> dyſtance, becauſe yõ can very hardly deſerne (being w<sup>t</sup>in dyſtance), by w<sup>ch</sup> ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword he will ſtryke, nor at w<sup>ch</sup> of thoſe prts aforeſayd, becauſe the ſwyft motion of y<sup>e</sup> hand deveyveth the eye,
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Line 1,219: Line 1,279:
 
| 4. If he lies aloft & strike as aforesaid at your head, you may endanger him if you thrust at his hand, or arm, turning your knuckles downward, but fly backward withal in the instant you thrust.
 
| 4. If he lies aloft & strike as aforesaid at your head, you may endanger him if you thrust at his hand, or arm, turning your knuckles downward, but fly backward withal in the instant you thrust.
 
| 4. yf he lye a loft & ſtrike as aforeſaid at yo<sup>r</sup> head, yõ may endanger him yf yõ thruſt at his hand, hilt or Arme, turninge yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles dounwarde, but fly back w<sup>t</sup> all in the inſtant y<sup>t</sup> yõ thruſt,
 
| 4. yf he lye a loft & ſtrike as aforeſaid at yo<sup>r</sup> head, yõ may endanger him yf yõ thruſt at his hand, hilt or Arme, turninge yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles dounwarde, but fly back w<sup>t</sup> all in the inſtant y<sup>t</sup> yõ thruſt,
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Line 1,224: Line 1,285:
 
| 5. If he lies aloft as aforesaid, & strike aloft at the left side of your head, if you will ward his blow with forehand ward, then be sure to keep your distance, except he come so certain that you sure to ward his blow, at which time if he comes in withal, you may endanger him from that ward, either by blow thrust or grip.
 
| 5. If he lies aloft as aforesaid, & strike aloft at the left side of your head, if you will ward his blow with forehand ward, then be sure to keep your distance, except he come so certain that you sure to ward his blow, at which time if he comes in withal, you may endanger him from that ward, either by blow thrust or grip.
 
| 5. yf he lye a loft as aforeſaid, & ſtrike a loft at the left ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed, yf yõ wil ward his blow w<sup>t</sup> forehand ward, then be ſure to kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, except he com ſo c<sup>r</sup>taine that yõ be ſure to ward his blow, at w<sup>ch</sup> tyme yf he comin w<sup>t</sup> all, yõ may endanger him from y<sup>t</sup> ward eyther by blow, thruſt or grype,
 
| 5. yf he lye a loft as aforeſaid, & ſtrike a loft at the left ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed, yf yõ wil ward his blow w<sup>t</sup> forehand ward, then be ſure to kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, except he com ſo c<sup>r</sup>taine that yõ be ſure to ward his blow, at w<sup>ch</sup> tyme yf he comin w<sup>t</sup> all, yõ may endanger him from y<sup>t</sup> ward eyther by blow, thruſt or grype,
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| 6. If he lies aloft & you lie low with your sword in the variable fight, then if you offer to ward his blow made at your head, with true guardant ward your time will be too long due in time to make a sure ward, so that it is better to bear it with the forehand ward, but be sure to keep your distance, to make him come in with his feet, whereby his time will be too long to do what he intended.
 
| 6. If he lies aloft & you lie low with your sword in the variable fight, then if you offer to ward his blow made at your head, with true guardant ward your time will be too long due in time to make a sure ward, so that it is better to bear it with the forehand ward, but be sure to keep your distance, to make him come in with his feet, whereby his time will be too long to do what he intended.
 
| 6. yf he lye a loft & yõ lye a lowe w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword inthe varyable fyght, then yf yõ offer to ward his blow made at yo<sup>r</sup> hed, w<sup>t</sup> true gardant ward yo<sup>r</sup> tyme wilbe to longe Due in tyme to make a ſure ward, for that it is bett<sup>r</sup> to bere it w<sup>t</sup> forehand ward, but be ſure t okepeyo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, to make him com in w<sup>t</sup> his feet, wher by his tyme wilbe to longe to do y<sup>t</sup> he intendeth.
 
| 6. yf he lye a loft & yõ lye a lowe w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword inthe varyable fyght, then yf yõ offer to ward his blow made at yo<sup>r</sup> hed, w<sup>t</sup> true gardant ward yo<sup>r</sup> tyme wilbe to longe Due in tyme to make a ſure ward, for that it is bett<sup>r</sup> to bere it w<sup>t</sup> forehand ward, but be ſure t okepeyo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, to make him com in w<sup>t</sup> his feet, wher by his tyme wilbe to longe to do y<sup>t</sup> he intendeth.
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| 7. If 2 men fight both upon open fight, he that first breaks his distance, if he attempts to strike the other's head, shall be surely struck on the head himself, if the patient agent strike there at his coming in, & slip a little back withal, for that sliding back makes an indirection, whereby your blow crosses his head, & makes a true ward for your own, this will that be, because the length of time in his coming in.
 
| 7. If 2 men fight both upon open fight, he that first breaks his distance, if he attempts to strike the other's head, shall be surely struck on the head himself, if the patient agent strike there at his coming in, & slip a little back withal, for that sliding back makes an indirection, whereby your blow crosses his head, & makes a true ward for your own, this will that be, because the length of time in his coming in.
 
| 7. yf ij Men fight both vpõ open fyght he y<sup>t</sup> firſt breaketh his diſtance, yf he attempt to ſtryke at the others hed, ſhalbe ſurely ſtryken on the hed himſelf, yf the patient Agent ſtrike ther at in his Comynge in, & ſlyp a lyttle back w<sup>t</sup> all, for y<sup>t</sup> ſlydinge back maketh an indirection, wherby yo<sup>r</sup> blow Croſſeth his hed, & maketh a true ward for yo<sup>r</sup> owne, this will yt be, becauſe of his length of tyme in his comynge in,
 
| 7. yf ij Men fight both vpõ open fyght he y<sup>t</sup> firſt breaketh his diſtance, yf he attempt to ſtryke at the others hed, ſhalbe ſurely ſtryken on the hed himſelf, yf the patient Agent ſtrike ther at in his Comynge in, & ſlyp a lyttle back w<sup>t</sup> all, for y<sup>t</sup> ſlydinge back maketh an indirection, wherby yo<sup>r</sup> blow Croſſeth his hed, & maketh a true ward for yo<sup>r</sup> owne, this will yt be, becauſe of his length of tyme in his comynge in,
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| 8. Also if 2 fight upon open fight, it is better for the patient to strike home strongly at the agent's head, when the said agent shall press upon him to win the place than to thrust, because the blow of the patient is not only hurtful to the agent, but also makes a true cross to defend his own head.
 
| 8. Also if 2 fight upon open fight, it is better for the patient to strike home strongly at the agent's head, when the said agent shall press upon him to win the place than to thrust, because the blow of the patient is not only hurtful to the agent, but also makes a true cross to defend his own head.
 
| 8. Alſo yf ij fyght, it is better for the patient to ſtrike home ſtrongly at the Agents hed, when the ſaid Agent ſhal preſs vpon him to wyn the place then to thruſt, becauſe the blow of the patient is not only hurtful to the Agent, but it alſo maketh a true Croſe to defend his owne hed,
 
| 8. Alſo yf ij fyght, it is better for the patient to ſtrike home ſtrongly at the Agents hed, when the ſaid Agent ſhal preſs vpon him to wyn the place then to thruſt, becauſe the blow of the patient is not only hurtful to the Agent, but it alſo maketh a true Croſe to defend his owne hed,
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| 9. If he charge you aloft, out of the open or true guardant fight, if you answer him with the imperfect guardant fight, with your body leaning forward, your space will be too wide on both sides to make a true ward in due time, & your arm and body will be too near unto him, so that with the bending of the body with the time of hand & foot, he may take the grip of you.
 
| 9. If he charge you aloft, out of the open or true guardant fight, if you answer him with the imperfect guardant fight, with your body leaning forward, your space will be too wide on both sides to make a true ward in due time, & your arm and body will be too near unto him, so that with the bending of the body with the time of hand & foot, he may take the grip of you.
 
| 9. yf he charge yõ a loft, out of the open or true gardant fyght, yf yõ anſwer him w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> Imprfyt gardant fyght, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> body leanynge forwarde, yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace wilbe to wyde on both ſyde to make a true ward in due tyme, & yo<sup>r</sup> arme And body wilbe to neere vnto him, ſo that w<sup>t</sup> the bending in of his body w<sup>t</sup> the tyme of hand & foote, he may take the grype of you,
 
| 9. yf he charge yõ a loft, out of the open or true gardant fyght, yf yõ anſwer him w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> Imprfyt gardant fyght, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> body leanynge forwarde, yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace wilbe to wyde on both ſyde to make a true ward in due tyme, & yo<sup>r</sup> arme And body wilbe to neere vnto him, ſo that w<sup>t</sup> the bending in of his body w<sup>t</sup> the tyme of hand & foote, he may take the grype of you,
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| But if you stand upright in true guardant fight, then he cannot reach to take the grip of you, nor otherwise to offend you if you keep your distance, without putting in of his foot or feet wherein his number will be too great, & so his time will be too long, & you in that time may by putting in of your body take the grip of him, if he press to come in with using only your hand, or hand or foot, & there upon you may strike or thrust with your sword & fly out withal according to your governors, see more of this, in the chapter of the grip.
 
| But if you stand upright in true guardant fight, then he cannot reach to take the grip of you, nor otherwise to offend you if you keep your distance, without putting in of his foot or feet wherein his number will be too great, & so his time will be too long, & you in that time may by putting in of your body take the grip of him, if he press to come in with using only your hand, or hand or foot, & there upon you may strike or thrust with your sword & fly out withal according to your governors, see more of this, in the chapter of the grip.
 
| but yf yõ ſtand vpright in true gardant fyght, then he cannot reach to take the grype of you, nor otherwiſe to offend yõ yf you kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, w<sup>t</sup>out puttinge in of his foote or feete wherin his number wilbe to great, & ſo histyme wilbe to longe, & yõ in that tyme may by puttinge in of yo<sup>r</sup> body take the grype of him, yf he preſs to com in w<sup>t</sup> vſing only yo<sup>r</sup> hand, or hand & foote, & ther vpon yõ may ſtryke or thruſt w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & fly out w<sup>t</sup>allaccordinge to yo<sup>r</sup> governors, ſe more of this, in the chapter of the grype
 
| but yf yõ ſtand vpright in true gardant fyght, then he cannot reach to take the grype of you, nor otherwiſe to offend yõ yf you kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, w<sup>t</sup>out puttinge in of his foote or feete wherin his number wilbe to great, & ſo histyme wilbe to longe, & yõ in that tyme may by puttinge in of yo<sup>r</sup> body take the grype of him, yf he preſs to com in w<sup>t</sup> vſing only yo<sup>r</sup> hand, or hand & foote, & ther vpon yõ may ſtryke or thruſt w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & fly out w<sup>t</sup>allaccordinge to yo<sup>r</sup> governors, ſe more of this, in the chapter of the grype
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| 10. If he will still press forcibly aloft upon you, charging you out of the open fight or the true guardant fight, intending to hurt you in the face or head, or to take the grip of you, against such a one, you must use both guardant & open fight, whereby upon every blow or thrust that he shall make at you, you may from your wards, strike or thrust him on the face, head, or body as it appears more art large in the 5th chapter of these my instructions.
 
| 10. If he will still press forcibly aloft upon you, charging you out of the open fight or the true guardant fight, intending to hurt you in the face or head, or to take the grip of you, against such a one, you must use both guardant & open fight, whereby upon every blow or thrust that he shall make at you, you may from your wards, strike or thrust him on the face, head, or body as it appears more art large in the 5th chapter of these my instructions.
 
| 10. yf he wil ſtil prſſe forcibly a loft vpõ you, Charginge yõ out of the open fyght or true gardant, fyght, Intendinge to hurt yõ in the face of hed, or to take the grype of yõ Againſt ſuch a on, you muſt vſe both gardant & open fyght, wherby vpon euery blow or thruſt that he ſhall make at you, you may from yo<sup>r</sup> wards ſtrike or thruſt him on the face hed or bodye as it appeareth more at large in the 5th Chapter of theſe my Inſtructions.
 
| 10. yf he wil ſtil prſſe forcibly a loft vpõ you, Charginge yõ out of the open fyght or true gardant, fyght, Intendinge to hurt yõ in the face of hed, or to take the grype of yõ Againſt ſuch a on, you muſt vſe both gardant & open fyght, wherby vpon euery blow or thruſt that he ſhall make at you, you may from yo<sup>r</sup> wards ſtrike or thruſt him on the face hed or bodye as it appeareth more at large in the 5th Chapter of theſe my Inſtructions.
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| 11. If you fight with one standing only upon his guardant fight or if he seeks to come in to you by the same fight, then do you strike & thrust continually at all manner of open places that shall come nearest unto you, still remembering your governors, so shall he continually be in danger, & often wounded, & wearied in that kind of fight, & you shall be safe, the reason is, he is a certain mark to you, & you are an uncertain mark to him.
 
| 11. If you fight with one standing only upon his guardant fight or if he seeks to come in to you by the same fight, then do you strike & thrust continually at all manner of open places that shall come nearest unto you, still remembering your governors, so shall he continually be in danger, & often wounded, & wearied in that kind of fight, & you shall be safe, the reason is, he is a certain mark to you, & you are an uncertain mark to him.
 
| 11. yf yõ fyght w<sup>t</sup> on y<sup>t</sup> ſtandeth only vpon his gardant fyght or yf he ſeeke to com in to yõ by the ſame fyght, then do yõ ſtrike & thruſt Contynually at al mann<sup>r</sup> of open place that ſhall com neereſt vnto you, ſtill remembringe yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors, ſo ſhall he Contynually be in dang<sup>r</sup>, & often wounded, & weryed in that kynd of fyght, & you ſhalbe ſaf, the reaſon is, he is a c<sup>r</sup>taine marke to you, & yõ are an uncertaine marke to hym.
 
| 11. yf yõ fyght w<sup>t</sup> on y<sup>t</sup> ſtandeth only vpon his gardant fyght or yf he ſeeke to com in to yõ by the ſame fyght, then do yõ ſtrike & thruſt Contynually at al mann<sup>r</sup> of open place that ſhall com neereſt vnto you, ſtill remembringe yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors, ſo ſhall he Contynually be in dang<sup>r</sup>, & often wounded, & weryed in that kynd of fyght, & you ſhalbe ſaf, the reaſon is, he is a c<sup>r</sup>taine marke to you, & yõ are an uncertaine marke to hym.
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| And further because he ties himself into one kind of fight only, he shall be wearied for want of change of lying, & you by reason of many changes shall not only fight at ease, & much more brave, but you have likewise 4 fights to his one, to wit, guardant, open, closed and variable fight, to his guardant only, therefore that fight only is not to be stood upon or used.
 
| And further because he ties himself into one kind of fight only, he shall be wearied for want of change of lying, & you by reason of many changes shall not only fight at ease, & much more brave, but you have likewise 4 fights to his one, to wit, guardant, open, closed and variable fight, to his guardant only, therefore that fight only is not to be stood upon or used.
 
| And further becauſe he tyeth him ſelf unto on kynd of fyght only, he ſhalbe wearyed for want of Change of lyinge, & yõ by reaſon of many changes ſhal not only ſtyll fyght at eaſe, & much more braue, but you haue lykewyſeiiij fyghts to his one, to wytt, gardant, open, cloſe, & variable fyght, to his gardant only, therfore y<sup>t</sup> fight only is not to be ſtode vpon or vsed.
 
| And further becauſe he tyeth him ſelf unto on kynd of fyght only, he ſhalbe wearyed for want of Change of lyinge, & yõ by reaſon of many changes ſhal not only ſtyll fyght at eaſe, & much more braue, but you haue lykewyſeiiij fyghts to his one, to wytt, gardant, open, cloſe, & variable fyght, to his gardant only, therfore y<sup>t</sup> fight only is not to be ſtode vpon or vsed.
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| 12. But if all this will not serve & although he has received many wounds, will continually run to come in, & forcibly break your distance, then may you safely take the grip of him, & hurt him at your pleasure with your sword, as appears in the chapter of the grip, & he can neither hurt nor take the grip of you, because the number of his feet are too many, to bring his hand in place in due time, for such a one ever gives you the place, therefore be sure to take your time therein.
 
| 12. But if all this will not serve & although he has received many wounds, will continually run to come in, & forcibly break your distance, then may you safely take the grip of him, & hurt him at your pleasure with your sword, as appears in the chapter of the grip, & he can neither hurt nor take the grip of you, because the number of his feet are too many, to bring his hand in place in due time, for such a one ever gives you the place, therefore be sure to take your time therein.
 
| 12. But yf al this will not ſ<sup>r</sup>ue, & although he hath receyved Many Wounds, wyl contynually run on to com in, & forcibly breake yo<sup>r</sup> dyſtance, then may you ſaffly take the grype of him, & hurt him at yo<sup>r</sup> pleaſure w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword, as appreareth in the chapter of the grype, & he can nether hurt nor take y<sup>e</sup> grype of yõ, becauſe the numb<sup>r</sup> of his feet are to many, to bringe his hand in place in due tyme, for ſuch a on ever geueth yõ the place, therfore beſure to take yo<sup>r</sup> tyme herin.
 
| 12. But yf al this will not ſ<sup>r</sup>ue, & although he hath receyved Many Wounds, wyl contynually run on to com in, & forcibly breake yo<sup>r</sup> dyſtance, then may you ſaffly take the grype of him, & hurt him at yo<sup>r</sup> pleaſure w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword, as appreareth in the chapter of the grype, & he can nether hurt nor take y<sup>e</sup> grype of yõ, becauſe the numb<sup>r</sup> of his feet are to many, to bringe his hand in place in due tyme, for ſuch a on ever geueth yõ the place, therfore beſure to take yo<sup>r</sup> tyme herin.
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| In the like sort may you do at sword & dagger, or sword & buckler, at such time as I say, that you may take the grip at the single sword fight, you may then instead of the grip, soundly strike him with your buckler on the head or stab him with your dagger & instantly either strike up his heels or fly out, & as he likes a cooling card to his hot brain, sick fit, so let him come for another.
 
| In the like sort may you do at sword & dagger, or sword & buckler, at such time as I say, that you may take the grip at the single sword fight, you may then instead of the grip, soundly strike him with your buckler on the head or stab him with your dagger & instantly either strike up his heels or fly out, & as he likes a cooling card to his hot brain, sick fit, so let him come for another.
 
| In the lyke ſort may yõ do at ſword & dagg<sup>r</sup>, or ſword & buckler, at ſuch tyme as I ſay, y<sup>t</sup> yõ Maye take the grype at the ſyngle ſword fyght, yõ may then inſteed of the grype, ſoundly ſtryke him w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> buckler on the hed or ſtabb him w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup> & inſtantly eytherſtryke vp his heeles or fly out, & as he lyketh y<sup>t</sup> coolinge card to his hot braine, ſyck fyt, ſo let him com for another.
 
| In the lyke ſort may yõ do at ſword & dagg<sup>r</sup>, or ſword & buckler, at ſuch tyme as I ſay, y<sup>t</sup> yõ Maye take the grype at the ſyngle ſword fyght, yõ may then inſteed of the grype, ſoundly ſtryke him w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> buckler on the hed or ſtabb him w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup> & inſtantly eytherſtryke vp his heeles or fly out, & as he lyketh y<sup>t</sup> coolinge card to his hot braine, ſyck fyt, ſo let him com for another.
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| If 2 fight & both lie upon the true guardant fight & that one of them will need seek to win the half sword by pressing in, that may you safely do, for upon that fight the half sword may safely be won, but he that first comes in must first go out, & that presently, otherwise his guard will be too wide above to defend his head, or if fit for that defence, then will it be too wide underneath to defend that thrust from his body which things the patient agent may do, & fly out safe, & that agent cannot avoid it, because the moving of his feet makes his ward unequal to defend both parts in due time, but the one or the other will be deceived & in danger, for he being agent upon his first entrance his time (by reason of the number of his feet) will be too long, so that the patient agent may first enter into his action, & the agent must be of force an after doer, & therefore cannot avoid this offense aforesaid.
 
| If 2 fight & both lie upon the true guardant fight & that one of them will need seek to win the half sword by pressing in, that may you safely do, for upon that fight the half sword may safely be won, but he that first comes in must first go out, & that presently, otherwise his guard will be too wide above to defend his head, or if fit for that defence, then will it be too wide underneath to defend that thrust from his body which things the patient agent may do, & fly out safe, & that agent cannot avoid it, because the moving of his feet makes his ward unequal to defend both parts in due time, but the one or the other will be deceived & in danger, for he being agent upon his first entrance his time (by reason of the number of his feet) will be too long, so that the patient agent may first enter into his action, & the agent must be of force an after doer, & therefore cannot avoid this offense aforesaid.
 
| 13. yf ij fyght & that both lye vpõ the true gardant fyght & that one of them will neede ſeek to wyn the half ſword by preſſinge in, y<sup>t</sup> may yõ ſaflye do, for vpõ y<sup>t</sup> fyght the half ſworde may ſafflye be woon, but he y<sup>t</sup> firſt cometh in, Muſt fyrſt go out, & y<sup>t</sup> prſently, otherwiſe his gard wilbe to wyde aboue to defend his hed, or yf fyt for y<sup>t</sup> defence, then wil it be to wyde vnd<sup>r</sup>neath to defend y<sup>t</sup> thruſt frõ his body w<sup>ch</sup> things the patient Agent may do, & fly out ſaf, & y<sup>t</sup> Agent cannot avoyd it, becauſe the moving of his feet maketh his ward vnequall to defend both prts in due tyme, but the one or the other wilbe diſceived & in danger, for he being Agent vpon his firſt entrance histyme (by reason of y<sup>t</sup> numb<sup>r</sup> of his feet), wilbe to longe, ſo y<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> patient Agent may firſt enter into his action, & the Agent muſt be of force an after doer, & therfore cannote avoyde this offence aforeſaid.
 
| 13. yf ij fyght & that both lye vpõ the true gardant fyght & that one of them will neede ſeek to wyn the half ſword by preſſinge in, y<sup>t</sup> may yõ ſaflye do, for vpõ y<sup>t</sup> fyght the half ſworde may ſafflye be woon, but he y<sup>t</sup> firſt cometh in, Muſt fyrſt go out, & y<sup>t</sup> prſently, otherwiſe his gard wilbe to wyde aboue to defend his hed, or yf fyt for y<sup>t</sup> defence, then wil it be to wyde vnd<sup>r</sup>neath to defend y<sup>t</sup> thruſt frõ his body w<sup>ch</sup> things the patient Agent may do, & fly out ſaf, & y<sup>t</sup> Agent cannot avoyd it, becauſe the moving of his feet maketh his ward vnequall to defend both prts in due tyme, but the one or the other wilbe diſceived & in danger, for he being Agent vpon his firſt entrance histyme (by reason of y<sup>t</sup> numb<sup>r</sup> of his feet), wilbe to longe, ſo y<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> patient Agent may firſt enter into his action, & the Agent muſt be of force an after doer, & therfore cannote avoyde this offence aforeſaid.
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| 14. If he come in to encounter the close & grip upon the bastard guardant ward, then you may cross his blade with yours upon the like guardant ward also, & as he comes in with his feet & have gained you the place, you may presently uncross & strike him a blow on the head, & fly out instantly, wherein he cannot offend you by reason of his lost time, nor defend himself upon the uncrossing, because his space is too wide whereby his time will be too long in due time to prevent your blow, this may you do safely.
 
| 14. If he come in to encounter the close & grip upon the bastard guardant ward, then you may cross his blade with yours upon the like guardant ward also, & as he comes in with his feet & have gained you the place, you may presently uncross & strike him a blow on the head, & fly out instantly, wherein he cannot offend you by reason of his lost time, nor defend himself upon the uncrossing, because his space is too wide whereby his time will be too long in due time to prevent your blow, this may you do safely.
 
| 14. yf he com in to encounter the Cloze & grype vpõ y<sup>e</sup> baſtard gardant ward, then yõ Maye Croſſe his blade w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup>s vpõ the lyke gardant ward alſo, & as he cometh in w<sup>t</sup> his feet & haue gayned yõ the place, yõ may p<sup>r</sup>ſently vncfoſſe & ſtryke him a ſound blowe on y<sup>e</sup>hed, & fly out inſtantly, wher in he cannot offend yõ by reaſon of his loſt tyme, nor defend him ſelf vpon yo<sup>r</sup> vncroſſing, becauſe his ſpace is to wyde wherby his tyme wilbe to longe in due tyme to prvent yo<sup>r</sup> blowe, this may yõ do ſafly.
 
| 14. yf he com in to encounter the Cloze & grype vpõ y<sup>e</sup> baſtard gardant ward, then yõ Maye Croſſe his blade w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup>s vpõ the lyke gardant ward alſo, & as he cometh in w<sup>t</sup> his feet & haue gayned yõ the place, yõ may p<sup>r</sup>ſently vncfoſſe & ſtryke him a ſound blowe on y<sup>e</sup>hed, & fly out inſtantly, wher in he cannot offend yõ by reaſon of his loſt tyme, nor defend him ſelf vpon yo<sup>r</sup> vncroſſing, becauſe his ſpace is to wyde wherby his tyme wilbe to longe in due tyme to prvent yo<sup>r</sup> blowe, this may yõ do ſafly.
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| 15. If he comes in upon the bastard guardant ward, bearing his hilt lower than his head, or but breast high or lower, then strike him soundly on the head which thing you may easily do, because his space is too wide in due time to ward the same.
 
| 15. If he comes in upon the bastard guardant ward, bearing his hilt lower than his head, or but breast high or lower, then strike him soundly on the head which thing you may easily do, because his space is too wide in due time to ward the same.
 
| 15. yfhe cõ in vpon the baſtard gardant ward, bearing his hylt lower than his hed, or but breſt hye or lower, then ſtrik him ſoundly on the hed w<sup>ch</sup> thinge yõ may eaſylye do, becauſe his ſpace is to wyde in due tyme to ward the ſame.
 
| 15. yfhe cõ in vpon the baſtard gardant ward, bearing his hylt lower than his hed, or but breſt hye or lower, then ſtrik him ſoundly on the hed w<sup>ch</sup> thinge yõ may eaſylye do, becauſe his ſpace is to wyde in due tyme to ward the ſame.
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| 16. If your enemy charge you upon his Stocata fight, you may lie variable with large distance & uncertainty with your sword & body at your pleasure, yet so you may strike, thrust or ward, & go forth & back as occasion is, to take the advantage of this coming in, whether he does it out of the Stocata, or Passata, which advantage you shall be sure to have, if you observe this rule & be not too rash in your actions, by reason that the number of his feet will be great, & also because when those 2 fights are met together, it is hard to make a true cross, therefore without large distance be kept of them, commonly they are both hurt or slain, because in narrow distance their hands have free course & are not tied to the time of the foot, by which swift motion of the hand the eye is deceived, as you may read more at large in the --- chapter of my paradoxes of defence. You may also use this fight, against the long sword, or long rapier, single or double.
 
| 16. If your enemy charge you upon his Stocata fight, you may lie variable with large distance & uncertainty with your sword & body at your pleasure, yet so you may strike, thrust or ward, & go forth & back as occasion is, to take the advantage of this coming in, whether he does it out of the Stocata, or Passata, which advantage you shall be sure to have, if you observe this rule & be not too rash in your actions, by reason that the number of his feet will be great, & also because when those 2 fights are met together, it is hard to make a true cross, therefore without large distance be kept of them, commonly they are both hurt or slain, because in narrow distance their hands have free course & are not tied to the time of the foot, by which swift motion of the hand the eye is deceived, as you may read more at large in the --- chapter of my paradoxes of defence. You may also use this fight, against the long sword, or long rapier, single or double.
 
| 16. yf yo<sup>r</sup> Enemy charge you vpõ his Stocata fyght, yõ May ly variable w<sup>t</sup> large Diſtance & vnc<sup>r</sup>taine w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & bodye at yo<sup>r</sup> pleaſure, yet ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ may ſtryke, thruſt or Ward, & go forth & back as occasion is, to take y<sup>e</sup> advantage of this cõmynge in, whether he doth it out of the Stocata, or paſſata, w<sup>ch</sup> advantage yõ ſhalbe ſure to haue, yf yõ obſrue this rule & be not to raſh in yo<sup>r</sup> actions, by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> numb<sup>r</sup> of his feet wilbe great, & alſo becauſe when thoſe ij fyghts are met together, it is hard to Make a true Croſſe, therfore w<sup>t</sup>out Large dyſdance be kept of them, Commonly they are both hurt of ſlayne, becauſe in narrow diſtance their hands haue free Courſe & are not tyed to the tyme of y<sup>e</sup> foote, by w<sup>ch</sup> ſwyft motion of the hand the eye is deceyved, as yõ may read more at large in the cap: of my prdoxes of defence. You may alſo vſe this fyght againſt the longe ſword, or longe rapior, ſyngle & dubble,
 
| 16. yf yo<sup>r</sup> Enemy charge you vpõ his Stocata fyght, yõ May ly variable w<sup>t</sup> large Diſtance & vnc<sup>r</sup>taine w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & bodye at yo<sup>r</sup> pleaſure, yet ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ may ſtryke, thruſt or Ward, & go forth & back as occasion is, to take y<sup>e</sup> advantage of this cõmynge in, whether he doth it out of the Stocata, or paſſata, w<sup>ch</sup> advantage yõ ſhalbe ſure to haue, yf yõ obſrue this rule & be not to raſh in yo<sup>r</sup> actions, by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> numb<sup>r</sup> of his feet wilbe great, & alſo becauſe when thoſe ij fyghts are met together, it is hard to Make a true Croſſe, therfore w<sup>t</sup>out Large dyſdance be kept of them, Commonly they are both hurt of ſlayne, becauſe in narrow diſtance their hands haue free Courſe & are not tyed to the tyme of y<sup>e</sup> foote, by w<sup>ch</sup> ſwyft motion of the hand the eye is deceyved, as yõ may read more at large in the cap: of my prdoxes of defence. You may alſo vſe this fyght againſt the longe ſword, or longe rapior, ſyngle & dubble,
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| Upon this ground some shallow witted fellow may say, if the patient must keep large distance, then he must be driven to go back still, to which I answer that in the continual motion & traverses of his ground he is to traverse circularly, forewards, backwards, upon the right hand, & upon the left hand, the which traverses are still a certainty to be used within himself, & not to be prevented by the agent, because the agent comes one upon a certain mark, for when he thinks to be sure of his purpose, the patient is sometimes on the one side, & sometimes on the other side, sometimes too far back, & sometimes too near, so still the agent must use the number of his feet which will be too long to answer the hand of the patient agent, & it cannot be denied but the patient agent by reason of his large distance, still sees what the agent does in his coming, but the agent cannot see what the other doeth, 'til the patient agent be into his action, therefore too late for him either to hurt the patient, or in due time to defend himself, because he entered into his action upon the knowledge of the patient, be he knows not what the patient agent will do 'til it is to late.
 
| Upon this ground some shallow witted fellow may say, if the patient must keep large distance, then he must be driven to go back still, to which I answer that in the continual motion & traverses of his ground he is to traverse circularly, forewards, backwards, upon the right hand, & upon the left hand, the which traverses are still a certainty to be used within himself, & not to be prevented by the agent, because the agent comes one upon a certain mark, for when he thinks to be sure of his purpose, the patient is sometimes on the one side, & sometimes on the other side, sometimes too far back, & sometimes too near, so still the agent must use the number of his feet which will be too long to answer the hand of the patient agent, & it cannot be denied but the patient agent by reason of his large distance, still sees what the agent does in his coming, but the agent cannot see what the other doeth, 'til the patient agent be into his action, therefore too late for him either to hurt the patient, or in due time to defend himself, because he entered into his action upon the knowledge of the patient, be he knows not what the patient agent will do 'til it is to late.
 
| vpon this ground ſom ſhallow wytted fellow may ſay, the patient muſt keep large diſtance then he muſt be dryven to goback ſtyll, to w<sup>ch</sup> I anſwer y<sup>t</sup> in the contynnuall motion & travers of his ground he is to travers circuler wyſe, forwards, backwards, vpõ the right hand, & vpõ the left hand, the w<sup>ch</sup> travers is still a certaintye to be vſed w<sup>t</sup>in him ſelf, & not to be p<sup>r</sup>vented by y<sup>e</sup> Agent, becauſe the Agent cõmeth one vpõ an vnc<sup>r</sup>taine marke, for when he thinketh to be ſure of his purpoſe, the patient is ſometymes on the on ſyde, & ſom tymes on y<sup>e</sup> other ſyde, ſomtymes to far back, & ſomtymes to neere, ſo y<sup>t</sup> ſtil the Agent muſt vſe the numb<sup>r</sup> of his feet w<sup>ch</sup> wilbe to longe to anſwer y<sup>e</sup> hand of y<sup>e</sup> patient Agent, & it cannot be denyed but the patient Agent, by reaſon of his large diſtance, ſtil ſeeth what y<sup>e</sup> Agent doth in his cõmyng, but the Agent cannot ſe what the other doth, til the patient Agent be into his Action, therfore to late for him eyther to hurt the patient or in due tyme to defend him ſelf, becauſe he entereth his actiõ vpõ y<sup>e</sup> knowledge of the patient, but he know<sup>t</sup> not what y<sup>e</sup> patient Agent will do til it be to late.
 
| vpon this ground ſom ſhallow wytted fellow may ſay, the patient muſt keep large diſtance then he muſt be dryven to goback ſtyll, to w<sup>ch</sup> I anſwer y<sup>t</sup> in the contynnuall motion & travers of his ground he is to travers circuler wyſe, forwards, backwards, vpõ the right hand, & vpõ the left hand, the w<sup>ch</sup> travers is still a certaintye to be vſed w<sup>t</sup>in him ſelf, & not to be p<sup>r</sup>vented by y<sup>e</sup> Agent, becauſe the Agent cõmeth one vpõ an vnc<sup>r</sup>taine marke, for when he thinketh to be ſure of his purpoſe, the patient is ſometymes on the on ſyde, & ſom tymes on y<sup>e</sup> other ſyde, ſomtymes to far back, & ſomtymes to neere, ſo y<sup>t</sup> ſtil the Agent muſt vſe the numb<sup>r</sup> of his feet w<sup>ch</sup> wilbe to longe to anſwer y<sup>e</sup> hand of y<sup>e</sup> patient Agent, & it cannot be denyed but the patient Agent, by reaſon of his large diſtance, ſtil ſeeth what y<sup>e</sup> Agent doth in his cõmyng, but the Agent cannot ſe what the other doth, til the patient Agent be into his Action, therfore to late for him eyther to hurt the patient or in due tyme to defend him ſelf, becauſe he entereth his actiõ vpõ y<sup>e</sup> knowledge of the patient, but he know<sup>t</sup> not what y<sup>e</sup> patient Agent will do til it be to late.
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| 17. If the agent says that then he will stand fast upon sure guard and sometimes moving & traversing his ground, & keep large distance as the patient does, to which I answer, that when 2 men shall meet that have both the perfection of their weapons, against the best no hurt can be done, otherwise if by any device one should be able to hurt the other, then were there no perfection in the use of weapons, this perfection of fight being observed, prevents both close fight, & all manner of closes, grips & wrestling & all manner of such devices whatsoever.
 
| 17. If the agent says that then he will stand fast upon sure guard and sometimes moving & traversing his ground, & keep large distance as the patient does, to which I answer, that when 2 men shall meet that have both the perfection of their weapons, against the best no hurt can be done, otherwise if by any device one should be able to hurt the other, then were there no perfection in the use of weapons, this perfection of fight being observed, prevents both close fight, & all manner of closes, grips & wrestling & all manner of such devices whatsoever.
 
| 17. yf the Agent ſay y<sup>t</sup> then he will ſtand faſt vpon som ſure gard & xſomtymes moving & trav<sup>r</sup>ſing his ground, & kepe large distance as y<sup>e</sup> patient do, to w<sup>ch</sup> I answer, y<sup>t</sup> when ij men ſal meete y<sup>t</sup> haue both the p<sup>r</sup>fection of their weapons, againſt the beſt no hurt canbedon other wiſe yf by any deviſe on ſhould be able to hurt the other, then wherther no prfection in y<sup>e</sup> vse of weapons, this prfection of fyght being obſrved, p<sup>r</sup>venteth both cloſe fyght, & al mann<sup>r</sup> of clozes, grype & wreſtling & al mann<sup>r</sup> of ſuch other devics what ſo euer.
 
| 17. yf the Agent ſay y<sup>t</sup> then he will ſtand faſt vpon som ſure gard & xſomtymes moving & trav<sup>r</sup>ſing his ground, & kepe large distance as y<sup>e</sup> patient do, to w<sup>ch</sup> I answer, y<sup>t</sup> when ij men ſal meete y<sup>t</sup> haue both the p<sup>r</sup>fection of their weapons, againſt the beſt no hurt canbedon other wiſe yf by any deviſe on ſhould be able to hurt the other, then wherther no prfection in y<sup>e</sup> vse of weapons, this prfection of fyght being obſrved, p<sup>r</sup>venteth both cloſe fyght, & al mann<sup>r</sup> of clozes, grype & wreſtling & al mann<sup>r</sup> of ſuch other devics what ſo euer.
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| 18. Also if he charges you upon his Stocata, or any other lying after that fashion, with his point low & large paced, then lie you aloft with your hand & hilt above your head, either true guardant, or upon the open fight, then he cannot reach you if you keep your distance without putting in his foot or feet, but you may reach him with the time of your hand, or with the time of your hand & body, or of the hand, body & foot, because he has already put in his body within your reach & has gained you the place,& you are at liberty & without his reach, 'til he puts in his foot or feet, which time is too wide in that place to make a ward in due time to defend his head, arms & hand, one of which will be always within your reach. Note still in this that your weapons be both short and of equal & convenient length of the short sword.
 
| 18. Also if he charges you upon his Stocata, or any other lying after that fashion, with his point low & large paced, then lie you aloft with your hand & hilt above your head, either true guardant, or upon the open fight, then he cannot reach you if you keep your distance without putting in his foot or feet, but you may reach him with the time of your hand, or with the time of your hand & body, or of the hand, body & foot, because he has already put in his body within your reach & has gained you the place,& you are at liberty & without his reach, 'til he puts in his foot or feet, which time is too wide in that place to make a ward in due time to defend his head, arms & hand, one of which will be always within your reach. Note still in this that your weapons be both short and of equal & convenient length of the short sword.
 
| 18. Alsfo yf he charge yõ vpõ his Stocata, or any other lying aft<sup>r</sup> y<sup>t</sup> faſhion, w<sup>t</sup> his poynt low & large paced, then lye yõ a loft yo<sup>r</sup> hand & hylt aboue yo<sup>r</sup> hed, eyther true gardant, or vpõ the open fight, then he cannot reach yõ yf yõ kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance w<sup>t</sup>out putting in his foot or feet, but yõ may reach him w<sup>t</sup> the tyme of your hand & body, or of hand, body & foot, becauſe he hath al redy put in his body w<sup>t</sup>in yo<sup>r</sup> reach & haue gayned yõ the place, & yõ are at lybertye & w<sup>t</sup>out his reach, til he put in his foot or feete, w<sup>ch</sup> tyme isto longe to anſwer the tyme of yo<sup>r</sup> hand, & his ſpace is to wyde in that place to make a ward in due tyme to defend his hed, Armes & hande, one of w<sup>ch</sup> wilbe alwaies w<sup>t</sup>in yo<sup>r</sup> reach. note ſtil in this y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> weapons be both ſhort of y<sup>e</sup> Equal & convenient length of y<sup>e</sup> ſhort ſword.
 
| 18. Alsfo yf he charge yõ vpõ his Stocata, or any other lying aft<sup>r</sup> y<sup>t</sup> faſhion, w<sup>t</sup> his poynt low & large paced, then lye yõ a loft yo<sup>r</sup> hand & hylt aboue yo<sup>r</sup> hed, eyther true gardant, or vpõ the open fight, then he cannot reach yõ yf yõ kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance w<sup>t</sup>out putting in his foot or feet, but yõ may reach him w<sup>t</sup> the tyme of your hand & body, or of hand, body & foot, becauſe he hath al redy put in his body w<sup>t</sup>in yo<sup>r</sup> reach & haue gayned yõ the place, & yõ are at lybertye & w<sup>t</sup>out his reach, til he put in his foot or feete, w<sup>ch</sup> tyme isto longe to anſwer the tyme of yo<sup>r</sup> hand, & his ſpace is to wyde in that place to make a ward in due tyme to defend his hed, Armes & hande, one of w<sup>ch</sup> wilbe alwaies w<sup>t</sup>in yo<sup>r</sup> reach. note ſtil in this y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> weapons be both ſhort of y<sup>e</sup> Equal & convenient length of y<sup>e</sup> ſhort ſword.
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| 19. If out of this variable fight he strikes at the right or left side of the head or body, then your best ward is to bear with the forehand ward, otherwise your space will be too wide & too far to make your ward in due time.
 
| 19. If out of this variable fight he strikes at the right or left side of the head or body, then your best ward is to bear with the forehand ward, otherwise your space will be too wide & too far to make your ward in due time.
 
| 19. yf out of his varyable fyght he ſtrike at y<sup>e</sup> right or left ſyde of the hed or body, then yo<sup>r</sup> beſt ward is to bere it w<sup>t</sup> fore hand ward, otherwiſe yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace wilbe to wyde & to far to make yo<sup>r</sup> ward in due tyme.
 
| 19. yf out of his varyable fyght he ſtrike at y<sup>e</sup> right or left ſyde of the hed or body, then yo<sup>r</sup> beſt ward is to bere it w<sup>t</sup> fore hand ward, otherwiſe yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace wilbe to wyde & to far to make yo<sup>r</sup> ward in due tyme.
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| 20. If he lies variable after the manner of the Passata then if you lie aloft as is above said, you have the advantage, because he that lies variable cannot reach home, at head, hand or arm, without putting in his foot or feet, & therefore it cannot be denied, but that he that plays aloft, has still the time of the hand to the time of the foot, which fight being truly handled is invincible advantage.
 
| 20. If he lies variable after the manner of the Passata then if you lie aloft as is above said, you have the advantage, because he that lies variable cannot reach home, at head, hand or arm, without putting in his foot or feet, & therefore it cannot be denied, but that he that plays aloft, has still the time of the hand to the time of the foot, which fight being truly handled is invincible advantage.
 
| 20. Yf he lye variable aft<sup>r</sup> the mann<sup>r</sup> of the paſſata then yf yõ lye a loft as is aboue ſaid, yõ haue the Advantage, becauſe he y<sup>t</sup> lyeth varyable cannot reach home, at hed hand or arme, w<sup>t</sup>out putting in his foote of feet, & therfore it cannot be denyed, but y<sup>t</sup> he y<sup>t</sup>playeth aloft, hath ſtil the tyme of the hand to the tyme of y<sup>e</sup> foot, w<sup>ch</sup> fight beinge truly handled is aduantage invincible.
 
| 20. Yf he lye variable aft<sup>r</sup> the mann<sup>r</sup> of the paſſata then yf yõ lye a loft as is aboue ſaid, yõ haue the Advantage, becauſe he y<sup>t</sup> lyeth varyable cannot reach home, at hed hand or arme, w<sup>t</sup>out putting in his foote of feet, & therfore it cannot be denyed, but y<sup>t</sup> he y<sup>t</sup>playeth aloft, hath ſtil the tyme of the hand to the tyme of y<sup>e</sup> foot, w<sup>ch</sup> fight beinge truly handled is aduantage invincible.
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| 21. If he lies variable upon the Imbrocata, then make a narrow space with your point upward, & suddenly if you can cross his point with your blade, put aside his point strongly with your sword & strike or thrust at him, & fly out instantly, ever remembering your governors that he deceive you not in taking his point.
 
| 21. If he lies variable upon the Imbrocata, then make a narrow space with your point upward, & suddenly if you can cross his point with your blade, put aside his point strongly with your sword & strike or thrust at him, & fly out instantly, ever remembering your governors that he deceive you not in taking his point.
 
| 21. yf he lye variable vpõ the Imbrocata, then make a narrow ſpace w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt vpwarde, & ſodainly yf yõ can Croſe his poynt w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> blade put aſyde his poynt ſtrongly w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & ſtrik or thruſt at him, & fly out inſtantly, euer remembring yo<sup>r</sup> gouernors y<sup>t</sup> hedeceve yõ not in taking of his poynt.
 
| 21. yf he lye variable vpõ the Imbrocata, then make a narrow ſpace w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt vpwarde, & ſodainly yf yõ can Croſe his poynt w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> blade put aſyde his poynt ſtrongly w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & ſtrik or thruſt at him, & fly out inſtantly, euer remembring yo<sup>r</sup> gouernors y<sup>t</sup> hedeceve yõ not in taking of his poynt.
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| 22. If he strike or thrust at your leg or lower part out of any fight, he shall not be able to reach the same unless you stand large paced with bending knee, or unless he comes in with his foot or feet, the which if he shall so do, then you may strike or thrust at his arm or upper part for then he puts them into the place gaining you the place whereby you make strike home upon him & he cannot reach you. But if he stands large paced with bending knee, then win the place & strike home freely at his knee, & fly back therewith.
 
| 22. If he strike or thrust at your leg or lower part out of any fight, he shall not be able to reach the same unless you stand large paced with bending knee, or unless he comes in with his foot or feet, the which if he shall so do, then you may strike or thrust at his arm or upper part for then he puts them into the place gaining you the place whereby you make strike home upon him & he cannot reach you. But if he stands large paced with bending knee, then win the place & strike home freely at his knee, & fly back therewith.
 
| 22. yf he ſtrike or thruſt at yo<sup>r</sup> lege or lower prte out of any fyght, he ſhal not be able to reach the ſame vnleſs yõ ſtand large paced w<sup>t</sup> bendinge knee, of vnleſs he com in w<sup>t</sup> his foote or feet, the w<sup>ch</sup> he ſhal ſo do, then yõ may ſtrikor thruſt at his arme or vpper prte for then he putteth them into the place gayning yõ the place wherby you may ſtrike home vpõ him & he cannot reach yõ. but yf he ſtand large paced w<sup>t</sup> bendinge knee then wyn the place & ſtrike home freely at his knee, & fly back ther w<sup>t</sup>
 
| 22. yf he ſtrike or thruſt at yo<sup>r</sup> lege or lower prte out of any fyght, he ſhal not be able to reach the ſame vnleſs yõ ſtand large paced w<sup>t</sup> bendinge knee, of vnleſs he com in w<sup>t</sup> his foote or feet, the w<sup>ch</sup> he ſhal ſo do, then yõ may ſtrikor thruſt at his arme or vpper prte for then he putteth them into the place gayning yõ the place wherby you may ſtrike home vpõ him & he cannot reach yõ. but yf he ſtand large paced w<sup>t</sup> bendinge knee then wyn the place & ſtrike home freely at his knee, & fly back ther w<sup>t</sup>
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|-  
 
|-  
Line 1,334: Line 1,417:
 
| 23. If he comes to the close fight with you & that you are both crossed aloft at the half sword with both your points upward, then if he comes in withal in his crossing bear strongly your hand & hilt over his wrist, close by his hilt, putting in over at the backside of his hand & hilt pressing down his hand & hilt strongly, in your entering in, & so thrust your hilt in his face, or strike him upon the head with your sword, & strike up his heels, & fly out.
 
| 23. If he comes to the close fight with you & that you are both crossed aloft at the half sword with both your points upward, then if he comes in withal in his crossing bear strongly your hand & hilt over his wrist, close by his hilt, putting in over at the backside of his hand & hilt pressing down his hand & hilt strongly, in your entering in, & so thrust your hilt in his face, or strike him upon the head with your sword, & strike up his heels, & fly out.
 
| 23. yf he com to the cloſe fight w<sup>t</sup> yõ & y<sup>t</sup> yõ are both crost aloft at y<sup>e</sup> half ſword w<sup>t</sup> both yo<sup>r</sup> points vpwards, then yf he com in w<sup>t</sup> all in his Croſſing bere ſtrongly yo<sup>r</sup> hand & hylt ou<sup>r</sup> his wriſt, cloſe by his hylt putting it ouer at y<sup>e</sup>backſyde of his hand & hylt prſſinge doune his hand & hylt ſtrongly & ſodainly, in yo<sup>r</sup> entring in, & ſo thruſt yo<sup>r</sup> hylt in his face, of ſtrike him vpõ y<sup>e</sup> hed ſword, & ſtrike vp his heeles, & fly out,
 
| 23. yf he com to the cloſe fight w<sup>t</sup> yõ & y<sup>t</sup> yõ are both crost aloft at y<sup>e</sup> half ſword w<sup>t</sup> both yo<sup>r</sup> points vpwards, then yf he com in w<sup>t</sup> all in his Croſſing bere ſtrongly yo<sup>r</sup> hand & hylt ou<sup>r</sup> his wriſt, cloſe by his hylt putting it ouer at y<sup>e</sup>backſyde of his hand & hylt prſſinge doune his hand & hylt ſtrongly & ſodainly, in yo<sup>r</sup> entring in, & ſo thruſt yo<sup>r</sup> hylt in his face, of ſtrike him vpõ y<sup>e</sup> hed ſword, & ſtrike vp his heeles, & fly out,
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|-  
Line 1,339: Line 1,423:
 
| 24. If you are both so crossed at the bastard guardant ward, & if he then presses in, then take the grip of him as is shown in the chapter of the grip.
 
| 24. If you are both so crossed at the bastard guardant ward, & if he then presses in, then take the grip of him as is shown in the chapter of the grip.
 
| 24. yf yõ are both ſo croſt at y<sup>e</sup> baſtard gardant ward, & yf he then preſs in, then take the grype of him as is shewed in y<sup>e</sup> chapter of y<sup>e</sup> grype,
 
| 24. yf yõ are both ſo croſt at y<sup>e</sup> baſtard gardant ward, & yf he then preſs in, then take the grype of him as is shewed in y<sup>e</sup> chapter of y<sup>e</sup> grype,
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|-  
 
|-  
Line 1,344: Line 1,429:
 
| Or with your left hand or arm, strike his sword blade strongly & suddenly toward your left side by which means you are uncrossed, & he is discovered, then may you thrust him in the body with your sword & fly out instantly, which thing he cannot avoid, neither can he offend you.
 
| Or with your left hand or arm, strike his sword blade strongly & suddenly toward your left side by which means you are uncrossed, & he is discovered, then may you thrust him in the body with your sword & fly out instantly, which thing he cannot avoid, neither can he offend you.
 
| Or w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> left hand or arme, ſtrike his ſword blade ſtrongly & ſodainly towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde by w<sup>ch</sup> meanes yõ are uncroſt, & he is diſcou<sup>r</sup>ed,, then may yõ thruſt him in the body w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & fly out inſtantly, w<sup>ch</sup> thinge he cannot avoyd, nether can he offend yõ
 
| Or w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> left hand or arme, ſtrike his ſword blade ſtrongly & ſodainly towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde by w<sup>ch</sup> meanes yõ are uncroſt, & he is diſcou<sup>r</sup>ed,, then may yõ thruſt him in the body w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & fly out inſtantly, w<sup>ch</sup> thinge he cannot avoyd, nether can he offend yõ
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|-  
 
|-  
Line 1,349: Line 1,435:
 
| Or being so crossed, you may suddenly uncross & strike him upon the head & fly out instantly which thing you may safely do & go out free.
 
| Or being so crossed, you may suddenly uncross & strike him upon the head & fly out instantly which thing you may safely do & go out free.
 
| Or being ſo croſt, yõ may ſodainly vncroſe & ſtrike him vpõ the hed & fly out inſtantly w<sup>ch</sup> thinge yõ may ſafly do & go out free.
 
| Or being ſo croſt, yõ may ſodainly vncroſe & ſtrike him vpõ the hed & fly out inſtantly w<sup>ch</sup> thinge yõ may ſafly do & go out free.
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|-  
 
|-  
Line 1,354: Line 1,441:
 
| 25. If you be both crossed at the half sword with his point up & your point down in the true guardant ward, then if he presses to come in, then either take the grip of him, as in the chapter of the grip, or with your left hand or arm, strike out his sword blade towards your left side as aforesaid, & so you may thrust him in the body with your sword & fly out instantly.
 
| 25. If you be both crossed at the half sword with his point up & your point down in the true guardant ward, then if he presses to come in, then either take the grip of him, as in the chapter of the grip, or with your left hand or arm, strike out his sword blade towards your left side as aforesaid, & so you may thrust him in the body with your sword & fly out instantly.
 
| 25. yf yõ be both croſt at y<sup>e</sup> half ſword w<sup>t</sup> hys poynt vp & yo<sup>r</sup> poynt doune in the true gardant ward, then yf he preſs to com in, then eyther take y<sup>e</sup> grype of him, as in the chapter of the grype, or w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> left hand or arme, ſtrike out his ſword blade towards yo<sup>r</sup> left ſydeas aforeſaid, & ſo yõ may thruſt him in the body w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & fly out inſtantly.
 
| 25. yf yõ be both croſt at y<sup>e</sup> half ſword w<sup>t</sup> hys poynt vp & yo<sup>r</sup> poynt doune in the true gardant ward, then yf he preſs to com in, then eyther take y<sup>e</sup> grype of him, as in the chapter of the grype, or w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> left hand or arme, ſtrike out his ſword blade towards yo<sup>r</sup> left ſydeas aforeſaid, & ſo yõ may thruſt him in the body w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & fly out inſtantly.
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|-  
 
|-  
Line 1,359: Line 1,447:
 
| 26. Do you never attempt to close or come to grip at these weapons unless it be upon the slow motion or disorder of your enemy,
 
| 26. Do you never attempt to close or come to grip at these weapons unless it be upon the slow motion or disorder of your enemy,
 
| 26. Do yõ neuer attempt to cloze or com to y<sup>e</sup> grype at theſe weapons vnleſsit be vpõ the slow motiõ or diſorder of yo<sup>r</sup> enemye,
 
| 26. Do yõ neuer attempt to cloze or com to y<sup>e</sup> grype at theſe weapons vnleſsit be vpõ the slow motiõ or diſorder of yo<sup>r</sup> enemye,
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|-  
 
|-  
Line 1,364: Line 1,453:
 
| But if he will close with you, then you may take the grip of him safely at his coming in, for he that first by strong pressing in adventures the close looses it, & is in great danger, by reason that the number of his feet are too great, whereby his time will be too long, in due time to answer the hand of the patient agent, as in the chapter of the grip does plainly appear.
 
| But if he will close with you, then you may take the grip of him safely at his coming in, for he that first by strong pressing in adventures the close looses it, & is in great danger, by reason that the number of his feet are too great, whereby his time will be too long, in due time to answer the hand of the patient agent, as in the chapter of the grip does plainly appear.
 
| but yf he will cloze w<sup>t</sup> you, then yõ may take the grype of him ſafly at his cõmynge in, for he y<sup>t</sup> firſt by ſtronge preſſing in adventureth the cloze looſeth it, & is in great danger, by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> the numb<sup>r</sup> of his feet are to great,whereby his tyme wilbe to longe, in due tyme to anſwer the hand of y<sup>e</sup> patient Agent, as in the chapter of the grype doth plainly appere,
 
| but yf he will cloze w<sup>t</sup> you, then yõ may take the grype of him ſafly at his cõmynge in, for he y<sup>t</sup> firſt by ſtronge preſſing in adventureth the cloze looſeth it, & is in great danger, by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> the numb<sup>r</sup> of his feet are to great,whereby his tyme wilbe to longe, in due tyme to anſwer the hand of y<sup>e</sup> patient Agent, as in the chapter of the grype doth plainly appere,
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|-  
 
|-  
Line 1,369: Line 1,459:
 
| 27. Always remembering if you fight upon the variable fight that you ward upon forehand ward, otherwise your space will be too wide in due time to make a true guardant ward, to defend yourself.
 
| 27. Always remembering if you fight upon the variable fight that you ward upon forehand ward, otherwise your space will be too wide in due time to make a true guardant ward, to defend yourself.
 
| 27. Alwaies remembring yf yõ fyght vpõ the variable fight y<sup>t</sup> yõ ward vpõ forehand ward, otherwise yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace wilbe to wyde in due tyme to make a true gardant ward, to defend yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf.
 
| 27. Alwaies remembring yf yõ fyght vpõ the variable fight y<sup>t</sup> yõ ward vpõ forehand ward, otherwise yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace wilbe to wyde in due tyme to make a true gardant ward, to defend yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf.
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|-  
 
|-  
Line 1,374: Line 1,465:
 
| 28. If you fight upon open fight, or true guardant fight, never ward upon forehand ward for then your space will be too wide also, in due time to make a sure ward.
 
| 28. If you fight upon open fight, or true guardant fight, never ward upon forehand ward for then your space will be too wide also, in due time to make a sure ward.
 
| 28. yf yõ fyght vpõ open fyght, or true gardant fyght, neuer ward vpõ forehand ward for then yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace wilbe to wyde alſo, in due tyme to make a ſureward,
 
| 28. yf yõ fyght vpõ open fyght, or true gardant fyght, neuer ward vpõ forehand ward for then yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace wilbe to wyde alſo, in due tyme to make a ſureward,
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|-  
 
|-  
Line 1,379: Line 1,471:
 
| 29. If he lies aloft with his point towards you, after the manner of the Imbrocata, then make your space narrow with your point, & strike or thrust as aforesaid but be sure herein to keep your distance, that he deceive you not in taking of his point.
 
| 29. If he lies aloft with his point towards you, after the manner of the Imbrocata, then make your space narrow with your point, & strike or thrust as aforesaid but be sure herein to keep your distance, that he deceive you not in taking of his point.
 
| 29. yf he lye aloft w<sup>t</sup> his poynt towarde you, aft<sup>r</sup> the mann<sup>r</sup> of the Imbrocata, then make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> point vpwarde & put by his poynt, & ſtrike or thruſt as aforeſaid but be ſure herin to kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, y<sup>t</sup> he deceve you not in taking of his poynt.
 
| 29. yf he lye aloft w<sup>t</sup> his poynt towarde you, aft<sup>r</sup> the mann<sup>r</sup> of the Imbrocata, then make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> point vpwarde & put by his poynt, & ſtrike or thruſt as aforeſaid but be ſure herin to kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, y<sup>t</sup> he deceve you not in taking of his poynt.
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|-  
 
|-  
Line 1,390: Line 1,483:
  
 
1. YF yo<sup>r</sup> enemy ſtrike at the right ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed, yõ lyinge true gardant, then put yo<sup>r</sup> hilt a little doune, Mounting yo<sup>r</sup> poynt, ſo that yo<sup>r</sup> blade May Croſſe a thwart yo<sup>r</sup> face, ſo ſhal yõ make A true ward for the right ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup>hed, from the w<sup>ch</sup> ward yõ may inſtantly ſtrike him on the ryght or left ſyde of the hed, or to turne doune yo<sup>r</sup> poynt, & thruſt him in the bodye, or you may ſtrike him on the left ſyde of the body, or on the out ſyde of the body, or on the out ſyde of his left thygh.
 
1. YF yo<sup>r</sup> enemy ſtrike at the right ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed, yõ lyinge true gardant, then put yo<sup>r</sup> hilt a little doune, Mounting yo<sup>r</sup> poynt, ſo that yo<sup>r</sup> blade May Croſſe a thwart yo<sup>r</sup> face, ſo ſhal yõ make A true ward for the right ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup>hed, from the w<sup>ch</sup> ward yõ may inſtantly ſtrike him on the ryght or left ſyde of the hed, or to turne doune yo<sup>r</sup> poynt, & thruſt him in the bodye, or you may ſtrike him on the left ſyde of the body, or on the out ſyde of the body, or on the out ſyde of his left thygh.
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|-  
 
|-  
Line 1,395: Line 1,489:
 
| Or you may strike him on the outside of the right thigh, one of those he cannot avoid if he fly not back instantly upon his blow, because he knows not which of these the patient agent will do.
 
| Or you may strike him on the outside of the right thigh, one of those he cannot avoid if he fly not back instantly upon his blow, because he knows not which of these the patient agent will do.
 
| Or yõ may ſtrike him on the out ſyde of the right thygh, on of thoſe he cannot avoyd yf he fly not back inſtantly vpõ his blowe, becauſe he know<sup>t</sup> not w<sup>ch</sup> of theſe the patient Agent wil do.
 
| Or yõ may ſtrike him on the out ſyde of the right thygh, on of thoſe he cannot avoyd yf he fly not back inſtantly vpõ his blowe, becauſe he know<sup>t</sup> not w<sup>ch</sup> of theſe the patient Agent wil do.
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|-  
 
|-  
Line 1,400: Line 1,495:
 
| 2. If you lie upon your true guardant ward, & he strikes at the left side of your head, you have the choice from your ward to strike him from it, on the right or left side of the head, or to turn down your point, & thrust him in the body, or you may strike him on the outside of the right or left thigh, for the reason above said in the last rule, except he flies out instantly upon his blow.
 
| 2. If you lie upon your true guardant ward, & he strikes at the left side of your head, you have the choice from your ward to strike him from it, on the right or left side of the head, or to turn down your point, & thrust him in the body, or you may strike him on the outside of the right or left thigh, for the reason above said in the last rule, except he flies out instantly upon his blow.
 
| 2. Yf yõ lye vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> true gardant ward, & he ſtrike at the left ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed, yõ haue the choyſe from yo<sup>r</sup> ward to ſtrike him from y<sup>t</sup>, on the right or left ſyde of the hed, or to turne doune yo<sup>r</sup> poynt, & thruſt him in the bodye, oryõ May ſtryke him on the out ſyde of the right or left thygh, for the reaſon aboue ſayde in the laſt rule, except he fly out inſtantly vpõ his blowe.
 
| 2. Yf yõ lye vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> true gardant ward, & he ſtrike at the left ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed, yõ haue the choyſe from yo<sup>r</sup> ward to ſtrike him from y<sup>t</sup>, on the right or left ſyde of the hed, or to turne doune yo<sup>r</sup> poynt, & thruſt him in the bodye, oryõ May ſtryke him on the out ſyde of the right or left thygh, for the reaſon aboue ſayde in the laſt rule, except he fly out inſtantly vpõ his blowe.
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|-  
 
|-  
Line 1,405: Line 1,501:
 
| 3. If he charge you upon the open or the true guardant fight, if you will answer him with the like, then keep your distance, & let your gathering be always in your fight to ward his right side so shall you with your sword choke up any blow that he can make at you, from the which ward you may strike him on the right or left side of the head, or thrust him in the body.
 
| 3. If he charge you upon the open or the true guardant fight, if you will answer him with the like, then keep your distance, & let your gathering be always in your fight to ward his right side so shall you with your sword choke up any blow that he can make at you, from the which ward you may strike him on the right or left side of the head, or thrust him in the body.
 
| 3. Yf he charge yõ vpon the open or true gardant fyght, yf yõ wil anſwer him w<sup>t</sup> the lyke, then kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, & let yo<sup>r</sup> gatheringe be all waies in y<sup>t</sup> fyght to warde his right ſyde ſo ſhal yõ w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword choake vp any blowe that he can make at yõ, from the w<sup>ch</sup>ward yõ May ſtryke him on the right or left ſyde of y<sup>e</sup> hed, or thruſt him in the bodye.
 
| 3. Yf he charge yõ vpon the open or true gardant fyght, yf yõ wil anſwer him w<sup>t</sup> the lyke, then kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, & let yo<sup>r</sup> gatheringe be all waies in y<sup>t</sup> fyght to warde his right ſyde ſo ſhal yõ w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword choake vp any blowe that he can make at yõ, from the w<sup>ch</sup>ward yõ May ſtryke him on the right or left ſyde of y<sup>e</sup> hed, or thruſt him in the bodye.
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|-  
 
|-  
Line 1,410: Line 1,507:
 
| But if he thrust at your face or body, then you may out of your guardant fight break it downward with your sword bearing your point strongly towards your right side, from the which breaking of his thrust you may likewise strike him from the right or left side of the head, or thrust him in the body.
 
| But if he thrust at your face or body, then you may out of your guardant fight break it downward with your sword bearing your point strongly towards your right side, from the which breaking of his thrust you may likewise strike him from the right or left side of the head, or thrust him in the body.
 
| but yf he thruſt at your face or body, then yõ may out of yo<sup>r</sup> gardant fight break it doune warde w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword bering yo<sup>r</sup> poynt ſtrongly towarde yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde, from the w<sup>ch</sup> breaking of his thruſt yõ may likwiſe ſtrike him frõ the right or left ſyde of y<sup>e</sup> hed, or thruſt him in the bodye.
 
| but yf he thruſt at your face or body, then yõ may out of yo<sup>r</sup> gardant fight break it doune warde w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword bering yo<sup>r</sup> poynt ſtrongly towarde yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde, from the w<sup>ch</sup> breaking of his thruſt yõ may likwiſe ſtrike him frõ the right or left ſyde of y<sup>e</sup> hed, or thruſt him in the bodye.
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|-  
Line 1,415: Line 1,513:
 
| 4. If you meet with one that cannot strike from his ward, upon such a one you may both double & false & so deceive him, but if he is skillful you must not do so, because he will be still so uncertain in his traverse that he will still prevent you of time & place, so that when you think to double & false, you shall gain him the place & there upon he will be before you in his action, & your coming he will still endanger you.
 
| 4. If you meet with one that cannot strike from his ward, upon such a one you may both double & false & so deceive him, but if he is skillful you must not do so, because he will be still so uncertain in his traverse that he will still prevent you of time & place, so that when you think to double & false, you shall gain him the place & there upon he will be before you in his action, & your coming he will still endanger you.
 
| 4. Yf yõ meet w<sup>t</sup> on y<sup>t</sup> cannot ſtrike frõ his warde, vpõ ſuch a on you may both dubble & faulſe & ſo deceue him, but yf he be skylful yõ muſt not do ſo, becauſe he wilbe ſtil ſo vnc<sup>r</sup>tain in his traverſe that he will ſtyll p<sup>r</sup>vent you of tyme & place, ſo y<sup>t</sup> when yõ think todubble & falſe, yõ ſhal gaynehim the place & ther vpõ he wilbe before yõ in his action, & in yo<sup>r</sup> comynge he will ſtil endanger yõ,
 
| 4. Yf yõ meet w<sup>t</sup> on y<sup>t</sup> cannot ſtrike frõ his warde, vpõ ſuch a on you may both dubble & faulſe & ſo deceue him, but yf he be skylful yõ muſt not do ſo, becauſe he wilbe ſtil ſo vnc<sup>r</sup>tain in his traverſe that he will ſtyll p<sup>r</sup>vent you of tyme & place, ſo y<sup>t</sup> when yõ think todubble & falſe, yõ ſhal gaynehim the place & ther vpõ he wilbe before yõ in his action, & in yo<sup>r</sup> comynge he will ſtil endanger yõ,
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Line 1,420: Line 1,519:
 
| 5. If you fight upon the variable fight, & that you receive a blow with forehand ward, made at the right side of your head or body, you have the choice of 8 offensive actions from that ward, the first to strike him on the right side, either on the head, shoulder, or thigh, or to thrust him in the body, or to strike him on the left side either on the head, shoulder or thigh, or to thrust him in the body, the like you may do if he strike ever at your left side, as is above said, if you bear it with your forehand ward.
 
| 5. If you fight upon the variable fight, & that you receive a blow with forehand ward, made at the right side of your head or body, you have the choice of 8 offensive actions from that ward, the first to strike him on the right side, either on the head, shoulder, or thigh, or to thrust him in the body, or to strike him on the left side either on the head, shoulder or thigh, or to thrust him in the body, the like you may do if he strike ever at your left side, as is above said, if you bear it with your forehand ward.
 
| 5. yf yõ fyght vpõ the variable fyght, & that yõ receue a blow w<sup>t</sup> forehand ward, made at the right ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed or body, yõ haue y<sup>e</sup> choiſe of viij offenciue Actions frõ y<sup>t</sup> ward, the firſt to ſtryke him on the right ſyde, eyther on the hed ſhould<sup>r</sup>, or thygh, or to thruſt him in the body, or to ſtryke him on the left ſyde either on the hed ſhold<sup>r</sup> or thygh, or to thruſt him in the body, the lyke may yõ do yf he ſtrike eu<sup>r</sup> at yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde, as is aboue ſaid, yf yõbere it w<sup>t</sup> fore hand ward.
 
| 5. yf yõ fyght vpõ the variable fyght, & that yõ receue a blow w<sup>t</sup> forehand ward, made at the right ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed or body, yõ haue y<sup>e</sup> choiſe of viij offenciue Actions frõ y<sup>t</sup> ward, the firſt to ſtryke him on the right ſyde, eyther on the hed ſhould<sup>r</sup>, or thygh, or to thruſt him in the body, or to ſtryke him on the left ſyde either on the hed ſhold<sup>r</sup> or thygh, or to thruſt him in the body, the lyke may yõ do yf he ſtrike eu<sup>r</sup> at yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde, as is aboue ſaid, yf yõbere it w<sup>t</sup> fore hand ward.
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| 6. In this forehand ward keep your distance, & take heed that he deceives you not with the downright blow at your head out of his open fight, for being within distance the swift motion of the hand may deceive your eye, because you know not by which side of your sword his blow will come.
 
| 6. In this forehand ward keep your distance, & take heed that he deceives you not with the downright blow at your head out of his open fight, for being within distance the swift motion of the hand may deceive your eye, because you know not by which side of your sword his blow will come.
 
| 6. In this forehand ward kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, & take heed y<sup>t</sup> he deceue yõ not w<sup>t</sup> the dounright blowe at yo<sup>r</sup> hed out of his open fyght, for being w<sup>t</sup> in diſtance y<sup>e</sup> ſwift motion of y<sup>e</sup> hand May deceue yo<sup>r</sup> eye, becauſe yõ know not by w<sup>ch</sup> ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword his blow wilcom
 
| 6. In this forehand ward kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, & take heed y<sup>t</sup> he deceue yõ not w<sup>t</sup> the dounright blowe at yo<sup>r</sup> hed out of his open fyght, for being w<sup>t</sup> in diſtance y<sup>e</sup> ſwift motion of y<sup>e</sup> hand May deceue yo<sup>r</sup> eye, becauſe yõ know not by w<sup>ch</sup> ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword his blow wilcom
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| 7. Also see that he deceive you not upon any false offering to strike at the one side, & then thereby you have turned your point aside, then to strike on the other side, but if you keep distance you are free from that, therefore still in all your actions remember your governors.
 
| 7. Also see that he deceive you not upon any false offering to strike at the one side, & then thereby you have turned your point aside, then to strike on the other side, but if you keep distance you are free from that, therefore still in all your actions remember your governors.
 
| 7. Alſo ſe y<sup>t</sup> he deceue yõ not vpõ any falſe offerynge to ſtryke at the on ſyde, & when therby yõ haue turned yo<sup>r</sup> poynt aſyde, then to ſtrike on the other ſyde, but yf yõ kepe diſtance yõ are free from y<sup>t</sup>, therfore ſtyll in all yo<sup>r</sup> actions rememb<sup>r</sup> y gou<sup>r</sup>nors
 
| 7. Alſo ſe y<sup>t</sup> he deceue yõ not vpõ any falſe offerynge to ſtryke at the on ſyde, & when therby yõ haue turned yo<sup>r</sup> poynt aſyde, then to ſtrike on the other ſyde, but yf yõ kepe diſtance yõ are free from y<sup>t</sup>, therfore ſtyll in all yo<sup>r</sup> actions rememb<sup>r</sup> y gou<sup>r</sup>nors
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| 8. If he will do nothing but thrust, answer him as it is set down in the 16th ground of the short sword fight & also in diverse places of the 8th chapter.
 
| 8. If he will do nothing but thrust, answer him as it is set down in the 16th ground of the short sword fight & also in diverse places of the 8th chapter.
 
| 8. yf he wil do nothinge but thruſt, Anſwer him as it is ſet doune in the 16<sup>th </sup> ground of y<sup>e</sup> ſhort ſword fyght & alſo in div<sup>rs </sup> places of the 8<sup>th </sup> chapt<sup>r</sup>.
 
| 8. yf he wil do nothinge but thruſt, Anſwer him as it is ſet doune in the 16<sup>th </sup> ground of y<sup>e</sup> ſhort ſword fyght & alſo in div<sup>rs </sup> places of the 8<sup>th </sup> chapt<sup>r</sup>.
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| 9. Also consider if he lies at the thrust upon the Stocata or Passata, & you have no way to avoid him, except you can cross his sword blade with yours, & so indirect his point, therefore keep narrow space upon his point, & keep well your distance in using your traverses.
 
| 9. Also consider if he lies at the thrust upon the Stocata or Passata, & you have no way to avoid him, except you can cross his sword blade with yours, & so indirect his point, therefore keep narrow space upon his point, & keep well your distance in using your traverses.
 
| 9. Alſo conſyder yf he lye at the thruſt vpon y<sup>e</sup> ſtocata, or paſſata, & yõ haue no waye to avoyde him, except yõ can Croſſe his ſword blade w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>rs</sup>, & ſo Indirect his poynt, therfore kepe well yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance in vſing yo<sup>r</sup> travers.
 
| 9. Alſo conſyder yf he lye at the thruſt vpon y<sup>e</sup> ſtocata, or paſſata, & yõ haue no waye to avoyde him, except yõ can Croſſe his ſword blade w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>rs</sup>, & ſo Indirect his poynt, therfore kepe well yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance in vſing yo<sup>r</sup> travers.
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| But if he puts forth his point so that you may cross it with forehand ward, for if you watch for his thrust then lie upon forehand ward with point a little up if he lies with his pointed mounted, & if you single your thrust upon the outside of your sword to ward your right side, or back of your sword hand, strike or bear his point out towards your right side, & thereupon putting forward your body & left foot circularly toward his right side you may strike him upon his sword arm, head, face or body.
 
| But if he puts forth his point so that you may cross it with forehand ward, for if you watch for his thrust then lie upon forehand ward with point a little up if he lies with his pointed mounted, & if you single your thrust upon the outside of your sword to ward your right side, or back of your sword hand, strike or bear his point out towards your right side, & thereupon putting forward your body & left foot circularly toward his right side you may strike him upon his sword arm, head, face or body.
 
| but yf he put forth his poynt ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ may Croſs it w<sup>t</sup> fore hand ward, for yf yõ wacth for his thruſt then lye vpõ forehand ward w<sup>t</sup> poynt alittle vp. yf he lye w<sup>t</sup> his poynt Mounted, & yf yõ ſyngle yo<sup>r</sup> thruſt vpõ the out ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword hand, ſtrike or bere his poynt out towarde yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde, & ther vpon putting forward yo<sup>r</sup> body & left foote Circuler wyſe to warde his right ſyde yõ May ſtrike him vpõ his ſword Arme, hed, face or bodye.
 
| but yf he put forth his poynt ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ may Croſs it w<sup>t</sup> fore hand ward, for yf yõ wacth for his thruſt then lye vpõ forehand ward w<sup>t</sup> poynt alittle vp. yf he lye w<sup>t</sup> his poynt Mounted, & yf yõ ſyngle yo<sup>r</sup> thruſt vpõ the out ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword hand, ſtrike or bere his poynt out towarde yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde, & ther vpon putting forward yo<sup>r</sup> body & left foote Circuler wyſe to warde his right ſyde yõ May ſtrike him vpõ his ſword Arme, hed, face or bodye.
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| Or if you take it on the inside of your sword blade to ward your left side then with your sword put by his point strongly & suddenly towards your left side, drawing your left circularly back behind the heel of your right foot, & strike him on the inside of his sword hand or arm or on the head, face, or body, & fly out according to your governors.
 
| Or if you take it on the inside of your sword blade to ward your left side then with your sword put by his point strongly & suddenly towards your left side, drawing your left circularly back behind the heel of your right foot, & strike him on the inside of his sword hand or arm or on the head, face, or body, & fly out according to your governors.
 
| Or yf yõ take it on the Inſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword put by his poynt ſtrongly & ſodainly towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde, drawing yo<sup>r</sup> left foote Circuler wyſe back behind the heele of yo<sup>r</sup> right foote, & ſtrike him on the inſyde of his ſword hand orArme or on the hed, face, or body, & fly out accordinge to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors  
 
| Or yf yõ take it on the Inſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword put by his poynt ſtrongly & ſodainly towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde, drawing yo<sup>r</sup> left foote Circuler wyſe back behind the heele of yo<sup>r</sup> right foote, & ſtrike him on the inſyde of his ſword hand orArme or on the hed, face, or body, & fly out accordinge to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors  
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| This may you use against the sword & dagger long or short, or rapier & poniard, or sword & buckler.
 
| This may you use against the sword & dagger long or short, or rapier & poniard, or sword & buckler.
 
| This May yõ vſe againſt y<sup>e</sup> ſword & dagg<sup>r</sup> longe or ſhort, or rapior & poynard, or ſword & buckler.
 
| This May yõ vſe againſt y<sup>e</sup> ſword & dagg<sup>r</sup> longe or ſhort, or rapior & poynard, or ſword & buckler.
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| 10. Also remember if he has a long sword & you a short sword, ever to make your space too narrow, that you may always break his thrust before that be in force if possible you may, & also to keep large distance whether he charge you out of the Stocata, Passata, or Imbrocata, etc. Of this you may see more at large in the 8th chapter.
 
| 10. Also remember if he has a long sword & you a short sword, ever to make your space too narrow, that you may always break his thrust before that be in force if possible you may, & also to keep large distance whether he charge you out of the Stocata, Passata, or Imbrocata, etc. Of this you may see more at large in the 8th chapter.
 
| 10. Alſo rememb<sup>r</sup> yf he haue a longe ſword, & yõ a ſhort ſword, euer to Make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace ſo narrow, y<sup>t</sup> yõ may alwaies break his thruſt before y<sup>t</sup> be in force yf poſſible yõ may, & alſo to kepe large diſtance whether he charge yõ out of the Stocata, paſſata, or Imbrocata &c, of this yõ may ſe more at large in the 8<sup>th chapter</sup>.
 
| 10. Alſo rememb<sup>r</sup> yf he haue a longe ſword, & yõ a ſhort ſword, euer to Make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace ſo narrow, y<sup>t</sup> yõ may alwaies break his thruſt before y<sup>t</sup> be in force yf poſſible yõ may, & alſo to kepe large diſtance whether he charge yõ out of the Stocata, paſſata, or Imbrocata &c, of this yõ may ſe more at large in the 8<sup>th chapter</sup>.
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1. Yf he ſtrike aloft at the left ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed, and run in w<sup>t</sup> all to take the Cloze or grype of you, then ward it gardant, & enter in w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde putting in yo<sup>r</sup> left hand, on the inſyde of his ſword Arme, neere his hylte, bering yo<sup>r</sup> hand ou<sup>r</sup> his Arme, & Wrape in his hand &ſworde vnd<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> Arme, as he cometh in, Wreſting his hand & ſword cloſe to your bodye turninge back yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde from him, ſo ſhal he not be able to reach yo<sup>r</sup> ſword, but yõ ſhall ſtyll haue it at lybertye to ſtryke or thruſt him & endanger the breakinge of his Arme, or the takinge away of his ſword by y<sup>t</sup> grype.
 
1. Yf he ſtrike aloft at the left ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed, and run in w<sup>t</sup> all to take the Cloze or grype of you, then ward it gardant, & enter in w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde putting in yo<sup>r</sup> left hand, on the inſyde of his ſword Arme, neere his hylte, bering yo<sup>r</sup> hand ou<sup>r</sup> his Arme, & Wrape in his hand &ſworde vnd<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> Arme, as he cometh in, Wreſting his hand & ſword cloſe to your bodye turninge back yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde from him, ſo ſhal he not be able to reach yo<sup>r</sup> ſword, but yõ ſhall ſtyll haue it at lybertye to ſtryke or thruſt him & endanger the breakinge of his Arme, or the takinge away of his ſword by y<sup>t</sup> grype.
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| 2. If you are both crossed in the close fight upon the bastard guardant ward low(?), you may put your left hand on the outside of his sword at the back of his hand, near or at the hilt of his sword arm & take him on the inside of the arm with your hand, above his elbow is best, & draw him towards you strongly, wresting his knuckles downward & his elbow upwards so may endanger to break his arm, or cast him down, or to wrest his sword out of his hand, & go free yourself.
 
| 2. If you are both crossed in the close fight upon the bastard guardant ward low(?), you may put your left hand on the outside of his sword at the back of his hand, near or at the hilt of his sword arm & take him on the inside of the arm with your hand, above his elbow is best, & draw him towards you strongly, wresting his knuckles downward & his elbow upwards so may endanger to break his arm, or cast him down, or to wrest his sword out of his hand, & go free yourself.
 
| 2. Yf yõ are both Croſt in Cloſe fyght vpon the baſtard gardant ward alowe, yõ May put yo<sup>r</sup> left hand on the out ſyde of his ſword at the back of his hand, neere, or at the hylte of his ſword Arme & take him on the inſyde of y<sup>t</sup> arme w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand, aboue his elbowe is beſt, & draw him in towarde yõ ſtrongly, wreſtinge his knuckles dounewarde & his elbowe vpwarde ſo may yõ endang<sup>r</sup> to break his arme, or caſt him doune or to wreſt his ſword out of his hand, & go free yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf.
 
| 2. Yf yõ are both Croſt in Cloſe fyght vpon the baſtard gardant ward alowe, yõ May put yo<sup>r</sup> left hand on the out ſyde of his ſword at the back of his hand, neere, or at the hylte of his ſword Arme & take him on the inſyde of y<sup>t</sup> arme w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand, aboue his elbowe is beſt, & draw him in towarde yõ ſtrongly, wreſtinge his knuckles dounewarde & his elbowe vpwarde ſo may yõ endang<sup>r</sup> to break his arme, or caſt him doune or to wreſt his ſword out of his hand, & go free yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf.
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| 3. In like sort upon this kind of close, you may clap your left hand upon the wrist of his sword arm, holding it strongly & therewith thrust him hard from you, & presently you may thrust him in the body with your sword for in that instant he can neither ward, strike, nor thrust.
 
| 3. In like sort upon this kind of close, you may clap your left hand upon the wrist of his sword arm, holding it strongly & therewith thrust him hard from you, & presently you may thrust him in the body with your sword for in that instant he can neither ward, strike, nor thrust.
 
| 3. in like ſort vpõ this kynd of cloze, yõ may clape yo<sup>r</sup> left hand vpõ the wriſt of his ſword arme, holding it ſtrongly & ther w<sup>t</sup> thruſt him hard from yõ, & p<sup>r</sup>ſently yõ may thruſt him in the body w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword for in y<sup>t</sup> Inſtant he can nether ward, ſtrike, nor thruſt,
 
| 3. in like ſort vpõ this kynd of cloze, yõ may clape yo<sup>r</sup> left hand vpõ the wriſt of his ſword arme, holding it ſtrongly & ther w<sup>t</sup> thruſt him hard from yõ, & p<sup>r</sup>ſently yõ may thruſt him in the body w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword for in y<sup>t</sup> Inſtant he can nether ward, ſtrike, nor thruſt,
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| 4. If he strike home at the left side of your head, & there withal come in to take the close or grip of your hilt or sword arm with his left hand, first ward his blow guardant, & be sure to put in your left hand under your sword & take hold on the outside of his left hand, arm or sleeve, putting your hand under the wrist of his arm with the top of your fingers upward, & your thumb & knuckles downward, then pluck him strongly towards your left side, so shall you indirect his feet, turning his left shoulder toward you, upon which instant you may strike or thrust him with your sword & fly out safe, for his feet being indirected, although he has his sword at liberty, yet shall he be not able to make any offensive fight against you because his time will be too long to direct his feet again to use his sword in due time.
 
| 4. If he strike home at the left side of your head, & there withal come in to take the close or grip of your hilt or sword arm with his left hand, first ward his blow guardant, & be sure to put in your left hand under your sword & take hold on the outside of his left hand, arm or sleeve, putting your hand under the wrist of his arm with the top of your fingers upward, & your thumb & knuckles downward, then pluck him strongly towards your left side, so shall you indirect his feet, turning his left shoulder toward you, upon which instant you may strike or thrust him with your sword & fly out safe, for his feet being indirected, although he has his sword at liberty, yet shall he be not able to make any offensive fight against you because his time will be too long to direct his feet again to use his sword in due time.
 
| 4. yf he ſtrike home at the left ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed, & ther w<sup>t</sup> all com in to take the cloze or grype of your hilt of ſword arme w<sup>t</sup> his left hand, firſt ward his blow gardant, & be ſure to put in yo<sup>r</sup> left hand und<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & take hold on the out ſyde of his left hand, Arme orſleve, putting yo<sup>r</sup> hand vnder the wrist of his Arme w<sup>t</sup> the toppe of yo<sup>r</sup> fing<sup>rs</sup> vpwarde, & yo<sup>r</sup> thumb & knuckles dounewarde, then pluck him ſtrongly towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde, ſo ſhal yõ indirect his feet turning hys left ſhould<sup>r</sup> towarde yõ, vpõ w<sup>ch</sup> inſtant yõ Mayeſtrike or thruſt him w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & fly out ſaf, for his feet being indirected, although he hath his ſword at lyberty, yet ſhal he not be able to Make any offencyve fight againſt yõ becauſe his tyme wilbe to longe to direct his feet againe to vſe his ſword in due tyme.
 
| 4. yf he ſtrike home at the left ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed, & ther w<sup>t</sup> all com in to take the cloze or grype of your hilt of ſword arme w<sup>t</sup> his left hand, firſt ward his blow gardant, & be ſure to put in yo<sup>r</sup> left hand und<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & take hold on the out ſyde of his left hand, Arme orſleve, putting yo<sup>r</sup> hand vnder the wrist of his Arme w<sup>t</sup> the toppe of yo<sup>r</sup> fing<sup>rs</sup> vpwarde, & yo<sup>r</sup> thumb & knuckles dounewarde, then pluck him ſtrongly towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde, ſo ſhal yõ indirect his feet turning hys left ſhould<sup>r</sup> towarde yõ, vpõ w<sup>ch</sup> inſtant yõ Mayeſtrike or thruſt him w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & fly out ſaf, for his feet being indirected, although he hath his ſword at lyberty, yet ſhal he not be able to Make any offencyve fight againſt yõ becauſe his tyme wilbe to longe to direct his feet againe to vſe his ſword in due tyme.
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| 5. Also if he attempts to close or grip with you upon his bastard guardant ward, then cross his sword with the like ward, & as he comes in with his feet you have the time of your hand & body, whereby with your left hand or arm you may put by his sword blade, which thing you must suddenly & strongly do, casting it towards your left side, so may you uncross & thrust him in the body with your sword & fly out instantly, for if you stay there he will direct his sword again & endanger you, this may safely be done, or you may uncross & turn your point up, & strike him on the head, & fly out instantly.
 
| 5. Also if he attempts to close or grip with you upon his bastard guardant ward, then cross his sword with the like ward, & as he comes in with his feet you have the time of your hand & body, whereby with your left hand or arm you may put by his sword blade, which thing you must suddenly & strongly do, casting it towards your left side, so may you uncross & thrust him in the body with your sword & fly out instantly, for if you stay there he will direct his sword again & endanger you, this may safely be done, or you may uncross & turn your point up, & strike him on the head, & fly out instantly.
 
| 5. Alſo yf he attempt the cloze or grype w<sup>t</sup> you vpon his baſtard gardant ward, then croſſe his ſword w<sup>t</sup> the lyke ward, & as he cometh in w<sup>t</sup> his feet you haue the tyme of yo<sup>r</sup> hand & bodye, wherby w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> left hand or Arme yõ May put by his ſword blade, w<sup>ch</sup> thingeyou muſt ſodainly & ſtrongly do, caſting it towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde ſo may yõ uncroſſe & thruſt him in y<sup>e</sup> body w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & fly out inſtantlye, for yf yõ ſtay ther he wil direct his ſword againe & endanger yõ, this may ſafly be don, or yõ May vncroſſe & turne yo<sup>r</sup>poynt vp, & ſtrike him on the hed, & fly out inſtantly.
 
| 5. Alſo yf he attempt the cloze or grype w<sup>t</sup> you vpon his baſtard gardant ward, then croſſe his ſword w<sup>t</sup> the lyke ward, & as he cometh in w<sup>t</sup> his feet you haue the tyme of yo<sup>r</sup> hand & bodye, wherby w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> left hand or Arme yõ May put by his ſword blade, w<sup>ch</sup> thingeyou muſt ſodainly & ſtrongly do, caſting it towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde ſo may yõ uncroſſe & thruſt him in y<sup>e</sup> body w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & fly out inſtantlye, for yf yõ ſtay ther he wil direct his ſword againe & endanger yõ, this may ſafly be don, or yõ May vncroſſe & turne yo<sup>r</sup>poynt vp, & ſtrike him on the hed, & fly out inſtantly.
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| 6. If he presses in to the half-sword upon a forehand ward, then strike a sound blow at the left side of his head turning strongly your hand & hilt pressing down his sword hand & arm strongly, & strike your hilt full in his face, bearing your hilt strongly upon him, for your hand being uppermost you have the advantage of the grip, for so may you break his face with your hilt, & strike up his heels with your left foot, and throw him a great fall, all this may safely be done by reason that he is weak in his coming in by that moving of his feet, & you repel him in the fullness of your strength, as appears in the chapter of the short single sword fight, in the 23rd ground of the same.
 
| 6. If he presses in to the half-sword upon a forehand ward, then strike a sound blow at the left side of his head turning strongly your hand & hilt pressing down his sword hand & arm strongly, & strike your hilt full in his face, bearing your hilt strongly upon him, for your hand being uppermost you have the advantage of the grip, for so may you break his face with your hilt, & strike up his heels with your left foot, and throw him a great fall, all this may safely be done by reason that he is weak in his coming in by that moving of his feet, & you repel him in the fullness of your strength, as appears in the chapter of the short single sword fight, in the 23rd ground of the same.
 
| 6. Yf he preſſe in to the half ſword vpõ a forehand ward, then ſtrike a ſound blow at the left ſyde of his hed turnyng ſtrongely yo<sup>r</sup> hand & hylt preſſing doun his ſword hand & arme ſtrongly, & ſtrike yo<sup>r</sup> hilt full in his face, beringe yo<sup>r</sup> hilt ſtrongly vpõ him, for yo<sup>r</sup> handbeinge vpp<sup>r</sup>moſt yõ haue the aduantage in y<sup>t</sup> grype, for ſo May yõ breake his face w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hylt, & ſtrike vp his heels w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> left foote, and throwe him a great fall, al this May ſafly be don by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> he is weake in his cõmynge in by y<sup>t</sup> moving of his feet, & yõrepell him in y<sup>e</sup> fulnes of yo<sup>r</sup> ſtrength, as appeareth in the Chapter of y<sup>e</sup> ſhort ſingle ſword fyght, in the 23<sup>rd</sup> grownde of the ſame,
 
| 6. Yf he preſſe in to the half ſword vpõ a forehand ward, then ſtrike a ſound blow at the left ſyde of his hed turnyng ſtrongely yo<sup>r</sup> hand & hylt preſſing doun his ſword hand & arme ſtrongly, & ſtrike yo<sup>r</sup> hilt full in his face, beringe yo<sup>r</sup> hilt ſtrongly vpõ him, for yo<sup>r</sup> handbeinge vpp<sup>r</sup>moſt yõ haue the aduantage in y<sup>t</sup> grype, for ſo May yõ breake his face w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hylt, & ſtrike vp his heels w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> left foote, and throwe him a great fall, al this May ſafly be don by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> he is weake in his cõmynge in by y<sup>t</sup> moving of his feet, & yõrepell him in y<sup>e</sup> fulnes of yo<sup>r</sup> ſtrength, as appeareth in the Chapter of y<sup>e</sup> ſhort ſingle ſword fyght, in the 23<sup>rd</sup> grownde of the ſame,
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| 7. Remember that you never attempt the close nor grip but look to his slip, consider what is said in the 8th general rule in the second chapter, & also in the 26th ground of the single sword fight in the 4th chapter.
 
| 7. Remember that you never attempt the close nor grip but look to his slip, consider what is said in the 8th general rule in the second chapter, & also in the 26th ground of the single sword fight in the 4th chapter.
 
| 7. remember that yõ neu<sup>r</sup> attempt the Cloſe nor grype but looke to his ſlyppe, Conſyder what is said in the 8<sup>th</sup> gen<sup>r</sup>all rule in the Second Chapter, & alſo in the 26<sup>th</sup> ground of the ſyngle ſword fyght in the 4<sup>th</sup> Chapter.
 
| 7. remember that yõ neu<sup>r</sup> attempt the Cloſe nor grype but looke to his ſlyppe, Conſyder what is said in the 8<sup>th</sup> gen<sup>r</sup>all rule in the Second Chapter, & alſo in the 26<sup>th</sup> ground of the ſyngle ſword fyght in the 4<sup>th</sup> Chapter.
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1. Obsrve at theſe weapons the form<sup>r</sup> rules, defend w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & not w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, yet yõ may croſs his ſword w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, yf yõ may conveniently reach the ſame therw<sup>t</sup>, w<sup>t</sup> out puttinge in of yo<sup>r</sup> foote, only by bendinge in of yo<sup>r</sup> body, other wyſe yo<sup>r</sup> tyme wilbeto longe, & this tyme wilbe ſufficient to diſplace his owne, ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ ſhal not hyt it w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, & ſo he may make a thruſt vpon yõ, this tyme y<sup>t</sup> I here Meane, of puttinge by of his ſword is, When he lyeth out ſpent w<sup>t</sup> his ſword poynt towarde you, & not elſe, w<sup>ch</sup>thinge yf yõ can do w<sup>t</sup>out puttinge in of yo<sup>t</sup> foote, then yõ may vſe yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, & ſtrike ſtrongly & ſodainlye his ſword poynt ther w<sup>t</sup> ſtrike or thruſt at him w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword,
 
1. Obsrve at theſe weapons the form<sup>r</sup> rules, defend w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & not w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, yet yõ may croſs his ſword w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, yf yõ may conveniently reach the ſame therw<sup>t</sup>, w<sup>t</sup> out puttinge in of yo<sup>r</sup> foote, only by bendinge in of yo<sup>r</sup> body, other wyſe yo<sup>r</sup> tyme wilbeto longe, & this tyme wilbe ſufficient to diſplace his owne, ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ ſhal not hyt it w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, & ſo he may make a thruſt vpon yõ, this tyme y<sup>t</sup> I here Meane, of puttinge by of his ſword is, When he lyeth out ſpent w<sup>t</sup> his ſword poynt towarde you, & not elſe, w<sup>ch</sup>thinge yf yõ can do w<sup>t</sup>out puttinge in of yo<sup>t</sup> foote, then yõ may vſe yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, & ſtrike ſtrongly & ſodainlye his ſword poynt ther w<sup>t</sup> ſtrike or thruſt at him w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword,
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| 2. Also you may put by his sword blade with your dagger when your swords are crossed, either above at forehand ward, or below at the bastard guardant ward & therewith instantly strike or thrust with your sword & fly out according to your governors, of this you may see more at large in the chapter of the single sword fight in the 24th ground of the same.
 
| 2. Also you may put by his sword blade with your dagger when your swords are crossed, either above at forehand ward, or below at the bastard guardant ward & therewith instantly strike or thrust with your sword & fly out according to your governors, of this you may see more at large in the chapter of the single sword fight in the 24th ground of the same.
 
| 2. Alſo yõ may put by his ſword blade w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup> When yo<sup>r</sup> ſwords are Croſt, eyther aboue at forehand ward, or belowe at the baſtard gardant ward & ther w<sup>t</sup> inſtantly ſtrike or thruſt w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & fly out accordinge to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors, of this yõ may ſee more at large in y<sup>e</sup> Chapter of the ſyngle ſword fyght in the 24<sup>t</sup>h ground of the ſame.
 
| 2. Alſo yõ may put by his ſword blade w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup> When yo<sup>r</sup> ſwords are Croſt, eyther aboue at forehand ward, or belowe at the baſtard gardant ward & ther w<sup>t</sup> inſtantly ſtrike or thruſt w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & fly out accordinge to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors, of this yõ may ſee more at large in y<sup>e</sup> Chapter of the ſyngle ſword fyght in the 24<sup>t</sup>h ground of the ſame.
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| 3. Also if he is so foolhardy to come to the close, then you may guard with your sword & stab with your dagger, & fly out safe, which thing you may do because his time is too long by the number of his feet, & you have but the swift time of your hand to use, & he cannot stab 'til he has setted in his feet, & so his time is to late to endanger you or to defend himself.
 
| 3. Also if he is so foolhardy to come to the close, then you may guard with your sword & stab with your dagger, & fly out safe, which thing you may do because his time is too long by the number of his feet, & you have but the swift time of your hand to use, & he cannot stab 'til he has setted in his feet, & so his time is to late to endanger you or to defend himself.
 
| 3. Alſo yf he be ſo foolehardye to com to the cloze, then yõ may gard w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & stabb w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, & fly out ſaf, w<sup>ch</sup> thinge yõ may do because his tyme is to longe by the numb<sup>r</sup> of his feet, & yõ haue but the ſwyft tyme of yo<sup>r</sup> hand to uſe, & he cannot stabbtil he haue ſetted in his feete, & ſo his time is to late to endang<sup>r</sup> yõ, or to defend himſelf.
 
| 3. Alſo yf he be ſo foolehardye to com to the cloze, then yõ may gard w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & stabb w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, & fly out ſaf, w<sup>ch</sup> thinge yõ may do because his tyme is to longe by the numb<sup>r</sup> of his feet, & yõ haue but the ſwyft tyme of yo<sup>r</sup> hand to uſe, & he cannot stabbtil he haue ſetted in his feete, & ſo his time is to late to endang<sup>r</sup> yõ, or to defend himſelf.
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| 4. Know that if you defend yourself with your dagger in other sort than is aforesaid, you shall be in danger to be hurt, because the space of your dagger will be still too wide to defend both blow & thrust for lack of circumference as the buckler has.
 
| 4. Know that if you defend yourself with your dagger in other sort than is aforesaid, you shall be in danger to be hurt, because the space of your dagger will be still too wide to defend both blow & thrust for lack of circumference as the buckler has.
 
| 4. Know y<sup>t</sup> yf yõ defend yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>r</sup> dagger in other ſort than is aforesaid, yõ shalbe endang<sup>r</sup> to be hurt, because the ſpace of yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup> wilbe ſtill to wyde to defend both blow & thruſt for lacke of Circomference as y<sup>e</sup> buckler hath.
 
| 4. Know y<sup>t</sup> yf yõ defend yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>r</sup> dagger in other ſort than is aforesaid, yõ shalbe endang<sup>r</sup> to be hurt, because the ſpace of yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup> wilbe ſtill to wyde to defend both blow & thruſt for lacke of Circomference as y<sup>e</sup> buckler hath.
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| 5. Also note when you defend blow & thrust with your sword, you have a nearer course to offend your enemy with your sword than when you ward with your dagger, for then you may for the most part from your ward strike or thrust him.
 
| 5. Also note when you defend blow & thrust with your sword, you have a nearer course to offend your enemy with your sword than when you ward with your dagger, for then you may for the most part from your ward strike or thrust him.
 
| 5. Alſo note when yõ defend blow & thruſt w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword yõ haue a neerer courſe to offend yo<sup>r</sup> enemye w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword then when yõ ward w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, for then yõ may for the moſt prte from yo<sup>r</sup> warde ſtrike or thruſt him.
 
| 5. Alſo note when yõ defend blow & thruſt w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword yõ haue a neerer courſe to offend yo<sup>r</sup> enemye w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword then when yõ ward w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, for then yõ may for the moſt prte from yo<sup>r</sup> warde ſtrike or thruſt him.
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| 6. You must neither close nor come to the grip at these weapons, unless it is by the slow motion or disorder of your adversary, yet if he attempts to close, or to come to the grip with you, then you may safely close & hurt him with your dagger or buckler & go free yourself, but fly out according to your governors & thereby you shall put him from his attempted close, but see you stay not at any time within distance, but in due time fly back or hazard to be hurt, because the swift motion of the hand being within distance will deceive the eye, whereby you shall not be able to judge in due time to make a true ward, of this you may see more in the chapter of the back sword fight in the 12th ground of the same.
 
| 6. You must neither close nor come to the grip at these weapons, unless it is by the slow motion or disorder of your adversary, yet if he attempts to close, or to come to the grip with you, then you may safely close & hurt him with your dagger or buckler & go free yourself, but fly out according to your governors & thereby you shall put him from his attempted close, but see you stay not at any time within distance, but in due time fly back or hazard to be hurt, because the swift motion of the hand being within distance will deceive the eye, whereby you shall not be able to judge in due time to make a true ward, of this you may see more in the chapter of the back sword fight in the 12th ground of the same.
 
| 6. Yõ muſt neyther Cloze nor com to the grype at theſe weapons, vnleſs it be by the ſlow motyon or diſordour of yo<sup>r</sup> adv<sup>r</sup>ſarie, yet yf he attempt y<sup>e</sup> Cloze, or to com to the grype w<sup>t</sup> yõ, then yõ may ſafly Cloze & hurt him w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup> or buckler & go free yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf, but fly out according to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors & ther by yõ ſhal put him from his attempted Cloze, but ſe yõ ſtay not at any tyme w<sup>t</sup>in diſtance, but in due tyme fly back or hazard to be hurt, becauſe y<sup>e</sup> ſwyft motion of the hand being w<sup>t</sup>in diſtance will deceue the eye, wher byyõ ſhall not be able to Judge in due tyme to make a true ward, of this yõ may ſe in the chapter of the back ſword fyght in the 12<sup>th</sup> ground of the ſame.
 
| 6. Yõ muſt neyther Cloze nor com to the grype at theſe weapons, vnleſs it be by the ſlow motyon or diſordour of yo<sup>r</sup> adv<sup>r</sup>ſarie, yet yf he attempt y<sup>e</sup> Cloze, or to com to the grype w<sup>t</sup> yõ, then yõ may ſafly Cloze & hurt him w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup> or buckler & go free yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf, but fly out according to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors & ther by yõ ſhal put him from his attempted Cloze, but ſe yõ ſtay not at any tyme w<sup>t</sup>in diſtance, but in due tyme fly back or hazard to be hurt, becauſe y<sup>e</sup> ſwyft motion of the hand being w<sup>t</sup>in diſtance will deceue the eye, wher byyõ ſhall not be able to Judge in due tyme to make a true ward, of this yõ may ſe in the chapter of the back ſword fyght in the 12<sup>th</sup> ground of the ſame.
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| 7. If he extends forth his dagger hand you may make your fight the same, remembering to keep your distance & to fly back according to your governors. Every fight & ward with these weapons, made out of any kind of fight, must be made & done according as is taught in the back sword fight, but only that the dagger must be used as is above said, instead of the grip.
 
| 7. If he extends forth his dagger hand you may make your fight the same, remembering to keep your distance & to fly back according to your governors. Every fight & ward with these weapons, made out of any kind of fight, must be made & done according as is taught in the back sword fight, but only that the dagger must be used as is above said, instead of the grip.
 
| 7. yf he extend forth his dagg<sup>r</sup> hand yõ may make yo<sup>r</sup> fyght at the ſame, remembring to kepe diſtance & to fly back according to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors. Every fight & ward w<sup>t</sup> theſe weapons, made out of any kynd of fyght, must be made & don according as is taught in the back ſword fyght, but only y<sup>t</sup> the dagg<sup>r</sup> muſt be vſed as is abouſaid, in steed of the grype.
 
| 7. yf he extend forth his dagg<sup>r</sup> hand yõ may make yo<sup>r</sup> fyght at the ſame, remembring to kepe diſtance & to fly back according to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors. Every fight & ward w<sup>t</sup> theſe weapons, made out of any kynd of fyght, must be made & don according as is taught in the back ſword fyght, but only y<sup>t</sup> the dagg<sup>r</sup> muſt be vſed as is abouſaid, in steed of the grype.
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| 8. If he lies bent upon his Stocata with his sword or rapier point behind his dagger so you cannot reach the same without putting in your foot, then make all your fight at his dagger hand, so that you may cross his sword blade with yours, then make narrow space upon him with your point & suddenly & strongly strike or bear his point towards his right side, indirecting the same, & instantly strike or thrust him on the head, face arm or body, & fly back therewith out of distance still remembering your governors.
 
| 8. If he lies bent upon his Stocata with his sword or rapier point behind his dagger so you cannot reach the same without putting in your foot, then make all your fight at his dagger hand, so that you may cross his sword blade with yours, then make narrow space upon him with your point & suddenly & strongly strike or bear his point towards his right side, indirecting the same, & instantly strike or thrust him on the head, face arm or body, & fly back therewith out of distance still remembering your governors.
 
| 8. yf he lye bent vpõ his Stocata w<sup>t</sup> his ſworde or rapior poynt behind his dagg<sup>r</sup> ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ cannot reach the ſame w<sup>t</sup>out putting in of yo<sup>r</sup> foote, then make al yo<sup>r</sup> fight at his dagg<sup>r</sup> hand, euer remembring yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors, & then yf he draw in his dagg<sup>r</sup> hand, ſo that yõ mayCroſe his ſworde blade w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>rs</sup>, then make narrow ſpace vpõ him w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt & ſodainly & strongely ſtryke or bere his poynt towarde his right ſyde, indirecting the ſame, & inſtantly ſtrike or thruſt him on the hed, face, Arme, or body, & fly back ther w<sup>t</sup> out of diſtance ſtil remembring yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors.
 
| 8. yf he lye bent vpõ his Stocata w<sup>t</sup> his ſworde or rapior poynt behind his dagg<sup>r</sup> ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ cannot reach the ſame w<sup>t</sup>out putting in of yo<sup>r</sup> foote, then make al yo<sup>r</sup> fight at his dagg<sup>r</sup> hand, euer remembring yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors, & then yf he draw in his dagg<sup>r</sup> hand, ſo that yõ mayCroſe his ſworde blade w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>rs</sup>, then make narrow ſpace vpõ him w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt & ſodainly & strongely ſtryke or bere his poynt towarde his right ſyde, indirecting the ſame, & inſtantly ſtrike or thruſt him on the hed, face, Arme, or body, & fly back ther w<sup>t</sup> out of diſtance ſtil remembring yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors.
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| 9. If he lies spent upon his variable fight then keep your distance & make your space narrow upon him, 'til you may cross his sword or rapier point with your sword point, whereupon, you having won or gained the place, strike or thrust instantly.
 
| 9. If he lies spent upon his variable fight then keep your distance & make your space narrow upon him, 'til you may cross his sword or rapier point with your sword point, whereupon, you having won or gained the place, strike or thrust instantly.
 
| 9. yf he lye ſpent vpõ his variable fyght then kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance & make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow vpõ him, til yõ may Croſſe his ſword or rapior point w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword poynt, wher vpon, yõ having won or gayned the place, ſtrike or thruſt inſtantly.
 
| 9. yf he lye ſpent vpõ his variable fyght then kepe yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance & make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow vpõ him, til yõ may Croſſe his ſword or rapior point w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword poynt, wher vpon, yõ having won or gayned the place, ſtrike or thruſt inſtantly.
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| 10. If he lies bent or spent upon the Imbrocata bear up your point, & make your space narrow & do the like.
 
| 10. If he lies bent or spent upon the Imbrocata bear up your point, & make your space narrow & do the like.
 
| 10. yf he lye bent or ſpent vpõ the Imbrocata bere vp yo<sup>r</sup> point, & make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow & do the lyke.
 
| 10. yf he lye bent or ſpent vpõ the Imbrocata bere vp yo<sup>r</sup> point, & make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow & do the lyke.
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1. YF yõ haue the ſhort ſword & dagg<sup>r</sup>, defend w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & not w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, except yõ haue a gautlet or hylt vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> dagger hand, then yõ may ward vpon the dubble w<sup>t</sup> the poynt of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword towarde his face.
 
1. YF yõ haue the ſhort ſword & dagg<sup>r</sup>, defend w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & not w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, except yõ haue a gautlet or hylt vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> dagger hand, then yõ may ward vpon the dubble w<sup>t</sup> the poynt of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword towarde his face.
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| 2. Lie not aloft with your short sword if he lies low variable upon the Stocata or Passata, etc., for then your space will be too wide to make a true cross in due time, or too far in his course to make your space narrow, which space take heed to make very narrow, yes, so that if it touches his blade, it is better.
 
| 2. Lie not aloft with your short sword if he lies low variable upon the Stocata or Passata, etc., for then your space will be too wide to make a true cross in due time, or too far in his course to make your space narrow, which space take heed to make very narrow, yes, so that if it touches his blade, it is better.
 
| 2. Lye not aloft w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſhort ſword yf he lye alowe variable on the Stocata or passata &c, for then ſpace wilbe to wyde to make a true Croſe in due tyme, or to farr in his courſe to make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow, the w<sup>ch</sup> ſpace take heede yõ make very narrow, yea, ſo y<sup>t</sup> yf it touch his blade, it is better.
 
| 2. Lye not aloft w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſhort ſword yf he lye alowe variable on the Stocata or passata &c, for then ſpace wilbe to wyde to make a true Croſe in due tyme, or to farr in his courſe to make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow, the w<sup>ch</sup> ſpace take heede yõ make very narrow, yea, ſo y<sup>t</sup> yf it touch his blade, it is better.
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| 3. I say make your space narrow until you can cross his sword blade strongly & suddenly, so shall you put by his point out of the right line, & instantly strike or thrust, & slip back according to your governors. But take heed unless you can surely & safely cross go not in, but although you can so cross, & thereupon you enter in, stay no by it but fly out according to your governors.
 
| 3. I say make your space narrow until you can cross his sword blade strongly & suddenly, so shall you put by his point out of the right line, & instantly strike or thrust, & slip back according to your governors. But take heed unless you can surely & safely cross go not in, but although you can so cross, & thereupon you enter in, stay no by it but fly out according to your governors.
 
| 3. I ſay make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow vntil yõ can croſe his ſword blade ſtrongly & ſodainly, ſo ſhal you put by his point out of the right lyne, & inſtantly ſtrike or thruſt, & ſlyp back according to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors, but take heede unleſs yõ can ſurely & ſafly croſe go not in, but although yõ can ſo croſe, & ther vpon yõ enter in, ſtay not by yt but fly out according to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors,
 
| 3. I ſay make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow vntil yõ can croſe his ſword blade ſtrongly & ſodainly, ſo ſhal you put by his point out of the right lyne, & inſtantly ſtrike or thruſt, & ſlyp back according to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors, but take heede unleſs yõ can ſurely & ſafly croſe go not in, but although yõ can ſo croſe, & ther vpon yõ enter in, ſtay not by yt but fly out according to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors,
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| 4. If with his long sword or rapier he charges you aloft out of his open or true guardant fight, striking at the right side of your head, if you have a gauntlet or closed hilt upon your dagger hand, then ward it double with forehand ward, bearing your sword hilt to ward your right shoulder, with your knuckles upward & your sword point to ward the right side of his breast or shoulder, crossing your dagger on your sword blade, resting it there upon the higher side of your sword bearing both your hilts close together with your dagger hilt a little behind your sword bearing both your hands right out together spent or very near spent when you ward his blow, meeting him so upon your ward that his blow may light at your half sword or within, so that his blade may slide from your sword & rest with your dagger, at which instant time thrust forth your point at his breast & fly out instantly, so shall you continually endanger him & go safe yourself.
 
| 4. If with his long sword or rapier he charges you aloft out of his open or true guardant fight, striking at the right side of your head, if you have a gauntlet or closed hilt upon your dagger hand, then ward it double with forehand ward, bearing your sword hilt to ward your right shoulder, with your knuckles upward & your sword point to ward the right side of his breast or shoulder, crossing your dagger on your sword blade, resting it there upon the higher side of your sword bearing both your hilts close together with your dagger hilt a little behind your sword bearing both your hands right out together spent or very near spent when you ward his blow, meeting him so upon your ward that his blow may light at your half sword or within, so that his blade may slide from your sword & rest with your dagger, at which instant time thrust forth your point at his breast & fly out instantly, so shall you continually endanger him & go safe yourself.
 
| 4. yf w<sup>t</sup> his longe ſword or rapior he charge you aloft out of his open or true gardant fyght strykyng at the right ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed, yf yõ haue a gautlet or cloſe hylt vpon yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup> hand then ward it dubble w<sup>t</sup> forehand ward, bering yo<sup>r</sup> ſword hylt to warde yo<sup>r</sup> right ſhould<sup>r</sup>, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles upwarde & yo<sup>r</sup> ſword poynt to warde the right ſyde of his brest or sholder, croſſing yo<sup>r</sup> dagger on yo<sup>r</sup> ſword blade reſting y<sup>t</sup> ther on vpon y<sup>e</sup> hyer ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword beringe yo<sup>r</sup> hylts cloſe together w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagger hilt a little behind yo<sup>r</sup>ſword hilt bering both yo<sup>r</sup> hands right out together ſpent or verye neere ſpent when yõ ward his blowe, Meetinge him ſo vpon yo<sup>r</sup> ward that his blow may light at yo<sup>r</sup> half ſword or w<sup>t</sup>in, ſo that his blade may ſlyde from yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & reſt on yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, at w<sup>ch</sup> inſtanttyme thruſt forth yo<sup>r</sup> poynt at his breſt & fly out inſtantly, ſo ſhal yõ cõtynually endanger him & go ſaf yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf.
 
| 4. yf w<sup>t</sup> his longe ſword or rapior he charge you aloft out of his open or true gardant fyght strykyng at the right ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed, yf yõ haue a gautlet or cloſe hylt vpon yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup> hand then ward it dubble w<sup>t</sup> forehand ward, bering yo<sup>r</sup> ſword hylt to warde yo<sup>r</sup> right ſhould<sup>r</sup>, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles upwarde & yo<sup>r</sup> ſword poynt to warde the right ſyde of his brest or sholder, croſſing yo<sup>r</sup> dagger on yo<sup>r</sup> ſword blade reſting y<sup>t</sup> ther on vpon y<sup>e</sup> hyer ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword beringe yo<sup>r</sup> hylts cloſe together w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagger hilt a little behind yo<sup>r</sup>ſword hilt bering both yo<sup>r</sup> hands right out together ſpent or verye neere ſpent when yõ ward his blowe, Meetinge him ſo vpon yo<sup>r</sup> ward that his blow may light at yo<sup>r</sup> half ſword or w<sup>t</sup>in, ſo that his blade may ſlyde from yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & reſt on yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, at w<sup>ch</sup> inſtanttyme thruſt forth yo<sup>r</sup> poynt at his breſt & fly out inſtantly, ſo ſhal yõ cõtynually endanger him & go ſaf yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf.
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| 5. If he strikes a loft at the left side of your head, ward as aforesaid, bearing your sword hilt towards your left shoulder with your knuckles downward, & your sword point towards the left side of his breast or shoulder, bowing your body & head a little towards him, & remember to bear your ward to both sides that he strike you not upon the head, then upon his blow meet his sword as aforesaid with your dagger crossed over your sword blade as before, when his sword by reason of his blow upon your sword shall slide down & rest upon your dagger, then suddenly cast his sword blade out toward your left side with your dagger, to indirect his point, & therewith thrust at his breast from your ward & fly out instantly, the like may you do if his sword glance out from yours, upon his blow. All this may safely be done with the short sword & closed hilted dagger or gauntlet.
 
| 5. If he strikes a loft at the left side of your head, ward as aforesaid, bearing your sword hilt towards your left shoulder with your knuckles downward, & your sword point towards the left side of his breast or shoulder, bowing your body & head a little towards him, & remember to bear your ward to both sides that he strike you not upon the head, then upon his blow meet his sword as aforesaid with your dagger crossed over your sword blade as before, when his sword by reason of his blow upon your sword shall slide down & rest upon your dagger, then suddenly cast his sword blade out toward your left side with your dagger, to indirect his point, & therewith thrust at his breast from your ward & fly out instantly, the like may you do if his sword glance out from yours, upon his blow. All this may safely be done with the short sword & closed hilted dagger or gauntlet.
 
| 5. Yf he ſtrike a loft at the left ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed, ward as aforesaid, bering yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles doun warde, & yo<sup>r</sup> ſword poynt towarde the left ſyde of his brest or shold<sup>r</sup>, bowing yo<sup>r</sup> body & hed a little forewarde towarde him, & rememb<sup>r</sup> to bere yo<sup>r</sup> warde on both ſyds y<sup>t</sup> he ſtrike you not vpon the hed, then vpõ his blow meet his ſword as is aforesaid w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagger croſt ou<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword blade as before, & when his ſword by reason of his blowe vpon yo<sup>r</sup> ſword ſhal ſlyde doune & resft vpon yo<sup>r</sup> dagger, then ſodainly caſt his ſword blade out to warde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagger, to indirect his point, & ther w<sup>t</sup> thruſt at his breſt frõ yo<sup>r</sup> ward & fly out inſtantly, the like may you do yf his ſword glance out frõ yo<sup>rs</sup>, vpõ his blowe. al this may ſafly be don w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> ſhort ſword & cloſe hylted dagger or gautlet
 
| 5. Yf he ſtrike a loft at the left ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed, ward as aforesaid, bering yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles doun warde, & yo<sup>r</sup> ſword poynt towarde the left ſyde of his brest or shold<sup>r</sup>, bowing yo<sup>r</sup> body & hed a little forewarde towarde him, & rememb<sup>r</sup> to bere yo<sup>r</sup> warde on both ſyds y<sup>t</sup> he ſtrike you not vpon the hed, then vpõ his blow meet his ſword as is aforesaid w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagger croſt ou<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword blade as before, & when his ſword by reason of his blowe vpon yo<sup>r</sup> ſword ſhal ſlyde doune & resft vpon yo<sup>r</sup> dagger, then ſodainly caſt his ſword blade out to warde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> dagger, to indirect his point, & ther w<sup>t</sup> thruſt at his breſt frõ yo<sup>r</sup> ward & fly out inſtantly, the like may you do yf his ſword glance out frõ yo<sup>rs</sup>, vpõ his blowe. al this may ſafly be don w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> ſhort ſword & cloſe hylted dagger or gautlet
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| 6. Stay not within distance of the long sword or rapier with your short sword, nor suffer him to win the place of you, but either cross his sword, or make your space very narrow to cross it before his blow or thrust be in force, yet keeping your distance whereby he shall strike or thrust at nothing, & so shall be subject to the time of your hand against the time of his feet.
 
| 6. Stay not within distance of the long sword or rapier with your short sword, nor suffer him to win the place of you, but either cross his sword, or make your space very narrow to cross it before his blow or thrust be in force, yet keeping your distance whereby he shall strike or thrust at nothing, & so shall be subject to the time of your hand against the time of his feet.
 
| 6. Stay not w<sup>t</sup>in diſtance of the longe ſword or rapior w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſhort ſword, nor ſuffer him to wyn the place of you, but eyther Croſe his ſword, or make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace verye narrow to croſe it before his blow or thrust be in force, yet keping yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance wher by he ſhall ſtrike or thruſt at nothing, & ſo he ſhalbe ſubject to the tyme of yo<sup>r</sup> hand againſt the tyme of his feet.
 
| 6. Stay not w<sup>t</sup>in diſtance of the longe ſword or rapior w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſhort ſword, nor ſuffer him to wyn the place of you, but eyther Croſe his ſword, or make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace verye narrow to croſe it before his blow or thrust be in force, yet keping yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance wher by he ſhall ſtrike or thruſt at nothing, & ſo he ſhalbe ſubject to the tyme of yo<sup>r</sup> hand againſt the tyme of his feet.
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| 7. Keep distance & lie as you think best for your ease & safety, yet so that you any strike, thrust or ward, & when you find his point certain, then make your space narrow & cross his sword, so shall you be the first mover, & enter first into your action, & he being an after doer, is not able to avoid your cross, not narrow space, nor any such offense as shall be put into execution against him.
 
| 7. Keep distance & lie as you think best for your ease & safety, yet so that you any strike, thrust or ward, & when you find his point certain, then make your space narrow & cross his sword, so shall you be the first mover, & enter first into your action, & he being an after doer, is not able to avoid your cross, not narrow space, nor any such offense as shall be put into execution against him.
 
| 7. Kepe diſtance & lye as yõ thinke beſt for yo<sup>r</sup> eaſe & ſafty, yet ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ may ſtrike, thruſt, or ward, & when yõ find his poynt Certaine, then make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow & croſe his ſword, ſo ſhal yõ be the first mou<sup>r</sup>, & enter firſt into yo<sup>r</sup> action, & he beinge an aft<sup>r</sup> doer, is not able to avoyd yo<sup>r</sup> Croſe, nor narrow ſpace, nor any such offence as shalbe put in execution against hym.
 
| 7. Kepe diſtance & lye as yõ thinke beſt for yo<sup>r</sup> eaſe & ſafty, yet ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ may ſtrike, thruſt, or ward, & when yõ find his poynt Certaine, then make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow & croſe his ſword, ſo ſhal yõ be the first mou<sup>r</sup>, & enter firſt into yo<sup>r</sup> action, & he beinge an aft<sup>r</sup> doer, is not able to avoyd yo<sup>r</sup> Croſe, nor narrow ſpace, nor any such offence as shalbe put in execution against hym.
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| 8. Having crossed his long sword or rapier with your short sword blade, & put his point out of the straight line by force then strike or thrust at him with your sword & fly out instantly according to your governors.
 
| 8. Having crossed his long sword or rapier with your short sword blade, & put his point out of the straight line by force then strike or thrust at him with your sword & fly out instantly according to your governors.
 
| 8. havinge Crost his longe ſword or rapior w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſhort ſword blade, & put his poynt out of the ſtrait lyne by force then ſtrike or thruſt at him w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & fly out inſtantly accordinge to y gou<sup>r</sup>nors.
 
| 8. havinge Crost his longe ſword or rapior w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſhort ſword blade, & put his poynt out of the ſtrait lyne by force then ſtrike or thruſt at him w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword & fly out inſtantly accordinge to y gou<sup>r</sup>nors.
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| 9. Stand not upon guardant fight only, for so he will greatly endanger you out of his other fights because you have made yourself a certain mark to him, for in continuing in that fight only you shall not only weary yourself, but do also exclude yourself from the benefit of the open, variable, & closed fights, & so shall he have four fights to your one, as you may see in the chapter of the short single sword fight in the 15th ground thereof.
 
| 9. Stand not upon guardant fight only, for so he will greatly endanger you out of his other fights because you have made yourself a certain mark to him, for in continuing in that fight only you shall not only weary yourself, but do also exclude yourself from the benefit of the open, variable, & closed fights, & so shall he have four fights to your one, as you may see in the chapter of the short single sword fight in the 15th ground thereof.
 
| 9. Stand not vpõ gardant fyght only, for ſo he will greatlye endanger yõ out of his other fyghts because yõ haue made yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf a c<sup>r</sup>taine marke to him, for in contynuynge in y<sup>t</sup> fyght only yõ ſhal not only weary yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf, but do alſo exclude yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf frõ the benyfyt of the Open, variable, & cloſe fyghts, & ſo ſhal he haue four fyghts to yo<sup>r</sup> one, as yõ may ſe in the Chapter of the ſhort ſyngle ſword fyght in the 15<sup>th</sup> ground therof
 
| 9. Stand not vpõ gardant fyght only, for ſo he will greatlye endanger yõ out of his other fyghts because yõ haue made yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf a c<sup>r</sup>taine marke to him, for in contynuynge in y<sup>t</sup> fyght only yõ ſhal not only weary yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf, but do alſo exclude yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf frõ the benyfyt of the Open, variable, & cloſe fyghts, & ſo ſhal he haue four fyghts to yo<sup>r</sup> one, as yõ may ſe in the Chapter of the ſhort ſyngle ſword fyght in the 15<sup>th</sup> ground therof
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| If he lies in open or true guardant fight, then you may upon your open or guardant fight safely bring yourself to the half sword, & then you may thrust him in the body, under his guard or sword when he bears it guardant, because he is too weak in his guard, but fly out instantly, & he cannot bring in his point to hurt you, except he goes back with his foot or feet, which time is too long to answer the swift time of the hand.
 
| If he lies in open or true guardant fight, then you may upon your open or guardant fight safely bring yourself to the half sword, & then you may thrust him in the body, under his guard or sword when he bears it guardant, because he is too weak in his guard, but fly out instantly, & he cannot bring in his point to hurt you, except he goes back with his foot or feet, which time is too long to answer the swift time of the hand.
 
| 10. Yf he lye in Open or true gardant fyght, then yõ may vpon yo<sup>r</sup> open & gardant fight ſafly bringe yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf to the half ſword, & then you may thruſt him in the body, vnder his gard or ſword when he beareth it gardant, becauſe he is weak in his garde, but fly out inſtantly, & he cannot bringe in his point to hurt yõ except he go back w<sup>t</sup> his foote or feet, w<sup>ch</sup> tyme is to longe to anſwer the ſwyft tyme of the hand.
 
| 10. Yf he lye in Open or true gardant fyght, then yõ may vpon yo<sup>r</sup> open & gardant fight ſafly bringe yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf to the half ſword, & then you may thruſt him in the body, vnder his gard or ſword when he beareth it gardant, becauſe he is weak in his garde, but fly out inſtantly, & he cannot bringe in his point to hurt yõ except he go back w<sup>t</sup> his foote or feet, w<sup>ch</sup> tyme is to longe to anſwer the ſwyft tyme of the hand.
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| If he puts down his sword lower to defend that thrust then will his head be open, so that you may strike him on the head over his sword & fly out therewith, which thing he cannot defend, because his space is too wide to put up his blade in due time to make a true ward for the same.
 
| If he puts down his sword lower to defend that thrust then will his head be open, so that you may strike him on the head over his sword & fly out therewith, which thing he cannot defend, because his space is too wide to put up his blade in due time to make a true ward for the same.
 
| yf he put doune his ſword lower to defend y<sup>t</sup> thruſt then will his hed be open, ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ may ſtrike him on the hed ou<sup>r</sup> his ſword & fly out ther w<sup>t</sup>, w<sup>ch</sup> thinge he cannot defend, because his ſpace is to wyde to put vp his blade in due tyme to make a true ward foo the ſame.
 
| yf he put doune his ſword lower to defend y<sup>t</sup> thruſt then will his hed be open, ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ may ſtrike him on the hed ou<sup>r</sup> his ſword & fly out ther w<sup>t</sup>, w<sup>ch</sup> thinge he cannot defend, because his ſpace is to wyde to put vp his blade in due tyme to make a true ward foo the ſame.
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| 11. Understand that the whole sum of the long rapier fight is either upon the Stocata, Passata, Imbrocata, or Mountanta, all these, and all the rest of their devices you may safely prevent by keeping your distance, because thereby you shall still drive him to use the time of his feet, whereby you shall still prevent him of the true place, & therefore he cannot in due time make any of these fights offensive upon you by reason that the number of his feet will still be too great, so that he shall still use the slow time of his feet to the swift time of your hand.
 
| 11. Understand that the whole sum of the long rapier fight is either upon the Stocata, Passata, Imbrocata, or Mountanta, all these, and all the rest of their devices you may safely prevent by keeping your distance, because thereby you shall still drive him to use the time of his feet, whereby you shall still prevent him of the true place, & therefore he cannot in due time make any of these fights offensive upon you by reason that the number of his feet will still be too great, so that he shall still use the slow time of his feet to the swift time of your hand.
 
| 11. Understand y<sup>t</sup> the whole ſom if the long rapior fyght is eyther upon the Stocata, Paſſata, Imbrocata, or Mountanta, al theſe, and al the reſt of their devyces you may ſafly prevent by kepinge yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, becauſe therby you ſhal stil dreue him to vſe the tyme of his feet, wherby yõ ſhal ſtil p<sup>r</sup>vent him of y<sup>e</sup> true place, & therfore he cannot in due tyme make any of theſe fyghts offencive vpon you by reason y<sup>t</sup> the number of his feet will ſtil be to great, ſo y<sup>t</sup> he ſhal ſtil vſe the ſlow tyme of his feet to the ſwyft tyme of yo<sup>r</sup> hand, &therfore yõ may ſafly defend yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf & offend him,
 
| 11. Understand y<sup>t</sup> the whole ſom if the long rapior fyght is eyther upon the Stocata, Paſſata, Imbrocata, or Mountanta, al theſe, and al the reſt of their devyces you may ſafly prevent by kepinge yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, becauſe therby you ſhal stil dreue him to vſe the tyme of his feet, wherby yõ ſhal ſtil p<sup>r</sup>vent him of y<sup>e</sup> true place, & therfore he cannot in due tyme make any of theſe fyghts offencive vpon you by reason y<sup>t</sup> the number of his feet will ſtil be to great, ſo y<sup>t</sup> he ſhal ſtil vſe the ſlow tyme of his feet to the ſwyft tyme of yo<sup>r</sup> hand, &therfore yõ may ſafly defend yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf & offend him,
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| Now you can plainly see how to prevent all these, but for the better example note this, whereas I say by keeping of distance some may object that then the rapier man will come in by degrees with such ward as shall best like him, & drive back the sword man continually, to whom I answer, the he can not do, by reason that the sword man's traverses are made circularly, so that the rapier man in his coming in has no place to carry the point of his rapier, in due time to make home his fight, but that still his rapier will lie within the compass of the time of the sword man's hand, to make a true cross upon him, the which cross being made with force he may safely uncross, & hurt the rapier man in the arm, head, face or body, with blow or thrust, & fly out safe before he shall have tie to direct his point again to make his thrust upon the sword man,
 
| Now you can plainly see how to prevent all these, but for the better example note this, whereas I say by keeping of distance some may object that then the rapier man will come in by degrees with such ward as shall best like him, & drive back the sword man continually, to whom I answer, the he can not do, by reason that the sword man's traverses are made circularly, so that the rapier man in his coming in has no place to carry the point of his rapier, in due time to make home his fight, but that still his rapier will lie within the compass of the time of the sword man's hand, to make a true cross upon him, the which cross being made with force he may safely uncross, & hurt the rapier man in the arm, head, face or body, with blow or thrust, & fly out safe before he shall have tie to direct his point again to make his thrust upon the sword man,
 
| Now you may plainly ſe how to p<sup>r</sup>vent al theſe, but for the bett<sup>r</sup> example note this, wher as I ſay by kepeinge of diſtance ſom may obiect y<sup>t</sup> then the rapior man will com in by degrees w<sup>t</sup> ſuch warde as ſhall beſt lyke him, & dryve back the ſword man contynually, towhome I anſwer, y<sup>t</sup> can he not do, by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> ſword mans travers is made c<sup>r</sup>culer wyſe, ſo y<sup>t</sup> the rapior man in his cõmyng hath no place to carrye the poynt of his rapior, in due tyme to make home his fyght, but y<sup>t</sup> ſtil his rapior wil lye w<sup>t</sup> in the compaſs of thetyme of the ſword mans hand, to make a true croſſe vpon him, the w<sup>ch</sup> croſe beinge made w<sup>t</sup> force he may ſafly vncroſe, & hurt the rapior man in the Arme, hed, face or body, w<sup>t</sup> blow or thruſt, & fly out ſaf before he ſal haue tyme to direct his poynt againe to make his thruſt vpõ y<sup>e</sup> ſword man.
 
| Now you may plainly ſe how to p<sup>r</sup>vent al theſe, but for the bett<sup>r</sup> example note this, wher as I ſay by kepeinge of diſtance ſom may obiect y<sup>t</sup> then the rapior man will com in by degrees w<sup>t</sup> ſuch warde as ſhall beſt lyke him, & dryve back the ſword man contynually, towhome I anſwer, y<sup>t</sup> can he not do, by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> ſword mans travers is made c<sup>r</sup>culer wyſe, ſo y<sup>t</sup> the rapior man in his cõmyng hath no place to carrye the poynt of his rapior, in due tyme to make home his fyght, but y<sup>t</sup> ſtil his rapior wil lye w<sup>t</sup> in the compaſs of thetyme of the ſword mans hand, to make a true croſſe vpon him, the w<sup>ch</sup> croſe beinge made w<sup>t</sup> force he may ſafly vncroſe, & hurt the rapior man in the Arme, hed, face or body, w<sup>t</sup> blow or thruſt, & fly out ſaf before he ſal haue tyme to direct his poynt againe to make his thruſt vpõ y<sup>e</sup> ſword man.
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| 12. If the rapier man lies upon the Stocata, first make your space narrow with your short sword, & take heed that he strikes not down your sword point with his dagger & so jump in & hurt you with the thrust of his long rapier, which thing he may do because he has commanded your sword, & so you are left open & discovered & left only unto the uncertain ward of your dagger, which ward is to single for a man to venture his life on, which if you miss to perform never so little you are hurt or slain.
 
| 12. If the rapier man lies upon the Stocata, first make your space narrow with your short sword, & take heed that he strikes not down your sword point with his dagger & so jump in & hurt you with the thrust of his long rapier, which thing he may do because he has commanded your sword, & so you are left open & discovered & left only unto the uncertain ward of your dagger, which ward is to single for a man to venture his life on, which if you miss to perform never so little you are hurt or slain.
 
| 12. Yf y<sup>e</sup> rapior man lye vpon the ſtocata, firſt make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſhort ſword, & take heed y<sup>t</sup> he ſtrike not doune yo<sup>r</sup> ſworde poynt w<sup>t</sup> his dagger & ſo Jump in & hurt you w<sup>t</sup> the thruſt of his longe rapior, w<sup>ch</sup> thing he may do becauſe he haue cõmaundedyour ſword, & ſo yõ are left open & diſcov<sup>r</sup>ed & left onlye vnto the vnc<sup>r</sup>taine ward of yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, w<sup>ch</sup> ward is to ſyngle for a man to venter his lyf on, w<sup>ch</sup> yf yõ myſſe to prforme Neuer ſo lyttle yõ are hurt or ſlaine.
 
| 12. Yf y<sup>e</sup> rapior man lye vpon the ſtocata, firſt make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſhort ſword, & take heed y<sup>t</sup> he ſtrike not doune yo<sup>r</sup> ſworde poynt w<sup>t</sup> his dagger & ſo Jump in & hurt you w<sup>t</sup> the thruſt of his longe rapior, w<sup>ch</sup> thing he may do becauſe he haue cõmaundedyour ſword, & ſo yõ are left open & diſcov<sup>r</sup>ed & left onlye vnto the vnc<sup>r</sup>taine ward of yo<sup>r</sup> dagg<sup>r</sup>, w<sup>ch</sup> ward is to ſyngle for a man to venter his lyf on, w<sup>ch</sup> yf yõ myſſe to prforme Neuer ſo lyttle yõ are hurt or ſlaine.
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| 13. To prevent this danger you must remember your governors, & presently upon his least motion be sure of your distance, & your narrow space, then do as follows.
 
| 13. To prevent this danger you must remember your governors, & presently upon his least motion be sure of your distance, & your narrow space, then do as follows.
 
| 13. To p<sup>r</sup>vent this danger yõ muſt remember your gou<sup>r</sup>nors, & p<sup>r</sup>ſently vpon his leaſt motion be ſure of yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, & yo<sup>r</sup> narrow ſpace, then do as followð.
 
| 13. To p<sup>r</sup>vent this danger yõ muſt remember your gou<sup>r</sup>nors, & p<sup>r</sup>ſently vpon his leaſt motion be ſure of yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, & yo<sup>r</sup> narrow ſpace, then do as followð.
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| 14. If he lies upon his Stocata, with his rapier point within or behind his dagger hand out straight, then lie upon variable in measure with your right foot before & your sword point out directly with your space very narrow as near his rapier point as you may, between his rapier point & his dagger hand, from which you may suddenly with a wrist blow, lift up your point & strike him on the outside or inside of his dagger hand, & fly out withal, then make your space narrow as before, then if he thrust home at you, you are already prepared for his thrust, or you may thrust at his dagger hand, doing which you may think best, but your blow must be only by moving your wrist, for if you lift up your hand & arm to fetch a large blow then your time will be too long, & your space to wide in due time to make a true ward to defend yourself from his thrust, so shall you hurt him although he has a gauntlet thereon, for your thrust will run up between his fingers, & your blow will cut off the fingers of his gauntlet, for he cannot defend himself from one blow or thrust of 20, by reason that you have the place to reach home at his hand, & for that cause he cannot prevent it, neither can he reach home to you without putting in his foot or feet, because the distance is too large, but upon every blow or thrust that you make at his hand slip back a little, so you shall still upon every blow or thrust that you make at him, be out of his reach.
 
| 14. If he lies upon his Stocata, with his rapier point within or behind his dagger hand out straight, then lie upon variable in measure with your right foot before & your sword point out directly with your space very narrow as near his rapier point as you may, between his rapier point & his dagger hand, from which you may suddenly with a wrist blow, lift up your point & strike him on the outside or inside of his dagger hand, & fly out withal, then make your space narrow as before, then if he thrust home at you, you are already prepared for his thrust, or you may thrust at his dagger hand, doing which you may think best, but your blow must be only by moving your wrist, for if you lift up your hand & arm to fetch a large blow then your time will be too long, & your space to wide in due time to make a true ward to defend yourself from his thrust, so shall you hurt him although he has a gauntlet thereon, for your thrust will run up between his fingers, & your blow will cut off the fingers of his gauntlet, for he cannot defend himself from one blow or thrust of 20, by reason that you have the place to reach home at his hand, & for that cause he cannot prevent it, neither can he reach home to you without putting in his foot or feet, because the distance is too large, but upon every blow or thrust that you make at his hand slip back a little, so you shall still upon every blow or thrust that you make at him, be out of his reach.
 
| 14. Yf he lye vpõ his ſtocata, w<sup>t</sup> his rapior point w<sup>t</sup> in or behind his dagg<sup>r</sup> hand out strait, then lye yõ variable in Meaſure w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> right foote before & yo<sup>r</sup> ſword poynt out directly forth w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace very narrow as neere his rapior poynt as yõ may, betwixt his rapiorpoynt & his dagger hand, from w<sup>ch</sup> yõ may ſodainly w<sup>t</sup> a wriſt blow, lyft vp yo<sup>r</sup> poynt & ſtrike him on the out ſyde or in ſyde of his dagg<sup>r</sup> hand, & fly out w<sup>t</sup> all, then make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow as before, then yf he thruſt home at yõ, yõ are redy p<sup>r</sup>pred for hys thruſt, or yõ may thruſt at his dagger hand, do w<sup>ch</sup> yõ ſhal thinke beſt, but yo<sup>r</sup> blow muſt be but only by moving of yo<sup>r</sup> wriſt, for yf yõ lyft vp yo<sup>r</sup> hand and Arme to fetch a large blowe then yo<sup>r</sup> tyme wilbe to longe, & yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace to wyde in due tyme to make a true ward to defend yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf from his thruſt, ſo shall yõ hurt him although he haue a gantlet therone, for yo<sup>r</sup> thruſt wil run vp between his fing, & yo<sup>r</sup> blow wil cut ofthe fyng of his gantlet, for he cannot defend himſelf from on blow or thruſt of 20, by reaſon that yõ haue the place to reach home at his hand, & for y<sup>t</sup> cauſe he cannot p<sup>r</sup>vent it, nether can he rech home to you w<sup>t</sup>out putting in of his foot or feet, becauſe his diſtance is to large, but upon eu<sup>r</sup> blow or thruſt y<sup>t</sup> yõ make at his hand ſlypp back a little, ſo ſhal yõ ſtill vpõ eu<sup>r</sup> blow or thruſt y<sup>t</sup> yõ make at him, be out of his reach,
 
| 14. Yf he lye vpõ his ſtocata, w<sup>t</sup> his rapior point w<sup>t</sup> in or behind his dagg<sup>r</sup> hand out strait, then lye yõ variable in Meaſure w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> right foote before & yo<sup>r</sup> ſword poynt out directly forth w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace very narrow as neere his rapior poynt as yõ may, betwixt his rapiorpoynt & his dagger hand, from w<sup>ch</sup> yõ may ſodainly w<sup>t</sup> a wriſt blow, lyft vp yo<sup>r</sup> poynt & ſtrike him on the out ſyde or in ſyde of his dagg<sup>r</sup> hand, & fly out w<sup>t</sup> all, then make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow as before, then yf he thruſt home at yõ, yõ are redy p<sup>r</sup>pred for hys thruſt, or yõ may thruſt at his dagger hand, do w<sup>ch</sup> yõ ſhal thinke beſt, but yo<sup>r</sup> blow muſt be but only by moving of yo<sup>r</sup> wriſt, for yf yõ lyft vp yo<sup>r</sup> hand and Arme to fetch a large blowe then yo<sup>r</sup> tyme wilbe to longe, & yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace to wyde in due tyme to make a true ward to defend yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf from his thruſt, ſo shall yõ hurt him although he haue a gantlet therone, for yo<sup>r</sup> thruſt wil run vp between his fing, & yo<sup>r</sup> blow wil cut ofthe fyng of his gantlet, for he cannot defend himſelf from on blow or thruſt of 20, by reaſon that yõ haue the place to reach home at his hand, & for y<sup>t</sup> cauſe he cannot p<sup>r</sup>vent it, nether can he rech home to you w<sup>t</sup>out putting in of his foot or feet, becauſe his diſtance is to large, but upon eu<sup>r</sup> blow or thruſt y<sup>t</sup> yõ make at his hand ſlypp back a little, ſo ſhal yõ ſtill vpõ eu<sup>r</sup> blow or thruſt y<sup>t</sup> yõ make at him, be out of his reach,
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| But if upon your blow or thrust he will enter in with his foot or feet to make home his Stocata or thrust upon you, then by reason of you sliding back, you shall be prepared in due time to make a perfect ward to defend yourself with your sword. Therefore ever respect his rapier point & remember to make & keep narrow space upon it with your sword point, that you may be sure to break his thrust before it is in full force.
 
| But if upon your blow or thrust he will enter in with his foot or feet to make home his Stocata or thrust upon you, then by reason of you sliding back, you shall be prepared in due time to make a perfect ward to defend yourself with your sword. Therefore ever respect his rapier point & remember to make & keep narrow space upon it with your sword point, that you may be sure to break his thrust before it is in full force.
 
| but yf vpon yo<sup>r</sup> blow or thruſt he wil enter in w<sup>t</sup> his foote or feet to make home his stocata or thruſt vpõ you, then by reaſon of yo<sup>r</sup> ſlydynge back, you ſhalbe prepared in due tyme to make a prfyt ward to defend yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſworde. Therfore euer reſpect his rapior poynte & remember to make & kepe narrow ſpace upon it w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword poynt, that yõ may be ſure to break his thruſt before it be in ful force.
 
| but yf vpon yo<sup>r</sup> blow or thruſt he wil enter in w<sup>t</sup> his foote or feet to make home his stocata or thruſt vpõ you, then by reaſon of yo<sup>r</sup> ſlydynge back, you ſhalbe prepared in due tyme to make a prfyt ward to defend yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſworde. Therfore euer reſpect his rapior poynte & remember to make & kepe narrow ſpace upon it w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword poynt, that yõ may be ſure to break his thruſt before it be in ful force.
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| 15. If he thrust at your higher parts with his point a little mounted, then make narrow your space with your point upon his, if you cross his blade on the inside between his rapier & his dagger, if he presses in then from your cross beat or bear back his point strongly towards his right side, & having indirected his point, strike him on the inside of the rapier or dagger hand or arm, or on the head, face, or body, & fly out instantly.  
 
| 15. If he thrust at your higher parts with his point a little mounted, then make narrow your space with your point upon his, if you cross his blade on the inside between his rapier & his dagger, if he presses in then from your cross beat or bear back his point strongly towards his right side, & having indirected his point, strike him on the inside of the rapier or dagger hand or arm, or on the head, face, or body, & fly out instantly.  
 
| 15. Yf he thruſt at yo<sup>r</sup> hyer prts w<sup>t</sup> his poynt a lyttle mounted, then make narrow yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt vpon his, yf yõ Croſe his blade on the inſyde between his rapior & his dagg<sup>r</sup>, yf he preſ in then frõ yo<sup>r</sup> croſe beat or bere backe his poynt ſtrongly towarde his right ſyde, and havinge indirected his poynt, ſtrike him on the inſyde of the rapior or dagg<sup>r</sup> hand or Arme, or on the hed, face, or body, & fly out inſtantly,  
 
| 15. Yf he thruſt at yo<sup>r</sup> hyer prts w<sup>t</sup> his poynt a lyttle mounted, then make narrow yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt vpon his, yf yõ Croſe his blade on the inſyde between his rapior & his dagg<sup>r</sup>, yf he preſ in then frõ yo<sup>r</sup> croſe beat or bere backe his poynt ſtrongly towarde his right ſyde, and havinge indirected his poynt, ſtrike him on the inſyde of the rapior or dagg<sup>r</sup> hand or Arme, or on the hed, face, or body, & fly out inſtantly,  
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| Or you may upon his pressing in with his thrust slip your point down as he comes in, & put up your hilt & ward it guardant, & therewith from that ward cast out his point, & suddenly strike him in one of the places aforesaid, & fly out instantly remembering your governors.
 
| Or you may upon his pressing in with his thrust slip your point down as he comes in, & put up your hilt & ward it guardant, & therewith from that ward cast out his point, & suddenly strike him in one of the places aforesaid, & fly out instantly remembering your governors.
 
| Or you may vpon his p<sup>r</sup>ſſinge in w<sup>t</sup> his thruſt Slypp yo<sup>r</sup> poynt doune as he cõmeth in, & put vp yo<sup>r</sup> hylt & ward it gardant, & ther w<sup>t</sup> from that ward caſt out his poynt & ſodainly ſtrike him in one of the placs aforeſaid, & fly out inſtantlye remembringe yo<sup>r</sup>gou<sup>r</sup>nors.
 
| Or you may vpon his p<sup>r</sup>ſſinge in w<sup>t</sup> his thruſt Slypp yo<sup>r</sup> poynt doune as he cõmeth in, & put vp yo<sup>r</sup> hylt & ward it gardant, & ther w<sup>t</sup> from that ward caſt out his poynt & ſodainly ſtrike him in one of the placs aforeſaid, & fly out inſtantlye remembringe yo<sup>r</sup>gou<sup>r</sup>nors.
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| 16. If he lies fast & does not come in, then strike & thrust at his dagger hand, with your wrist blow & slip back therewith every time.
 
| 16. If he lies fast & does not come in, then strike & thrust at his dagger hand, with your wrist blow & slip back therewith every time.
 
| 16. Yf he lye faſt & do not com in, then ſtrike & thruſt at his dagg<sup>r</sup> hand, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> wriſt blow and ſlypp back ther w<sup>t</sup> euery tyme
 
| 16. Yf he lye faſt & do not com in, then ſtrike & thruſt at his dagg<sup>r</sup> hand, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> wriſt blow and ſlypp back ther w<sup>t</sup> euery tyme
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| 17. But if he lies fast & beats down your point with his dagger, & then thrusts at you from his Stocata then turn up your hilt with your knuckles upward & your nails downward, taking his blade upon the backside of yours towards your left side & bear it guardant towards that side, & so may you offend him as before is said upon that ward.
 
| 17. But if he lies fast & beats down your point with his dagger, & then thrusts at you from his Stocata then turn up your hilt with your knuckles upward & your nails downward, taking his blade upon the backside of yours towards your left side & bear it guardant towards that side, & so may you offend him as before is said upon that ward.
 
| 17. but if he lye faſt & beat doune yo<sup>r</sup> poynt w<sup>t</sup> his dagger, & then thruſt at you from his Stocata then turne vp yo<sup>r</sup> hilt w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles vpwarde & yo<sup>r</sup> nayles dounwarde, takinge his blade vpõ the backſyde of yo<sup>rs</sup> towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde & bere it gardant towarde y<sup>t</sup>ſyde, & ſo may yõ offend him as before is ſaid vpõ y<sup>t</sup> ward.
 
| 17. but if he lye faſt & beat doune yo<sup>r</sup> poynt w<sup>t</sup> his dagger, & then thruſt at you from his Stocata then turne vp yo<sup>r</sup> hilt w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles vpwarde & yo<sup>r</sup> nayles dounwarde, takinge his blade vpõ the backſyde of yo<sup>rs</sup> towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde & bere it gardant towarde y<sup>t</sup>ſyde, & ſo may yõ offend him as before is ſaid vpõ y<sup>t</sup> ward.
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| 18. The like may you do upon him if he lays out his point, when you have crossed the same with yours, & then strike it to either side, & so indirect his point, and then strike or thrust & fly out.
 
| 18. The like may you do upon him if he lays out his point, when you have crossed the same with yours, & then strike it to either side, & so indirect his point, and then strike or thrust & fly out.
 
| 18. The lyke may yõ do vpon him yf he lye out w<sup>t</sup> his poynt, when yõ haue croſt y<sup>e</sup> ſame w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>rs</sup>, & ſtrike it to eyther ſyde, & ſo indirect his poynt, and then ſtrike or thruſt & fly out.
 
| 18. The lyke may yõ do vpon him yf he lye out w<sup>t</sup> his poynt, when yõ haue croſt y<sup>e</sup> ſame w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>rs</sup>, & ſtrike it to eyther ſyde, & ſo indirect his poynt, and then ſtrike or thruſt & fly out.
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| 19. The like you must do, if he lies with his point direct towards your belly.
 
| 19. The like you must do, if he lies with his point direct towards your belly.
 
| 19. The lyke muſt yõ do, yf he lye with his point directly towarde yo<sup>r</sup> bellye
 
| 19. The lyke muſt yõ do, yf he lye with his point directly towarde yo<sup>r</sup> bellye
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| 20. But if you cross his point so mounted or directed as above said, upon the outside of your sword with his point a little higher than your hilt, so that you may cross his blade, then if he thrust over your blade single uncrossing the same, then you may break it with your forehand ward out towards your right side, & if he comes in therewith, then strike him on the outside of his rapier hand or arm, or on the head or face, & fly out therewith.
 
| 20. But if you cross his point so mounted or directed as above said, upon the outside of your sword with his point a little higher than your hilt, so that you may cross his blade, then if he thrust over your blade single uncrossing the same, then you may break it with your forehand ward out towards your right side, & if he comes in therewith, then strike him on the outside of his rapier hand or arm, or on the head or face, & fly out therewith.
 
| 20. but yf yõ croſe his poynt ſo mounted or dyrect as aboueſaid, vpõ y<sup>e</sup> out ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword w<sup>t</sup> his poynt a little hyer than yo<sup>r</sup> hylt, ſo y<sup>t</sup> you may croſe his blade, then yf he thruſt ouer yo<sup>r</sup> blade ſyngle uncroſſing the ſame, then may you break it w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> forehand ward out towarde yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde, & yf he com in ther w<sup>t</sup>, then ſtrike him on the out ſyde of his rapior hand or Arme, or on the hed or face, & fly out ther w<sup>t</sup>
 
| 20. but yf yõ croſe his poynt ſo mounted or dyrect as aboueſaid, vpõ y<sup>e</sup> out ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword w<sup>t</sup> his poynt a little hyer than yo<sup>r</sup> hylt, ſo y<sup>t</sup> you may croſe his blade, then yf he thruſt ouer yo<sup>r</sup> blade ſyngle uncroſſing the ſame, then may you break it w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> forehand ward out towarde yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde, & yf he com in ther w<sup>t</sup>, then ſtrike him on the out ſyde of his rapior hand or Arme, or on the hed or face, & fly out ther w<sup>t</sup>
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| 21. But if he thrusts in over your sword as above said & presses in his blade strongly double with the help of his dagger, then put down your point & turn up your hilt guardant, so shall you safely defend it bearing it guardant out towards your left side & from that strike him in between his rapier and dagger in one of the aforesaid places & fly out. But if from the cross he slips his point down to thrust under your sword, then strike down his point towards his left foot & therewith strike him on the outside of his rapier hand or arm, head, face, or body & fly out instantly, according to your governors.
 
| 21. But if he thrusts in over your sword as above said & presses in his blade strongly double with the help of his dagger, then put down your point & turn up your hilt guardant, so shall you safely defend it bearing it guardant out towards your left side & from that strike him in between his rapier and dagger in one of the aforesaid places & fly out. But if from the cross he slips his point down to thrust under your sword, then strike down his point towards his left foot & therewith strike him on the outside of his rapier hand or arm, head, face, or body & fly out instantly, according to your governors.
 
| 21. but yf he thruſt in ouer yo<sup>r</sup> ſword as aboueſaid & preſ in his blade ſtrongly dubble w<sup>t</sup> the helpe of his dagger, then put doune yo<sup>r</sup> poynt & turne vp yo<sup>r</sup> hylt gardant, ſo ſhal yõ ſafly defend it beringe it gardant out towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde & from yt ſtrike him in between his rapior and dagger in on of the foreſaid places, & fly out, but yf from this croſe he ſlypp his poynt doune to thruſt vnd<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword, then ſtrike doune his poynt towarde his left foote & ther w<sup>t</sup> ſtrike him on the out ſyde of his rapior hand or arme, hed, face, or body, & fly out inſtantly according to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors.
 
| 21. but yf he thruſt in ouer yo<sup>r</sup> ſword as aboueſaid & preſ in his blade ſtrongly dubble w<sup>t</sup> the helpe of his dagger, then put doune yo<sup>r</sup> poynt & turne vp yo<sup>r</sup> hylt gardant, ſo ſhal yõ ſafly defend it beringe it gardant out towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde & from yt ſtrike him in between his rapior and dagger in on of the foreſaid places, & fly out, but yf from this croſe he ſlypp his poynt doune to thruſt vnd<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſword, then ſtrike doune his poynt towarde his left foote & ther w<sup>t</sup> ſtrike him on the out ſyde of his rapior hand or arme, hed, face, or body, & fly out inſtantly according to yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors.
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| Also you may upon this of his point down, then turn your point short over his blade in your stepping back, & put your point down in the inside of his blade, turning up your hilt guardant as aforesaid, & then if he thrusts at you, bear it guardant towards your left side, & then have you the same offensive blows & thrusts against him as is above said upon the same ward.
 
| Also you may upon this of his point down, then turn your point short over his blade in your stepping back, & put your point down in the inside of his blade, turning up your hilt guardant as aforesaid, & then if he thrusts at you, bear it guardant towards your left side, & then have you the same offensive blows & thrusts against him as is above said upon the same ward.
 
| Alſo yõ may vpon this of his poynt doune, then turne yo<sup>r</sup> poynt ſhort ouer his blade in yo<sup>r</sup> ſteppinge back, & put yo<sup>r</sup> poynt doune in the inſyde of his blade turnynge vp yo<sup>r</sup> hilt gardant as aforeſaid, & then yf he thruſt at yõ, bere it gardant towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde, & then haue you the ſame offencive blowes & thruſts againſt him as is aboveſaid vpõ y<sup>e</sup> ſame ward.
 
| Alſo yõ may vpon this of his poynt doune, then turne yo<sup>r</sup> poynt ſhort ouer his blade in yo<sup>r</sup> ſteppinge back, & put yo<sup>r</sup> poynt doune in the inſyde of his blade turnynge vp yo<sup>r</sup> hilt gardant as aforeſaid, & then yf he thruſt at yõ, bere it gardant towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde, & then haue you the ſame offencive blowes & thruſts againſt him as is aboveſaid vpõ y<sup>e</sup> ſame ward.
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| 22. If he lies after the Stocata with his point down towards your foot, then cross his blade on the outside, & if he turns his point over your blade to make his thrust upon you, bear it out towards your left side, & from that ward offend him as aforesaid.
 
| 22. If he lies after the Stocata with his point down towards your foot, then cross his blade on the outside, & if he turns his point over your blade to make his thrust upon you, bear it out towards your left side, & from that ward offend him as aforesaid.
 
| 22. Yf he lye aft<sup>r</sup> the Stocata w<sup>t</sup> his poynt doune towarde yo<sup>r</sup> foote, then croſe his blade on y<sup>e</sup> out ſyde, & yf he turne his poynt ou<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hilt & bere it gardant as aboveſaid, bearing it out towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde, & frõ y<sup>t</sup> ward offend him as aboveſaid
 
| 22. Yf he lye aft<sup>r</sup> the Stocata w<sup>t</sup> his poynt doune towarde yo<sup>r</sup> foote, then croſe his blade on y<sup>e</sup> out ſyde, & yf he turne his poynt ou<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hilt & bere it gardant as aboveſaid, bearing it out towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde, & frõ y<sup>t</sup> ward offend him as aboveſaid
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| 23. Also in this fight take heed that he thrusts you not in the sword hand or arm, therefore ever respect to draw it back in due time, remembering therein your twofold governor, in your coming in, to make your cross or narrow space.
 
| 23. Also in this fight take heed that he thrusts you not in the sword hand or arm, therefore ever respect to draw it back in due time, remembering therein your twofold governor, in your coming in, to make your cross or narrow space.
 
| 23. Alſo in this fyght take heed y<sup>t</sup> he thruſt yõ not in the ſword hand or arme, therfore euer reſpect to draw it back in due tyme, remembring therin yo<sup>r</sup> twofold gou<sup>r</sup>nor, in yo<sup>r</sup> comyng in, to make yo<sup>r</sup> croſe or narrow ſpace.
 
| 23. Alſo in this fyght take heed y<sup>t</sup> he thruſt yõ not in the ſword hand or arme, therfore euer reſpect to draw it back in due tyme, remembring therin yo<sup>r</sup> twofold gou<sup>r</sup>nor, in yo<sup>r</sup> comyng in, to make yo<sup>r</sup> croſe or narrow ſpace.
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| 24. If at sword & dagger or buckler he strikes in at the outside of your right leg ward it with the back of your sword, carrying your point down, bearing you knuckles downward & your nails upward, bearing your sword out strongly towards your right side, upon which ward, you may strike him on the outside of the left leg, or thrust him in the thigh or belly.
 
| 24. If at sword & dagger or buckler he strikes in at the outside of your right leg ward it with the back of your sword, carrying your point down, bearing you knuckles downward & your nails upward, bearing your sword out strongly towards your right side, upon which ward, you may strike him on the outside of the left leg, or thrust him in the thigh or belly.
 
| 24. Yf at ſword & dagger or buckler he ſtrike in at the out ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> right legge ward it w<sup>t</sup> the back of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword, carrying yo<sup>r</sup> poynt doune holding yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles dounwarde & yo<sup>r</sup> Nayles upwarde, bering yo<sup>r</sup> ſword out ſtrongly towarde yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde, vpon w<sup>ch</sup> ward yõ may ſtrike him on the out ſyde of the left legge, or thruſt him in y<sup>e</sup> thigh or belly
 
| 24. Yf at ſword & dagger or buckler he ſtrike in at the out ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> right legge ward it w<sup>t</sup> the back of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword, carrying yo<sup>r</sup> poynt doune holding yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles dounwarde & yo<sup>r</sup> Nayles upwarde, bering yo<sup>r</sup> ſword out ſtrongly towarde yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde, vpon w<sup>ch</sup> ward yõ may ſtrike him on the out ſyde of the left legge, or thruſt him in y<sup>e</sup> thigh or belly
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| 25. The like may you do if he strike at your other side, if you ward his blow with the edge of your sword your hand and knuckles as aforesaid, casting out his sword blade towards your left side, this may be used at short or long sword fight.
 
| 25. The like may you do if he strike at your other side, if you ward his blow with the edge of your sword your hand and knuckles as aforesaid, casting out his sword blade towards your left side, this may be used at short or long sword fight.
 
| 25. The lyke may yõ do yf he ſtrik at yo<sup>r</sup> other ſyde, yf yõ ward his blowe w<sup>t</sup> the edge of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword yo<sup>r</sup> hand & knuckles as aforeſaid, caſting out his ſword blade towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde, this may be vſed at ſhort or longe ſword fyght.
 
| 25. The lyke may yõ do yf he ſtrik at yo<sup>r</sup> other ſyde, yf yõ ward his blowe w<sup>t</sup> the edge of yo<sup>r</sup> ſword yo<sup>r</sup> hand & knuckles as aforeſaid, caſting out his ſword blade towarde yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde, this may be vſed at ſhort or longe ſword fyght.
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| 26. You must never use any fight against the long rapier & dagger with your short sword but the variable fight, because your space will be too wide & your time too long, to defend or offend in due time.
 
| 26. You must never use any fight against the long rapier & dagger with your short sword but the variable fight, because your space will be too wide & your time too long, to defend or offend in due time.
 
| 26. you muſt never vſe any fyght againſt the longe rapior & dagg<sup>r</sup> w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſhort ſword but variable fyght, becauſe yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace wilbe to wyde, & yo<sup>r</sup> time to longe, to defend of offend in due tyme.
 
| 26. you muſt never vſe any fyght againſt the longe rapior & dagg<sup>r</sup> w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſhort ſword but variable fyght, becauſe yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace wilbe to wyde, & yo<sup>r</sup> time to longe, to defend of offend in due tyme.
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| 27. Also you must use very large distance ever, because out of that fight you can hardly make a true cross because being within distance, the eye is deceived to it in due time.
 
| 27. Also you must use very large distance ever, because out of that fight you can hardly make a true cross because being within distance, the eye is deceived to it in due time.
 
| 27. Alſo yõ muſt uſe large diſtance euer, becauſe out of y<sup>t</sup> fyght yõ can hardly make a true croſe becauſe being w<sup>t</sup> in diſtance y<sup>e</sup> eye is deceived to do it in due tyme
 
| 27. Alſo yõ muſt uſe large diſtance euer, becauſe out of y<sup>t</sup> fyght yõ can hardly make a true croſe becauſe being w<sup>t</sup> in diſtance y<sup>e</sup> eye is deceived to do it in due tyme
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| 28. Remember in putting forth your sword point to make your space narrow, when he lies upon his Stocata, or any thrust, you must hold the handle thereof as it were along your hand, resting the pommel thereof in the hollow part of the middle of the heel of your hand towards the wrist, & the former part of the handle must be held between the forefinger & thumb, without the middle joint of the forefinger towards the top thereof, holding that finger somewhat straight out gripping round your handle with your other 3 fingers, & laying your thumb straight towards his, the better to be able to perform this action perfectly, for if you grip your handle close out- thwart(?) in your hand, then you cannot lay your point straight upon his to make your space narrow, but that your point will still lie too wide to do the same in due time, & this is the best way to hold your sword in all kinds of variable fight.  
 
| 28. Remember in putting forth your sword point to make your space narrow, when he lies upon his Stocata, or any thrust, you must hold the handle thereof as it were along your hand, resting the pommel thereof in the hollow part of the middle of the heel of your hand towards the wrist, & the former part of the handle must be held between the forefinger & thumb, without the middle joint of the forefinger towards the top thereof, holding that finger somewhat straight out gripping round your handle with your other 3 fingers, & laying your thumb straight towards his, the better to be able to perform this action perfectly, for if you grip your handle close out- thwart(?) in your hand, then you cannot lay your point straight upon his to make your space narrow, but that your point will still lie too wide to do the same in due time, & this is the best way to hold your sword in all kinds of variable fight.  
 
| 28. rememb<sup>r</sup> in putting forth yo<sup>r</sup> ſword point to make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow, when he lyeth vpõ his ſtocata, or any thruſt, yõ muſt hold y<sup>e</sup> handle thereof as it were a longſt yo<sup>r</sup> hand, reſting the po~mmell thereof in the hollow prte of the mydl of the heele of yo<sup>r</sup> handtowarde the wriſt, & the former prte of the handle muſt be holden between the fore fynger & thumbe, w<sup>t</sup>out the Myddle Joynt of the fore fynger towarde the topp ther of, holding y<sup>t</sup> fynger ſomethinge ſtrait out gryping round yo<sup>r</sup> handle w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> other iij fingers, & laying yo<sup>r</sup> thumbe ſtrait out vpõ the handle, ſo y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> thumbe lye al alonge vpon y<sup>e</sup> ſame, ſo ſhal yõ lay yo<sup>r</sup> point out ſtrait towarde his, the better to be able to prforme this actiõ prfytly, for yf yõ grype yo<sup>r</sup> handle cloſe ou<sup>r</sup>thwart in yo<sup>r</sup> hand, then can yõ not lay yo<sup>r</sup>poynt ſtrait vpon his to make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow, but y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt wil ſtil lye to wyde to doe the ſame in due tyme, & this is the beſt way to hold yo<sup>r</sup> ſword in al kinde of variable fyght
 
| 28. rememb<sup>r</sup> in putting forth yo<sup>r</sup> ſword point to make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow, when he lyeth vpõ his ſtocata, or any thruſt, yõ muſt hold y<sup>e</sup> handle thereof as it were a longſt yo<sup>r</sup> hand, reſting the po~mmell thereof in the hollow prte of the mydl of the heele of yo<sup>r</sup> handtowarde the wriſt, & the former prte of the handle muſt be holden between the fore fynger & thumbe, w<sup>t</sup>out the Myddle Joynt of the fore fynger towarde the topp ther of, holding y<sup>t</sup> fynger ſomethinge ſtrait out gryping round yo<sup>r</sup> handle w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> other iij fingers, & laying yo<sup>r</sup> thumbe ſtrait out vpõ the handle, ſo y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> thumbe lye al alonge vpon y<sup>e</sup> ſame, ſo ſhal yõ lay yo<sup>r</sup> point out ſtrait towarde his, the better to be able to prforme this actiõ prfytly, for yf yõ grype yo<sup>r</sup> handle cloſe ou<sup>r</sup>thwart in yo<sup>r</sup> hand, then can yõ not lay yo<sup>r</sup>poynt ſtrait vpon his to make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow, but y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt wil ſtil lye to wyde to doe the ſame in due tyme, & this is the beſt way to hold yo<sup>r</sup> ſword in al kinde of variable fyght
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| 29. But upon your guardant or open fight then hold it with full gripping it in your hand, & not laying your thumb along the handle, as some use, then shall you never be able to strongly to ward a strong blow.
 
| 29. But upon your guardant or open fight then hold it with full gripping it in your hand, & not laying your thumb along the handle, as some use, then shall you never be able to strongly to ward a strong blow.
 
| 29. but vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> gardant or open fyght then hold it w<sup>t</sup> ful gryping it in yo<sup>r</sup> hand, & not laying yo<sup>r</sup> thumb alonge y<sup>e</sup> handle, as ſom vſe, then ſhal you neuer be able ſtrongly to ward a ſtronge blowe.
 
| 29. but vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> gardant or open fyght then hold it w<sup>t</sup> ful gryping it in yo<sup>r</sup> hand, & not laying yo<sup>r</sup> thumb alonge y<sup>e</sup> handle, as ſom vſe, then ſhal you neuer be able ſtrongly to ward a ſtronge blowe.
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| 30. This have I written out of my entire love that I bear to my countrymen, wishing them yet once again to follow the truth, & to fly the vain imperfect rapier fight, the better to save themselves from wounds & slaughter, for who so attains to the perfection of this true fight which I have here set forth in these my brief instructions, & also in paradoxes of defence, shall not only defend themselves, but shall thereby bring those that fight upon the imperfect fight of the rapier under their mercy, or else put them in Cobb's traverse, where of you may read in the 38th chapter of my paradoxes aforesaid.
 
| 30. This have I written out of my entire love that I bear to my countrymen, wishing them yet once again to follow the truth, & to fly the vain imperfect rapier fight, the better to save themselves from wounds & slaughter, for who so attains to the perfection of this true fight which I have here set forth in these my brief instructions, & also in paradoxes of defence, shall not only defend themselves, but shall thereby bring those that fight upon the imperfect fight of the rapier under their mercy, or else put them in Cobb's traverse, where of you may read in the 38th chapter of my paradoxes aforesaid.
 
| 30. This haue I written out of myne entyre loue y<sup>t</sup> I bere to my country men, wiſhing them yet once againe to follow the truth, & to fly the vaine Imprfyt rapior fight, the bett<sup>r</sup> to ſaue themſelues from wounds & ſlawghter, for who ſo attayneth to the p<sup>r</sup>fectiõ of this truefyght w<sup>ch</sup> I haue here ſet forth in theſe my bref Inſtructions, & alſo in my pradoxes of defence, ſhal not only defend them ſelues, but ſhal ther by bring thoſe that fyght vpõ that Imprfyt fyght of y<sup>e</sup> rapior vnd<sup>r</sup> their mercye, or elſe put them in Cobbs travers, where ofyõ may read in the 38 Chapter of my pradoxes aforeſaid.
 
| 30. This haue I written out of myne entyre loue y<sup>t</sup> I bere to my country men, wiſhing them yet once againe to follow the truth, & to fly the vaine Imprfyt rapior fight, the bett<sup>r</sup> to ſaue themſelues from wounds & ſlawghter, for who ſo attayneth to the p<sup>r</sup>fectiõ of this truefyght w<sup>ch</sup> I haue here ſet forth in theſe my bref Inſtructions, & alſo in my pradoxes of defence, ſhal not only defend them ſelues, but ſhal ther by bring thoſe that fyght vpõ that Imprfyt fyght of y<sup>e</sup> rapior vnd<sup>r</sup> their mercye, or elſe put them in Cobbs travers, where ofyõ may read in the 38 Chapter of my pradoxes aforeſaid.
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Sword & Buckler fight, & ſword & dagg<sup>r</sup> fyght are al one, ſaving y<sup>t</sup> yõ ſafly defend both blowe & thruſt, ſyngle w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> buckler only, & in likeſort yõ may ſafly ward both blowes & thruſts dubble, y<sup>t</sup> is w<sup>t</sup> ſword & buckler together w<sup>ch</sup> is great aduantage againſt y<sup>e</sup> ſword & dagg<sup>r</sup>, &c, & is the ſureſt ſight of al ſhort weapons.
 
Sword & Buckler fight, & ſword & dagg<sup>r</sup> fyght are al one, ſaving y<sup>t</sup> yõ ſafly defend both blowe & thruſt, ſyngle w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> buckler only, & in likeſort yõ may ſafly ward both blowes & thruſts dubble, y<sup>t</sup> is w<sup>t</sup> ſword & buckler together w<sup>ch</sup> is great aduantage againſt y<sup>e</sup> ſword & dagg<sup>r</sup>, &c, & is the ſureſt ſight of al ſhort weapons.
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These weapons are to be vſed in fight as the ſhort ſtaf, yf both play vpõ dubble & ſyngle hand, at the ij hand ſword, the long ſword hath the advantage yf the waight ther of be not to heavye for his ſtrength y<sup>t</sup> hath it, but yf both play only vpon dubble hand, then his blade w<sup>ch</sup> is of cõvenyent length agreeing w<sup>t</sup> his ſtature y<sup>t</sup> hath it, w<sup>ch</sup> is according with the length of the meaſure of his ſyngle ſwordblade, hath the advantage of y<sup>e</sup> ſword y<sup>t</sup> is to long for y<sup>e</sup> ſtature of the contrarye prtye, becauſe he can croſe & uncroſe, ſtrike & thruſt,cloze & grype in ſhorter tyme than the other can.
 
These weapons are to be vſed in fight as the ſhort ſtaf, yf both play vpõ dubble & ſyngle hand, at the ij hand ſword, the long ſword hath the advantage yf the waight ther of be not to heavye for his ſtrength y<sup>t</sup> hath it, but yf both play only vpon dubble hand, then his blade w<sup>ch</sup> is of cõvenyent length agreeing w<sup>t</sup> his ſtature y<sup>t</sup> hath it, w<sup>ch</sup> is according with the length of the meaſure of his ſyngle ſwordblade, hath the advantage of y<sup>e</sup> ſword y<sup>t</sup> is to long for y<sup>e</sup> ſtature of the contrarye prtye, becauſe he can croſe & uncroſe, ſtrike & thruſt,cloze & grype in ſhorter tyme than the other can.
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| 1. At these weapons ever lie so you may be able to thrust single & double, & to ward, strike, or thrust in due time, so shall your enemy, if he strikes only upon double hand be driven of necessity, seeking to win the place, to gain you the place whereby you may safely hurt him, & go free yourself by reason of your distance, & where you shall seek to win the place upon him he shall not be able to gain the place upon you, nor keep the place from you whereby he shall either be hurt, or in great danger of hurt, by reason of your large reach, true place & distance, your fight being truly handled keeping itself from close & grip.
 
| 1. At these weapons ever lie so you may be able to thrust single & double, & to ward, strike, or thrust in due time, so shall your enemy, if he strikes only upon double hand be driven of necessity, seeking to win the place, to gain you the place whereby you may safely hurt him, & go free yourself by reason of your distance, & where you shall seek to win the place upon him he shall not be able to gain the place upon you, nor keep the place from you whereby he shall either be hurt, or in great danger of hurt, by reason of your large reach, true place & distance, your fight being truly handled keeping itself from close & grip.
 
| 1. At theſe weapons euer lye ſo that yõ may be able to thruſt ſyngle & dubble, & to ward, ſtrike, or thruſt in due tyme, ſo ſhal yo<sup>r</sup> enemye, yf he fyght only vpõ dubble hand be driuen of neceſſitie, ſeeking to wyn the place, to gayne yõ the place wher by yõ may ſaflyhurt him, & go free yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf by reaſon of yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, & when yõ ſhal ſeeke to wyn the place vpon him he ſhal not be able to gaine the place vpon you, nor to kepe the place frõ you wher by he ſhal eyther be hurt, or in great danger of hurt, by reaſon of yo<sup>r</sup> large reach, true place & diſtance, yo<sup>r</sup> fight being truly handled keeping it ſelf from Cloze & grype.
 
| 1. At theſe weapons euer lye ſo that yõ may be able to thruſt ſyngle & dubble, & to ward, ſtrike, or thruſt in due tyme, ſo ſhal yo<sup>r</sup> enemye, yf he fyght only vpõ dubble hand be driuen of neceſſitie, ſeeking to wyn the place, to gayne yõ the place wher by yõ may ſaflyhurt him, & go free yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf by reaſon of yo<sup>r</sup> diſtance, & when yõ ſhal ſeeke to wyn the place vpon him he ſhal not be able to gaine the place vpon you, nor to kepe the place frõ you wher by he ſhal eyther be hurt, or in great danger of hurt, by reaſon of yo<sup>r</sup> large reach, true place & diſtance, yo<sup>r</sup> fight being truly handled keeping it ſelf from Cloze & grype.
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| 2. And in like sort shall it be between two, which shall play upon the best, that is, if they play both double & single handed.
 
| 2. And in like sort shall it be between two, which shall play upon the best, that is, if they play both double & single handed.
 
| 2. And in like ſort ſhal it be betweene two, w<sup>ch</sup> ſhal play vpon the beſt, y<sup>t</sup> is, yf they play both dubble & ſyngle handed.
 
| 2. And in like ſort ſhal it be betweene two, w<sup>ch</sup> ſhal play vpon the beſt, y<sup>t</sup> is, yf they play both dubble & ſyngle handed.
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| 3. If you find yourself too strong for your adversary in any manner of ward, whether the same be above or below, put by his staff with force, & then strike or thrust him from it,
 
| 3. If you find yourself too strong for your adversary in any manner of ward, whether the same be above or below, put by his staff with force, & then strike or thrust him from it,
 
| 3. yf yõ fynd yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf to ſtrong for yo<sup>r</sup> adu<sup>r</sup>ſarie in any mann<sup>r</sup> of ward, whether the ſame be aboue or belowe, put by his ſtaf w<sup>t</sup> force, & then ſtrike or thruſt from it,
 
| 3. yf yõ fynd yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf to ſtrong for yo<sup>r</sup> adu<sup>r</sup>ſarie in any mann<sup>r</sup> of ward, whether the ſame be aboue or belowe, put by his ſtaf w<sup>t</sup> force, & then ſtrike or thruſt from it,
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| 4. But if you find him too strong for you upon his blows from aloft, so that you can hardly bear them upon your ward, then when he strikes in aloft at your head, & by his main strength would beat down your staff, & so give you a hurt before you shall be able to come again into your ward.  
 
| 4. But if you find him too strong for you upon his blows from aloft, so that you can hardly bear them upon your ward, then when he strikes in aloft at your head, & by his main strength would beat down your staff, & so give you a hurt before you shall be able to come again into your ward.  
 
| 4. but yf yõ fynd him to ſtrong for yõ vpõ hys blowes from a loft, ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ can hardly bere them vpon yo<sup>r</sup> ward, then when he ſtryketh in a loft at yo<sup>r</sup> hed, & by hys maine ſtrength would beat doune yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf, & ſo geue yõ a hurt before yõ ſhalbe able to com againeinto yo<sup>r</sup> ward,
 
| 4. but yf yõ fynd him to ſtrong for yõ vpõ hys blowes from a loft, ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ can hardly bere them vpon yo<sup>r</sup> ward, then when he ſtryketh in a loft at yo<sup>r</sup> hed, & by hys maine ſtrength would beat doune yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf, & ſo geue yõ a hurt before yõ ſhalbe able to com againeinto yo<sup>r</sup> ward,
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| Against such a one give a slip in the sort, suddenly draw back the higher part of your body a little & your foremost foot withal, & slip in the point of your staff under his staff, & thrust single at him, & fly out with all, so shall you be sure to hit him & go out free.
 
| Against such a one give a slip in the sort, suddenly draw back the higher part of your body a little & your foremost foot withal, & slip in the point of your staff under his staff, & thrust single at him, & fly out with all, so shall you be sure to hit him & go out free.
 
| Againſt ſuch a on giue the ſlypp in this ſort, ſodainly dray back the hyer prte of yo<sup>r</sup> body a lyttle & yo<sup>r</sup> for moſt foote w<sup>t</sup> all, & ſlyp in the poynt of yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf vnd<sup>r</sup> his ſtaf, & thruſt ſingle at him, & fly out w<sup>t</sup> all, ſo ſhal you be ſure to hyt him & go out free,
 
| Againſt ſuch a on giue the ſlypp in this ſort, ſodainly dray back the hyer prte of yo<sup>r</sup> body a lyttle & yo<sup>r</sup> for moſt foote w<sup>t</sup> all, & ſlyp in the poynt of yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf vnd<sup>r</sup> his ſtaf, & thruſt ſingle at him, & fly out w<sup>t</sup> all, ſo ſhal you be ſure to hyt him & go out free,
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| 5. If he lies aloft with his staff, then you lie with your back hand low, with your point upwards towards his staff, making your space narrow because you may cross his staff to ward his blow before it comes into full force, & then strongly & suddenly misdirect his point & so thrust at him single, the which you may do before he can remove his feet, by reason of the swiftness of your hand or fly out therewith, do this for both sides of the head if cause requires it, so shall you save both your head, body, and all parts, for your upper parts are guarded, & your lower parts far out of his reach.
 
| 5. If he lies aloft with his staff, then you lie with your back hand low, with your point upwards towards his staff, making your space narrow because you may cross his staff to ward his blow before it comes into full force, & then strongly & suddenly misdirect his point & so thrust at him single, the which you may do before he can remove his feet, by reason of the swiftness of your hand or fly out therewith, do this for both sides of the head if cause requires it, so shall you save both your head, body, and all parts, for your upper parts are guarded, & your lower parts far out of his reach.
 
| 5. yf he lye a loft w<sup>t</sup> his ſtaf, then lye yõ w<sup>t</sup> your hind<sup>r</sup> hand alowe, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt vptowards his ſtaf making yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow becauſe yõ may croſe hys ſtaf to ward his blow before it com in ful force, & then ſtrongly & ſodainlye indirect his poynt, & ſo thruſt at himſyngle, the w<sup>ch</sup> yõ may do before he can remoue his feet, by reaſon of the ſwyſtnes of yo<sup>r</sup> hand & fly out ther w<sup>t</sup> do this for both ſyds of y<sup>e</sup> hed yf cauſe require yt, ſo ſhal yõ ſaue both yo<sup>r</sup> hed, body, and al prts, for yo<sup>r</sup> vpp<sup>r</sup> parts are garded, & yo<sup>r</sup> lower prts tofarr out of his reach.
 
| 5. yf he lye a loft w<sup>t</sup> his ſtaf, then lye yõ w<sup>t</sup> your hind<sup>r</sup> hand alowe, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt vptowards his ſtaf making yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow becauſe yõ may croſe hys ſtaf to ward his blow before it com in ful force, & then ſtrongly & ſodainlye indirect his poynt, & ſo thruſt at himſyngle, the w<sup>ch</sup> yõ may do before he can remoue his feet, by reaſon of the ſwyſtnes of yo<sup>r</sup> hand & fly out ther w<sup>t</sup> do this for both ſyds of y<sup>e</sup> hed yf cauſe require yt, ſo ſhal yõ ſaue both yo<sup>r</sup> hed, body, and al prts, for yo<sup>r</sup> vpp<sup>r</sup> parts are garded, & yo<sup>r</sup> lower prts tofarr out of his reach.
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| 6. If he lies low with his point down, then lie you with your point down also, with your foremost hand low & your hind most hand high, so that you may cross his staff, & do all things as said in the other.  
 
| 6. If he lies low with his point down, then lie you with your point down also, with your foremost hand low & your hind most hand high, so that you may cross his staff, & do all things as said in the other.  
 
| 6. yf he lye a lowe w<sup>t</sup> his poynt doune, then lye yõ w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt alſo, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> foremoſt hand lowe & yo<sup>r</sup> hind<sup>r</sup> moſt hand hye, for ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ may croſe his ſtaf, & do in al things as is before ſaid in the other
 
| 6. yf he lye a lowe w<sup>t</sup> his poynt doune, then lye yõ w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt alſo, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> foremoſt hand lowe & yo<sup>r</sup> hind<sup>r</sup> moſt hand hye, for ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ may croſe his ſtaf, & do in al things as is before ſaid in the other
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| 7. If he lies upon the thrust then you lie with your space narrow lying up or down with your point in such sort as you may cross his staff, & thereby you shall be able to put or beat by his thrust before it is in full force, & then strike or thrust, ever remembering your governors. If upon this any will object that if this is true, then it is in vain to strike, to thrust, because he that does it is still in danger, this doubt is answered in the short single sword fight, in the 12th ground thereof.
 
| 7. If he lies upon the thrust then you lie with your space narrow lying up or down with your point in such sort as you may cross his staff, & thereby you shall be able to put or beat by his thrust before it is in full force, & then strike or thrust, ever remembering your governors. If upon this any will object that if this is true, then it is in vain to strike, to thrust, because he that does it is still in danger, this doubt is answered in the short single sword fight, in the 12th ground thereof.
 
| 7. yf he lye vpõ the thruſt then lye yõ w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow lying vp or doune w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt in ſuch ſort as you may croſe his ſtaf, & therby yõ ſhal be able to put by or beat by this thruſt before it be in ful force, & then ſtrike or thruſt, euer remembring yo<sup>r</sup> gouernors. yf vpon this any wil obiect y<sup>t</sup> yf this betrue, then it is in vaine to ſtrike, or thruſt, becauſe he y<sup>t</sup> doth it is ſtil in danger, this doubt is answered in the ſhort ſingle ſword fight, in the 12<sup>th</sup> ground therof
 
| 7. yf he lye vpõ the thruſt then lye yõ w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow lying vp or doune w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt in ſuch ſort as you may croſe his ſtaf, & therby yõ ſhal be able to put by or beat by this thruſt before it be in ful force, & then ſtrike or thruſt, euer remembring yo<sup>r</sup> gouernors. yf vpon this any wil obiect y<sup>t</sup> yf this betrue, then it is in vaine to ſtrike, or thruſt, becauſe he y<sup>t</sup> doth it is ſtil in danger, this doubt is answered in the ſhort ſingle ſword fight, in the 12<sup>th</sup> ground therof
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| 8. If your adversary strikes aloft at any side of your head or body, ward it with your point up & making your space so narrow that you may cross his staff before it comes in full force bearing or beating down his blow strongly, back again towards that side that he strikes in at you, & out of that ward, then instantly, either strike from that ward turning back your staff, & strike him on that side of the that is next to your staff.
 
| 8. If your adversary strikes aloft at any side of your head or body, ward it with your point up & making your space so narrow that you may cross his staff before it comes in full force bearing or beating down his blow strongly, back again towards that side that he strikes in at you, & out of that ward, then instantly, either strike from that ward turning back your staff, & strike him on that side of the that is next to your staff.
 
| 8. Yf yo<sup>r</sup> adu<sup>r</sup>ſarie ſtrike a loft at any ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed or body, ward it w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> point vp & making yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace ſo narrow y<sup>t</sup> yõ may croſe his ſtaf before it com in ful force bearing or beating doune his blow ſtrongly, back againe towards y<sup>t</sup> ſyde y<sup>t</sup> he ſtryketh in at you, & out of y<sup>t</sup> ward, then Inſtantly, eyther ſtrike frõ y<sup>t</sup> ward, turning back yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf, & ſtrike him on y<sup>t</sup> ſyde of the hed y<sup>t</sup> is next yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf,  
 
| 8. Yf yo<sup>r</sup> adu<sup>r</sup>ſarie ſtrike a loft at any ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed or body, ward it w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> point vp & making yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace ſo narrow y<sup>t</sup> yõ may croſe his ſtaf before it com in ful force bearing or beating doune his blow ſtrongly, back againe towards y<sup>t</sup> ſyde y<sup>t</sup> he ſtryketh in at you, & out of y<sup>t</sup> ward, then Inſtantly, eyther ſtrike frõ y<sup>t</sup> ward, turning back yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf, & ſtrike him on y<sup>t</sup> ſyde of the hed y<sup>t</sup> is next yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf,  
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| Or lift up your staff again, & so strike him on the head or body, or thrust at his body double or single, as you may find your best advantage ever in holding your staff, let there be such convenient space between your hands, wherein you shall find yourself most apt to ward, strike or thrust to your best liking.
 
| Or lift up your staff again, & so strike him on the head or body, or thrust at his body double or single, as you may find your best advantage ever in holding your staff, let there be such convenient space between your hands, wherein you shall find yourself most apt to ward, strike or thrust to your best liking.
 
| Or lyft vp yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf againe, & ſo ſtrike him on the hed or body, or thruſt at his body dubble or ſyngle, as yõ may find yo<sup>r</sup> beſt aduantage ever in holding yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf, let ther be ſuch convenient ſpace between yo<sup>r</sup> hands, wher in you ſhal fynd yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf apteſt to ward, ſtrike or thruſt to yo<sup>r</sup> beſt lyking
 
| Or lyft vp yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf againe, & ſo ſtrike him on the hed or body, or thruſt at his body dubble or ſyngle, as yõ may find yo<sup>r</sup> beſt aduantage ever in holding yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf, let ther be ſuch convenient ſpace between yo<sup>r</sup> hands, wher in you ſhal fynd yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf apteſt to ward, ſtrike or thruſt to yo<sup>r</sup> beſt lyking
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| 9. If you play with your staff with your left hand before and your right hand back behind, as many men find themselves most apt when that hand is before, & if your adversary upon his blow comes in to take the close of you, when you find his staff crossed with yours near his hand, then suddenly slip up you right hand close to the hind side of your foremost hand, & presently loosing the hind side of your foremost hand & put in under your own staff, & then cross or put by his staff therewith your hand take hold of his staff in such sort that your little finger be towards the point of his staff, & your thumb & forefinger towards his hands, & presently with your right hand mount the point of your own staff casting the point thereof over your right shoulder, with your knuckles downwards, & so stab him in the body or face with the hind end of your staff, but be sure to stab him at his coming in, whether you catch his staff or not, for sometimes his staff will lie to far out that upon his coming in you cannot reach it, then catch that arm in his coming in which he shall first put forth within your reach, but be sure to stab, for his staff can do you no hurt, and having so done, if you find yourself too strong for him, strike up his heels, if too weak fly out.
 
| 9. If you play with your staff with your left hand before and your right hand back behind, as many men find themselves most apt when that hand is before, & if your adversary upon his blow comes in to take the close of you, when you find his staff crossed with yours near his hand, then suddenly slip up you right hand close to the hind side of your foremost hand, & presently loosing the hind side of your foremost hand & put in under your own staff, & then cross or put by his staff therewith your hand take hold of his staff in such sort that your little finger be towards the point of his staff, & your thumb & forefinger towards his hands, & presently with your right hand mount the point of your own staff casting the point thereof over your right shoulder, with your knuckles downwards, & so stab him in the body or face with the hind end of your staff, but be sure to stab him at his coming in, whether you catch his staff or not, for sometimes his staff will lie to far out that upon his coming in you cannot reach it, then catch that arm in his coming in which he shall first put forth within your reach, but be sure to stab, for his staff can do you no hurt, and having so done, if you find yourself too strong for him, strike up his heels, if too weak fly out.
 
| 9. Yf yõ play w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> left hand before & yo<sup>r</sup> right hand back behind, as many men do fynd them ſelues moſt apteſt when y<sup>t</sup> hand is before, & yf yo<sup>r</sup> aduerſarie vpõ his blowe com in to take the cloze of you, when yõ fynd his ſtaf croſt w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>rs</sup> neere his hand then ſodainlye ſlyp vp yo<sup>r</sup> right hand close to the hind<sup>r</sup> ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> formoſt hand, & p<sup>r</sup>ſently looſing yo<sup>r</sup> for muſt hand & put it vnd<sup>r</sup> your owne ſtaf, & then croſe or put by his ſtaf ther w<sup>t</sup> & w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand take hold of his ſtaf in such ſort y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> lyttle fyng<sup>r</sup> be towards the poynt of his ſtaf , & yo<sup>r</sup> thumb & fore fing<sup>r</sup> towards his hands, & p<sup>r</sup>ſently w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> right hand mount y<sup>e</sup> point of yo<sup>r</sup> owne ſtaf caſting the point thereof back ouer yo<sup>r</sup> right ſhold<sup>r</sup>, yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles doun wards, & yo<sup>r</sup> nayles vpwards, & ſo ſtabb him in the body or face w<sup>t</sup> the hind<sup>r</sup> end of y<sup>e</sup> ſtaf, but be ſure to ſtabb him at his cõmyng in, whether yõ catch his ſtaf or not, for ſomtymes his ſtaf will lye ſo farr out y<sup>t</sup> vpon his cõmyng in yõ cannot reach it, then catch y<sup>t</sup> arme in his comynge in w<sup>ch</sup> he ſhal firſt put forth w<sup>t</sup> in yo<sup>r</sup>reach, but be ſure to ſtabb, for his ſtaf can do yõ no hurt, and having ſo don, yf yõ fynd yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf to ſtrong for him, ſtrike vp his heeles, yf to weake fly out.
 
| 9. Yf yõ play w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> left hand before & yo<sup>r</sup> right hand back behind, as many men do fynd them ſelues moſt apteſt when y<sup>t</sup> hand is before, & yf yo<sup>r</sup> aduerſarie vpõ his blowe com in to take the cloze of you, when yõ fynd his ſtaf croſt w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>rs</sup> neere his hand then ſodainlye ſlyp vp yo<sup>r</sup> right hand close to the hind<sup>r</sup> ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> formoſt hand, & p<sup>r</sup>ſently looſing yo<sup>r</sup> for muſt hand & put it vnd<sup>r</sup> your owne ſtaf, & then croſe or put by his ſtaf ther w<sup>t</sup> & w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand take hold of his ſtaf in such ſort y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> lyttle fyng<sup>r</sup> be towards the poynt of his ſtaf , & yo<sup>r</sup> thumb & fore fing<sup>r</sup> towards his hands, & p<sup>r</sup>ſently w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> right hand mount y<sup>e</sup> point of yo<sup>r</sup> owne ſtaf caſting the point thereof back ouer yo<sup>r</sup> right ſhold<sup>r</sup>, yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles doun wards, & yo<sup>r</sup> nayles vpwards, & ſo ſtabb him in the body or face w<sup>t</sup> the hind<sup>r</sup> end of y<sup>e</sup> ſtaf, but be ſure to ſtabb him at his cõmyng in, whether yõ catch his ſtaf or not, for ſomtymes his ſtaf will lye ſo farr out y<sup>t</sup> vpon his cõmyng in yõ cannot reach it, then catch y<sup>t</sup> arme in his comynge in w<sup>ch</sup> he ſhal firſt put forth w<sup>t</sup> in yo<sup>r</sup>reach, but be ſure to ſtabb, for his ſtaf can do yõ no hurt, and having ſo don, yf yõ fynd yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf to ſtrong for him, ſtrike vp his heeles, yf to weake fly out.
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| 10. The like must you do if you play with your right hand before, & your left hand back behind, but if you need not to slide forth your left hand, because your right hand is in the right place on your staff already to use in that action, but then you must displace your left hand to take hold of his staff, or the grip as is aforesaid, & to use the stab as is above said.
 
| 10. The like must you do if you play with your right hand before, & your left hand back behind, but if you need not to slide forth your left hand, because your right hand is in the right place on your staff already to use in that action, but then you must displace your left hand to take hold of his staff, or the grip as is aforesaid, & to use the stab as is above said.
 
| 10. The like muſt yõ do yf yõ play w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> right hand before, & yo<sup>r</sup> left hand back behind, but y<sup>t</sup> yõ neede not to ſlyde forth yo<sup>r</sup> left hand, becauſe yo<sup>r</sup> right hand is in the right place of yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf alredye to vſe in y<sup>t</sup> action, but then yõ muſt diſplace yo<sup>r</sup> left hand to take hold of his ſtaf, or the grype as is a foreſaid, & to vſe the ſtabb as is aboue ſaid,
 
| 10. The like muſt yõ do yf yõ play w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> right hand before, & yo<sup>r</sup> left hand back behind, but y<sup>t</sup> yõ neede not to ſlyde forth yo<sup>r</sup> left hand, becauſe yo<sup>r</sup> right hand is in the right place of yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf alredye to vſe in y<sup>t</sup> action, but then yõ muſt diſplace yo<sup>r</sup> left hand to take hold of his ſtaf, or the grype as is a foreſaid, & to vſe the ſtabb as is aboue ſaid,
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Line 1,825: Line 1,999:
 
| 11. If both lie aloft as aforesaid, & play with the left hand before, if he strikes at the right side of your head or body then must you cross his staff before his blow is in full force, by making your space narrow, & then strike it strongly back again towards his left side, & from that ward you may turn back your staff & strike him backward & therewith on the left side of his head, or lift up your staff & strike him on the right or left side of the head, body, or arm, or thrust him in the body, the like blows or thrusts any you make at him whether he strikes or thrusts, having put by his staff, remembering your governors. The like order must you use in playing with the right hand foreward.
 
| 11. If both lie aloft as aforesaid, & play with the left hand before, if he strikes at the right side of your head or body then must you cross his staff before his blow is in full force, by making your space narrow, & then strike it strongly back again towards his left side, & from that ward you may turn back your staff & strike him backward & therewith on the left side of his head, or lift up your staff & strike him on the right or left side of the head, body, or arm, or thrust him in the body, the like blows or thrusts any you make at him whether he strikes or thrusts, having put by his staff, remembering your governors. The like order must you use in playing with the right hand foreward.
 
| 11. yf both lye a loft as aforeſaid, & play w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> left hand before, yf he ſtrike at the Ryght ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed or body then muſt yõ croſe his ſtaf before his blow be in ful force, by making yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow, & then ſtrike it ſtrongly back againe towards his left ſyde, & from y<sup>t</sup>ward yõ may turne back yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf & ſtrike him backwards ther w<sup>t</sup> on the left ſyde of the hed, or lyft vp yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf & ſtrike him on the right or left ſyde of the hed, body, or arme, or thruſt him in the body, the lyke blowes or thruſts may you make at him whether he ſtrike or thruſt, having put by his ſtaf, remembring yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors. The like ord<sup>r</sup> muſt yõ vſe in playing with the right hand before,
 
| 11. yf both lye a loft as aforeſaid, & play w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> left hand before, yf he ſtrike at the Ryght ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> hed or body then muſt yõ croſe his ſtaf before his blow be in ful force, by making yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow, & then ſtrike it ſtrongly back againe towards his left ſyde, & from y<sup>t</sup>ward yõ may turne back yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf & ſtrike him backwards ther w<sup>t</sup> on the left ſyde of the hed, or lyft vp yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf & ſtrike him on the right or left ſyde of the hed, body, or arme, or thruſt him in the body, the lyke blowes or thruſts may you make at him whether he ſtrike or thruſt, having put by his ſtaf, remembring yo<sup>r</sup> gou<sup>r</sup>nors. The like ord<sup>r</sup> muſt yõ vſe in playing with the right hand before,
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Line 1,830: Line 2,005:
 
| 12. But if he thrust at you continually then ever have a special care to consider, whether he lies aloft or below, & do continually thrust at you there from, then look that you ever lie so that you make your space so narrow upon him, that you be sure to cross his staff with yours, & put it before it be in full force, and from that ward, thrust at him single or double as you find it best, & if he remember not to fly back at that instant when he thrusts it will be too late for him to avoid any thrust that you shall make at him.
 
| 12. But if he thrust at you continually then ever have a special care to consider, whether he lies aloft or below, & do continually thrust at you there from, then look that you ever lie so that you make your space so narrow upon him, that you be sure to cross his staff with yours, & put it before it be in full force, and from that ward, thrust at him single or double as you find it best, & if he remember not to fly back at that instant when he thrusts it will be too late for him to avoid any thrust that you shall make at him.
 
| 12. but yf he thruſt at yõ cõtynually then euer have a ſpeciall care to cõſyder, whether he lye a loft or belowe, & do continually thruſt at yõ ther from, then looke that yõ euer lye ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace ſo narrow vpon him, y<sup>t</sup> yõ be ſure to croſe his ſtaf w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>rs</sup>, & put it before it be in full force, and frõ y<sup>t</sup> ward, thruſt at him ſyngle or dubble as yõ fynd it beſt, & yf he rememb<sup>r</sup> not to fly back at y<sup>t</sup> inſtant when he thruſteth it wilbe to late for him to avoyd any thruſt y<sup>t</sup> yõ ſhal make at him,
 
| 12. but yf he thruſt at yõ cõtynually then euer have a ſpeciall care to cõſyder, whether he lye a loft or belowe, & do continually thruſt at yõ ther from, then looke that yõ euer lye ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace ſo narrow vpon him, y<sup>t</sup> yõ be ſure to croſe his ſtaf w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>rs</sup>, & put it before it be in full force, and frõ y<sup>t</sup> ward, thruſt at him ſyngle or dubble as yõ fynd it beſt, & yf he rememb<sup>r</sup> not to fly back at y<sup>t</sup> inſtant when he thruſteth it wilbe to late for him to avoyd any thruſt y<sup>t</sup> yõ ſhal make at him,
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1. Yf yõ haue a ſtaf of longer length than is cõvenient then make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow, & ſeeke not to offend vntil yõ haue ſtrongly & ſwyftly put by his point the w<sup>ch</sup> yõ ſhal w<sup>t</sup> eaſe accompliſh, by reaſon of yo<sup>r</sup> narrow ſpace & yo<sup>r</sup> force, then ſtrike or thruſt as yõ ſhalthinke beſt.
 
1. Yf yõ haue a ſtaf of longer length than is cõvenient then make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow, & ſeeke not to offend vntil yõ haue ſtrongly & ſwyftly put by his point the w<sup>ch</sup> yõ ſhal w<sup>t</sup> eaſe accompliſh, by reaſon of yo<sup>r</sup> narrow ſpace & yo<sup>r</sup> force, then ſtrike or thruſt as yõ ſhalthinke beſt.
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Line 1,846: Line 2,023:
 
| 2. This short staff fight against the long staff is done in the same sort that short staff fight to short staff fight is done, but that the man with the short staff must always remember to keep narrow space upon the long staff, where so ever the long staff shall lie, high or low, continually make your space narrow upon him, so shall you be sure if he strikes or thrusts at you, to take the same before it is into its full force & by reason that your force is more with your short staff than his can be at the point of his long staff you shall cast his staff so far out of the straight line with your short staff, that you may safely enter in with your feet, & strike or thrust home at him.
 
| 2. This short staff fight against the long staff is done in the same sort that short staff fight to short staff fight is done, but that the man with the short staff must always remember to keep narrow space upon the long staff, where so ever the long staff shall lie, high or low, continually make your space narrow upon him, so shall you be sure if he strikes or thrusts at you, to take the same before it is into its full force & by reason that your force is more with your short staff than his can be at the point of his long staff you shall cast his staff so far out of the straight line with your short staff, that you may safely enter in with your feet, & strike or thrust home at him.
 
| 2. This ſhort ſtaf fight againſt y<sup>e</sup> longe ſtaf is don in the ſame ſort that ſhort ſtaf fight to ſhort ſtaf is don, but y<sup>t</sup> the man w<sup>t</sup> the ſhort ſtaf muſt alwaies rememb<sup>r</sup> to kepe a narrow ſpace vpon y<sup>e</sup> long ſtaf, wher ſo euer the longe ſtaf ſhal lye, Hye or lowe, cõtinually make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow vpõ, ſo shall yõ be ſure yf he ſtrike or thruſt at yõ, to take the ſame before it be into his full force, & by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> force is more w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſhort ſtaf than his can be at the poynt of his longe ſtaf, yõ ſhal caſt his ſtaf ſo farr out of y<sup>e</sup> ſtreit lyne w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup>ſhort ſtaf, y<sup>t</sup> yõ may ſafly enter in w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> feet, & ſtrike or thruſt home at him.
 
| 2. This ſhort ſtaf fight againſt y<sup>e</sup> longe ſtaf is don in the ſame ſort that ſhort ſtaf fight to ſhort ſtaf is don, but y<sup>t</sup> the man w<sup>t</sup> the ſhort ſtaf muſt alwaies rememb<sup>r</sup> to kepe a narrow ſpace vpon y<sup>e</sup> long ſtaf, wher ſo euer the longe ſtaf ſhal lye, Hye or lowe, cõtinually make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow vpõ, ſo shall yõ be ſure yf he ſtrike or thruſt at yõ, to take the ſame before it be into his full force, & by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> force is more w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſhort ſtaf than his can be at the poynt of his longe ſtaf, yõ ſhal caſt his ſtaf ſo farr out of y<sup>e</sup> ſtreit lyne w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup>ſhort ſtaf, y<sup>t</sup> yõ may ſafly enter in w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> feet, & ſtrike or thruſt home at him.
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Line 1,851: Line 2,029:
 
| 3. Yet this present shift he has at that instant, he may slip back his staff in his hands, which time is swifter then your feet coming forward, whereby he will have his staff as short as yours, yet by reason that at the first you cast his staff so far out of the right line, that you had time to enter with your feet, you shall then be so near him, that you make narrow space upon him again, so that he shall have no time to slip foreward his staff again in his former place, nor go back with his feet, & so to recover the hind end of his staff again, because if he slips forth his staff to strike or thrust at you, that may you safely defend because of your narrow space upon him, & therewithal you may strike or thrust him from your ward, either at single or double.
 
| 3. Yet this present shift he has at that instant, he may slip back his staff in his hands, which time is swifter then your feet coming forward, whereby he will have his staff as short as yours, yet by reason that at the first you cast his staff so far out of the right line, that you had time to enter with your feet, you shall then be so near him, that you make narrow space upon him again, so that he shall have no time to slip foreward his staff again in his former place, nor go back with his feet, & so to recover the hind end of his staff again, because if he slips forth his staff to strike or thrust at you, that may you safely defend because of your narrow space upon him, & therewithal you may strike or thrust him from your ward, either at single or double.
 
| 3. Yet this p<sup>r</sup>ſent ſhift he hath at y<sup>t</sup> inſtant, he may ſlypp back his ſtaf in his hands, w<sup>ch</sup> tyme is ſwyfter then yo<sup>r</sup> feet in cõmynge forwarde, wher by he will haue his ſtaf as ſhort as yo<sup>rs</sup>, yet by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> at y<sup>e</sup> firſt yõ caſt his ſtaf ſo farr out of the right lyne, that yõ hadtyme to enter in w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> feet, yõ ſhal then be ſo neere him, y<sup>t</sup> yõ may make narrow ſpace vpõ him againe, ſo y<sup>t</sup> he ſhal haue no tyme to ſlyp forwarde his ſtaf agayne in his former place, nor to go back w<sup>t</sup> his feet, & ſo to recou<sup>r</sup> the hind<sup>r</sup> end of his ſtaf againe, becauſeyf he ſlyp forth his ſtaf to ſtrike or thruſt at you, that may yõ ſafly defend becauſe of your narrow ſpace vpõ him, & ther w<sup>t</sup> al yõ may ſtrike or thruſt him frõ yo<sup>r</sup> warde, eyther at ſyngle or dubble,
 
| 3. Yet this p<sup>r</sup>ſent ſhift he hath at y<sup>t</sup> inſtant, he may ſlypp back his ſtaf in his hands, w<sup>ch</sup> tyme is ſwyfter then yo<sup>r</sup> feet in cõmynge forwarde, wher by he will haue his ſtaf as ſhort as yo<sup>rs</sup>, yet by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> at y<sup>e</sup> firſt yõ caſt his ſtaf ſo farr out of the right lyne, that yõ hadtyme to enter in w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> feet, yõ ſhal then be ſo neere him, y<sup>t</sup> yõ may make narrow ſpace vpõ him againe, ſo y<sup>t</sup> he ſhal haue no tyme to ſlyp forwarde his ſtaf agayne in his former place, nor to go back w<sup>t</sup> his feet, & ſo to recou<sup>r</sup> the hind<sup>r</sup> end of his ſtaf againe, becauſeyf he ſlyp forth his ſtaf to ſtrike or thruſt at you, that may yõ ſafly defend becauſe of your narrow ſpace vpõ him, & ther w<sup>t</sup> al yõ may ſtrike or thruſt him frõ yo<sup>r</sup> warde, eyther at ſyngle or dubble,
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| 4. But if he will go back with his feet thinking by that means to recover the whole length of his staff again, that can he not do in convenient time because the time of your hand is swifter than the time of his feet, by reason whereof you may strike or thrust him in his going back.
 
| 4. But if he will go back with his feet thinking by that means to recover the whole length of his staff again, that can he not do in convenient time because the time of your hand is swifter than the time of his feet, by reason whereof you may strike or thrust him in his going back.
 
| 4. but yf he wil go back w<sup>t</sup> his feet thinking by y<sup>t</sup> meanes to recou<sup>r</sup> the whole length of hys ſtaf againe, y<sup>t</sup> can he not do in cõvenyent tyme because the tyme of yo<sup>r</sup> hand is ſwyft<sup>r</sup> than y<sup>e</sup> tyme of his feet, by reaſon wherof yõ may ſtrike or thruſt him in his goyngback.
 
| 4. but yf he wil go back w<sup>t</sup> his feet thinking by y<sup>t</sup> meanes to recou<sup>r</sup> the whole length of hys ſtaf againe, y<sup>t</sup> can he not do in cõvenyent tyme because the tyme of yo<sup>r</sup> hand is ſwyft<sup>r</sup> than y<sup>e</sup> tyme of his feet, by reaſon wherof yõ may ſtrike or thruſt him in his goyngback.
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| 5. Again it is to be remembered in that time that you keep him at bay, upon the drawing in of his staff, the hind end thereof lying so far back behind will be so troublesome for him, that he can make no perfect fight against you & commonly in his drawing in of his staff it will be too short to make a true fight against you, neither to offend you or make himself safe.
 
| 5. Again it is to be remembered in that time that you keep him at bay, upon the drawing in of his staff, the hind end thereof lying so far back behind will be so troublesome for him, that he can make no perfect fight against you & commonly in his drawing in of his staff it will be too short to make a true fight against you, neither to offend you or make himself safe.
 
| 5. Againe it is to be remembred in y<sup>t</sup> tyme y<sup>t</sup> yõ keepe him at y<sup>t</sup> bay, vpõ the drawing in of his ſtaf, the hind<sup>r</sup> end therof lying ſo farr back behind him wilbe ſo trobbleſom vnto him, that he can make no prfyt fight againſt yõ & cõmonly in his drawing in of his ſtaf itwilbe to ſhort to make true fight against you, nether to offend yõ nor defend him ſelf.
 
| 5. Againe it is to be remembred in y<sup>t</sup> tyme y<sup>t</sup> yõ keepe him at y<sup>t</sup> bay, vpõ the drawing in of his ſtaf, the hind<sup>r</sup> end therof lying ſo farr back behind him wilbe ſo trobbleſom vnto him, that he can make no prfyt fight againſt yõ & cõmonly in his drawing in of his ſtaf itwilbe to ſhort to make true fight against you, nether to offend yõ nor defend him ſelf.
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Line 1,866: Line 2,047:
 
| 6. If he attempts the close with you then stab him with the hind end of your staff as said in the fight of the 2 short staves of convenient length, in the 9th ground thereof.
 
| 6. If he attempts the close with you then stab him with the hind end of your staff as said in the fight of the 2 short staves of convenient length, in the 9th ground thereof.
 
| 6. yf he attempt the Cloze w<sup>t</sup> yõ then ſtabb him w<sup>t</sup> the hind<sup>r</sup> end of yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf as is ſaid in y<sup>e</sup> fyght of y<sup>e</sup> ij ſhort ſtaves of cõvenyent length, in the 9<sup>t</sup>h ground therof.
 
| 6. yf he attempt the Cloze w<sup>t</sup> yõ then ſtabb him w<sup>t</sup> the hind<sup>r</sup> end of yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf as is ſaid in y<sup>e</sup> fyght of y<sup>e</sup> ij ſhort ſtaves of cõvenyent length, in the 9<sup>t</sup>h ground therof.
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Line 1,871: Line 2,053:
 
| Note: Remember that at the Morris pike, forest bill, long staff & two handed sword, that you lie in such sort upon your wards that you may both ward, strike & thrust both double & single, & then return to your former wards slips & lie again & then are you as you were before. The like fight is to be used with the javelin, partisan, halberd, black bill, battle axe, glaive, half pike, etc.
 
| Note: Remember that at the Morris pike, forest bill, long staff & two handed sword, that you lie in such sort upon your wards that you may both ward, strike & thrust both double & single, & then return to your former wards slips & lie again & then are you as you were before. The like fight is to be used with the javelin, partisan, halberd, black bill, battle axe, glaive, half pike, etc.
 
| Note. Rememb<sup>r</sup> y<sup>t</sup> at Morris pyke, forreſt byll, longe ſtaf & two hand ſword, y<sup>t</sup> yõ lye in ſuch ſort vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> wards y<sup>t</sup> yõ may both ward, ſtrike, & thruſt, both dubble & ſyngle, & then returne to yo<sup>r</sup> former wards ſlyps & lyinge againe & then are yõ as yõ wer before The like fight is to be vſed w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> Javelen, prtyſon, halbard, black byll. battle Axe, gleve half pyke &c.
 
| Note. Rememb<sup>r</sup> y<sup>t</sup> at Morris pyke, forreſt byll, longe ſtaf & two hand ſword, y<sup>t</sup> yõ lye in ſuch ſort vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> wards y<sup>t</sup> yõ may both ward, ſtrike, & thruſt, both dubble & ſyngle, & then returne to yo<sup>r</sup> former wards ſlyps & lyinge againe & then are yõ as yõ wer before The like fight is to be vſed w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> Javelen, prtyſon, halbard, black byll. battle Axe, gleve half pyke &c.
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Line 1,882: Line 2,065:
  
 
1. The forreſt byl haue the fyght of the ſtaf but y<sup>t</sup> it hath iiij wards more w<sup>t</sup> the hed of the byll, y<sup>t</sup> is one to bere it vpwards, another to beat it dounwards ſo y<sup>t</sup> the carrage of yo<sup>r</sup> byll hed be w<sup>t</sup> the edge neyther nor doune but ſyde wyſe.
 
1. The forreſt byl haue the fyght of the ſtaf but y<sup>t</sup> it hath iiij wards more w<sup>t</sup> the hed of the byll, y<sup>t</sup> is one to bere it vpwards, another to beat it dounwards ſo y<sup>t</sup> the carrage of yo<sup>r</sup> byll hed be w<sup>t</sup> the edge neyther nor doune but ſyde wyſe.
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Line 1,887: Line 2,071:
 
| The other 2 wards are one to cast his bill head downwards towards the right side, & the other towards the left. And upon either one of these wards or catches run up to his hands with the head of your bill & then by reason that you have put his staff out of the right line, you may catch at his head, neck, arm or legs, etc., with the edge of your bill, & hook or pluck him strongly to you & fly out withal.
 
| The other 2 wards are one to cast his bill head downwards towards the right side, & the other towards the left. And upon either one of these wards or catches run up to his hands with the head of your bill & then by reason that you have put his staff out of the right line, you may catch at his head, neck, arm or legs, etc., with the edge of your bill, & hook or pluck him strongly to you & fly out withal.
 
| The other ij wards are on to cast his byl hed towards the ryght ſyde, thother towards y<sup>e</sup> left ſyde. And vpon ei<sup>r</sup> on of theſe wards of catches run vp to his hands w<sup>t</sup> the hed of yo<sup>r</sup> byll & then by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> yõ haueput his ſtaf out of y<sup>e</sup> right lyne, yõ may catch at his hed neck arme or leggs &c w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> edge of yo<sup>r</sup> byll, & hook or pluck him ſtrongly to you & fly out w<sup>t</sup>all.
 
| The other ij wards are on to cast his byl hed towards the ryght ſyde, thother towards y<sup>e</sup> left ſyde. And vpon ei<sup>r</sup> on of theſe wards of catches run vp to his hands w<sup>t</sup> the hed of yo<sup>r</sup> byll & then by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> yõ haueput his ſtaf out of y<sup>e</sup> right lyne, yõ may catch at his hed neck arme or leggs &c w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> edge of yo<sup>r</sup> byll, & hook or pluck him ſtrongly to you & fly out w<sup>t</sup>all.
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Line 1,892: Line 2,077:
 
| 2. If you cast his staff so far out that your bill slides not up to his hands, then you may safely run in sliding your hands within one yard of the head of your bill, & so with your bill in one hand take him by the leg with the blade of your bill & pluck him to you & with your other hand defend yourself from his gripping if he offers to grapple with you.
 
| 2. If you cast his staff so far out that your bill slides not up to his hands, then you may safely run in sliding your hands within one yard of the head of your bill, & so with your bill in one hand take him by the leg with the blade of your bill & pluck him to you & with your other hand defend yourself from his gripping if he offers to grapple with you.
 
| 2. Yf yõ caſt his ſtaf ſo farr out y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> byll ſlyde not vp to his hands, then you may ſafly run in ſlyding yo<sup>r</sup> hands w<sup>t</sup>in one yard of y<sup>e</sup> hed of yo<sup>r</sup> byll, & ſo w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> byl in one hand take him by y<sup>e</sup> legg w<sup>t</sup> the blade of yo<sup>r</sup> byll & pluck him to yõ & w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> other hand defend yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf from his grips yf he offer to grype w<sup>t</sup> you.
 
| 2. Yf yõ caſt his ſtaf ſo farr out y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> byll ſlyde not vp to his hands, then you may ſafly run in ſlyding yo<sup>r</sup> hands w<sup>t</sup>in one yard of y<sup>e</sup> hed of yo<sup>r</sup> byll, & ſo w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> byl in one hand take him by y<sup>e</sup> legg w<sup>t</sup> the blade of yo<sup>r</sup> byll & pluck him to yõ & w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> other hand defend yo<sup>r</sup> ſelf from his grips yf he offer to grype w<sup>t</sup> you.
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Line 1,897: Line 2,083:
 
| 3. If you fight bill to bill do the like in all respects as with the staff in your fight, for your bill fight & staff fight is all one, but only for the defence & offense with the head of the bill, & where the staff man upon the close if he uses the stab with the butt end of his staff, the bill man at that time is to use the catch at the leg with the edge of his bill in the second ground above is said.
 
| 3. If you fight bill to bill do the like in all respects as with the staff in your fight, for your bill fight & staff fight is all one, but only for the defence & offense with the head of the bill, & where the staff man upon the close if he uses the stab with the butt end of his staff, the bill man at that time is to use the catch at the leg with the edge of his bill in the second ground above is said.
 
| 3. Yf you fight byll to byll do the like in al reſpects as w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> ſtaf in yo<sup>r</sup> fyght, for yo<sup>r</sup> byll fight & ſtaf fyght is al one, but only for the defence & offence w<sup>t</sup> the hed of y<sup>e</sup> byll, & wher y<sup>e</sup> ſtaf man vpõ the cloze yf he vſe y<sup>e</sup> ſtabb w<sup>t</sup> the butt end of his ſtaf, the byll man aty<sup>t</sup> tyme is to vſe y<sup>e</sup> catch at he legg w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> edge of his byll, as in y<sup>e</sup> ſecond ground above is ſaid.
 
| 3. Yf you fight byll to byll do the like in al reſpects as w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> ſtaf in yo<sup>r</sup> fyght, for yo<sup>r</sup> byll fight & ſtaf fyght is al one, but only for the defence & offence w<sup>t</sup> the hed of y<sup>e</sup> byll, & wher y<sup>e</sup> ſtaf man vpõ the cloze yf he vſe y<sup>e</sup> ſtabb w<sup>t</sup> the butt end of his ſtaf, the byll man aty<sup>t</sup> tyme is to vſe y<sup>e</sup> catch at he legg w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> edge of his byll, as in y<sup>e</sup> ſecond ground above is ſaid.
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Line 1,902: Line 2,089:
 
| 4. Remember ever in all your fights with this weapon to make your space narrow whether it is against the staff or bill so that whatsoever he shall do against you, you shall still make your ward before he is in his full force to offend you.
 
| 4. Remember ever in all your fights with this weapon to make your space narrow whether it is against the staff or bill so that whatsoever he shall do against you, you shall still make your ward before he is in his full force to offend you.
 
| 4. Rememb<sup>r</sup> euer in al yo<sup>r</sup> fyght w<sup>t</sup> this weapon to make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow whether it be againſt the ſtaf or byll ſo y<sup>t</sup> what ſo euer he ſhal do againſt you, yõ ſhal ſtill make yo<sup>r</sup> ward before he be in his ful force to offend you.
 
| 4. Rememb<sup>r</sup> euer in al yo<sup>r</sup> fyght w<sup>t</sup> this weapon to make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace narrow whether it be againſt the ſtaf or byll ſo y<sup>t</sup> what ſo euer he ſhal do againſt you, yõ ſhal ſtill make yo<sup>r</sup> ward before he be in his ful force to offend you.
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Line 1,907: Line 2,095:
 
| 5. Also if you can reach within the head of his bill with the head of your bill then suddenly with the head of your bill snatch his bill head strongly towards you, & therewithal indirect his bill head & forcibly run up your bill head to his hands, so have you the like advantage as above said, whereas I spoke of running up towards his hands.
 
| 5. Also if you can reach within the head of his bill with the head of your bill then suddenly with the head of your bill snatch his bill head strongly towards you, & therewithal indirect his bill head & forcibly run up your bill head to his hands, so have you the like advantage as above said, whereas I spoke of running up towards his hands.
 
| 5. Alſo yf yõ can reach w<sup>t</sup>in the hed of yo<sup>r</sup> byll then ſodainly w<sup>t</sup> the hed of yo<sup>r</sup> byll ſnach his byll hed ſtrongly towards you, & therw<sup>t</sup>all indirect his byl hed & forcibly run vp yo<sup>r</sup> byl hed to his hands, ſo haue yõ the lyke advantage as aboueſaid, wheras I ſpake ofrunyng vp towards his hands.
 
| 5. Alſo yf yõ can reach w<sup>t</sup>in the hed of yo<sup>r</sup> byll then ſodainly w<sup>t</sup> the hed of yo<sup>r</sup> byll ſnach his byll hed ſtrongly towards you, & therw<sup>t</sup>all indirect his byl hed & forcibly run vp yo<sup>r</sup> byl hed to his hands, ſo haue yõ the lyke advantage as aboueſaid, wheras I ſpake ofrunyng vp towards his hands.
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Line 1,912: Line 2,101:
 
| 6. If he lies low with this bill head then if you can put your bill head in over the head of his bill, & strongly put down his bill staff with your bill head, bearing it flat, then you may presently run up your bill head single handed to his hands & fly out therewith, so shall you hurt him in the hands & go free yourself.
 
| 6. If he lies low with this bill head then if you can put your bill head in over the head of his bill, & strongly put down his bill staff with your bill head, bearing it flat, then you may presently run up your bill head single handed to his hands & fly out therewith, so shall you hurt him in the hands & go free yourself.
 
| 6. Yf he lye alowe w<sup>t</sup> his byl hed then yf yõ can put yo<sup>r</sup> byll hed in ou<sup>r</sup> the hed of his bylle & ſtronglye put doune his byl ſtaf w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> byl hed, bearinge it flat, then yõ may p<sup>r</sup>ſently run vp yo<sup>r</sup> byll hed ſingle handed to his hands, & fly out therw<sup>t</sup>, ſo ſhal yõ hurt him iny<sup>e</sup> hand & go free yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf.
 
| 6. Yf he lye alowe w<sup>t</sup> his byl hed then yf yõ can put yo<sup>r</sup> byll hed in ou<sup>r</sup> the hed of his bylle & ſtronglye put doune his byl ſtaf w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> byl hed, bearinge it flat, then yõ may p<sup>r</sup>ſently run vp yo<sup>r</sup> byll hed ſingle handed to his hands, & fly out therw<sup>t</sup>, ſo ſhal yõ hurt him iny<sup>e</sup> hand & go free yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf.
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Line 1,917: Line 2,107:
 
| 7. The like may you do with your bill against the short staff if you can press it down in the like sort, but if he has a long staff then run up double handed with both hands upon your bill, which thing you may safely do because you are in your strength & have taken him in the weak part of his staff.
 
| 7. The like may you do with your bill against the short staff if you can press it down in the like sort, but if he has a long staff then run up double handed with both hands upon your bill, which thing you may safely do because you are in your strength & have taken him in the weak part of his staff.
 
| 7. The like may yõ do w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> byll againſt the ſhort ſtaf yf yõ can preſs it doune in y<sup>e</sup> lyke ſort, but yf he haue a longe ſtaf then run up dubble handed w<sup>t</sup> both hands vpon yo<sup>r</sup> byll, w<sup>ch</sup> thynge yõ may ſafly do becauſe yõ are in yo<sup>r</sup> ſtrength & haue taken him in the weak prte of his ſtaf.
 
| 7. The like may yõ do w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> byll againſt the ſhort ſtaf yf yõ can preſs it doune in y<sup>e</sup> lyke ſort, but yf he haue a longe ſtaf then run up dubble handed w<sup>t</sup> both hands vpon yo<sup>r</sup> byll, w<sup>ch</sup> thynge yõ may ſafly do becauſe yõ are in yo<sup>r</sup> ſtrength & haue taken him in the weak prte of his ſtaf.
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Line 1,922: Line 2,113:
 
| 8. If he lies high with his bill head then put up your bill head under his & cast out his bill to the side that you shall find most fit, so have you the advantage to thrust or hook at him & fly out.
 
| 8. If he lies high with his bill head then put up your bill head under his & cast out his bill to the side that you shall find most fit, so have you the advantage to thrust or hook at him & fly out.
 
| 8. Yf he lye hye w<sup>t</sup> his byll hed then put vp yo<sup>r</sup> byll hed und<sup>r</sup> his & caſt his byll out to y<sup>t</sup> ſyde y<sup>t</sup> yõ ſhal fynd fyteſt, ſo haue yõ the aduantage to thruſt or hook at him & fly out.
 
| 8. Yf he lye hye w<sup>t</sup> his byll hed then put vp yo<sup>r</sup> byll hed und<sup>r</sup> his & caſt his byll out to y<sup>t</sup> ſyde y<sup>t</sup> yõ ſhal fynd fyteſt, ſo haue yõ the aduantage to thruſt or hook at him & fly out.
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Line 1,927: Line 2,119:
 
| Or if you cast out his bill far out of the right line then run in & take him by the leg with the edge of your bill, as is said in the 2nd ground of this chapter.
 
| Or if you cast out his bill far out of the right line then run in & take him by the leg with the edge of your bill, as is said in the 2nd ground of this chapter.
 
| Or yf yõ caſt his byl farr out of the right lyne then run in & take him by the legg w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> edge of yo<sup>r</sup> byll, as is ſaid in the 2nd ground of this chapter.
 
| Or yf yõ caſt his byl farr out of the right lyne then run in & take him by the legg w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> edge of yo<sup>r</sup> byll, as is ſaid in the 2nd ground of this chapter.
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Line 1,932: Line 2,125:
 
| 9. If you ward his blow with the bill staff within your bill head then answer him as with the short staff.
 
| 9. If you ward his blow with the bill staff within your bill head then answer him as with the short staff.
 
| 9. If yõ ward his blow w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> byll ſtaf w<sup>t</sup>in yo<sup>r</sup> byll hed, then anſwer him as w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> ſhort ſtaf.
 
| 9. If yõ ward his blow w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> byll ſtaf w<sup>t</sup>in yo<sup>r</sup> byll hed, then anſwer him as w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> ſhort ſtaf.
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Line 1,937: Line 2,131:
 
| Note: That as the bill man's advantage is to take the staff with the head of the bill so that the staff man by reason that the head of the bill is a fair mark has the advantage of him in the casting aside of the head of the bill with his staff or beating it aside, the which if the bill man looks not very well into the staff man thereupon will take all manner of advantages of the staff fight against him.
 
| Note: That as the bill man's advantage is to take the staff with the head of the bill so that the staff man by reason that the head of the bill is a fair mark has the advantage of him in the casting aside of the head of the bill with his staff or beating it aside, the which if the bill man looks not very well into the staff man thereupon will take all manner of advantages of the staff fight against him.
 
| Note y<sup>t</sup> as the byl mans aduantage is to tak the ſtaf w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> hed of y<sup>e</sup> byll ſo the ſtaf man by reason y<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> hed of y<sup>e</sup> byll is a faire mark hath y<sup>e</sup> aduantage of him in y<sup>e</sup> caſting aſyde of the hed of the byll w<sup>t</sup> his ſtaf or beating y<sup>t</sup> aſyde, the w<sup>ch</sup> yf y<sup>e</sup> byll man looke not very well into it the staff man ther vpon wil take al mann<sup>r</sup> of aduantages of y<sup>e</sup> ſtaf fyght againſt him.
 
| Note y<sup>t</sup> as the byl mans aduantage is to tak the ſtaf w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> hed of y<sup>e</sup> byll ſo the ſtaf man by reason y<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> hed of y<sup>e</sup> byll is a faire mark hath y<sup>e</sup> aduantage of him in y<sup>e</sup> caſting aſyde of the hed of the byll w<sup>t</sup> his ſtaf or beating y<sup>t</sup> aſyde, the w<sup>ch</sup> yf y<sup>e</sup> byll man looke not very well into it the staff man ther vpon wil take al mann<sup>r</sup> of aduantages of y<sup>e</sup> ſtaf fyght againſt him.
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Line 1,948: Line 2,143:
  
 
1. Yf yõ fight w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> enemy having both morris pyks w<sup>t</sup> both poynts of yo<sup>r</sup> pyks forwards, alowe upon y<sup>e</sup> ground, holding the butt end of the pyke in one hand ſyngle w<sup>t</sup> knuckles vpwards & the thumb undrneth, w<sup>t</sup> the thumbe& forefing<sup>r</sup> towards yo<sup>r</sup> face & the lyttle fynger towards the poynt of y<sup>e</sup> pyke, bering the butt end of the pyke frõ the one ſyde to y<sup>e</sup> other right before the face, then lye yõ w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſpent & yo<sup>r</sup> body open w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand to y<sup>e</sup> rightſyde w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles Dounwards & yo<sup>r</sup> nailes vpwards.
 
1. Yf yõ fight w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> enemy having both morris pyks w<sup>t</sup> both poynts of yo<sup>r</sup> pyks forwards, alowe upon y<sup>e</sup> ground, holding the butt end of the pyke in one hand ſyngle w<sup>t</sup> knuckles vpwards & the thumb undrneth, w<sup>t</sup> the thumbe& forefing<sup>r</sup> towards yo<sup>r</sup> face & the lyttle fynger towards the poynt of y<sup>e</sup> pyke, bering the butt end of the pyke frõ the one ſyde to y<sup>e</sup> other right before the face, then lye yõ w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſpent & yo<sup>r</sup> body open w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand to y<sup>e</sup> rightſyde w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles Dounwards & yo<sup>r</sup> nailes vpwards.
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Line 1,953: Line 2,149:
 
| Or you may lie in that sort, with your hand over to the left side with your knuckles upwards & your nails downwards, whereby all your body will be open, if then he shall suddenly raise up the point of his pike with his other hand & come thrust at you, then in the mounting of his point or his coming in, suddenly toss the point of your pike with your hand single & so thrust him in the legs with your pike & fly out therewith.
 
| Or you may lie in that sort, with your hand over to the left side with your knuckles upwards & your nails downwards, whereby all your body will be open, if then he shall suddenly raise up the point of his pike with his other hand & come thrust at you, then in the mounting of his point or his coming in, suddenly toss the point of your pike with your hand single & so thrust him in the legs with your pike & fly out therewith.
 
| Or yõ may lye in y<sup>t</sup> ſort, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand over to the left ſyde w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles vpwards & yo<sup>r</sup> nayles Dounwards, wherby al yo<sup>r</sup> body wilbe Open. yf then he ſhal ſodainlye rayſe vp the point of his pyke w<sup>t</sup> his other hand & com to thruſt at yõ, then in the Mountinge of his poynt or his cõynge in ſodainlye toſſe vp the poynt or yo<sup>r</sup> pyke w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand ſyngle & ſo thruſt him in the leggs w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> pyke & fly out therw<sup>t</sup>.
 
| Or yõ may lye in y<sup>t</sup> ſort, w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand over to the left ſyde w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles vpwards & yo<sup>r</sup> nayles Dounwards, wherby al yo<sup>r</sup> body wilbe Open. yf then he ſhal ſodainlye rayſe vp the point of his pyke w<sup>t</sup> his other hand & com to thruſt at yõ, then in the Mountinge of his poynt or his cõynge in ſodainlye toſſe vp the poynt or yo<sup>r</sup> pyke w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand ſyngle & ſo thruſt him in the leggs w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> pyke & fly out therw<sup>t</sup>.
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| Or else you may stand upon your ward & not toss up your point but break his thrust by crossing the point of his pike with the middle of your pike by casting up your hand, with the butt end of your pike above your head, & so bearing over his point with your staff, to the other side as for example.
 
| Or else you may stand upon your ward & not toss up your point but break his thrust by crossing the point of his pike with the middle of your pike by casting up your hand, with the butt end of your pike above your head, & so bearing over his point with your staff, to the other side as for example.
 
| Or els you May ſtand vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> ward & Not toſſe vp yo<sup>r</sup> pykes poynt but breake his thruſt by croſſynge the poynt of his pyke w<sup>t</sup> the Mydds of yo<sup>r</sup> pyke by caſting vp yo<sup>r</sup> hand, w<sup>t</sup> the butt end of yo<sup>r</sup> pyke aboue yo<sup>r</sup> hed, & ſo bering ouer hys point w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf, to the other ſyde as for example,
 
| Or els you May ſtand vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> ward & Not toſſe vp yo<sup>r</sup> pykes poynt but breake his thruſt by croſſynge the poynt of his pyke w<sup>t</sup> the Mydds of yo<sup>r</sup> pyke by caſting vp yo<sup>r</sup> hand, w<sup>t</sup> the butt end of yo<sup>r</sup> pyke aboue yo<sup>r</sup> hed, & ſo bering ouer hys point w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf, to the other ſyde as for example,
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| 2. If you lie with your hand spent towards the left side of your body, then suddenly bear his point over strongly towards your right side. If you lie with your hand spent towards your right side then bear his point towards your left side, & thereupon gather up your pike with your other hand & thrust him & fly out.
 
| 2. If you lie with your hand spent towards the left side of your body, then suddenly bear his point over strongly towards your right side. If you lie with your hand spent towards your right side then bear his point towards your left side, & thereupon gather up your pike with your other hand & thrust him & fly out.
 
| 2. Yf yõ lye w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand ſpent towards the left ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> bodye, then ſodainlye bere his poynt ouer ſtrongly towards yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde. Yf yõ lye w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand ſpent towards yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde then bere his poynt towards yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde, & ther vpon gather vp yo<sup>r</sup> pyke w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> other hand & thruſt at him & fly out.
 
| 2. Yf yõ lye w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand ſpent towards the left ſyde of yo<sup>r</sup> bodye, then ſodainlye bere his poynt ouer ſtrongly towards yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde. Yf yõ lye w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand ſpent towards yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde then bere his poynt towards yo<sup>r</sup> left ſyde, & ther vpon gather vp yo<sup>r</sup> pyke w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> other hand & thruſt at him & fly out.
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| If he continues his fight with his point above, & you lie with your pike breast high & higher with you hand & point so, that you make your thrust at his face or body with your point directly towards his face, holding your pike with both your hands on your back hand with your knuckles upwards & your foreward hand with your knuckles downwards & there shaking your pike & falsing at his face with your point as near his face as you may, then suddenly make out your thrust single handed at his face & fly out withal, which thrust he can hardly break one of 20 by reason that you made your space so narrow upon his guard, so that you being first in your action he will still be too late in his defence to defend himself.
 
| If he continues his fight with his point above, & you lie with your pike breast high & higher with you hand & point so, that you make your thrust at his face or body with your point directly towards his face, holding your pike with both your hands on your back hand with your knuckles upwards & your foreward hand with your knuckles downwards & there shaking your pike & falsing at his face with your point as near his face as you may, then suddenly make out your thrust single handed at his face & fly out withal, which thrust he can hardly break one of 20 by reason that you made your space so narrow upon his guard, so that you being first in your action he will still be too late in his defence to defend himself.
 
| Yf he cõtynew his fyght w<sup>t</sup> his point aboue, & yõ lye w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> pyke brest hye & hyer w<sup>t</sup> your hand & point ſo, y<sup>t</sup> yõ may Make yo<sup>r</sup> thruſt at his face or body w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt Directly towards his face, holding yo<sup>r</sup> pyke w<sup>t</sup> both your hands on yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf yo<sup>r</sup> hinder hand w<sup>t</sup>yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles vpwards & yo<sup>r</sup> formuſt hand w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles dounwards & ther ſhaking yo<sup>r</sup> pyke & faulſing at his face w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt as Neere his face as you may, then ſodainlye Make out yo<sup>r</sup> thruſt ſyngle handed at his face & fly backe w<sup>t</sup>all, w<sup>ch</sup> thruſt he can hardly breake one of 20 by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> yõ haue make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace ſo narrow vpon his gard, ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ beinge firſt in yo<sup>r</sup> action he wil ſtil be to late in his defence to defend himſelf.
 
| Yf he cõtynew his fyght w<sup>t</sup> his point aboue, & yõ lye w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> pyke brest hye & hyer w<sup>t</sup> your hand & point ſo, y<sup>t</sup> yõ may Make yo<sup>r</sup> thruſt at his face or body w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt Directly towards his face, holding yo<sup>r</sup> pyke w<sup>t</sup> both your hands on yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf yo<sup>r</sup> hinder hand w<sup>t</sup>yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles vpwards & yo<sup>r</sup> formuſt hand w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> knuckles dounwards & ther ſhaking yo<sup>r</sup> pyke & faulſing at his face w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> poynt as Neere his face as you may, then ſodainlye Make out yo<sup>r</sup> thruſt ſyngle handed at his face & fly backe w<sup>t</sup>all, w<sup>ch</sup> thruſt he can hardly breake one of 20 by reaſon y<sup>t</sup> yõ haue make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace ſo narrow vpon his gard, ſo y<sup>t</sup> yõ beinge firſt in yo<sup>r</sup> action he wil ſtil be to late in his defence to defend himſelf.
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| 4. But note while you lie falsing to deceive him look to your legs that he in the mean time toss not up the point of his pike single handed & hurt you therewith in the shins.
 
| 4. But note while you lie falsing to deceive him look to your legs that he in the mean time toss not up the point of his pike single handed & hurt you therewith in the shins.
 
| 4. but note while yõ lye faulfinge to Deceve him looke well to yo<sup>r</sup> leggs y<sup>t</sup> he in the Meane tyme toſſe not vp the poynt of his pyke ſyngle handed & hurt yõ therw<sup>t</sup> in y<sup>e</sup> ſhynes.
 
| 4. but note while yõ lye faulfinge to Deceve him looke well to yo<sup>r</sup> leggs y<sup>t</sup> he in the Meane tyme toſſe not vp the poynt of his pyke ſyngle handed & hurt yõ therw<sup>t</sup> in y<sup>e</sup> ſhynes.
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| 5. If he lies so with his point up aloft as you do then make your space narrow mounting your point a little & cross his pike with yours & strongly and suddenly cast his point out of the right line & thrust home from the same single or double as you find your best advantage, & fly out therewith.  
 
| 5. If he lies so with his point up aloft as you do then make your space narrow mounting your point a little & cross his pike with yours & strongly and suddenly cast his point out of the right line & thrust home from the same single or double as you find your best advantage, & fly out therewith.  
 
| 5. If he lye ſo w<sup>t</sup> his poynt vp a loft as you do then Make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace Narrow Mountinge yo<sup>r</sup> point a lyttle & croſe his pyke w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>rs</sup> & ſtronglye and ſodainly caſt his poynt out of the right lyne and thruſt whome from the ſame ſyngle or dubble as you fynd yo<sup>r</sup> beſtaduantage, & fly out therw<sup>t</sup>
 
| 5. If he lye ſo w<sup>t</sup> his poynt vp a loft as you do then Make yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace Narrow Mountinge yo<sup>r</sup> point a lyttle & croſe his pyke w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>rs</sup> & ſtronglye and ſodainly caſt his poynt out of the right lyne and thruſt whome from the ſame ſyngle or dubble as you fynd yo<sup>r</sup> beſtaduantage, & fly out therw<sup>t</sup>
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Line 1,983: Line 2,185:
 
| Or you may run in when you have cast out his point finding both your hands on your staff 'til you come within 3 quarters of a yard of the head of your pike & stab him through with one hand & with the other keep him from the grip.
 
| Or you may run in when you have cast out his point finding both your hands on your staff 'til you come within 3 quarters of a yard of the head of your pike & stab him through with one hand & with the other keep him from the grip.
 
| Or yõ may run in when yõ haue caſt out his poynt ſlydinge both yo<sup>r</sup> hands on yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf til yõ com w<sup>t</sup>in iij quarters of a yard of the hed of yo<sup>r</sup> pyke & ſtabb him therw<sup>t</sup> w<sup>t</sup> one hand & w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> other hand kepe him of from y<sup>e</sup> grype.
 
| Or yõ may run in when yõ haue caſt out his poynt ſlydinge both yo<sup>r</sup> hands on yo<sup>r</sup> ſtaf til yõ com w<sup>t</sup>in iij quarters of a yard of the hed of yo<sup>r</sup> pyke & ſtabb him therw<sup>t</sup> w<sup>t</sup> one hand & w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> other hand kepe him of from y<sup>e</sup> grype.
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| 6. Now if he is a man of skill, notwithstanding the making of the fault in suffering you to do so yet this help he has, as you are coming in he will suddenly draw in his pike point & fly back withal, then have you no help but to fly out instantly to the middle of your pike & from thence back to the end & then are you as at the first beginning of your fight you were.
 
| 6. Now if he is a man of skill, notwithstanding the making of the fault in suffering you to do so yet this help he has, as you are coming in he will suddenly draw in his pike point & fly back withal, then have you no help but to fly out instantly to the middle of your pike & from thence back to the end & then are you as at the first beginning of your fight you were.
 
| 6. Now yf he be a man of ſkyll, notw<sup>t</sup>ſtandinge y<sup>e</sup> Making of y<sup>t</sup> faulte in ſuffering you to do ſo yet this help he hath, as yõ aer cõmynge in he will ſodainlye draw in his pyke poynt & fly back w<sup>t</sup>all, then haue yõ no helpe but to fly out inſtantly to the myddle of yo<sup>r</sup>pyke & from thence backeto y<sup>e</sup> end & then are yõ as at the firſt begynnynge of yo<sup>r</sup> fyght yõ were.
 
| 6. Now yf he be a man of ſkyll, notw<sup>t</sup>ſtandinge y<sup>e</sup> Making of y<sup>t</sup> faulte in ſuffering you to do ſo yet this help he hath, as yõ aer cõmynge in he will ſodainlye draw in his pyke poynt & fly back w<sup>t</sup>all, then haue yõ no helpe but to fly out inſtantly to the myddle of yo<sup>r</sup>pyke & from thence backeto y<sup>e</sup> end & then are yõ as at the firſt begynnynge of yo<sup>r</sup> fyght yõ were.
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Line 1,993: Line 2,197:
 
| 7. If you find that he lies far out of the right line with his point or that you can so far indirect the same then cast your pike out of your hands, cross over upon the middle of his pike, by which means you shall entangle his pike, then while he does strive to get his pike at liberty, run you in suddenly drawing your dagger & strike or staff at him.
 
| 7. If you find that he lies far out of the right line with his point or that you can so far indirect the same then cast your pike out of your hands, cross over upon the middle of his pike, by which means you shall entangle his pike, then while he does strive to get his pike at liberty, run you in suddenly drawing your dagger & strike or staff at him.
 
| 7. Yf you fynd y<sup>t</sup> he lye farr out of y<sup>e</sup> right lyne w<sup>t</sup> his poynt or y<sup>t</sup> yõ can ſo farr Indirect y<sup>e</sup> ſame then caſt yo<sup>r</sup> pyke out of yo<sup>r</sup> hands, croſe over vpon the myds of his pyke, by w<sup>ch</sup> meanes yõ ſhal entangle his pyke, then while he doth ſtryve to get his pyke atlybertye, run you in ſodainly drawing yo<sup>r</sup> Dagg<sup>r</sup> & ſtrike or ſtabb at him.
 
| 7. Yf you fynd y<sup>t</sup> he lye farr out of y<sup>e</sup> right lyne w<sup>t</sup> his poynt or y<sup>t</sup> yõ can ſo farr Indirect y<sup>e</sup> ſame then caſt yo<sup>r</sup> pyke out of yo<sup>r</sup> hands, croſe over vpon the myds of his pyke, by w<sup>ch</sup> meanes yõ ſhal entangle his pyke, then while he doth ſtryve to get his pyke atlybertye, run you in ſodainly drawing yo<sup>r</sup> Dagg<sup>r</sup> & ſtrike or ſtabb at him.
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| 8. Then if he has the perfection of this fight as well as you, he will be ready with his dagger as you are with yours, then must you fight it out at the single dagger fight as is shown in the 15th chapter: then he that has not the perfection of that fight goes to ruin.
 
| 8. Then if he has the perfection of this fight as well as you, he will be ready with his dagger as you are with yours, then must you fight it out at the single dagger fight as is shown in the 15th chapter: then he that has not the perfection of that fight goes to ruin.
 
| 8. Then yf he haue the prfection of this fyght as well as you, he wilbe as reddy w<sup>t</sup> his dagg<sup>r</sup> as yõ are w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>rs</sup>, then muſt yõ fyght it out at the ſyngle dagg<sup>r</sup> fyght as is ſhewed in the 15<sup>th</sup> Cap: then he y<sup>t</sup> hath not the prfection of y<sup>t</sup> fyght gow<sup>t</sup> to wracke.
 
| 8. Then yf he haue the prfection of this fyght as well as you, he wilbe as reddy w<sup>t</sup> his dagg<sup>r</sup> as yõ are w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>rs</sup>, then muſt yõ fyght it out at the ſyngle dagg<sup>r</sup> fyght as is ſhewed in the 15<sup>th</sup> Cap: then he y<sup>t</sup> hath not the prfection of y<sup>t</sup> fyght gow<sup>t</sup> to wracke.
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| 9. And here note that in all the course of my teaching of these my brief instructions if both the parties have the full perfection of the true fight then the one will not be able to hurt the other at what perfect weapon soever.
 
| 9. And here note that in all the course of my teaching of these my brief instructions if both the parties have the full perfection of the true fight then the one will not be able to hurt the other at what perfect weapon soever.
 
| 9. And here note y<sup>t</sup> in al the courſe of my teachinge of theſe my breef Inſtructions yf both prtyes haue the ful prfection of y<sup>e</sup> true fyght then the on will not be able to hurt thother at what prfyt weapon ſo euer.
 
| 9. And here note y<sup>t</sup> in al the courſe of my teachinge of theſe my breef Inſtructions yf both prtyes haue the ful prfection of y<sup>e</sup> true fyght then the on will not be able to hurt thother at what prfyt weapon ſo euer.
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| 10. But if a man that has the perfection of fight shall fight with one that has it not then must that unskillful man go to ruin & the other go free.
 
| 10. But if a man that has the perfection of fight shall fight with one that has it not then must that unskillful man go to ruin & the other go free.
 
| 10. But yf a Man y<sup>t</sup> haue the prfection of fight ſhal fight w<sup>t</sup> on y<sup>t</sup> haue it not then muſt y<sup>t</sup> vnſkylful man go to wrack & thother goe free.
 
| 10. But yf a Man y<sup>t</sup> haue the prfection of fight ſhal fight w<sup>t</sup> on y<sup>t</sup> haue it not then muſt y<sup>t</sup> vnſkylful man go to wrack & thother goe free.
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1. First know y<sup>t</sup> to this weapon ther belongeth no Wards nor gryps but againſt ſuch a one as is foolehardy & will ſuffer himſelf to haue a ful ſtabb in the face or bodye to hazard the geving of Another, then againſt him yõ may vſe yo<sup>r</sup> left hand in throwinge him aſydeor ſtrike vp his heeles aft<sup>r</sup> yõ haue ſtab<sup>d</sup> him.
 
1. First know y<sup>t</sup> to this weapon ther belongeth no Wards nor gryps but againſt ſuch a one as is foolehardy & will ſuffer himſelf to haue a ful ſtabb in the face or bodye to hazard the geving of Another, then againſt him yõ may vſe yo<sup>r</sup> left hand in throwinge him aſydeor ſtrike vp his heeles aft<sup>r</sup> yõ haue ſtab<sup>d</sup> him.
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Line 2,024: Line 2,233:
 
| 2. In this dagger fight, you must use continual motion so shall he not be able to put you to the close or grip, because your continual motion disappoints him of his true place, & the more fierce he is in running in, the sooner he gains you the place, whereby he is wounded, & you not anything the rather endangered.
 
| 2. In this dagger fight, you must use continual motion so shall he not be able to put you to the close or grip, because your continual motion disappoints him of his true place, & the more fierce he is in running in, the sooner he gains you the place, whereby he is wounded, & you not anything the rather endangered.
 
| 2. In this dagg<sup>r</sup> fyght, yõ muſt vſe cotynual motion ſo ſhal he not be able to put yõ to y<sup>e</sup> cloze of grype, becauſe yo<sup>r</sup> contynuall motion diſappointeth him of his true place, & the more ferce he is in runnynge in, the ſoon<sup>r</sup> he gayneth you the place, whereby he is wounded, & yõ not any thing the rather endangered.
 
| 2. In this dagg<sup>r</sup> fyght, yõ muſt vſe cotynual motion ſo ſhal he not be able to put yõ to y<sup>e</sup> cloze of grype, becauſe yo<sup>r</sup> contynuall motion diſappointeth him of his true place, & the more ferce he is in runnynge in, the ſoon<sup>r</sup> he gayneth you the place, whereby he is wounded, & yõ not any thing the rather endangered.
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Line 2,029: Line 2,239:
 
| 3. The manner of handling your continual motion is this, keep out of distance & strike or thrust at his hand, arm, face or body, that shall press upon you, & if he defends blow or thrust with his dagger make your blow or thrust at his hand.
 
| 3. The manner of handling your continual motion is this, keep out of distance & strike or thrust at his hand, arm, face or body, that shall press upon you, & if he defends blow or thrust with his dagger make your blow or thrust at his hand.
 
| 3. The mann<sup>r</sup> of handling yo<sup>r</sup> cõtynuall motion is this, kepe out of diſtance & ſtrik or thruſt at his hand, Arme, face or body, y<sup>t</sup> ſhal preſs vpon yõ, & yf he defend blow or thruſt w<sup>t</sup> his dagg<sup>r</sup> make yõ blow or thruſt at his hand.
 
| 3. The mann<sup>r</sup> of handling yo<sup>r</sup> cõtynuall motion is this, kepe out of diſtance & ſtrik or thruſt at his hand, Arme, face or body, y<sup>t</sup> ſhal preſs vpon yõ, & yf he defend blow or thruſt w<sup>t</sup> his dagg<sup>r</sup> make yõ blow or thruſt at his hand.
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| 4. If he comes in with his left leg forewards or with the right, do you strike at that part as soon as it shall be within reach, remembering that you use continual motion in your progression & regression according to your twofold governors.
 
| 4. If he comes in with his left leg forewards or with the right, do you strike at that part as soon as it shall be within reach, remembering that you use continual motion in your progression & regression according to your twofold governors.
 
| 4. Yf he com in w<sup>t</sup> his left legg forewards or w<sup>t</sup> the right, do you ſtrike at y<sup>t</sup> prte as ſoone as it ſhalbe w<sup>t</sup>in yo<sup>r</sup> reach, remembring y<sup>t</sup> yõ vſe contynual motion in yo<sup>r</sup> prgreſſion & regreſſyon according to yo<sup>r</sup> twyfold gou<sup>r</sup>nors.
 
| 4. Yf he com in w<sup>t</sup> his left legg forewards or w<sup>t</sup> the right, do you ſtrike at y<sup>t</sup> prte as ſoone as it ſhalbe w<sup>t</sup>in yo<sup>r</sup> reach, remembring y<sup>t</sup> yõ vſe contynual motion in yo<sup>r</sup> prgreſſion & regreſſyon according to yo<sup>r</sup> twyfold gou<sup>r</sup>nors.
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| class="noline" |  
| 5. Although the dagger fight is thought a very dangerous fight by reason of the shortness & singleness thereof, yet the fight thereof being handled as is aforesaid, is as safe & as defensive as the fight of any other weapon, this ends my brief instructions.
+
| class="noline" | 5. Although the dagger fight is thought a very dangerous fight by reason of the shortness & singleness thereof, yet the fight thereof being handled as is aforesaid, is as safe & as defensive as the fight of any other weapon, this ends my brief instructions.
 
FINIS.
 
FINIS.
| 5. Although the dagg<sup>r</sup> fyght be thought a verye dangerous fyght by reaſon of y<sup>e</sup> ſhortnes & ſynglenes therof, yet the fight therof being handled as is aforeſaid, is as ſaf & as defencive as is the fight of any other weapon, this endeth my Inſtructions.
+
| class="noline" | 5. Although the dagg<sup>r</sup> fyght be thought a verye dangerous fyght by reaſon of y<sup>e</sup> ſhortnes & ſynglenes therof, yet the fight therof being handled as is aforeſaid, is as ſaf & as defencive as is the fight of any other weapon, this endeth my Inſtructions.
 
Finis.
 
Finis.
  
Line 2,047: Line 2,259:
 
{{master begin
 
{{master begin
 
  | title = Additional Notes
 
  | title = Additional Notes
  | width = 84em
+
  | width = 120em
 
}}
 
}}
 
The proper placement of these pages cannot be determined without examining scans of the [[Bref Instructions vpõ My Pradoxes of Defence (Sloane MS No.376)|Sloane MS No.376]].
 
The proper placement of these pages cannot be determined without examining scans of the [[Bref Instructions vpõ My Pradoxes of Defence (Sloane MS No.376)|Sloane MS No.376]].
{| class="floated master"
+
{| class="master"
 
|-  
 
|-  
! id="thin" | <p>Images<br/></p>
+
! <p>Illustrations</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B|Completed Modernization}}<br/>by [[Steve Hick]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B|Completed Modernization}}<br/>by [[Steve Hick]]</p>
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Jonathan Miller]]</p>
+
! <p>[[Bref Instructions vpõ My Pradoxes of Defence (Sloane MS No.376)|London Transcription]] (ca. 1605)<br/>by [[Jonathan Miller]]</p>
 +
! <p>[[Bref instructions upon my Paradoxes of defence (MS 1086)|Leuven Transcription]] (1800s)<br/></p>
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,066: Line 2,279:
 
# ſyngle
 
# ſyngle
 
# gardant
 
# gardant
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,077: Line 2,291:
 
# he y<sup>t</sup> goeth back w<sup>t</sup> ſom blow or thruſt
 
# he y<sup>t</sup> goeth back w<sup>t</sup> ſom blow or thruſt
 
# he y<sup>t</sup> ſtandeth to his wards or paſſato
 
# he y<sup>t</sup> ſtandeth to his wards or paſſato
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,088: Line 2,303:
 
# y<sup>e</sup> 2<sup>nd</sup> is beſt followed w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> variable & vnc<sup>r</sup>taine handling els ſhould yõ be a ma<sup>r</sup>ke to yo<sup>r</sup> enemy & too ſlow in motion.
 
# y<sup>e</sup> 2<sup>nd</sup> is beſt followed w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> variable & vnc<sup>r</sup>taine handling els ſhould yõ be a ma<sup>r</sup>ke to yo<sup>r</sup> enemy & too ſlow in motion.
 
# y<sup>e</sup> 3<sup>rd</sup>muſt be incountred w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> gardant play wherin you ſhal try him at y<sup>e</sup> B ſword or how he can eſcape y<sup>e</sup> prting blow or thruſt. When yõ gather kepe yo<sup>r</sup> place & ſpace equal & only be a patient & rememb<sup>r</sup> y<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> gardant play bringeth yõ ſafly in & keps yo<sup>r</sup> enemy out.
 
# y<sup>e</sup> 3<sup>rd</sup>muſt be incountred w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> gardant play wherin you ſhal try him at y<sup>e</sup> B ſword or how he can eſcape y<sup>e</sup> prting blow or thruſt. When yõ gather kepe yo<sup>r</sup> place & ſpace equal & only be a patient & rememb<sup>r</sup> y<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> gardant play bringeth yõ ſafly in & keps yo<sup>r</sup> enemy out.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,093: Line 2,309:
 
| Know this order of play else you best may be deceived, to be used against all these differences & bring the goodness thereof in suspicion, for all these pays are good in their kind, time & occasion offered by diversity of play, but not one of them to be continually used & played upon as perfection against every assault.
 
| Know this order of play else you best may be deceived, to be used against all these differences & bring the goodness thereof in suspicion, for all these pays are good in their kind, time & occasion offered by diversity of play, but not one of them to be continually used & played upon as perfection against every assault.
 
| Know this ord<sup>r</sup> of play els y<sup>e</sup> beſt may be deceaved, to be uſed againſt al theſe differencs & bring y<sup>e</sup> goodnes therof in ſuſpitiõ, for al theſe plaies are good in their kynd, tyme & occaſiõ offered by div<sup>r</sup>ſitie of play, but not on of them to be continually uſed & playedvpon as a p<sup>r</sup>fectiõ againſt euery aſſault.
 
| Know this ord<sup>r</sup> of play els y<sup>e</sup> beſt may be deceaved, to be uſed againſt al theſe differencs & bring y<sup>e</sup> goodnes therof in ſuſpitiõ, for al theſe plaies are good in their kynd, tyme & occaſiõ offered by div<sup>r</sup>ſitie of play, but not on of them to be continually uſed & playedvpon as a p<sup>r</sup>fectiõ againſt euery aſſault.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,098: Line 2,315:
 
| 1. In the naked play you must set your self upright with your feet in a small space, observing the place of your hand where you may strike or thrust most quickly & readily & so take the time of him that presses on (using the time of his feet) with your blow or thrust where he is most open.
 
| 1. In the naked play you must set your self upright with your feet in a small space, observing the place of your hand where you may strike or thrust most quickly & readily & so take the time of him that presses on (using the time of his feet) with your blow or thrust where he is most open.
 
| 1. In y<sup>e</sup> naked play yõ muſt ſet yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf vpright w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> feet in a ſmale ſpace, obſ<sup>r</sup>ving y<sup>e</sup> place of yo<sup>r</sup> hand wher yõ may ſtike or thruſt moſt quickly & redely & ſo tke y<sup>e</sup> tyme of him y<sup>t</sup> p<sup>r</sup>ſſeth on (vſing y<sup>e</sup> tyme of his feet) w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> blowe or thruſt wher he is moſt open.
 
| 1. In y<sup>e</sup> naked play yõ muſt ſet yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf vpright w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> feet in a ſmale ſpace, obſ<sup>r</sup>ving y<sup>e</sup> place of yo<sup>r</sup> hand wher yõ may ſtike or thruſt moſt quickly & redely & ſo tke y<sup>e</sup> tyme of him y<sup>t</sup> p<sup>r</sup>ſſeth on (vſing y<sup>e</sup> tyme of his feet) w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> blowe or thruſt wher he is moſt open.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,103: Line 2,321:
 
| 1. In the variable play, you drive him to his shifts changing yourself into sundry kinds of blows thrusts & lyings, which you must not stay upon,
 
| 1. In the variable play, you drive him to his shifts changing yourself into sundry kinds of blows thrusts & lyings, which you must not stay upon,
 
| 1. In y<sup>e</sup> variable play, yõ dryve him to his ſhyfts changing yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf into ſundry kynds of blowes thruſts & lyings, w<sup>ch</sup> yõ muſt not ſtay upon,
 
| 1. In y<sup>e</sup> variable play, yõ dryve him to his ſhyfts changing yo<sup>r</sup>ſelf into ſundry kynds of blowes thruſts & lyings, w<sup>ch</sup> yõ muſt not ſtay upon,
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,108: Line 2,327:
 
| 2. Seeking to cross him still in his playing as you may, whereby you shall force him to fly, or else to stand to the proof of his backsword play.
 
| 2. Seeking to cross him still in his playing as you may, whereby you shall force him to fly, or else to stand to the proof of his backsword play.
 
| 2. ſeeking to + him ſtil in his playes as yõ may, wherby yõ ſhal force him to fly, or els to ſtand to y<sup>e</sup> proof of his B ſword play.
 
| 2. ſeeking to + him ſtil in his playes as yõ may, wherby yõ ſhal force him to fly, or els to ſtand to y<sup>e</sup> proof of his B ſword play.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,113: Line 2,333:
 
| 3. The guardant play is to be used against the blow, thrust or Passata that comes within danger of hurt, for treading that right way & keeping your place & hand in space & strength you cannot loose time to defend from either of these offers.
 
| 3. The guardant play is to be used against the blow, thrust or Passata that comes within danger of hurt, for treading that right way & keeping your place & hand in space & strength you cannot loose time to defend from either of these offers.
 
| 3. the gardant play is to be vſed againſt y<sup>e</sup> blowe, thruſt & paſſata y<sup>t</sup> cometh w<sup>t</sup>in dang<sup>r</sup> of hurt, for treading y<sup>e</sup> right way & keping yo<sup>r</sup> place & hand in ſpace & ſtrength you cannot looſe y<sup>e</sup> tyme to defend frõ either of thoſe offers.
 
| 3. the gardant play is to be vſed againſt y<sup>e</sup> blowe, thruſt & paſſata y<sup>t</sup> cometh w<sup>t</sup>in dang<sup>r</sup> of hurt, for treading y<sup>e</sup> right way & keping yo<sup>r</sup> place & hand in ſpace & ſtrength you cannot looſe y<sup>e</sup> tyme to defend frõ either of thoſe offers.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,118: Line 2,339:
 
| These judged of in reason & known by some practice will make you deal safely against all sorts, skillful or unskillful, so that fear of anger hinders not your knowledge.
 
| These judged of in reason & known by some practice will make you deal safely against all sorts, skillful or unskillful, so that fear of anger hinders not your knowledge.
 
| theſe Judged of in reaſon & known by ſom practiſe wil make yõ deale ſafly againſt al ſorts, ſkilful or vnſkilful, ſo y<sup>t</sup> feare or Ang<sup>r</sup> hinder not yo<sup>r</sup> Knowledge.
 
| theſe Judged of in reaſon & known by ſom practiſe wil make yõ deale ſafly againſt al ſorts, ſkilful or vnſkilful, ſo y<sup>t</sup> feare or Ang<sup>r</sup> hinder not yo<sup>r</sup> Knowledge.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,133: Line 2,355:
 
:hand & foot
 
:hand & foot
 
:foot & hand. naught
 
:foot & hand. naught
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,146: Line 2,369:
 
# y<sup>e</sup> tyme of y<sup>e</sup> hand & foot is when yõ tread y ground in courſe to ſtrike rather than p<sup>r</sup>ſſing forwards, or when yõ ſlide back or go back, yo<sup>r</sup> hand & foot being then of equal agillitie.
 
# y<sup>e</sup> tyme of y<sup>e</sup> hand & foot is when yõ tread y ground in courſe to ſtrike rather than p<sup>r</sup>ſſing forwards, or when yõ ſlide back or go back, yo<sup>r</sup> hand & foot being then of equal agillitie.
 
# y<sup>e</sup> tyme of y<sup>e</sup> foot & hand is when yõ handle yo<sup>r</sup> gardant play vſing then a ſlowe motiõ in both.
 
# y<sup>e</sup> tyme of y<sup>e</sup> foot & hand is when yõ handle yo<sup>r</sup> gardant play vſing then a ſlowe motiõ in both.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,151: Line 2,375:
 
| There is but 1 good way to gather upon your enemy, guardant. All other are dangerous & subject to the blows on the head or thrust on the body. For no way can ward both but as aforesaid.
 
| There is but 1 good way to gather upon your enemy, guardant. All other are dangerous & subject to the blows on the head or thrust on the body. For no way can ward both but as aforesaid.
 
| ther is but i good way to gather vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> enemy, gardant. Al other are dangerous & ſubiect to y<sup>e</sup> blowe on y<sup>e</sup> hed or thruſt on y<sup>e</sup> body. for no way can ward both but as aforſ<sup>d</sup>.
 
| ther is but i good way to gather vpõ yo<sup>r</sup> enemy, gardant. Al other are dangerous & ſubiect to y<sup>e</sup> blowe on y<sup>e</sup> hed or thruſt on y<sup>e</sup> body. for no way can ward both but as aforſ<sup>d</sup>.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,156: Line 2,381:
 
| Your hand & feet in good play must go together, whether it is in quick or in slow motion.
 
| Your hand & feet in good play must go together, whether it is in quick or in slow motion.
 
| yo<sup>r</sup> hand & feet in good play muſt go together, whether it be in quick or ſlow motion.
 
| yo<sup>r</sup> hand & feet in good play muſt go together, whether it be in quick or ſlow motion.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,161: Line 2,387:
 
| In gathering forewards or towards your right side your hand falls from your place, space, time, & strength, & so falls out the loss of time.
 
| In gathering forewards or towards your right side your hand falls from your place, space, time, & strength, & so falls out the loss of time.
 
| In gathering forwards or tow<sup>rds</sup>s yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde yo<sup>r</sup> hand falleth frõ yo<sup>r</sup> place, ſpace, & ſtrength & ſo falleth our y<sup>e</sup> loſs of tyme.
 
| In gathering forwards or tow<sup>rds</sup>s yo<sup>r</sup> right ſyde yo<sup>r</sup> hand falleth frõ yo<sup>r</sup> place, ſpace, & ſtrength & ſo falleth our y<sup>e</sup> loſs of tyme.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,166: Line 2,393:
 
| When you gather & suffer that govern your fight, defend only. When you do, be single, or not fixed towards any single lying, but also the quickness of your hand in its proper place carried.
 
| When you gather & suffer that govern your fight, defend only. When you do, be single, or not fixed towards any single lying, but also the quickness of your hand in its proper place carried.
 
| when yõ gather & ſuffer gou<sup>r</sup>ne yo<sup>r</sup> fight, defend only. when yõ do, be ſingle, or not fixed towards on any lying but alſo y<sup>e</sup> quicknes of yo<sup>r</sup> hand in its p<sup>r</sup>p<sup>r</sup> place carried,
 
| when yõ gather & ſuffer gou<sup>r</sup>ne yo<sup>r</sup> fight, defend only. when yõ do, be ſingle, or not fixed towards on any lying but alſo y<sup>e</sup> quicknes of yo<sup>r</sup> hand in its p<sup>r</sup>p<sup>r</sup> place carried,
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,171: Line 2,399:
 
| In breaking the thrust when you lie aloft single or guardant & space your arm somewhat bowing in warding the blow, have respect to your place of hand & strength, your arm straight. This course in your time is best performed, the one of these with your hand aloft your point down the other your hand in place your more high your space less curious.
 
| In breaking the thrust when you lie aloft single or guardant & space your arm somewhat bowing in warding the blow, have respect to your place of hand & strength, your arm straight. This course in your time is best performed, the one of these with your hand aloft your point down the other your hand in place your more high your space less curious.
 
| In breaking y<sup>e</sup> thruſt when yõ lye aloft ſingle or gardant & ſpace yo<sup>r</sup> arme ſomwhat bowing in warding y<sup>e</sup> blowe, haue reſpect to yo<sup>r</sup> place of hand & ſtrength, yo<sup>r</sup> arme ſtrait. this courſe in yo<sup>r</sup> tyme is beſt p<sup>r</sup>formed, the on of theſe w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand aloft yo<sup>r</sup> point downe thotheryo<sup>r</sup> hand in place yo<sup>r</sup> more high yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace leſ curious.
 
| In breaking y<sup>e</sup> thruſt when yõ lye aloft ſingle or gardant & ſpace yo<sup>r</sup> arme ſomwhat bowing in warding y<sup>e</sup> blowe, haue reſpect to yo<sup>r</sup> place of hand & ſtrength, yo<sup>r</sup> arme ſtrait. this courſe in yo<sup>r</sup> tyme is beſt p<sup>r</sup>formed, the on of theſe w<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hand aloft yo<sup>r</sup> point downe thotheryo<sup>r</sup> hand in place yo<sup>r</sup> more high yo<sup>r</sup> ſpace leſ curious.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 +
|
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
 
|  
Line 2,183: Line 2,413:
 
| II 93<sup>r</sup>
 
| II 93<sup>r</sup>
 
tyme is cheefly to be obſ<sup>r</sup>ved in both actions vpõ w<sup>ch</sup> (place ſpace) waiteth.
 
tyme is cheefly to be obſ<sup>r</sup>ved in both actions vpõ w<sup>ch</sup> (place ſpace) waiteth.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,188: Line 2,419:
 
| Upon these 3 the 4 following, upon these 4 the first 3, upon these the latter 3.
 
| Upon these 3 the 4 following, upon these 4 the first 3, upon these the latter 3.
 
| Upon theſe 3 y<sup>e</sup> 4 following, vpon theſe 4 y<sup>e</sup> firſt 3, upon theſe y<sup>e</sup> later 3.
 
| Upon theſe 3 y<sup>e</sup> 4 following, vpon theſe 4 y<sup>e</sup> firſt 3, upon theſe y<sup>e</sup> later 3.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,193: Line 2,425:
 
| To hurt or defend, a time in both is observed to the furtherance of which place is to be gotten, without which time will be too long to perform that which is intended, the space is to be noted between 2 opponents & in respect of touching, or in regard of saving as also for preserving of time, by the small way it has either to the body, or putting by the weapon.
 
| To hurt or defend, a time in both is observed to the furtherance of which place is to be gotten, without which time will be too long to perform that which is intended, the space is to be noted between 2 opponents & in respect of touching, or in regard of saving as also for preserving of time, by the small way it has either to the body, or putting by the weapon.
 
| to hurt or defend, a tyme in both is to be obſ<sup>r</sup>ved to y<sup>e</sup> furtherance of w<sup>ch</sup> place is to be gotten, w<sup>t</sup>out w<sup>ch</sup> tyme wilbe to long to p<sup>r</sup>form y<sup>t</sup> w<sup>ch</sup> is intended, y<sup>e</sup> ſpace is to be noted betwene ij oppoſits & in reſpect of touching, or in regard of ſaving as alſo for prſving of tyme, by y<sup>e</sup> ſmale way it hath either to y<sup>e</sup> body, or puting by y<sup>e</sup> weapon.
 
| to hurt or defend, a tyme in both is to be obſ<sup>r</sup>ved to y<sup>e</sup> furtherance of w<sup>ch</sup> place is to be gotten, w<sup>t</sup>out w<sup>ch</sup> tyme wilbe to long to p<sup>r</sup>form y<sup>t</sup> w<sup>ch</sup> is intended, y<sup>e</sup> ſpace is to be noted betwene ij oppoſits & in reſpect of touching, or in regard of ſaving as alſo for prſving of tyme, by y<sup>e</sup> ſmale way it hath either to y<sup>e</sup> body, or puting by y<sup>e</sup> weapon.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,198: Line 2,431:
 
| The next 4 must be used together to perform the other 3 rules, for the hand being nimble & quick of itself may else be hindered in the want of any of these, the weapon must be framed & inclined to serve the agility of the hand either in hurting or defending.
 
| The next 4 must be used together to perform the other 3 rules, for the hand being nimble & quick of itself may else be hindered in the want of any of these, the weapon must be framed & inclined to serve the agility of the hand either in hurting or defending.
 
| the next 4 muſt be vſed together to p<sup>r</sup>forme thother iij rules, for y<sup>e</sup> hand being nymble & quick of itſelf may els be hindered in y<sup>e</sup> want of any of theſe, the weapon muſt be framed & inclyned to srve y<sup>e</sup> agilitie of y<sup>e</sup> hand eyther in hurting or defending.
 
| the next 4 muſt be vſed together to p<sup>r</sup>forme thother iij rules, for y<sup>e</sup> hand being nymble & quick of itſelf may els be hindered in y<sup>e</sup> want of any of theſe, the weapon muſt be framed & inclyned to srve y<sup>e</sup> agilitie of y<sup>e</sup> hand eyther in hurting or defending.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,203: Line 2,437:
 
| 4. The body upright or leaning to the weapon, that it hinders not the disposition of the other 2 the foot answerable to them plying the hand & ward all in straight space, the ward with the hand high with the point down, the arm straight out as ready for both actions
 
| 4. The body upright or leaning to the weapon, that it hinders not the disposition of the other 2 the foot answerable to them plying the hand & ward all in straight space, the ward with the hand high with the point down, the arm straight out as ready for both actions
 
| 4. the body vpright or leanyng to y<sup>e</sup> weapon, y<sup>t</sup> it hind<sup>r</sup> not y<sup>e</sup> diſpoſitiõ of thother ij the foot anſwerable to them plying y<sup>e</sup> hand & ward al in ſtrait ſpace, y<sup>e</sup> w w<sup>t</sup> hand high y<sup>e</sup> point downe, the arme ſtrait out as redy for both actions.
 
| 4. the body vpright or leanyng to y<sup>e</sup> weapon, y<sup>t</sup> it hind<sup>r</sup> not y<sup>e</sup> diſpoſitiõ of thother ij the foot anſwerable to them plying y<sup>e</sup> hand & ward al in ſtrait ſpace, y<sup>e</sup> w w<sup>t</sup> hand high y<sup>e</sup> point downe, the arme ſtrait out as redy for both actions.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,208: Line 2,443:
 
| The way under the ward withdrawing the body from harm, the motion slow that the action of the hand is not hindered.
 
| The way under the ward withdrawing the body from harm, the motion slow that the action of the hand is not hindered.
 
| the way vnd<sup>r</sup> y<sup>e</sup> w w<sup>t</sup>drawing y<sup>e</sup> body from harmes, the motiõ ſlowe y<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> actiõ of y<sup>e</sup> hand be not hindered.
 
| the way vnd<sup>r</sup> y<sup>e</sup> w w<sup>t</sup>drawing y<sup>e</sup> body from harmes, the motiõ ſlowe y<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> actiõ of y<sup>e</sup> hand be not hindered.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,217: Line 2,453:
 
:Slowfoot : ſwift hand : quick foot : ſlow hand.
 
:Slowfoot : ſwift hand : quick foot : ſlow hand.
 
:tread : ſtride : follow : falaway :
 
:tread : ſtride : follow : falaway :
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 2,222: Line 2,459:
 
| When you seek to offend with blow or thrust, your place of the hand is lost, the way to redeem it is to slide back under your lofty ward as aforesaid always that your adversary lie aloft ready to strike or thrust or use his hand only.
 
| When you seek to offend with blow or thrust, your place of the hand is lost, the way to redeem it is to slide back under your lofty ward as aforesaid always that your adversary lie aloft ready to strike or thrust or use his hand only.
 
| When yõ ſeek to offend blow or thruſt, yo<sup>r</sup> place of hand is loſt, y<sup>e</sup> way to redeeme it is to ſlyde back vnd<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> lofty ward as aforeſd alwaies y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> adu<sup>r</sup>ſarie lye aloft redy to ſtrike or thruſt or vſe his hand only,
 
| When yõ ſeek to offend blow or thruſt, yo<sup>r</sup> place of hand is loſt, y<sup>e</sup> way to redeeme it is to ſlyde back vnd<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> lofty ward as aforeſd alwaies y<sup>t</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> adu<sup>r</sup>ſarie lye aloft redy to ſtrike or thruſt or vſe his hand only,
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
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| If you would offend him that lies low upon the thrust when you displace your weapon from aloft you may after your blow at head or arm or nearest place, stand & thrust before you go back because he is out of place & space & cannot cross, & thereby losses his time to annoy you & you may thrust & retire for a new assault.
 
| If you would offend him that lies low upon the thrust when you displace your weapon from aloft you may after your blow at head or arm or nearest place, stand & thrust before you go back because he is out of place & space & cannot cross, & thereby losses his time to annoy you & you may thrust & retire for a new assault.
 
| yf yõ would offend him y<sup>t</sup> lyeth lowe vpõ y<sup>e</sup> thruſt then when yõ diſplace yo<sup>r</sup> weapon frõ aloft yõ may aft<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> blow at hed or arme or neereſt place, ſtand & thruſt before yõ go backe becauſe he is out of place & ſpace & cannot +, & therby looſeth his tyme to annoy yõ & yõ may thruſt & retyre for a new aſſault.
 
| yf yõ would offend him y<sup>t</sup> lyeth lowe vpõ y<sup>e</sup> thruſt then when yõ diſplace yo<sup>r</sup> weapon frõ aloft yõ may aft<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> blow at hed or arme or neereſt place, ſtand & thruſt before yõ go backe becauſe he is out of place & ſpace & cannot +, & therby looſeth his tyme to annoy yõ & yõ may thruſt & retyre for a new aſſault.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
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:Strike : thruſt : ward : breake :
 
:Strike : thruſt : ward : breake :
 
:the dubble offence is in ſtriking & thruſting.
 
:the dubble offence is in ſtriking & thruſting.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
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| the iij fold defence in warding y<sup>e</sup> blow breaking or puting bye y<sup>e</sup> thruſt ſlyding back vnd<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hanging ward.
 
| the iij fold defence in warding y<sup>e</sup> blow breaking or puting bye y<sup>e</sup> thruſt ſlyding back vnd<sup>r</sup> yo<sup>r</sup> hanging ward.
 
:wyn y<sup>e</sup> place : ſtand faſt, ſtrike home offend, defend, & go ſaf.
 
:wyn y<sup>e</sup> place : ſtand faſt, ſtrike home offend, defend, & go ſaf.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
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| al vnd<sup>r</sup> play is beaten w<sup>t</sup> moſt agil, ſingle & y<sup>e</sup> lofty the lofty w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> gardant, His when w<sup>t</sup> his foot he ſeeke y<sup>e</sup> low lying is out of place to ofend defend or not ſo for lack of tyme ſpace & croſſing, yf he lye out w<sup>t</sup> his long<sup>r</sup> weapõ it is put bye frõ aloft, who hath place tyme & reach of body & arme al w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> +.
 
| al vnd<sup>r</sup> play is beaten w<sup>t</sup> moſt agil, ſingle & y<sup>e</sup> lofty the lofty w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> gardant, His when w<sup>t</sup> his foot he ſeeke y<sup>e</sup> low lying is out of place to ofend defend or not ſo for lack of tyme ſpace & croſſing, yf he lye out w<sup>t</sup> his long<sup>r</sup> weapõ it is put bye frõ aloft, who hath place tyme & reach of body & arme al w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> +.
 
: 93 re y<sup>e</sup> reading y<sup>e</sup> enterlyyinge of other things therto adioyning.
 
: 93 re y<sup>e</sup> reading y<sup>e</sup> enterlyyinge of other things therto adioyning.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
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| The lofty naked play is beaten with the ward because of cross, space, time. To defend, the lofty naked single loose play serves to win the time of the low & double play.
 
| The lofty naked play is beaten with the ward because of cross, space, time. To defend, the lofty naked single loose play serves to win the time of the low & double play.
 
| the lofty naked play is beaten w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> ward becs of Croſs ſpace tyme to Defend, y<sup>e</sup> lofty naked ſingle looſe play ſ<sup>r</sup>veth to win y<sup>e</sup> Tyme of y<sup>e</sup> lowe & dubble play.
 
| the lofty naked play is beaten w<sup>t</sup> y<sup>e</sup> ward becs of Croſs ſpace tyme to Defend, y<sup>e</sup> lofty naked ſingle looſe play ſ<sup>r</sup>veth to win y<sup>e</sup> Tyme of y<sup>e</sup> lowe & dubble play.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
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| The bent guardant requires your arm straight high & outside the point towards (93 re II well) the body & foot that way inclined
 
| The bent guardant requires your arm straight high & outside the point towards (93 re II well) the body & foot that way inclined
 
| the bent gardant requireth yo<sup>r</sup> arme ſtrait high & out y<sup>e</sup> point down towards (93 re II wel) y<sup>e</sup> body & foote y<sup>t</sup> way inclyned.
 
| the bent gardant requireth yo<sup>r</sup> arme ſtrait high & out y<sup>e</sup> point down towards (93 re II wel) y<sup>e</sup> body & foote y<sup>t</sup> way inclyned.
 +
|
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
|  
+
| class="noline" |  
| [Remaining text forthcoming]
+
| class="noline" | [Remaining text forthcoming]
|  
+
| class="noline" |  
  
 
|}
 
|}
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}}
 
}}
 
{{sourcebox
 
{{sourcebox
  | work        = [[Bref Instructions vpõ My Pradoxes of Defence (Sloane MS No.376)|Sloane MS No.376]]
+
  | work        = [[Bref Instructions vpõ My Pradoxes of Defence (Sloane MS No.376)|London Transcription]]
 
  | authors    = [[Jonathan Miller]]
 
  | authors    = [[Jonathan Miller]]
 
  | source link = http://www.sirwilliamhope.org/Library/Silver/SilverMSS.php
 
  | source link = http://www.sirwilliamhope.org/Library/Silver/SilverMSS.php
 
  | source title= The Linacre School of Defence
 
  | source title= The Linacre School of Defence
 
  | license    = noncommercial
 
  | license    = noncommercial
 +
}}
 +
{{sourcebox
 +
| work        = [[Bref instructions upon my Paradoxes of defence (MS 1086)|Leuven Transcription]]
 +
| authors    =
 +
| source link =
 +
| source title= [[Index:Bref instructions upon my Paradoxes of defence (MS 1086)]]
 +
| license    = default
 
}}
 
}}
 
{{sourcebox footer}}<section end="sourcebox"/>
 
{{sourcebox footer}}<section end="sourcebox"/>
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* [[George Silver|Silver, George]]. ''[http://books.google.com/books?id=olgCAAAAYAAJ The Works of George Silver]''. Ed. Cyril G. R. Matthey. London: George Bell and Sons, 1898.
 
* [[George Silver|Silver, George]]. ''[http://books.google.com/books?id=olgCAAAAYAAJ The Works of George Silver]''. Ed. Cyril G. R. Matthey. London: George Bell and Sons, 1898.
 
* Wagner, Paul. ''Master Of Defence: The Works of George Silver''. Boulder, CO: [[Paladin Press]], 2008. ISBN 978-1581607239
 
* Wagner, Paul. ''Master Of Defence: The Works of George Silver''. Boulder, CO: [[Paladin Press]], 2008. ISBN 978-1581607239
* Hand, Stephen. ''English Swordsmanship: The True Fight of George Silver, Vol. 1: Single Sword''. Highland Village, TX [[Chivalry Bookshelf]],2006. ISBN 1-891448-27-7
 
  
 
== References ==
 
== References ==
  
{{reflist}}
+
{{reflist|2}}
 
{{DEFAULTSORT: Silver, George}}
 
{{DEFAULTSORT: Silver, George}}
 
__FORCETOC__
 
__FORCETOC__
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[[Category:Dagger]]
 
[[Category:Dagger]]
 
[[Category:Greatsword]]
 
[[Category:Greatsword]]
[[Category:Longsword]]
+
[[Category:Pike]]
 
[[Category:Pole Weapons]]
 
[[Category:Pole Weapons]]
 
[[Category:Rapier]]
 
[[Category:Rapier]]
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[[Category:Sword and Cloak]]
 
[[Category:Sword and Cloak]]
 
[[Category:Sword and Dagger]]
 
[[Category:Sword and Dagger]]
 +
 +
[[Category:Format on hold]]

Latest revision as of 23:23, 14 October 2020

George Silver
Born ca. 1550s-early 60s
Died date of death unknown
Spouse(s) Mary Haydon
Nationality English
Genres Fencing manual
Language English
Notable work(s) Paradoxes of Defence
Manuscript(s)
First printed
english edition
Matthey, 1898
Concordance by Michael Chidester, Stephen Hand
Translations Český Překlad

George Silver (ca.1550s- early 1560s - 1620s) was a 16th - 17th century English nobleman and fencing enthusiast. He was likely born in the 1550s or early 1560s, the eldest of four brothers; apparently at least one of them, Toby, was also an accomplished swordsman. Silver is described as a gentleman in his treatise, and the fencing historian Aylward claims that he was eleventh in descent from Sir Bartholomew Silver, who was knighted by Edward II [1]. On March 24th 1580 (1579 in the old calendar then in use in England), he was married to Mary Haydon in London, England. [2]

Silver's martial lineage is unknown, but as a member of the gentry he was not affiliated with the lower class London Masters of Defence and would not have been a fencing master himself as the latter were classed as vagrants under the relevant act of 1529 [3]. In spite of this, he was possessed of strong opinions about the proper method of fencing and was strongly opposed to the contemporary Continental fencing traditions. He was particularly critical of the Italian masters who had set up schools in London, including Rocco Bonetti and Vincentio Saviolo. He and Toby went so far as to challenge Saviolo to a public fencing match to demonstrate the superiority of English arts, but even though they placarded London, Southwark, and Westminster with the challenge, and had it carried to Saviolo personally on the appointed day, Silver states that no formal match occurred.[4] Silver challenged Saviolo to fence him at ten weapons, beginning with the single rapier and rapier and dagger, which suggests that Silver had at least a passing familiarity with those weapons.[5]

In 1599, Silver published a treatise entitled Paradoxes of Defence and dedicated it to Robert Devereux, the Earl of Essex and also Saviolo's patron. Silver uses "paradox" in the sense of heresy and in this work he speaks against the wildly popular rapier, detailing what he sees as its inherent flaws as well as those of the foreign fencing styles that emphasize it. A second volume, entitled Brief Instructions upon My Paradoxes of Defence and explaining his own English fencing style, was written at a later date. The manuscript is undated but refers to Great Britain and so must have been written after James I's introduction of that term in late 1604. Bref Instructions remained unpublished for unknown reasons.

Silver's activities after the publication of his book are unclear. Aylward claims that he was alive in 1622, when he was visited (a kind of audit of people claiming noble or gentlemanly status) by Cooke, Clarenceux King-of-Arms. [6] However, Robert Cooke died in 1593. The Clarenceux King-of Arms in 1622 was William Camden, but as he became paralyzed in 1622 and died in 1623 it is doubtful whether he visited Silver either.[7]

Treatises