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Difference between revisions of "Monomachia ovvero Arte di Scherma (MS II.iii.315)"

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| <p>[03 verso] Therefore, since it can occur, it is good in any case to know about it whatever is useful; and as I have said before, I value this practice so good and necessary for any soldier, like the knowledge of how to handle a horse for a man-at-arms. Others say, I think, that if one wants to teach this art, one should not use the duel; I only approve it in those cases in which it is truthfully necessary or connected with the public good, however, in this work I will principally speak of dueling or of similar things. And although I always say that two must fight with the same weapons, it does not follow that in practice the weapons will always match, but considering that Herakles too according to that ancient proverb could not face two opponents, or that he also could not handle weapons in pairs, but only at a time. In this way only, by teaching matching weapons, is it possible to teach without confusion. I have always introduced two facing one another with the same arms in hand, not because it is impossible to fight with different arms either by chance or by choice, but because he who has the good and true knowledge of simple and similar arms necessarily also understands compound, dissimilar, and contrary arms. Therefore he who knows all the techniques and the nature of the ispiede as well as those of the partigianone, when he finds himself carrying one [ispiede/weapon] and his opponent carries the other, then he knows both what the opponent can do and what he can do himself, [and] certainly he will chart a course that will be necessary or appropriate, in the same way as if he had practiced with these arms. And because in similar exercises sometimes malice prevails over virtue I have included in my work warnings of foul play not only because it is done but so as to avoid it, although even when we remove deceit and evil intent<p>
 
| <p>[03 verso] Therefore, since it can occur, it is good in any case to know about it whatever is useful; and as I have said before, I value this practice so good and necessary for any soldier, like the knowledge of how to handle a horse for a man-at-arms. Others say, I think, that if one wants to teach this art, one should not use the duel; I only approve it in those cases in which it is truthfully necessary or connected with the public good, however, in this work I will principally speak of dueling or of similar things. And although I always say that two must fight with the same weapons, it does not follow that in practice the weapons will always match, but considering that Herakles too according to that ancient proverb could not face two opponents, or that he also could not handle weapons in pairs, but only at a time. In this way only, by teaching matching weapons, is it possible to teach without confusion. I have always introduced two facing one another with the same arms in hand, not because it is impossible to fight with different arms either by chance or by choice, but because he who has the good and true knowledge of simple and similar arms necessarily also understands compound, dissimilar, and contrary arms. Therefore he who knows all the techniques and the nature of the ispiede as well as those of the partigianone, when he finds himself carrying one [ispiede/weapon] and his opponent carries the other, then he knows both what the opponent can do and what he can do himself, [and] certainly he will chart a course that will be necessary or appropriate, in the same way as if he had practiced with these arms. And because in similar exercises sometimes malice prevails over virtue I have included in my work warnings of foul play not only because it is done but so as to avoid it, although even when we remove deceit and evil intent<p>
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== Gallery ==
 
== Gallery ==

Revision as of 21:10, 22 April 2021

Monomachia ovvero Arte di Scherma
MS II.iii.315, Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze
Florence, Italy
MS II.iii.315 Ir.jpg
Folio Ir
WiktenauerLeng
WierschinHils
Type Fencing manual
Date between 1539 and 1569
Language(s) Italian
Author(s) Francesco di Sandro Altoni
Size 72 folia
Format Double-sided
Treatise scans Microfilm scans

Monomachia ovvero Arte di Scherma ("Dueling, or the Art of Defense", MS II.iii.315) is a 16th century Italian fencing manual written between 1539 and 1569[1] by Francesco di Sandro Altoni. It resides in the holdings of the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale di Firenze in Florence, Italy. This is one of two manuscript copies of Altoni's work, the other being the MS L.V.23.

Provenance

Contents

Gallery

[Microfilm images available for import.]

Additional Resources

References

  1. Based on its dedication to Cosimo I de' Medici as Duke of Florence; after 1569, he was Grand Duke of Tuscany.

Copyright and License Summary

For further information, including transcription and translation notes, see the discussion page.

Work Author(s) Source License
Images Tauman.com
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Transcription Index:Monomachia ovvero Arte di Scherma (MS II.iii.315)
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