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Difference between revisions of "Peter von Danzig zum Ingolstadt"

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== Additional Resources ==
 
== Additional Resources ==
  
 +
* [[Dierk Hagedorn|Hagedorn, Dierk]] and [[Christian Henry Tobler]]. ''The Peter von Danzig Fight Book''. [[Freelance Academy Press]], 2021. ISBN 978-1-937439-53-8
 
* [[Christian Henry Tobler|Tobler, Christian Henry]]. ''In Saint George's Name: An Anthology of Medieval German Fighting Arts.'' Wheaton, IL: [[Freelance Academy Press]], 2010. ISBN 978-0-9825911-1-6
 
* [[Christian Henry Tobler|Tobler, Christian Henry]]. ''In Saint George's Name: An Anthology of Medieval German Fighting Arts.'' Wheaton, IL: [[Freelance Academy Press]], 2010. ISBN 978-0-9825911-1-6
 
* ''[http://www.archive.org/details/anzeigerfurkunde01germ Anzeiger für Kunde der deutschen Vorzeit]''. Nuremberg: [[Germanisches Nationalmuseum|Verlag der Artistisch-literarischen Anstalt des Germanischen Museums]], 1854.
 
* ''[http://www.archive.org/details/anzeigerfurkunde01germ Anzeiger für Kunde der deutschen Vorzeit]''. Nuremberg: [[Germanisches Nationalmuseum|Verlag der Artistisch-literarischen Anstalt des Germanischen Museums]], 1854.

Latest revision as of 17:57, 17 July 2021

Peter von Danzig zum Ingolstadt
Born date of birth unknown
Died between 1452 and ca. 1470
Occupation Fencing master
Citizenship Ingolstadt
Movement Fellowship of Liechtenauer
Influences Johannes Liechtenauer
Genres Fencing manual
Language Early New High German
Archetype(s) Currently lost
Manuscript(s) Cod. 44.A.8 (1452)
First printed
english edition
Tobler, 2010
Translations

Peter von Danzig was a 15th century German fencing master. Apart from the fact that he was apparently born in Danzig (Gdańsk), a coastal city in modern-day Poland, and lived in the city of Ingolstadt in Bavaria, all that can be determined about Danzig's life is that his renown as a master was sufficient for Paulus Kal to include him in the roll of members of the Fellowship of Liechtenauer in ca. 1470.[1] Danzig is often erroneously credited as the author of the 1452 manuscript Starhemberg Fechtbuch, a compilation of several treatises by different masters of the Liechtenauer tradition. In actuality, Danzig only authored the final section of that book, a gloss of Johannes Liechtenauer's Recital on dueling with the short sword.

Treatises

Additional Resources

References

  1. The Fellowship of Liechtenauer is recorded in three versions of Paulus Kal's treatise: MS 1825 (1460s), Cgm 1570 (ca. 1470), and MS KK5126 (1480s).
  2. der letzte Buchstabe ist etwas unleserlich, da er ein ursprüngliches »z« überschreibt
  3. Literally “his”.
  4. Literally “his”.