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User:Kendra Brown/Latin Lew/English complete only

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This is the complete transcribed text of the Lew gloss as present in Paulus Hector Mair's manuscript (Dresden) copy. These are transcluded from the main User:Kendra Brown/Latin Lew pages, which also have translations and notes and have the German Zettel verses inserted into the gloss sequence.

This page mostly uses Kendra and Rebecca's "Sandbox" format, where each unit of text is broken onto separate numbered lines by phrases.

81 r

a

Brief statement of the character of the longer sword

  1. First, you should undertake in all things that you worship and love God,
  2. you should honor the feminine sex,
  3. and your fame will be increased by this means:
  4. therefore, you should learn,
  5. any of these things would be fitting,
  6. use the force and strength of oaks everywhere and in (beautiful) war,
  7. thus that your fortitude is approved by all.

b

  1. First reminder,
  2. first you will dedicate the work,
  3. so that the Strike,
  4. which will soon be described,
  5. you will be able to strike skillfully in the custom of Athletics,
  6. if you would have wished to produce a strong gladiator.
  7. When you set the left foot in front,
  8. and strike to[^3] the right side,
  9. now he/it has been deceived,
  10. and the strike is false,
  11. on the other hand, if he/it will not follow on the right side
  12. and it will be clear that a short blow,
  13. however suitable it is,
  14. [moved to 12]
  15. truly cannot be employed properly toward the right side.
     
  16. but if, however, you should set the right before,
  17. and strike from the left side,
  18. and do not follow immediately with the left,
  19. then you are deceived in turn.
  20. Take care, on account of these things,
  21. so that,
  22. if you direct the blow from the right side,
  23. you would immediately follow with the right foot likewise in the same thrust.
  24. You will do the same,
  25. if you strike from the left,
  26. and you will adapt the body at the right moment to this method,
  27. and the extended strikes are shaped by gladiatorial custom.

c

  1. If you approached toward the enemy having been struck,
  2. do not hold back while directing the sword,
  3. however, if you always make a habit of awaiting/looking out for his strike.
  4. For all Athletes,
  5. who do this,
  6. do not rejoice in athleticness,
  7. because they are often struck.

d

  1. Item when you would have withdrawn toward the opponent,
  2. and you will wish to use the gesture,
  3. make it according to the Strength of spirit and body,
  4. and take care to strike his head,
  5. and you will compel the adversary by this method,
  6. in order that he look out for it,
  7. and neither will he be able/it be possible to take up change-abouts at any time.
  8. Your sword's point (in fact) will prevent his advance.
  9. But if, however, with the stronger part,
  10. which is the part from the cross[,] the enemy’s sword continuously contacts your sword toward the middle,
  11. you wound his left shoulder/arm
  12. and thence you withdraw,
  13. before he becomes aware of it


81 v

a

  1. When you have arrived closer to the enemy,
  2. If you are more skillful with striking from the right side
  3. you want to exercise the skill of athletics strenuously
  4. At no time direct the first cut from the left side.
  5. it is indeed weaker,
  6. than while you resist the enemy in the striking together of swords,
  7. truly if you strike from the right side,
  8. then you can stoutly resist,
  9. and practice various postures.

b

  1. But if, however, the left hand is more dexterous than the right,
  2. Then also do not strike the first strike from the right side,
  3. But preferably from the left.


c

  1. In fighting it is best,
  2. in order to observe, when you come earlier than the opponent with striking,
  3. If you cause "it",
  4. any of all the things which you want to employ,
  5. continuing to use against him
  6. in order that HE would have been immediately forced to defend himself.
     
  7. Truly if HE comes earlier than you in carrying out the strike,
  8. the first concern would be,
  9. to fiercely defend yourself with the sword,
  10. and using this method, reduce his attempt into nothing.



d

  1. The place or the part of the sword is called stouter,
  2. which is contained from the cross of the sword up to its middle,
  3. weaker truly is extended from middle up to the point,
  4. to which purpose it is proper for you to exercise these parts using the method
  5. It will be indicated in the following



82 r

a

Hereafter are five skillful strikes, unknown to many, which, if any, can drive back into nothingness using the Athletic custom without defeat, he surely will have earned no small respect among the most proven boxers, and deservedly he would obtain the wealthier prize for this, than some.

b

The First is, which gets its name from "ire"; the Second is called the "curved" Strike; the Third, “Transverse”; the Fourth, which takes the name "squinter" among fencers; The fifth strike, striving directly for the crown of the enemy's head: Athletics/Sport is especially and primarily based on these, you will have descriptions of them in the following.

c

On the other hand there are twelve [stances? actions?], which athletes learn, it is essential,  First it is agreed four guards. Second, four methods, with which to drive back the attack of the enemy, Third, by means of which the enemy having been threatened [may] be pressed hard, (Fourth),  transferring the sword, (Fifth) shifting, (Sixth) change about, (Seventh) withdrawing of the sword, (Eighth) running over, (Ninth)  interruption, (Tenth) method by which the hand of the enemy is crushed, (Eleventh) leanings, (Twelfth) twirlings

d

Action of its strike
which takes up the name from "ire"
This strike turns aside all upper strikes using its point, even though it is the easiest and most uncultivated. Employ it in this way: If the adversary approaches your head above from his right side, you do the same thing in turn, (all defense having been [already] shifted), touching his sword firmly, and suddenly turn the point of your sword over to his face or chest. Truly if he notices this, and also if he would take out the attack using the stouter part of the sword, then you lift your sword up from his sword, it [your sword] having been shifted above, turn back again toward the other side of the sword, you strike the head.


82 v

a

Another caution.
  1. If you would strike the ire movement against the enemy,
  2. and he holds the sword strongly,
  3. and you wish to use the gesture the way it is remembered above,
  4. and you resist strongly in turn,
  5. thence if you would lift the arm toward your right side,
  6. you would twist the short edge of the sword away from him,
  7. and stab him above in the face,
  8. but if the adversary observes this,
  9. (the sword having been lifted to take out an attack),
  10. you would remain in the twirling,
  11. and direct the point to the opponent below.

b

  1. Also, when the adversary touches your sword from the form of puncture or strike,
  2. in the first fight/conflict,
  3. you do not want to immediately administer repeated strikes,
  4. but hasten slowly,
  5. and you will take the greatest care,
  6. in order to observe earlier whether[,] in the striking together of swords[,] he holds the sword gently or strongly,
  7. but if you are able to recognize this,
  8. you are able to use the twisting/twirling and the frequent strikes,
  9. having been assailed[,] you meet/intercept any action we Germans call beautiful/warfare[,] at the closest opening.

c

  1. The gesture, which we call beautiful/warfare,
  2. when twirling and thence through the point formed toward the four openings,
  3. it uses it[masc]
  4. truly you will practice using this method:
  5. If you would strike a winning stroke called from ire against the enemy,
  6. and he, having received it
  7. (the arms having been lifted)
  8. the point of your sword joins his sword against the enemy above the opening of the left side.
  9. Truly if he were to withdraw his strength,
  10. in the gesture of twirling you will remember to take a position,
  11. but you change the point below into the left side.
  12. And if the adversary would withdraw it,
  13. now seek out his lower opening of the right side with the point,
  14. and if he would likewise thrust it back,
  15. with the sword lifted into the left side,
  16. in against the right side of the enemy as a means of seeking out the upper openings,
  17. and so he will have attacked/discussed the action of beautiful warfare versus soldiering below or above the enemy,
  18. if indeed you will exercise/practice that true instruction in the manner of the wrestler/athlete

17 alternate: and so the enemy will be stirred (driven out, harassed, continually disturbed) above and below [???] an action of beautiful war or soldiering (belli and militiae set up as opposites)

83 r

a

Twirlings you will learn skillfully [through??] practice, it is agreed among everyone with regard to three things, which are Strike, Puncture, and Cutting, if therefore you wanted to use the same, of great concern would be that you would practice them rightly and skillfully, lest it be punctured, you should strike, and not puncture or gash, if he should be struck. Therefore if you had done these properly, all of them easily, those who contest against you, [whom?] you are deceiving, the remainder on the other hand the [action of] further twirling in pursuit and however many would be their action, you will catch [them].

b

About the four openings.

When you would proceed in the face of the adversary, if indeed you want to exercise skillful sport/athletics, you will not strike [imperative, fut] the sword of that one with striking/hitting, however, from the four openings, observe only: they are indeed those: one, the right side, second the left side above the belt, remaining, the right side and the left below the belt, therefore if you have advanced [or] selected any of them, [you should] batter audaciously, but also take care, for any who use the action against you. But if he defends himself[,] the strike/blow of the enemy having been taken/received, you would thus strike in your defense against his closest opening, and so the body, you will not have the particular method of the sword.

Alternate last clause: you will have the particular method not of the swords


83 v

a

The method allows [you] to observe any opening which has been minorly injured

If anyone strikes against you fiercely and with [their] whole strength, and you attempt to impede the attempt of the adversary, and to take care, [and] the enemy has not wounded the four parts of the body in the way which has been recorded above, and HE having been wounded is more reluctant, then by means of repetitions against the higher part of the sword, which is called stouter, and use alterations against the weaker, therefore if you employ this form. the opponent is easily wounded, and he will not be able to take up any gesture —

employ repetitions using this method, If the adversary strikes against you from above away from his right arm, and you in turn equally with the same from the right, likewise don't hesitate to strike firmly while seeking the head; should the opponent take out that strike using the stouter part of the sword, (the arms having been lifted), if you would with-twirl (wring?) the knob of your sword with the left hand below the right shoulder, you would wound his head by means of sending the long edge forward from crossed arms back to his sword

b

And if in the first clash the long sharp edge of his sword having been connected from out of your left side. the shoulder/arm having been immediately raised in his sword[,] yours <your sword> would hesitate, truly/certainly afterwards the sword having been drawn close behind, you would wound the head with the short sharp edge.


84 r

a

  1. HE has used of the changings.
  1. When you strike toward the enemy fiercely from above from your right shoulder,
  2. and HE would take out your attack,
  3. and would not hold the sword strongly,
  4. then weave the short edge of your sword around up next to his sword[;]
  5. thenceforth (the arms having been lifted)
  6. you should thrust the sword from above on top of his sword
  7. then prick at the other opening.


b

  1. But if, however, you formed a Strike from the left side,
  2. and you connected with his long edge using [your] sword,
  3. (the arms having been raised)
  4. [then] don't shift that edge back from the sword of the adversary,
  5. toward the lower openings that have been wounded;
  6. and you can employ two gestures from all of the previously described Strikes using this method,
  7. immediately following the observation,
  8. whether the enemy holds the sword strongly or less [strongly].


c

  1. The description of the strike, which is called curved all conditions having been applied/used
     
  2. Now the strike which is recalled to mind is first from the four shiftings,
  3. against the four guards,
  4. in addition, this receives the strikes that use the gesture/posture which takes its name from the raging of the ox and the wild boar,
  5. [and] they are vanquished,
  6. as well as the lower strike[,] you will employ it in this way.
  7. If you proceed into range of the adversary,
  8. and HE stands against you holding the sword before [his] head in the ox guard from his left side,
  9. then you place the left in front,
  10. holding your sword next to your right arm in the guard,
  11. truly you leap forth from this into the right side,
  12. and you wound the hands of the enemy with the long edge from crossed arms.


84 v

a

You can also employ the same from the crossed guard from either side, therefore dispose yourself in the previously mentioned guard. When near to the opponent pull back the gladius in the manner of athletes [in order to?] concede temporarily, advance your left foot, thus hold the sword next to the right side, so that the point inclines downward, turn the long edge above, and so you will make the left side opening available to the enemy, if the enemy should assail IT striking, then leap forward with the right foot and using this method you evade the blow into the right side of the enemy, thence you twist the knot[^1] of the sword under the right arm, and you wound his hands using the pointfrom the long edge (the hands having been crossed).


b

In the crossed guard, adjust yourself to this manner, if you want to practice it from the left side. When you approach toward the enemy, (the sword being properly guided), place the right foot forward, hold the sword downwards with crossed arms from the left side, the point having been inverted, so that the short edge stands above, and you present the open right side to the enemy: and if he seeks to strike it, then with the left foot having been advanced into the left side in the same manner, you will avoid the strike of the enemy, and you will wound his hands with the short edge in this advance.

c

Another of the same method

 
  1. In the flashing of the swords by this method,
  2. in order that it extends below,[^2]
  3. Conduct yourself
  4. using this gesture against the masters of sport from the union of the swords
  5. If you step toward the adversary,
  6. you would place your sword in the crossed guard on the right side,
  7. or into the proximity of the upper arm,
  8. and if the adversary wishes to wound you in a high opening,
  9. then hit quickly from the crossed arms in the way of his strike (the long edge having been sent forward),
  10. truly, as the first, the swords will have seized with mutual flashing
  11. suddenly twist the sword,
  12. toward the left side,
  13. thence (the arms having been lifted),
  14. dig at the upper opening,
  15. on the other hand if you don't want to dig,
  16. insofar as you are able to make your decision with judgement,
  17. then the flashing of the swords having occurred,
  18. you attempt to wound the head and other parts of the body with the short edge.



85 r

a

The curve strike has been extended and thence you should not forget the change about

 
  1. This gesture is formed against the guard using the rage of the ox,
  2. therefore make use of [?] in this method.
     
  3. If you will advance in view of the adversary,
  4. and if HE stands in the aforementioned guard,
  5. and he holds the sword on the left side in front of your right arm,
  6. you imitate this,
  7. as if out of the posture of the first approach you would want to touch the sword of the adversary from the curve strike,
  8. truly the strike, having not been extended more, thence moreover change about below,
  9. and drive/thrust the longer point on the other side against the opening,
  10. by this method, the enemy is compelled to take out the attack,
  11. on the other hand then you want to practice the gesture & the strike in any time.

b

Another caution or using the curved strike.

When you use this strike, it is always necessary to present yourself open to the adversary, and thereupon grasp this. If you strike him the strike from your right side, or you touch his sword, you appear open from the left side, And if HE would have diligently drawn so near before, the sword having been shifted away from a mutual collision of swords, and also the opening, then as you present to him, he seeks to strike, and he tries to ensnare you with swiftness, your \[sword\] sticks/clings to his sword immediately after and follows/overtakes his strike, afterwards, twist the sword with your point, truly into the face of the opponent, and with continuous strikes, which is called "warfare" by german athletes, use \[this tactic\] when the openings are acquired, therefore you will completely confuse the adversary with this method, so that he would neither be able to protect himself against your strike, nor stabbing gesture.


85 v

a

  1. Gestures, and various Uses of the transverse.
     
  2. THAT strike [verbs] the guard of the day. first, this which is described now,
  3. drives back a strike,
  4. from above and the remaining,
  5. which is struck from the day from above and below.
  6. Thus practice the transverse.
  7. If the adversary stands against you,
  8. and lifts his sword (the arms having been lifted) in the guard,
  9. (awaiting you),
  10. if you will take care you will have conceded closer to him,
  11. in order that you put the left foot forward,
  12. (the width of a sword),
  13. or if you hold the flat of the sword next to the right arm/elbow.
  14. and if he advances and threatens close against you,
  15. then take care to precede him,
  16. and leap with your right foot into your right side in the same way,
  17. suddenly rotating the hilt of your sword in front of your face so that the thumb stands firm,
  18. thence you batter the left side of the head of the enemy with the short edge.


b

But if, in contrast, he arrives before you, then (the right foot having been inserted as directed [above] only for defense), you leap forward into your right side avoiding the strike of the enemy, and, as said in the preceding place, you crash together in the transverse strike.


86 r

a

Then also especially undertake striking the transverse, to do it with all strength, or at the stouter part of the sword, IT also having been taken out by the adversary, if you lift the stouter part of the sword, and if using this part you perceive the weaker of the enemy himself, use alterations ~shiftings~ directed above his sword toward the lower openings, or if you prefer toward his neck. Truly, if you cannot do this, employ repetitions to the back of his sword, thence also undertake that you should crash into the head of the adversary.


b

The other/the remaining things
if the enemy defends himself so fiercely, that you are not able to employ the remembered/related gestures, using the hilt of your sword, you drive back the sword of the adversary and batter his other side with the transverse, or if on the other hand he tries to run in, practice the gesture of incising under his arm.


c

In the preceding it has been said, how the Ox and the plow \[may be\] two military camps, or they may be guards, here, on the other hand, four openings are called Ox and plow. The Ox, two openings above, this is, the right and left sides of the head. The Plow, two openings below, that is two sides below the belt. These openings therefore explore thoroughly using the Transverse in the approach of the enemy.

d

When you would come near to the adversary, and he stands against you in the guard of the day, then advance the right foot against him toward the right side, and with all strength, dash the transverse above against the left side of the head, which is called Ox, and if the opponent repels that forward attack, next [attack with the transverse] below at the lower right side, which stands near or below the belt, which is called plow. And so hereafter employ the Transverse alternately, first above, next below brandish the plow in the likeness of the cross.


86 v

a

Of the wild strike.

Athletes are maximally blinded and deceived by this strike, and you will greatly desire those who endeavor to protect themselves, [because] you can strike, ALSO those who undertake to strike the sword, not the body

Alternate ending

and you will be able to eagerly strike those who endeavor to protect themselves


b

Therefore, make use of that [strike] by means of this method, if you approach closer to the enemy, you employ the strike from below on both sides. but if you draw near to him with the strike having been made from below from the right side, suddenly inject the point to the chest of the opponent from the long edge, and thereupon it will become necessary, in order that he shifts your forward attack, truly thence quickly leap forward with the left foot to the right side of the adversary, and pretend, as if you would want to batter the side, as was described before with the transverse, but withdrawn, or the thrust having been alter, soon strike toward the left side, Or if you come near to him from the left side forming the transverse, and also then you drive the sword from the long edge against the breast of the enemy, and employ this gesture from close in as described above.

c

  1. This posture being used in advancing against the enemy,
  2. for instance, you restrict the enemy with it,
  3. so that you could run across,
  4. and overcome him.
  5. This posture being used in advancing against the enemy,
  6. for instance, you restrict the enemy with it,
  7. so that you could run across,
  8. and overcome him.


87r

a

  1. Practice the turner-over or turning strike in this way,
  2. always set the left foot in front against the opponent,
  3. and from the right side,
  4. strike the opponent likewise on the right,
  5. and as often as you would advance,
  6. take care in order to strike a low strike in the advance itself,
  7. truly by practicing the strike according to itself,
  8. you reverse/turn over the long edge of the sword,
  9. so that it always appears from above,
  10. and you contact his sword to the highest degree possible,
  11. you thrust itself in against the higher sword,
  12. and dig at his face.
  13. truly if he shifts it,
  14. and also raises the arms upward,
  15. you should remember to run across,
  16. or if he stays behind,
  17. neither lifting the arms,
  18. then seize his right elbow with the left hand,
  19. if you have held firmly with strength,
  20. having leapt forward, you place with the right in front of the left foot of the enemy,
  21. and drive him by the same.
  22. When, on the other hand, he is run across,
  23. as will be described a little later.


b

  1. Regarding the twofold wild strike.
  1. It is a twin,
  2. which will soon be described subsequently,
  3. and practice it in this way:
  4. in the mutual approach, place the left foot forward,
  5. contact the sword with the right arm/shoulder,
  6. and, if you foresee that you would strike an enemy, for whom you have longed,
  7. then leap forward with your right foot to your right side,
  8. and compose yourself with this method,
  9. as if [you were] freely beating the left side of the head of the adversary,
  10. truly drawing back the strike.
  11. if you leap forward on his right side with the right foot,
  12. you batter his head in the running across.
  13. And if he sets aside this forward attack,
  14. and you contact the sword so much,
  15. then advance a little[,] close to that side,
  16. then, out of the doubling gesture you should cut [with the edge/forward part of the sword] back to the middle of the sword of the opponent, using the short edge,
  17. and even the other shoulder.
  18. It is permitted to practice this gesture on both sides,
  19. and you can shape the wild by transversing equally from the highest strike possible.


87v

a

  1. Here follows a variation
  2. using[^1] his thrust which is called the side-eye thrust,
  3. having inherited it, it is called the squinter by us.
  1. This strike is a serious and strict gesture,
  2. for it overwhelms the enemy with strength of strokes and pricking,
  3. and it is shaped by inverting the sword:
  4. for which reason many masters of Athletics are ignorant[^2] concerning this,
  5. then again, they are entirely ignorant of the plow.
  1. Practice the gesture or thrust using these conditions:
  2. If you advance into view of the adversary,
  3. set the left foot before.
  4. you should contain the sword with a movement,
  5. and if it happens,
  6. in order that the opponent strikes from above against your head,
  7. inverting the sword,
  8. you should join the left to the right foot (?),
  9. and the arms having been stretched out [and] the long edge extended,
  10. strike his sword above against his strike or face or chest,
  11. and if the adversary uses this trick;
  12. your sword now contacts,
  13. in truth it goes across underneath,
  14. then you oppose extending the sword against his face the shoulder having been extended,
  15. and thence the adversary cannot strike you,
  16. nor use the transfer.


b

  1. Another gesture[^3]
  1. Another gesture follows.
  2. If you would stand fast against the enemy,
  3. holding the sword near to the right upper arm,
  4. But he stands against [you] in the Plow guard,
  5. and threatens a lower puncture,
  6. then YOU sending forward the extended short edge above,
  7. strike the blow called side eye,
  8. and from there drive/thrust the point either against his face or his breast,
  9. and if you used this method,
  10. the adversary cannot overtake you with lower pricking/strike.


88r

a

  1. Another form
  2. When you would stand against the enemy,
  3. holding the sword close to your right upper arm:
  4. and HE in turn in the Plow guard,
  5. and he barricades you with a lower puncture,
  6. YOU would convert the strike from the short edge,
  7. and if you direct [it?] extended above against the opponent,
  8. HE cannot overtake you in your strike

b

  1. Observation.
  2. From whence it can be considered,
  3. if the adversary would practice the extended sword even less.
  4. In the approach against the opponent,
  5. you should watch diligently with a side eye as it were,
  6. if he would have struck short,
  7. truly you should seize him/it in this way,
  8. if he would not extend the arm in the thrust itself,
  9. it is short and if you should take a position in a guard,
  10. he will not be able to injure you,
  11. and if he tries to trip you up with his sword,
  12. truly if it happens that he in the same way can't overtake you,
  13. so that he works from the Ox or from the Plow posture,
  14. likewise, he is deceived/trapped,
  15. Finally, whatever he exercises,
  16. they are evidently foolish.
  17. You would send/go across this type of Athlete,
  18. therefore restrict/collect, in order that it is necessary to watch your strikes by warding off themselves,
  19. and then you would freely practice the gesture as often as you want,
  20. and also when you begin wrestling with the enemy.


c

  1. Item, if you would step to the enemy,
  2. in this progression,
  3. observe the side eye,
  4. now briefly train/exercise the sword,
  5. you would discern it using this method,
  6. in the collision, if he does not extend arms in the thrust itself,
  7. next you freely send across with blows,
  8. then truly using a puncture from the longer sword,
  9. and the adversary will be rounded up using this method,
  10. so that it would have been permitted[^4] to you,
  11. seize strenuously upon this condition[^5] against whomsoever,
  12. no diminishment[^6] on this side of the body itself.



88v

a

  1. USE OF THE SQUINTER
  2. ANOTHER against the longer point
  3. practice this gesture in this way,
  4. If you step close to the enemy,
  5. and he extends the sword against your face or breast,
  6. YOU hold the sword in position next to your right upper arm,
  7. and you invert turning back the sword in the side eye,
  8. afterwards pretend,
  9. as if you wanted to strike [using it (side eye)?],
  10. Truly strongly out of [the same] the strike which is called squinter by us having been sent forward using the long edge,
  11. strike his sword,
  12. thence truly adding the long point against the opponent's neck drive forward with an advance of[^2] the right foot.


b

  1. A GESTURE, IN WHICH THE HAND
  2. of the enemy is struck
  3. IF the enemy stands against you in the method of the long sword,
  4. and YOU desire to hit his hand,
  5. then you want to strike together the face or the head as if with a squinter,
  6. truly feint, by shifting the purpose of the mind, thence you strike the hand.


89r

a

  1. METHOD, FROM WHENCE FROM BOTH SIDES
  2. you can practice the wild twin.
  3. You capture down by means of this method itself,
  4. In advance,
  5. if you would advance to the enemy,
  6. place the left foot in front,
  7. hold the sword next to the right upper arm,
  8. and if you would observe him above hostile to you,
  9. then jump toward him with the right foot on your right side,
  10. and you compose yourself,
  11. as if you would freely wish to strike the head above from the left side of the adversary,
  12. in the same way you go before equally the defense having been employed,
  13. the strike truly having been dragged together,
  14. quickly spring the left foot forward against the adversary's right side,
  15. and in the same action you will pretend to want to strike his left side,
  16. but the strike having been drawn back again spring forward to his left side,
  17. and you should batter the same side courageously:
  18. and if meanwhile he will seek after your weaknesses,
  19. then meet[^2] your sharp long edge,
  20. and set his forward attack aside,
  21. and you know how to exercise from this and the other side,
  22. and you are able to manage from the Transverse on both sides.

b

  1. Various uses of his strike.
  2. by means of which the crown of the head is assailed.
  3. IT [is] the face strike. and the chest
  4. it is in the habit of being deceitful, in order to lie open below.
  5. I mention/name above THE[^5] posture [of] the guard of the poplar tree that took place , breaking and turning away.
  6. Therefore employ it in this way,
  7. If the adversary has prepared himself to join mutually in battle in the guard of the fool/poplar
  8. YOU would raise up the arms extending above the head in the guard of the day,
  9. and you advance your right foot against the enemy,
  10. you strike downwards strongly and from above with the long point sent forward,
  11. you strike/plunge the sword downwards into the face or breast of the enemy, repeatedly raising the arms,
  12. truly if the enemy would drive back using the action of the Crown, therefore in order that both the hilts of the sword are erected/upliftedby his sword
  13. and he lifts upward,
  14. and also twists the point of your sword,
  15. then stab/pierce the sword below the crown of the opponent inverted in his arm using the edge,
  16. thence if you press/follow/urge hard,
  17. his gesture will be ineffective,
  18. truly in the same gesture of urging/pressing hard you would gash him,
  19. and thence recede from him.


89v

a

  1. Now follow the four camps/forts,
  2. or in the same way they call the defenses
  3. The ox, the plow, the poplar/popular, the posture of the day.
  4. Those four camps,
  5. four guards they are,
  6. from which it is proper to excel yourself, the vigorous athlete.

b

  1. Of the ox.
  2. It is necessary to prepare yourself in this way for this posture,
  3. you should set the left foot before,
  4. hold your sword against the right side,
  5. the hilt standing before your face,
  6. thus in the same way the short edge is turned against you,
  7. the point extended against his face.


c

  1. Truly adjust yourself from the left side in this stance in this way,
  2. you should put the right foot before,
  3. hold the sword on the left side,
  4. the hilt stands before the face,
  5. the long edge turned towards you,
  6. and the point extended in the opponent's face.
  7. THIS therefore is called the stance of the OX.


90r

a

  1. Regarding the plow
  2. The second guard is called the plow:
  3. it will be useful for you to adapt yourself in it using this manner,
  4. Set your left foot in front,
  5. hold the sword downward to the right side, your hands crossed over,
  6. place the pommel close to the right hip,
  7. thus, it is apparent that the short edge is higher/upward,
  8. the sword will in truth be extended against the face of the adversary.


b

  1. Similarly compose yourself in this way in the Plow posture of the left side.
  2. place your right foot in front,
  3. hold the sword adjacent to the left side downward in the same way close to the left hip,
  4. set the long edge higher,
  5. [so that] the point inclines upwards gazing at the face of the adversary.

c

  1. Regarding the form, which is called
  2. the poplar tree by the Germans.
  3. The third guard is the poplar tree,
  4. adjust yourself into this posture,
  5. it is necessary to set your left foot in front,
  6. hold the sword in front of you with the arms extended,
  7. thus the point is leaning[^2] on the ground,
  8. so that the short edge is upward.


d

  1. guard of the day
  2. This is the fourth guard,
  3. compose yourself in this manner,
  4. do not hesitate to set your left foot in front,
  5. hold the lifted sword with the arms extended above the head, the long edge extended in front,
  6. the sword point hangs down not a little bit in back:
  7. and thus you would stand in the guard.


90v

a

  1. The following four
  2. strikes by which any gestures and camps born in all ways are repelled,
  3. and in nothing are driven back.
  4. In the above it is stated about the four guards,
  5. now therefore I will teach,
  6. which would be the principal forms,
  7. with which the forward attack of the enemy is delayed,
  8. of which the four strikes are.


b

  1. The first is that which is called Curved,
  2. of which it is mentioned above,
  3. it shifts the posture,
  4. or the guard of Ox.
  5. Second. the transverse,
  6. which repels the guard of the day.
  7. Third, which gets the name from side-eye,
  8. it disrupts the guard of Plow.
  9. Fourth is the Strike,
  10. which seeks the crown of the head,
  11. which repels that guard which our Germans call Poplar.
  12. In which way, however, certain conditions would be formed out of the preceding Strikes,
  13. and any who would be in a position against the guards,
  14. the above are described in the Strikes,
  15. for which reason if you wish to hit to cut through,
  16. practice no others besides these.


c

  1. Caution and Observation,
  2. which will have been done,
  3. if the opponent would take out the forward attack,
  4. and doesn't want to shift away from your sword.
  5. If the adversary would take out your Strength bearing it in[^3] for himself,
  6. neither does he want to shift away from the sword,
  7. truly he tries,
  8. nor(?) are you able to employ any actions,
  9. then next you will pretend as if you wanted to pull back,
  10. and you should drag together up to the middle,
  11. afterwards, having lifted it quickly,
  12. strike his head with the short edge,
  13. or in the gesture of doubling.


d

  1. Another form
  2. When the adversary has set your forward attack aside,
  3. extract the sword from on high from his sword toward his sword,
  4. as if you will take it out from a higher level,
  5. in truth, you would not shift the sword,
  6. but therefore, adhering to the sword, you would strike his head.



91 r

a

  1. A method and form, from which
  2. the point of the sword is applied to Four openings.
  3. The method at hand will have been applying the heavy sword and other actions.
  4. anyone you fight against,
  5. [is] dangerous,
  6. because he is accustomed to being hurt in the four openings,
  7. and then he is accustomed to being exercised,
  8. when you are set up to go back speedily from the adversary.


b

  1. Therefore, conduct this action thus when applying the sword,
  2. if you have come to the enemy with the sword, the Athletic custom having been guided,
  3. then you would adapt yourself into the guard of the Ox, or the Plow
  4. if you prefer,
  5. and if the enemy would attempt to hit you (from) above or to prick from his right side,
  6. you should anticipate taking it out,
  7. up to the closest opening on his left side,
  8. you would drive forward the longer point,
  9. awaiting,
  10. if you could hunt, connecting the opportunity of the sword.


c

  1. Again when he strikes against you from above from his left side,
  2. and then you should anticipate taking it out,
  3. you should thrust the longer point in to his right side.
  4. But yet if HE strikes from below from his right side,
  5. YOU drive the long point against the closest opening on the right side of the adversary.


d

  1. needs title
  2. If he strikes against you truly in the same way from below from his left side,
  3. then you should strike the longer point in against the lower opening of the right side,
  4. immediately thereupon awaiting the point,
  5. and if HE observed/saw through the twirling of the point,
  6. and shift it,
  7. your sword should stay back above the opponent's sword,
  8. and thence you should strike the sword quickly against the nearest opening.


91v

a

  1. Method for attacking the enemy
  2. having advanced to overtake.
  3. The condition and Use of these methods are diverse,
  4. and they are to be practiced with great skill and industriousness against Athletes,
  5. who draw from the extended and free Athletic Strikes,
  6. but truly the art of Athletics itself,
  7. And they do not make concealment great.

b

  1. Exercise the first gesture of the method of pressing the opponent hard in this way,
  2. if you come up to the opponent ,
  3. you would place your left foot in front,
  4. and would collect yourself in the guard of the day,
  5. but you would observe more diligently,
  6. the gesture that is used against you by anyone,
  7. and if it happens,
  8. in order that he would strike against you extended above from his upper right shoulder
  9. you do not thrust back his forward attack,
  10. but undertake that the adversary not seize you with the strike,
  11. and while his sword would bear down in those strikes with strength, having been overthrown to the ground,
  12. you would rush toward him with the right foot,
  13. and batter the closest opening on the left side from above,
  14. and by means of this method, before the enemy would have lifted the sword,
  15. soon he is/will have been wounded.

c

  1. Another of the preceding gesture
  2. When the adversary directs the longer strike downwards,
  3. this will take place,
  4. if YOU do not take it out,
  5. the strike flows down indeed in that same way:
  6. YOU, however, would overtake by hitting his strike,
  7. when therefore HE quickly raises his sword back,
  8. and takes out your forward attack,
  9. strongly then your long edge,
  10. remains bound to his sword,
  11. and if he tries to shift upwards,
  12. then, springing back, you place the left after the right foot of the enemy,
  13. and by transversing or with another method, you will batter his head from the right side of the head,
  14. thence truly you will work quickly against the other side using an action of doubling or elsewhere to generate a strike,
  15. during close observation,
  16. now he holds the sword strongly,
  17. or less [so],
  18. and this is called the outward form.


92 r

a

  1. Likewise another action.
  2. If the opponent is brought to longer striking below,
  3. and you (will) follow his blow.
  4. If it happens that his sword is against his left side,[^1]
  5. and HE strikes your right quickly from transverse fortifications,
  6. then YOU employing the transverse,
  7. will have broken under his sword,
  8. you should wound the neck from the left side,
  9. or spring with the left foot,
  10. toward the adversary's right side,
  11. and follow his blow with your same blow against the right side,
  12. or make use of a cutting-into injecting the arm against his head.

b

  1. ANOTHER FORM
  2. of the reversed pursuit/following.
  3. When you fight against the adversary practicing a strike from below or composed in the guard called Poplar,
  4. and HE contacts the sword ?with yours? before you raise up,
  5. continuing/remaining [below][^4] you lift the sword up high:
  6. Truly, if he attempts to strike against you from the fortification,
  7. or YOU will arrange[^5] to twist his [sword] with your sword,
  8. he is not able to shift the sword,
  9. and [you] will fight following against his closest opening.
  10. You will observe the above,
  11. so that you press him hard in the attack with threatening from all guards,
  12. and from all strikes, you should learn to the
  13. highest degree possible,
  14. any longer strike the adversary directs,
  15. how much it is possible to immediately lift the sword
  16. and to the greatest extent the opening[^6] (the most exposed [bit]?) no matter what part of the body it would be[^7]
  17. he will present[^8].

alternative 12 (end) to 17: you should learn to the greatest degree, regardless of the longer strike directed by the adversary, how it is possible to lift the sword as much as possible to the most exposed [part] he will present, whatever part of the body that would be.


c

  1. A caution, to any who perceive
  2. whether the opponent would hold his sword strongly or not.
  3. Among the gestures of the longer sword,
  4. "it"[^10] is the most excellent of all:
  5. to perceive whether the enemy would hold the sword strongly or weakly.
  6. Secondly: you should employ continuous strikes against the opponent,
  7. and make "it" very quick.
  8. [moved to line 6]
  9. And if a master wants to consider any of these arts,
  10. and has not studied the action in the preceding manner,
  11. and then he boasts worthlessly about comprehending Athletics,
  12. because the two have to be learned first of all.


92 v

a

  1. You will fully understand this action of perceiving by this method,
  2. If you have arrived at the enemy with flourishings of sword,
  3. and you have mutually contacted the swords from the first meeting,
  4. then in that mutual flash of the swords it will have been observed next by YOU,[^4]
  5. then he has contacted your sword more or less strongly,[^5]
  6. truly you have perceived “it” as much as possible,
  7. immediately you should call speed to mind,[^6]
  8. that is,[^7][^8]
  9. in order that you will fight equally with the enemy [by] most swiftly perceiving in this action,[^9]
  10. and by this condition he will be wounded beyond belief.[^10]


b

  1. Perceiving, at a distance,[^12]
  2. and quickly using continuous strikes on top of that,
  3. those two gestures cannot mutually tear themselves apart from one another,
  4. it will not be permitted[^13] to safely make use of either without the other.
  5. therefore, you will gain/learn from this.
  6. If you would have perceived,
  7. that one to have weakly or strongly touched your sword,
  8. while [the] above was kept in mind,[^14]
  9. [then] you quickly use continuous strikes.
  10. for these two gestures are always connected.
  11. But moreover another,
  12. which is,
  13. in order to be fast and quick:[^15]
  14. you can seize upon in all conditions/actions.
  15. That is, during doublings together, during changings about, during runnings across, during cuttings into, during wrestlings,
  16. creeping up on the sword using this gesture,
  17. however you would want,
  18. [if] you will try "it" in particular against this lasting/continuing action, you will be able to practice the unknown ones.


c

  1. The sequence of the cutting-into out of the applied form.
  2. You should make use of the sequences out of both sides while adding the cutting-into,
  3. grasp it thus.
  4. If the adversary had passed his long strike before your eyes from the right side,
  5. or the left,
  6. YOU! follow his strike courageously,
  7. with your sword against his opening.
  8. but if HE had raised lifted up the sword,
  9. and your sword had struck from below,
  10. while (during) being observed most carefully,
  11. in order that the swords will have been contacted to the greatest extent,
  12. you place your sword on top (or over [his]) from the long point,
  13. quickly at the shoulder of the enemy,
  14. and you press it down with this account,
  15. or, if you would prefer,
  16. you plow into the mouth/face[^16].

8-9, 11-12 swapped from latin order


93 r

a

  1. The action of throwing/spreading/sprinkling the swords above
  2. If anyone approached you using strikes from below,
  3. you should conduct yourself in opposition in this way,
  4. if you [also?] wished to use the action which has been called to mind/mentioned.
  5. When you have come near to the opponent,
  6. and HE strikes against you from below(ly),
  7. you will refuse to take out his forward attack,
  8. [you] will truly observe carefully,
  9. when his low strike drew near to you,
  10. YOU would strike an extended strike from the right arm,
  11. and thence you would drive the adversary forward with the longer point in the face or chest,
  12. indeed come into contact with him,
  13. and if you would support/contact the sword in the intended place/location,
  14. and so it will be done,
  15. that the enemy is unable to seize you below(ly).
  16. If HE raised the sword away from below(ly) to the stated place,
  17. and he would take out your forward attack,
  18. the long edge of your sword stays connected firmly to the sword of the opponent,
  19. and thence you will quickly fight (contest) against his nearest opening.
  20. To that point it must likewise have been observed by you,
  21. if you have strongly contacted his sword,
  22. and HE tries to strike you out of the fortification on the other side,
  23. then you wound his head using the long edge,
  24. and you work equally on both sides against the opening and also the earlier [antecedent ?head?].

b

  1. The gesture and use of shifting
  2. Any who will practice in this way,
  3. if you were to advance toward the adversary,
  4. and HE were to arrange himself as if he wanted to prick,
  5. YOU would have placed your left foot forward,
  6. and indeed, you would have composed yourself against that one in the plow,
  7. out of your right side,
  8. you should expose an openness and the left side to the enemy,
  9. When, therefore, he would attempt to stab the opening,
  10. you should turn the sword aside into your left side against his sword,
  11. and the short edge,
  12. you should join to his sword,
  13. and you shift the forward attack of the enemy in the situation still extending the point against the enemy,
  14. the right foot [already] having been joined behind the left,
  15. thence you should dig at the face or chest.

c

  1. Another form of going before/surpassing
  2. If you stand in the posture of the Plow from the right side,
  3. and the adversary attempts to strike the opening on the left side from above,
  4. YOU, having lifted the sword,
  5. turn it back against his strike in the left side with the sword hilt positioned in the form of the Ox in front of your face,
  6. if you have joined the second foot to the right,
  7. thence prick the face or the chest of the adversary,
  8. and you bring this about from the Plow away from the left side.


93 v

a

  1. About the change-about
  2. or the Use of the sending across
  3. The state of different changing-abouts and they are used,
  4. of which you will be able to use against gladiators from all strikes,
  5. [those] who strike more strongly against swords,
  6. than [against] openings,
  7. therefore, in order to discreetly learn more about them,
  8. truly, while YOU use the change over,
  9. the enemy will strive after you with the point.

b

  1. You will practice the changing-about in this method.
  2. When you advance toward the opponent,
  3. you strike extended abovely against his head by means of seeking after,
  4. truly if HE strikes in opposition,
  5. seeking after the sword and not the body,
  6. then send the point across belowly,
  7. before the adversary touches your sword,
  8. and you prick against the other side.
  9. and if it has taken place that the enemy observes,
  10. and he will attempt to shift the forward attack,
  11. you will remember to send across the sword again turning to the other side,
  12. therefore employ this gesture so often,
  13. as often as the adversary to support himself meets your sword on both sides.

c

  1. Another form of the same.
  2. WHEN you proceed toward the adversary,
  3. you set the left foot in front,
  4. and you turn the longer point against his face,
  5. and if HE has sought abovely or belowly toward striking your sword,
  6. and tries to shake it [the sword] out,
  7. you prick using the point inclined down and also against the other side,
  8. and practice this against all strikes.

d

  1. Also observe this,
  2. when the adversary takes out the forward attack,
  3. or contacts your sword in the first conflict,
  4. and if he turns the point of his sword so it isn't against an opening at your body,
  5. Truly, he extends in vain next to the side,
  6. then you courageously pierce the sword through:
  7. But if you have kept your sword truly in front of your face,
  8. or the openings having been turned,
  9. then you do not want to send across,
  10. indeed you would remain adhering to the sword,
  11. and you would thence work against the closest opening,
  12. and you will beware that action,
  13. having been pursued, the enemy cannot threaten you:
  14. nor can he join the point to your openings.


94 r

a

  1. drawing back the swords
  2. This manner should be practiced against teachers of Athletics,
  3. [and] any kind of stronger ones, in the flashing and clashing of swords, a defense having been added at the same time,
  4. And besides against those,
  5. who don't hold back in expectation about the conjunction of swords,
  6. [depending on] whether they [the people listed above] wish to direct the longer strike of the adversary,
  7. or set the sword aside,
  8. If, therefore, you wish to deceive those teachers,
  9. you use the sword in this manner by drawing back:
  10. you should strike from the right side fiercely against the head of the adversary,
  11. and if HE attempts to shift the forward attack,
  12. you draw the sword back until it [the sword] contacts him,
  13. thence moreover prick the other side,
  14. and use this gesture according to each contact at a time.


b

  1. Another of the preceding gesture?
  2. If the adversary touches/contacts your sword.
  3. If, therefore, the adversary hesitates, expecting in the collision of swords,
  4. that you will not wish to shift your sword,
  5. YOU shall simulate withdrawing of the sword,
  6. nevertheless you (should) linger just as much,
  7. Truly, the sword having been withdrawn most quickly all the way to the middle,
  8. suddenly prick his face or chest near the sword,
  9. If, however, you have not truly pricked[^2] the enemy,
  10. then use doublings,
  11. or employ whatever seemed best to you while doing it.


94 v

a

  1. Running across, and about wrestling.
  2. Use this condition to be able against gladiators,
  3. who, dreading, are accustomed to running toward wounds and strikes,
  4. Practice this other method to them.
  5. When the adversary shifts your attack,
  6. and desires to attack (with?) lifted arms,
  7. having wished to conquer you by his upper body strength,
  8. YOU raise the shoulders quickly,
  9. and you lift up with the left hand the node of the sword above the head,
  10. the sword, drawn tightly, is inclined through the back,
  11. thence moreover the head through his arms,
  12. you pierce through in direction of the side,
  13. then also the right foot having been advanced.
  14. you have placed behind his right,
  15. and having leapt into him,
  16. you encircle the body of the enemy,
  17. from the left side with the right arm,[^4]
  18. and if you throw him using your right hip,
  19. cast down the adversary onto the head.


b

  1. Another wrestling of the knee.
  2. If the adversary ran in with arms lifted,
  3. and YOU in turn do the same,
  4. then you should run across using the head against his right side,
  5. [subsumed into 5]
  6. you put/place the right foot foremost in front of the right [foot] of the adversary in the same way,
  7. and the right arm under his arm in the same way (the right having been stretched out),
  8. you will put [the arms] around the groin[^6] of the opponent,
  9. and sink yourself downward a certain amount,
  10. thence if you threw/hurled/struck[^7] him into (onto?) the right hip,[^8]
  11. throw back[^9] the adversary backwards,
  12. and practice this wrestling on both sides.

c

  1. Another form besides.
  2. While HE would have run in toward your right side,
  3. and would have lifted his arms,
  4. you likewise having arranged yourself thusly,
  5. you should hold the sword with the right,
  6. and you should drive his arm away,
  7. thence leaping forward you should put the left foot in front of the right foot of the adversary,
  8. also put the arms around his loins from the left,
  9. thence if you have sunk yourself a little,
  10. and you would have thrown into the left hip,
  11. laying the opponent low on his face.


95 r

a

  1. Another
  2. While the adversary is running in with raised arms,
  3. and YOU likewise would have stood in this way,
  4. hold the sword with the right hand,
  5. If thence he shifts his arm,
  6. place the left foot behind his right,
  7. (subsumed by 6)
  8. and you should stretch the left arm before his chest while seizing the left side,
  9. and if you place your left in his hip,[^2]
  10. you throw him back,
  11. therefore practice this wrestling on both sides.


b

  1. On the other hand, if the adversary attacks with a sword,
  2. By dropping the arms, you are not able to run through,
  3. You should make use of the subsequent gesture.

c

  1. If the enemy attacks with the sword lifted,
  2. in truth, with the hands somewhat lowered,
  3. if you shift the left [hand] from the sword,
  4. seize the right hand of the enemy on the inside between his other hand,[^3]
  5. thence turn back into his left side,
  6. and by holding the sword with the right hand strike the head abovely.
  7. But if you are not willing to strike,
  8. the adversary having leapt forward with his left foot,
  9. then place your right foot after,[^4]
  10. and the right shoulder forwardly of his neck
  11. or backwardly if you have enveloped him,
  12. you strike him down by means of the right knee.

d

  1. Another
  2. While the adversary runs in with a sword,
  3. but with his hands being lowered,
  4. shift your left right hand from the sword as previously,
  5. you should direct the pommel using the right outwardly over the right hand of the opponent,
  6. and also press down:
  7. thence moreover if you seize his right elbow with the left hand and the enemy having leapt forward with his right foot,
  8. place your left foot in front,[^7]
  9. you should press the adversary down using the same.

e

  1. Another
  2. The opponent having been run in, YOU should cast the sword away,
  3. seize outwardly the right having been alteredshifted (by/to) his same right,
  4. moreover you should seize his elbow of the opponent using the left ,
  5. thence, if, using your left arm,
  6. you set his right arm in front,
  7. and indeed if you lift your left foot,[^10]
  8. the enemy is blockaded,
  9. and you can shatter his upper arm,
  10. or you overthrow him facedown with your left foot.


95 v

a

  1. Gesture of slicing off
  2. This gesture shifts the wrapping from above of your sword,
  3. and it is necessary to handle it thusly.
  4. If you employ Athletics against the enemy using the strikes from below[^2],
  5. or if you arrange yourself in the guard,
  6. which is called Popular/Poplar by us,
  7. and HE places his sword over yours before you lift up the sword[^1],
  8. your sword remains in contact below under his sword,
  9. truly, if you will strongly raise using the short edge,
  10. and if HE presses down,
  11. then your sword having been shifted backwards and stealthily[^3] away from his,
  12. quickly wound the face abovely next to the opponent's sword.

b

  1. ANOTHER FORM
  2. Which you will use together with the strike from below toward the enemy in the approach,
  3. or while you stand in the guard Popular/Poplar,
  4. and HE strikes your sword thus near the hilt,
  5. in order to incline the point into the right side,
  6. then quickly lift the pommel over his sword[^3],
  7. you injure the head of the opponent (the long edge having been sent forward).
  8. or if he strikes your sword from the left side,
  9. More quickly lift the sword of the enemy above [and] backwards using the pommel,[^4]
  10. his head will shake violently by means of the short edge.

c

  1. Regarding the four slices
  2. Two are above,
  3. which are used against Athletes,
  4. who flourish the sword from fortifications,
  5. or from collisions of the swords,
  6. and they are in the habit of striking (a bargain) against the other side,
  7. you will be able to prevent that in this way using the slice.
  8. If the adversary were to attempt to strike[^5] using a singling-out,
  9. or in a conjunction of the other sword from the left side,
  10. and with a sudden transverse or if he were to attempt to strike the right side using another strike,
  11. then you, taking evasive action with respect to the strike, would jump with the left foot into the right side of the adversary,
  12. and you place the long point of the sword on top
  13. above both arms of the adversary,
  14. and you would press back using a slice,
  15. and you use this gesture from both sides,
  16. as often as he assails the other side from the exchange.


d

  1. The two lower cutting-intos are practiced against gladiators running in arms lifted:
  2. during this therefore use this method,
  3. as often as the adversary strikes your sword out of the first approach,
  4. and he has lifted the arm,
  5. and he runs in to the left side,
  6. you will change your sword so,
  7. that the thumb stands below,
  8. the long edge in the same way stands below the hilt of the sword of the enemy,
  9. it would reach as far as his other arm,
  10. out of this form you should stretch toward (him) using a high cutting-in,
  11. or if he runs in,
  12. the arms having been raised up against your right side,
  13. alter shift the sword backward so that the thumb stands below,
  14. the short edge is in the same way placed below with respect to the hilt of the adversary,
  15. touching the arm, and if you lift up,
  16. duly use this condition.


96 r

a

  1. A method, from which high cutting-ins from out of below are changed and may be shaped
  2. learn it thoroughly in this way,
  3. If the adversary runs in against the left side with raised arms,
  4. then turn the long edge of your sword under the hilt arranged in the arm of the opponent,
  5. and fiercely stretch upward,
  6. thence advancing toward his right side,
  7. meanwhile the pommel having been turned below you should not shift the sword away from the arms of the adversary,
  8. then the sword having been turned back out of the lower cutting into the upper [cutting], the long edge having been let through over his arm,
  9. and rightly you have used this gesture.

b

  1. But if, however, the enemy attacks/runs in towards the right side having lifted his arm in this way,
  2. then you place the sword under below his sword hilt, the long of the sword having been turned back into the arm,
  3. and lift firmly,
  4. thence if you proceed toward the left side of the adversary,
  5. the pommel having been transferred below,
  6. after you turn back the long edge above the arm of the enemy from/out of the long edge into the form of the slice,
  7. and thence you drive back.

c

  1. REGARDING THE TWO ANGLES of throwing the sword upward
  2. THESE angles are nothing other,
  3. than the postures of the Plow from both sides in which [postures] it is essential and also permitted to observe,
  4. whether the adversary holds the sword strongly or not enough,
  5. during the blows and the punctures,
  6. then also during the first flashing of the sword.
  7. And in addition to this,
  8. KNOW the four wrappings that are to be practiced,
  9. and out of these you can form any single strike, puncture, and cutting-in from above.


96 v

a

  1. REGARDING THE WIDE-OPEN WINDOW
  2. It was called to mind[^3] above,
  3. a method by which it is essential to compose yourself athletically, the sword having been directed in the four aforesaid guards.
  4. Now therefore you would understand that posture,
  5. from which we start/originate,
  6. to be the guard,
  7. in which you can most safely stand,
  8. moreover the guard itself is the point[^4],
  9. of the long edge,
  10. here namely is the best part of the sword,
  11. and the noblest:
  12. if any therefore practice properly out of the same Athletics[^5],
  13. consequently they round up the adversaries,
  14. in order that the reluctant will be wounded.

b

  1. On the other hand, you will form the wide open window in this way.
  2. If, in view of the adversary, you moved forward, the sword being properly directed,
  3. employing whatever stroke,
  4. whether from above or from below,
  5. then immediately after the long point, the lower arm having been extended equally from the strike,
  6. you strike against the face or the chest of the enemy,
  7. and you press him hard in the attack with this condition up to having defended himself,
  8. or he will strike your sword in the first approach,
  9. therefore, if he would do this,
  10. the long edge of your sword would stick fiercely to his sword ;[^7]
  11. and in the meantime, you would diligently observe with the strong and unwearied mind,
  12. what gesture the adversary wants to practice,
  13. if the enemy withdraws from your sword,
  14. with your sword following,
  15. seek his face or chest.
  16. But if in truth he attempts to strike your other side from the first flashing approach,
  17. you would strongly cut the arm of the adversary in turn,
  18. and work diligently against his head.
  19. Truly if the adversary neither withdraws from your sword,
  20. nor does he want to strike the other side,
  21. then use doubling or another from whatever gesture close to[^8] that which you perceive/feel him to hold his sword strongly or weakly.

c

  1. the longest long point of all is the best posture,
  2. and in fact the adversary is driven in that direction using the same,
  3. if you threaten,
  4. in order that he were not even able to employ any gestures,
  5. on account of which you should employ it in (regard to) all strikes against his face or chest,
  6. and thence you would form various further/extended postures.

d

  1. And also the wide-open window is addressed on this point:
  2. When you would be approaching nearly in view of the adversary,
  3. place the left foot in front,
  4. and stretch the long point against the face or chest of the adversary, the arms having been extended,
  5. until you contact his sword,
  6. and you stand to strike anyone using that method,
  7. or look forward at which gesture would have been made use of against you.
  8. When he strikes above,
  9. then the sword having been lifted,
  10. you should turn against his thrust in(to) the Ox posture,
  11. and thence prick the face.
  12. But if, however, he desires to strike only to the sword, the body having been disregarded,
  13. bravely change-about and prick the other side,
  14. but if, however, he runs in (the arms having been raised),
  15. use a low cutting-in,
  16. and if he sends that away,
  17. you can wrestle,
  18. therefore by this method, the gesture permits overthrowing anyone by the arms,
  19. which would seem best to you.


97r

a

  1. On wrappings with the sword
  2. You need to have been practiced in those individual conditions,
  3. In order that you can practice them quickly,
  4. and for every attack of the adversary,
  5. which is used against you,
  6. you could wisely move back.
  7. Also if you recall there to be four origins of the angles,
  8. two above,
  9. and also two likewise below.
  10. The above ones are indeed called Ox,
  11. While belowly Plow on both sides.
  12. Truly out of the four aforesaid angles eight wrappings are formed,
  13. and you should observe them diligently,
  14. in order that from any wrapping you bring out in particular one strike,
  15. puncture,
  16. and cutting into.

b

  1. Now truly perceive,
  2. in which manner you can form eight wrappings out of the four angles,
  3. The first [angle] has two wrappings,
  4. you should therefore practice these using this following method,
  5. When you go together with the enemy, your sword being directed for Athletics,
  6. you should stand in the posture of Ox from the right side,
  7. and if HE strikes abovely against your left side,
  8. then in the path[^8] of his blow,
  9. you should twist the sword,
  10. so that you apply the short edge of your sword,
  11. to his blade in the posture of Ox,
  12. and thence don't hesitate to prick him in the face,
  13. and THIS gesture is called wrapping.
  14. But if, however, the adversary tries to shift that forward attack from[^9] the left side,
  15. your sword should remain bound to his sword,
  16. and you should thence twist the sword backwards on your right side in the posture of Ox,
  17. such that the long edge,
  18. touches his sword,
  19. and dig above and backwards at the face of the opponent,
  20. and IT is a posture called Angle from the right side[,] the two wrappings having been employed[^11] on the sword of the opponent.

c

  1. Practice in this way the second throwing upward of the sword, two others having been added.
  2. If you stepped forward into view of the adversary,
  3. you stand in the Ox from the left side:
  4. and if the opponent strikes above against your right side,
  5. then you apply[^13] the long edge of your sword,
  6. to his sword,
  7. and prick his face above,
  8. and THIS gesture is the wrapping,
  9. but if, however, he drives that puncture back against his right side,
  10. you stay by adhering to his sword,
  11. thence also you twist the sword back on the left side into the posture of the Ox,
  12. so that the short edge is applied to the sword of the adversary,
  13. and out of that form you prick the face of the enemy abovely,
  14. and THAT is the second/next throwing upward from the left side, the two wrappings having been used in turn on the sword of the enemy.


d

  1. It will have been observed to you above,
  2. four wrappings are likewise to be employed from the two lower forward angles,
  3. because the Plow is on both sides,
  4. in order that it is remembered on top of that,
  5. [that] every gesture of these [feminine - wrappings or forward angles] having been employed are formed from the strike from above.[^15]
  6. therefore, as often as is proper, whenever you want to make use of the class of wrappings,
  7. always be mindful of the strike, puncture, and incision,
  8. in order to make use those gestures as was said above.