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'''Hans Medel von Salzburg''' (Hans Niedel, Hans Mendel) was an early [[century::16th century]] [[nationality::German]] [[fencing master]]. Salzburg is a city in northern Austria, and he seems to have operated as a burgher and ''Schirmmeister'' there from at least 1503.<ref>''Mitteilungen der Gesellschaft für Salzburger Landeskunde'', vol. 40. Salzburg, 1900. p 177.</ref> Little else is known about this master, but he seems to have been associated with the tradition of [[Johannes Liechtenauer]]. He may have traced his lineage through [[Hans Seydenfaden von Erfurt]], a member of the [[Fellowship of Liechtenauer]],<ref>The Fellowship of Liechtenauer is recorded in three versions of [[Paulus Kal]]'s treatise: [[Paulus Kal Fechtbuch (MS 1825)|MS 1825]] (1460s), [[Paulus Kal Fechtbuch (Cgm 1507)|Cgm 1570]] (ca. 1470), and [[Paulus Kal Fechtbuch (MS KK5126)|MS KK5126]] (1480s).</ref> as Medel's text is the only known source that mentions the earlier master's teachings.
+
'''Hans Medel von Salzburg''' (Hans Niedel, Hans Mendel) was an early [[century::16th century]] [[nationality::German]] [[fencing master]]. Salzburg is a city in northern Austria, and he seems to have operated as a burgher and ''Schirmmeister'' there from at least 1503.<ref>''Mitteilungen der Gesellschaft für Salzburger Landeskunde'', vol. 40. Salzburg, 1900. p 177.</ref> Little else is known about this master, but he seems to have been associated with the tradition of [[Johannes Liechtenauer]]. He may have traced his lineage through [[Hans Seydenfaden von Erfurt]], a member of the [[Fellowship of Liechtenauer]],<ref>The Fellowship of Liechtenauer is recorded in three versions of [[Paulus Kal]]'s treatise: [[Paulus Kal Fechtbuch (MS 1825)|MS 1825]] (1460s), [[Paulus Kal Fechtbuch (Cgm 1507)|Cgm 1570]] (ca. 1470), and [[Paulus Kal Fechtbuch (MS KK5126)|MS KK5126]] (1480s).</ref> as Medel's text is the only known source that mentions teachings from the earlier master.
  
Medel's name is attached to a manuscript treatise on swordsmanship from 1539, including an incomplete [[gloss]] of Liechtenauer's [[Recital]] and an addendum on fencing based on "the Seven Stances". This gloss is unique in the Liechtenauer tradition in that it not only offers direct commentary on the Recital, but also demonstrates an awareness of the earlier glosses of [[Sigmund ain Ringeck]] (from which a great deal of text is lifted) and [[Pseudo-Peter von Danzig]], and even includes occasional criticisms of and corrections to their teachings. In a few places the gloss specifically describes a teaching of Hans Seydenfaden or Hans Medel, but in several more it merely attributes the teaching to "Master Hans" without indicating which one. This manuscript eventually passed into the library of [[Paulus Hector Mair]], who bound it into the current [[Hans Medel Fechtbuch (Cod.I.6.2º.5)|Codex I.6.2º.5]] some time after 1566; unfortunately, the extant fragment of the gloss terminates abruptly at the beginning of the section on Zucken, and the remainder of Medel's gloss is currently lost.
+
Medel's name is attached to a manuscript treatise on swordsmanship from 1539, including an incomplete [[gloss]] of Liechtenauer's [[Recital]] and an addendum on fencing based on "the Seven Stances"; it seems to have been written by a student or associate of Medel rather than the master himself. This gloss is unique in the Liechtenauer tradition in that it not only offers unique commentary on the Recital, but also both quotes and occasionally offers criticisms of and corrections to the earlier glosses of [[Sigmund ain Ringeck]] and [[Nicolaüs]]. In a few places the gloss specifically describes a teaching of Hans Seydenfaden or Hans Medel, but in several more it merely attributes the teaching to "Master Hans" without indicating which one.
 +
 
 +
This manuscript eventually passed into the library of [[Paulus Hector Mair]], who bound it into the current [[Hans Medel Fechtbuch (Cod.I.6.2º.5)|Codex I.6.2º.5]] some time after 1566; unfortunately, the extant fragment of the gloss terminates abruptly at the beginning of the section on Zucken, and the remainder is currently lost.
  
 
== Treatise ==
 
== Treatise ==
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{{master begin
 
{{master begin
 
  | title = Long Sword Gloss
 
  | title = Long Sword Gloss
  | width = 76em
+
  | width = 90em
 
}}
 
}}
{| class="floated master"
+
{| class="master"
 
|-  
 
|-  
! id="thin" | <p>Images</p>
+
! <p>Illustrations</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B}}<br/>by [[Christian Trosclair]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B}}<br/>by [[Christian Trosclair]]</p>
 
! <p>[[Hans Medel Fechtbuch (Cod.I.6.2º.5)|Transcription]]{{edit index|Hans Medel Fechtbuch (Cod.I.6.2º.5)}}<br/>by [[Andreas Engström]], [[Anton Kohutovič]], <br/>and [[Christian Trosclair]]</p>
 
! <p>[[Hans Medel Fechtbuch (Cod.I.6.2º.5)|Transcription]]{{edit index|Hans Medel Fechtbuch (Cod.I.6.2º.5)}}<br/>by [[Andreas Engström]], [[Anton Kohutovič]], <br/>and [[Christian Trosclair]]</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>1</small>
 
| <small>1</small>
| ''Young knight learn<br/>&emsp;to have love for god, also honor women.''
+
| ''Young knight learn<br/>&emsp;loveth god, furthermore honor women.''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>2</small>
 
| <small>2</small>
| ''Thus increase your honor,<br/>&emsp;cultivate knightly virtue and learn''
+
| ''Thus cultivate your honor,<br/>&emsp;practice chivalry and learn''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>3</small>
 
| <small>3</small>
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|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>4</small>
 
| <small>4</small>
| ''Good fetter of lightness,<br/>&emsp;glaive, spear and messer;''
+
| ''Wrestling, good grappler,<br/>&emsp;glaive, spear and messer;''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>5</small>
 
| <small>5</small>
Line 89: Line 91:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>6</small>
 
| <small>6</small>
| ''Cut into that and hurry,<br/>&emsp;rush in. Hit or let go''
+
| ''Hew therein and hurry,<br/>&emsp;rush onwards. Hit or let drive''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>7</small>
 
| <small>7</small>
| ''so that the wise hate it,<br/>&emsp;then one see praises.''
+
| ''Those maturing in this wisdom,<br/>&emsp;This one sees praises.''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>8</small>
 
| <small>8</small>
| ''Thereupon they hold,<br/>&emsp;all art has reach and angulation.''
+
| ''Hold yourself to this,<br/>&emsp;all art has length and measure.''
 
|}
 
|}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 21r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 21r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
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|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''This is the test about many good general lessons of the long sword.'''</p>
+
| <p>'''This is the text about many good general lessons of the long sword.'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>9</small>
 
| <small>9</small>
| ''If you wish to exhibit the art,<br/>&emsp;then go left and right with cutting''
+
| ''If you wish to examine the art,<br/>&emsp;then go left and right with hewing''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>10</small>
 
| <small>10</small>
| ''and left with right<br/>&emsp;is what you strongly desire to fence.''
+
| ''and left with right<br/>&emsp;that is, if you desire to fence strongly.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' Note, this is the first lesson of the long sword if you shall learn to cut the hews correctly from both sides if you wish to otherwise fence strongly and correctly. Understand it thusly: When you wish to cut from the right side, see that your left foot stands forward. If you then cut an over-cut from the right side, then follow after the cut with the right foot. If you do not do this, then the cut is false and incorrect. When your right side remains there behind, the cut is thus shortened and can not have it's correct path downward to the other side before the left foot. Similarly, when you cut from the left side and the cut is not followed with the left foot, then the cut also false. Therefore note from whichever side you cut, that you follow-after the cut with the same foot if you want to correctly execute all your plays with strength and as such all other cuts shall be hewn.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' Note, this is the first lesson of the long sword if you shall learn to hew the hews correctly from both sides if you wish to otherwise fence strongly and correctly. Understand it like this: When you wish to hew from the right side, see that your left foot stands forward. If you then hew an over-hew from the right side, then follow after the hew with the right foot. If you do not do this, then the hew is false and incorrect. When your right side remains there behind, the hew is thus shortened and can not have it's correct path downward to the other side before the left foot. Similarly, when you hew from the left side and the hew is not followed with the left foot, then the hew also false. Therefore note from whichever side you hew, that you follow-after the hew with the same foot if you want to correctly deploy all your plays with strength and as such all other hews shall be hewn.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 21r.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 21v.jpg|1|lbl=21v|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 21r.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 21v.jpg|1|lbl=21v|p=1}}
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|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>11</small>
 
| <small>11</small>
| ''Whoever goes after cuts,<br/>&emsp;they demand little joy from their art.''
+
| ''Whoever goes after hews,<br/>&emsp;They allow themselves to hardly enjoy the art.''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>12</small>
 
| <small>12</small>
| ''Cut closely whatever you wish.<br/>&emsp;No changing-through comes upon your cross.''
+
| ''Hew closely whatever you wish.<br/>&emsp;No changing-through comes upon your cross.''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>13</small>
 
| <small>13</small>
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|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>14</small>
 
| <small>14</small>
| ''Fence with the entire body<br/>&emsp;whatever you desire to execute strongly.''
+
| ''Fence with the entire body<br/>&emsp;whatever you desire to deploy strongly.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' When you come to someone with the onset, then you shall not look to his cut nor wait as he executes it against you. Because all fencers that watch and wait upon the cut of someone else and will do nothing than parry, they shall enjoy such art less because they often become struck by that. Therefore cut and thrust to the opening.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' When you come to someone with the approach, then you shall not look to his hew nor wait as he deploys it against you. Because all fencers that watch and wait upon the hew of someone else and will do nothing than displace, they shall enjoy such art less because they often become struck by that. Therefore hew and thrust to the opening.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 21v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 21v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Item. Also note: Everything that you wish to fence, execute that with the entire strength of your body and with that cleave-in closely to the head and to the body so he may not change through before your sword and with that cut shall not omit the biters to the nearest opening in the binding-on of the swords that will be explained hereafter in the five cuts and other plays.</p>
+
| <p>Item. Also note: Everything that you wish to fence, deploy that with the entire strength of your body and with that cleave-in closely to the head and to the body so he may not change through before your sword and with that hew shall not omit the biters to the nearest opening in the binding-on of the swords that will be explained hereafter in the five hews and other plays.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 21v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 21v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
Line 150: Line 152:
 
| ''And also severely hindered<br/>&emsp;in the right, if you are left.''
 
| ''And also severely hindered<br/>&emsp;in the right, if you are left.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This lesson hits upon two people, a lefty and a righty. Understand it thusly: When you come to the onset with someone, if you are a righty and intend to strike-into the opponent, then do not cut the first cut from the left side, because that is weak and cannot, with that, hold against when one binds strongly upon that. Therefore cut from your right side, then you can work strongly upon the sword with art, whatever you wish. Similarly, if you are a lefty, also do not cut from the right side, because that art is quite wild for a lefty to execute from the right side. Similarly it is also for a righty from the left side.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This lesson hits upon two people, a lefty and a righty. Understand it like this: When you come to the approach with someone, if you are a righty and intend to strike-into the opponent, then do not hew the first hew from the left side, because that is weak and cannot, with that, hold against when one binds strongly upon that. Therefore hew from your right side, then you can work strongly upon the sword with art, whatever you wish. Similarly, if you are a lefty, also do not hew from the right side, because that art is quite wild for a lefty to deploy from the right side. Similarly it is also for a righty from the left side.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 21v.jpg|4|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22r.jpg|1|lbl=22r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 21v.jpg|4|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22r.jpg|1|lbl=22r|p=1}}
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| ''If you frighten easily,<br/>&emsp;never learn any fencing.''
 
| ''If you frighten easily,<br/>&emsp;never learn any fencing.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is so that, before any confrontation, you shall understand and capture the two things, that is, the before and the after. Thereafter the weak and the strong of the sword and of the word in-the-moment. From those come the entire foundation and origin of all of the fencing. When you capture the things correctly and furthermore do not forget the word in-the-moment in all plays that you execute, you will be a good master.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is so that, before any confrontation, you shall understand and capture the two things, that is, the before and the after. Thereafter the weak and the strong of the sword and of the word in-the-moment. From those come the entire foundation and origin of all of the fencing. When you capture the things correctly and furthermore do not forget the word in-the-moment in all plays that you deploy, you will be a good master.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
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| <p>'''The Before.'''</p>
 
| <p>'''The Before.'''</p>
  
<p>The before, this is so that you shall (if you wish) always come before with a cut or with a thrust into the opening, so that he must parry. Then work in the parrying swiftly before you with the sword from one opening to the other so that he may not come before your work into his. But if he runs-in, then come before with the wrestling or point running.</p>
+
<p>The before, this is so that you shall (if you wish) always come before with a hew or with a thrust into the opening, so that he must displace. Then work in the displacement swiftly before you with the sword from one opening to the other so that he may not come before your work into his. But if he runs-in, then come before with the wrestling or point running.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
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| <p>'''The After.'''</p>
 
| <p>'''The After.'''</p>
  
<p>The after is when you cannot come in the before (or otherwise will not take it), so await upon the after. That is the break upon any play that he executes upon you. Understand it thusly: When he comes before, so that you must parry him, then in-the-moment work swiftly with the after to the nearest opening in front of you. Thus, you hit him before he brings forth his play. In this way, you yet win the before and he remains after.</p>
+
<p>The after is when you cannot come in the before (or otherwise will not take it), so await upon the after. That is the break upon any play that he deploys upon you. Understand it like this: When he comes before, so that you must displace him, then in-the-moment work swiftly with the after to the nearest opening in front of you. Thus, you hit him before he brings forth his play. In this way, you yet win the before and he remains after.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>In the after and in the before, you shall also note how you shall work with the word in-the-moment according to the weak and according to the strong of his sword and understand it thusly: From the hilt of the sword the mid-part of the blade, the sword has its strong, with that you may hold against [it] well when someone binds upon you therein; and has its weak from the middle beyond to the point, you cannot hold against [it] there. And when you understand the things correctly, then you may work with the art properly and with that ward yourself and furthermore teach princes and lords so that they may well understand this art in play and in earnest. But if you frighten easily, then you should never learn this art about fencing, because you will become struck by any art. Therefore you shall not learn it because a blood drained heart does no good in fencing.</p>
+
| <p>In the after and in the before, you shall also note how you shall work with the word in-the-moment according to the weak and according to the strong of his sword and understand it like this: From the hilt of the sword the mid-part of the blade, the sword has its strong, with that you may hold against [it] well when someone binds upon you therein; and has its weak from the middle beyond to the point, you cannot hold against [it] there. And when you understand the things correctly, then you may work with the art properly and with that ward yourself and furthermore teach princes and lords so that they may well understand this art in play and in earnest. But if you frighten easily, then you should never learn this art about fencing, because you will become struck by any art. Therefore you shall not learn it because a blood drained heart does no good in fencing.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22r.jpg|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22v.jpg|1|lbl=22v|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22r.jpg|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22v.jpg|1|lbl=22v|p=1}}
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|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The text about the five cuts.'''</p>
+
| <p>'''The text about the five hews.'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>21</small>
 
| <small>21</small>
| ''Learn the five cuts,<br/>&emsp;from the correct<ref>alt: right</ref> hand<ref>alt: side</ref> against the weapon,''<ref>alt: defense</ref>
+
| ''Learn the five hews,<br/>&emsp;from the correct<ref>alt: right</ref> hand<ref>alt: side</ref> against the weapon,''<ref>alt: defense</ref>
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>22</small>
 
| <small>22</small>
 
| ''that we laud,<br/>&emsp;easily estimating the artificing.''<ref>the artist/professional doing their work</ref><ref>alt: gladly valuing in the arts</ref><ref>alt: gladly valuing with kindness</ref>
 
| ''that we laud,<br/>&emsp;easily estimating the artificing.''<ref>the artist/professional doing their work</ref><ref>alt: gladly valuing in the arts</ref><ref>alt: gladly valuing with kindness</ref>
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' Note the recital lists five hidden cuts about which many that name themselves master do not know to say: That you should not learn to cut differently from the correct<ref>alt: right</ref> side against them, when they position themselves against you in defence<ref>alt: weapon</ref> and if you select one of the cuts from the five, then one may hit with the first strike. And whoever can break the cuts without his harm and especially whatever work thereafter goes with it, that will be praised by the masters of the recital, thus his art shall be accredited to him better than another fencer that cannot fence against the five cuts. And how you shall cut the five cuts, you will find that in those very cuts in the recital hereafter written and taught.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' Note the recital lists five hidden hews about which many that name themselves master do not know to say: That you should not learn to hew differently from the correct<ref>alt: right</ref> side against them, when they position themselves against you in defence<ref>alt: weapon</ref> and if you select one of the hews from the five, then one may hit with the first strike. And whoever can break the hews without his harm and especially whatever work thereafter goes with it, that will be praised by the masters of the recital, thus his art shall be accredited to him better than another fencer that cannot fence against the five hews. And how you shall hew the five hews, you will find that in those very hews in the recital hereafter written and taught.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
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|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>23</small>
 
| <small>23</small>
| ''Wrath-cut, crooked, thwart<br/>&emsp;has squinter with scalper''
+
| ''Wrath-hew, crooked, thwart<br/>&emsp;has squinter with scalper''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>24</small>
 
| <small>24</small>
| ''fool parries<br/>&emsp;following-after, run-over set the cut,''
+
| ''fool displaces<br/>&emsp;following-after, run-over set the hew,''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>25</small>
 
| <small>25</small>
| ''change-through, pull, run-through,<br/>&emsp;slice-away, press the hands''
+
| ''change-through, pull, run-through,<br/>&emsp;cut-off, press the hands''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>26</small>
 
| <small>26</small>
| ''hang and with openings strike,<br/>&emsp;catch, sweep, thrust with blows.''
+
| ''hang and with openings strike,<br/>&emsp;catch, stroke, thrust with blows.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' Note, here the proper principal-plays of the art of the long sword are named, as all are specifically titled with their names and are seventeen in number, and it begins with the five cuts. The first cut is called the wrath-cut. The second, the crooked-cut. The third, thwart-cut. The fourth, the squint-cut. The fifth, the part-cut.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' Note, here the proper principal-plays of the art of the long sword are named, as all are specifically titled with their names and are seventeen in number, and it begins with the five hews. The first hew is called the wrath-hew. The second, the crooked-hew. The third, thwart-hew. The fourth, the squint-hew. The fifth, the part-hew.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Then the other twelve plays begin. The first or sixth in the numbering is called the four guards or positions. The seventh, the parries. The eighth, the racing-after. The ninth, the running-over. The X, the setting-aside. The XI, the changing-through. The XII, the disengaging. The XIII, the running-through. The XIV, the slicing-aside. The XV, the hand pressing. The XVI, the hangings. The XVII, the windings.</p>
+
| <p>Then the other twelve plays begin. The first or sixth in the numbering is called the four guards or positions. The seventh, the displaces. The eighth, the racing-after. The ninth, the running-over. The X, the offsetting. The XI, the changing-through. The XII, the disengaging. The XIII, the running-through. The XIV, the cutting-off. The XV, the hand pressing. The XVI, the hangings. The XVII, the windings.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 22v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>And how you shall uncover with the hanging and the winding and execute all the forenamed plays, you will find it all taught and written hereafter in the explanation and glosses of the recital, etc.</p>
+
| <p>And how you shall uncover with the hanging and the winding and deploy all the aforenamed plays, you will find it all taught and written hereafter in the explanation and glosses of the recital, etc.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23r.jpg|1|lbl=23r}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23r.jpg|1|lbl=23r}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_23r.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_23r.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| <section begin="wrath-1"/><p>'''The text on the wrath-cut with its plays and works.'''<br/><br/></p>
+
| <section begin="wrath-1"/><p>'''The text on the wrath-hew with its plays and works.'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>27</small>
 
| <small>27</small>
| ''Who over-cuts you, wrath-cut<br/>&emsp;Threatens<ref>eindrohen: to imminently threaten</ref> the point.''
+
| ''Who over-hews you, wrath-hew<br/>&emsp;Threatens<ref>eindrohen: to imminently threaten</ref> the point.''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>28</small>
 
| <small>28</small>
| ''If he becomes aware of it,<br/>&emsp;Take-away without driving.''
+
| ''If he becomes aware of it,<br/>&emsp;Take-off without driving.''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small style="color:#696969;">[13]</small>
 
| <small style="color:#696969;">[13]</small>
 
| ''To the head, to the body<br/>&emsp;Do not omit the biters''<ref>Zeck: a biting insect, ie: a tick.</ref>
 
| ''To the head, to the body<br/>&emsp;Do not omit the biters''<ref>Zeck: a biting insect, ie: a tick.</ref>
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' When one will strike you to the head from his right side with an over-cut, so you cut as well against it with a wrath-cut from your right side (especially if he defends softly on the sword) and in the cut, throw-in the wrath-point into his face and thrust.<includeonly></p></includeonly><section end="wrath-1"/> <section begin="wrath-2"/><includeonly><p></includeonly>If he then sees it and notices and parries, then take-away above and strike around it from your left shoulder to his right with the short edge if it goes nearer<ref>alt: closer, sooner</ref> than the other. And break the biters to the head, to the body if you can. You may also properly take-away with the long edge, there after striking or severing<ref>this is usually the term for the severing of limbs/extremities, though can mean cutting while exiting</ref> from him, etc.</p><section end="wrath-2"/>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' When one will fell you with an over-hew to the head from his right side, then you hew as well against it with a wrath-hew from your right side (especially if he stays soft against the sword) and in the hew, launch the wrath-point into his face and thrust.<includeonly></p></includeonly><section end="wrath-1"/> <section begin="wrath-2"/><includeonly><p></includeonly>If he subsequently sees it and notices and displaces, then take-off above and strike around it from your left shoulder to his right with the short edge if it goes nearer<ref>alt: closer, sooner</ref> than the other. And break the biters to the head, to the body if you can. You may also properly take-off colliding with the long edge, there after warring or separating<ref>this is usually the term for the severing of limbs/extremities, though it can mean hewing while exiting or just separating</ref> from him, etc.</p><section end="wrath-2"/>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <section begin="wrath-3"/><p>Item. The wrath-cut is nothing other than a strong wrathful over-cut like a simple peasant strike and is obscurely named in the record for the over-cut. The same as with the other four cuts that will follow hereafter with their particular names. So that they, with their content and plays, are not common to everyone.</p><section end="wrath-3"/>
+
| <section begin="wrath-3"/><p>Item. The wrath-hew is nothing other than a strong wrathful over-hew like a simple peasant strike and is obscurely named in the record for the over-hew. The same as with the other four hews that will follow hereafter with their particular names. So that they, with their principles and plays, are not common to everyone.</p><section end="wrath-3"/>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23v.jpg|1|lbl=23v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23v.jpg|1|lbl=23v}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <section begin="wrath-4"/><p>'''The taking-away''' is nothing other than when you have bound-upon with someone from over-cuts and go-up upon his sword and draw your sword above, around his sword or point, to the other side or shoulder into another cut to his other side or opening.</p><section end="wrath-4"/>
+
| <section begin="wrath-4"/><p>'''The taking-off''' is nothing other than when you have bound on with someone from over-hews and go-up upon his sword and draw your sword above, around his sword or point, to the other side or shoulder into another hew to his other side or opening.</p><section end="wrath-4"/>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <section begin="wrath-5"/><p>'''Break against the taking-away.'''</p>
+
| <section begin="wrath-5"/><p>'''Break against the taking-off.'''</p>
  
<p>If one takes-away and strikes to your other side, then bind or lay-into him, that is, wind-in strongly with the short edge into the ears and goes to both sides, also called doubling and mutating.</p><section end="wrath-5/>
+
<p>If one takes-off and strikes to your other side, then bind or lay-into him, that is, wind-in strongly with the short edge into the ears and goes to both sides, also called doubling and mutating.</p><section end="wrath-5/>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <section begin="wrath-6"/><p>'''A different taking-away'''</p>
+
| <section begin="wrath-6"/><p>'''A different taking-off'''</p>
  
<p>As Master Hans Medel lays-out and betters: If you wish to take-away, when you have threatened him with your point then take away with the short edge and do not strike to his right with an over-cut. If he then flies-on again, wind crooked against him sideways to the earth. If he will then go up again and strike at you to your left, strike in-the-moment against it, again with the short edge, to his right under his sword or wait upon him again into the after and wind-in to his right crooked into his head. Remember the biters with the short edge upon his head.</p><section end="wrath-6"/>
+
<p>As Master Hans Medel lays-out and betters: If you wish to take-off, when you have threatened him with your point then take away with the short edge and do not strike to his right with an over-hew. If he then flies-on again, wind crooked out against him immediately to the earth. If he will then go up again and strike at you to your left, strike in-the-moment against it, again with the short edge, to his right under his[sic] sword or wait upon him again into the after and wind-in to his right crooked into his head. Remember the biters with the short edge upon his head.</p><section end="wrath-6"/>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
Line 287: Line 289:
 
| ''Be strong against it<br/>&emsp;Wind thrust, if he sees it above, then take it below''
 
| ''Be strong against it<br/>&emsp;Wind thrust, if he sees it above, then take it below''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' If you have both bound-upon with an over-cut and wrath-cut and have not yet thrown with the point. If he is then strong upon the sword, then be strong out-against and wind-up on the sword into the thrust or stab. If he then sees it and will ward and fend-off and drive up into the air with the parrying; then, where it has connected, set the point underneath between his arms upon the breast</p><section end="wrath-7"/>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' If you have both bound on with an over-hew and wrath-hew as above and have not yet thrown with the point. If he is then strong upon the sword, then be strong out against and wind-up on the sword into the thrust or stab. If he then sees it and will ward it and fend-off and drive up into the air with the displacement; then, where it has connected, set the point underneath between his arms upon the breast</p><section end="wrath-7"/>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23v.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23v.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <section begin="wrath-8"/><p>Or take-away with either the short or long edge as above as the others maintain.</p><section end="wrath-8"/>
+
| <section begin="wrath-8"/><p>Or take-off with either the short or long edge as above as the others maintain.</p><section end="wrath-8"/>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23v.jpg|6|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23v.jpg|6|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <section begin="wrath-9"/><p>Or rather, when you fence with another, if he binds softly upon the sword, then drive further with the sword strongly and lay-upon him upon the neck and back him to the side. But if he binds-on hard and strong, then be strong against and wind the short edge upon his sword and thrust and snap quickly back around it and strike to his right side with the short edge—if you go closer. Or rather, if you have wound the short edge upon his sword, then strike-against<ref>widerschlagen: to strike against, in a reverberating sense</ref> him to the same side, down to the head.</p><section end="wrath-9"/>
+
| <section begin="wrath-9"/><p>Or rather, when you fence with another, if he binds softly upon the sword, then drive further with the sword strongly and lay-upon him upon the neck and drag him to the side. But if he binds-on hard and strong, then be strong against and wind the short edge upon his sword and thrust and snap quickly back around it and strike to his right side with the short edge—if you go closer. Or rather, if you have wound the short edge upon his sword, then strike-against<ref>widerschlagen: to strike against, in a reverberating sense</ref> him to the same side, down to the head.</p><section end="wrath-9"/>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23v.jpg|7|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 24r.jpg|1|lbl=24r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 23v.jpg|7|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 24r.jpg|1|lbl=24r|p=1}}
Line 306: Line 308:
 
| <section begin="wrath-10"/><p>'''Be strong against it'''</p>
 
| <section begin="wrath-10"/><p>'''Be strong against it'''</p>
  
<p>As Master Hans Medel says: If you will bind-upon another with the wrath-cut and point, then be strong against him in the binding-upon with the thwart-cut. If he then sees that, then take-away again with the crooked or short edge to his right as above with its work, etc. You may also properly remain after your short strike and go-after him.</p><section end="wrath-10"/>
+
<p>As Master Hans Medel says: If you will bind on another with the wrath-hew and point, then be strong in the binding-on with the thwart against him. If he then sees that, then take-off again with the crooked or short edge to his right as above with its work, etc. You may also properly remain after your short strike and go-after him.</p><section end="wrath-10"/>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 24r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 24r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 323: Line 325:
 
| ''Whoever aspires to that in the war,<br/>&emsp;they become shamed above.''
 
| ''Whoever aspires to that in the war,<br/>&emsp;they become shamed above.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is so that you shall accurately consider when one binds upon your sword with a cut or thrust or otherwise whether he is soft or hard. As you perceive or feel it then wind in-the-moment with the war according to the soft or hard to the nearest opening, then you shall know what seems best to you in-the-moment: whether you should work with the before or with the after. Yet you should not be too hasty with the inciting of the war, because the war is nothing other than the windings in the sword. They are to be wisely executed upon whoever that does not understand or know them well.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is so that you shall accurately consider when one binds upon your sword with a hew or thrust or otherwise whether he is soft or hard. As you perceive or feel it then wind in-the-moment with the war according to the soft or hard to the nearest opening, then you shall know what seems best to you in-the-moment: whether you should work with the before or with the after. Yet you should not be too hasty with the inciting of the war, because the war is nothing other than the windings in the sword. They are to be wisely deployd upon whoever that does not understand or know them well.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 24r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 24r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''A text: How one shall correctly find cut [and] thrust. A lesson:'''</p>
+
| <p>'''A text: How one shall correctly find hew [and] thrust. A lesson:'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>33</small>
 
| <small>33</small>
| ''In all winding<br/>&emsp;learn to correctly find cut, thrust, slice.''
+
| ''In all winding<br/>&emsp;learn to correctly find hew, thrust, cut.''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>34</small>
 
| <small>34</small>
| ''You shall also<br/>&emsp;test <span style="color:#696969;">[the offending<br/>position whether it is soft or hard, etc.]*</span><br/>&emsp;cut, thrust or slice''
+
| ''You shall also<br/>&emsp;test <span style="color:#696969;">[the offending<br/>position whether it is soft or hard, etc.]*</span><br/>&emsp;cut, thrust or cut''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>35</small>
 
| <small>35</small>
 
| ''in all hits<br/>&emsp;of the masters if you wish to confound them.''
 
| ''in all hits<br/>&emsp;of the masters if you wish to confound them.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is so that you shall learn to find cut, thrust, and slice in all winding, also so you shall be quite ready with all winding upon the sword. Because each winding has three particular plays, that is: a cut, a stab and a slice. And when you wind upon the sword, so you shall quite precisely test, so that you do not incorrectly select the play that is called for in the winding. Hence, you do not cut when you shall thrust and not thrust when you shall slice and when one parries the one, so you hit with the other. Hence, if one parries your stab, then execute the cut. If one runs-in upon you, then execute the under-slice into his arm. Note this in all hits and bindings-on of the sword if you wish to mock the masters that set themselves against you and do not understand.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is so that you shall learn to find hew, thrust, and cut in all winding, also so you shall be quite ready with all winding upon the sword. Because each winding has three particular plays, that is: a hew, a stab and a cut. And when you wind upon the sword, so you shall quite precisely test, so that you do not incorrectly select the play that is called for in the winding. Hence, you do not hew when you shall thrust and not thrust when you shall cut and when one displaces the one, so you hit with the other. Hence, if one displaces your stab, then deploy the hew. If one runs-in upon you, then deploy the under-cut into his arm. Note this in all hits and bindings-on of the sword if you wish to mock the masters that set themselves against you and do not understand.</p>
  
 
<p>* Master Hans also calls for this back in other places.</p>
 
<p>* Master Hans also calls for this back in other places.</p>
Line 349: Line 351:
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_24v.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_24v.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 
| <p>'''About the four openings'''</p>
 
| <p>'''About the four openings'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
Line 359: Line 361:
 
| ''upon any drive<br/>&emsp;without doubt as he bears.''
 
| ''upon any drive<br/>&emsp;without doubt as he bears.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' You shall here note the four openings upon the opponent that you shall always fence-into. The first opening is the right side, the second the left side; above the girdle of the man. The other two are the right and the left sides below the girdle. Take precise note of the openings in the onset with whichever opening he opens himself against you. Target that cunningly without danger with the shooting-in of the long-point and with riding-after and also with the winding upon the sword and otherwise with all attacks and do not heed as he bears against you, thus if you perceive wisely and strike a strike thereupon, then that is exquisite and allows him to not come into his plays. And always target the opening and not the sword. If (he) will parry you, then work further to the closest opening with the war or otherwise.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' You shall here note the four openings upon the opponent that you shall always initiate-fencing. The first opening is the right side, the second the left side; above the girdle of the man. The other two are the right and the left sides below the girdle. Take precise note of the openings in the approach with whichever opening he opens himself against you. Target that cunningly without danger with the shooting-in of the long-point and with racing-after and also with the winding upon the sword and otherwise with all attacks and do not heed as he bears against you, thus if you perceive wisely and strike a strike thereupon, then that is exquisite and allows him to not come into his plays. And always target the opening and not the sword. If (he) will displace you, then work further to the closest opening with the war or otherwise.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 24v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 24v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 368: Line 370:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>38</small>
 
| <small>38</small>
| ''If you wish to vindicate yourself,<br/>&emsp;artfully break the four openings.''
+
| ''If you wish to reckon yourself,<br/>&emsp;artfully break the four openings.''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>39</small>
 
| <small>39</small>
Line 379: Line 381:
 
| ''If you have understood this,<br/>&emsp;he may come to little.''
 
| ''If you have understood this,<br/>&emsp;he may come to little.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' As Master Hans Medel has said: If you have bound-upon with someone from earnest over-cuts or otherwise and wish to take vengeance for yourself and into that opening he wishes to strike, [you] have parried and broken. If he then strikes back around to the other side into the other opening of your head with taking-away or otherwise, then you shall again break the openings, that is, striking with the doubling or the mutating so that you break the opening from one side to the other and becomes stuck and you parry and strike as one without harm.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' As Master Hans Medel has said: If you have bound on with someone from earnest over-hews or otherwise and wish to take reckon<ref>rechnen: compute, take into account, align</ref> yourself and the opening. In this, he will have displaced and broken your strikes. If he then strikes back around to the other side into the other opening of your head with taking-off or otherwise, then you shall again break the openings, that is, striking with the doubling or the mutating so that you break the opening from one side to the other and becomes struck and you displace and strike as one without harm.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 25r.jpg|1|lbl=25r}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 25r.jpg|1|lbl=25r}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''Here note how you shall execute the doubling to both sides.'''</p>
+
| <p>'''Here note how you shall deploy the doubling to both sides.'''</p>
  
<p>You shall make the doubling thusly: When he has bound-upon you with an over-cut, or otherwise, from his right side to your left, etc. and strikes you back again around it to your right side, then do nothing more as soon as you perceive the moment he strikes, then wind-in your sword under his sword to the side with the short edge upon his left side. So if he becomes struck and is bound or laid-into at once, that is then called the doubling above and breaking the openings with that. You may also make the doubling against his right side, yet you must wind-in crooked, etc.</p>
+
<p>You shall deploy the doubling like this: When he has bound on you with an over-hew, or otherwise, from his right side to your left, etc. and strikes you back again around it to your right side, then do nothing more as soon as you perceive the moment he strikes, then wind-in your sword under his sword to the side with the short edge upon his left side so he becomes struck and is bound to it or pinned alike, that is then called the doubling above and breaking the openings with it. You may also make the doubling against his right side, yet you must wind-in crooked, etc.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 25r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 25r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 396: Line 398:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''Here note how you shall execute the mutating to both sides.'''</p>
+
| <p>'''Here note how you shall deploy the mutating to both sides.'''</p>
  
<p>Make the mutating thusly: When you have just doubled-in and broken the opening as is taught above, if he then strikes back around again to your left side, etc. If he will not strike against it, then you must allow nothing lesser to go through, as above. Then allow your point to go through it, between you both and strike him into the under openings. So if you always wind under against it with your sword or point, then you break each opening in the same way such that he does not know truthfully where he is without danger and may not come properly to striking. This is called mutating below right and breaking the openings artfully and vindicated as Master Hans Medel von Salzburg says.</p>
+
<p>Make the mutating like this: When you have just doubled-in and broken the opening as is taught above, if he will then strike back around it to your left side, etc. But if he is not to strike back here, then you must not allow anything more to go through, as above, etc. Then allow your point to go through it, between you both and strike him in the other opening of the right side of the head. If from this he then strikes to your lower openings, then you wind with the sword or point back here into the lower openings whichever way thus you break all of his openings like this so that he does not truthfully know where he is without danger and may not come well to blows. This is called 'down right mutate' and breaking and reckoning the openings as Master Hans Medl von Salzburg says.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 25r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 25r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_25v.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_25v.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| <p>'''The crooked-cut with its plays.'''</p>
+
| <p>'''The crooked-hew with its plays.'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 409: Line 411:
 
| ''Crook-up swiftly,<br/>&emsp;throw the point upon the hands.''
 
| ''Crook-up swiftly,<br/>&emsp;throw the point upon the hands.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is how you shall crooked-cut to the hands. Execute it thusly: Stand with your left foot forward, well into the scales, and hold your sword crooked, that is with crossed hands such that the long edge stands upwards, with the point out forward upon the ground. And the first play according to the text executes thusly: When one cuts-into you from his right shoulder with an over- or under-cut, so step inward into him with your right foot in-the-moment against him and let the crossed hand or the crook go-up and set-aside the cut with your sword with the long edge or point thrown well out-over his hand against<ref>towards</ref> his left side. Thereafter, war and work as you wish. But if he throws you with the hand here-over with power with his going-up, then let it go easily and make a strike around it around your head into his left side with the short or long edge, whichever course goes nearer. He breaks that with mutating against you. This hew also breaks the guards of the oxen. When someone stands therein against you, so you must break your crooked-cut there-against. It also breaks over- and under-cuts and is one of the four parries against the four guards such as the oxen.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is how you shall hew crooked to the hands. Deploy it like this: Stand with your left foot forward and hold your sword crooked out forward with the point upon the ground, that is, with crossed hands such that the long edge stands upwards well in the scales and the first play according to the text deploys like this: When one initiates a hew at you from his right shoulder with an over- or under-hew, so step in well toward him with your right foot against him in this and let the crossed hand or the crook go-up and offset the hew with your sword with the long edge or point thrown well out-over his hand against<ref>towards</ref> his left side. Thereafter, war and work as you wish. But if he over-throws you with the hands with power with his going-up, then let it go easily and make a strike around it around your head into his left side with the short or long edge, whichever course goes nearer. He breaks that with mutating against you. This hew also breaks the guards of the oxen. When someone stands therein against you, so you must break your crooked-hew there-against. It also breaks over- and under-hews and is one of the four displaces against the four guards such as the oxen.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 25v.jpg|1|lbl=25v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 25v.jpg|1|lbl=25v}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>''Rule: Give yourself a firm opening in the crooked-cut.''</p>
+
| <p>''Rule: Give yourself a firm opening in the crooked-hew.''</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 25v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 25v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_26r.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_26r.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 
| <p>'''Again a play'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Again a play'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>43</small>
 
| <small>43</small>
| ''Whoever properly sets crooked, <br/>&emsp;Disrupts many cuts with stepping.''
+
| ''Crook whoever sets well, <br/>&emsp;With stepping, [he] disrupts many hews''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is how you will set-aside the over-cuts with the crooked-cut. It executes thusly: Stand well crooked next to your left foot, which shall stand forward, crossing to the same side, that is, in the crooked setting-on with your sword with crossed hands with the point upon the ground. When he then strikes into the opening from his right side, so step and strike or set-aside and work as closest above. Yet, if you are able to fall well over the hands in the barrier-guard as others name, [it] goes to both sides.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is how you will offset the over-hews with the crooked-hew. It deploys like this: Stand well crooked next to your left foot, which shall stand forward, crossing to the same side, that is, in the crooked setting-on with your sword with crossed hands with the point upon the ground. When he then strikes into the opening from his right side, so step and strike or offset and work as closest above. Yet, if you are able to fall well over the hands in the barrier-guard as others name, [it] goes to both sides.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 26r.jpg|1|lbl=26r}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 26r.jpg|1|lbl=26r}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>And if you stand and have your sword to the other side in the crooked setting-on and not with crossed hands, rather with open arms, then the long edge again stands above and with setting-aside as before and thereafter working with warring or otherwise. That is, that you also strike him properly from the setting-aside to his head. Or with that, crooking-in or winding-up strikes or thrusts is also good against the fool or the flats. If he throws you over as above, then strike as above, etc.</p>
+
| <p>And if you stand and have your sword to the other side in the crooked setting-on and not with crossed hands, rather with open arms, then the long edge again stands above and with offsetting as before and thereafter working with warring or otherwise. That is, that you also strike him properly from the offsetting to his head. This is so that you also strike or thrust him well upon his head from the offsetting. [This] is also good against the fool or the flat. If he throws you over it as above, then strike as above, etc.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 26r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 26r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 439: Line 441:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>44</small>
 
| <small>44</small>
| ''Cut crooked to the flat <br/>&emsp;of the masters if you wish to weaken them.''
+
| ''Hew crooked to the flat <br/>&emsp;of the masters if you wish to weaken them.''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>45</small>
 
| <small>45</small>
| ''When it clashes above, <br/>&emsp;stand firm. That I will laud.''
+
| ''When it clashes above, <br/>&emsp; then stand <ref>In the standard verse it is 'ab', not 'fast'</ref>. That I will laud.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>This is when you wish to weaken the master. So note when someone stands hanging in the flat or the fool with the right foot forward. So cut from your right side from the crooked setting-on and set him aside with crossed hands, crooked upon his sword and step toward and as soon as your sword has clashed upon it, stand firm and wait upon the after, etc. Or if you will not wait, then swiftly strike back out from the sword with the short or long edge at his head into his left side or wind the short edge upon his sword with the crooked-cut and stab into his chest or do whatever you think is good.</p>
+
<p>This is when you wish to weaken the master. So note when someone stands hanging in the flat or the fool with the right foot forward. So hew from your right side from the crooked setting-on and offset him with crossed hands, crooked upon his sword and tread in and as soon as your sword has clashed upon it, stand firm and wait upon the after, etc. Or if you will not wait, then swiftly strike back up from the sword with the short or long edge at his head into his left side or wind the short edge on his sword with the crooked-hew and stab into his chest or do whatever you think is good.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 26v.jpg|1|lbl=26v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 26v.jpg|1|lbl=26v}}
  
Line 453: Line 455:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>46</small>
 
| <small>46</small>
| ''Do not crooked-cut, short-cut. <br/>&emsp;With it, display the changing-through.''
+
| ''Do not crooked-hew, short-hew. <br/>&emsp;With it, display the changing-through.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is when he cuts or stands against you in the flat or the fool as closest above, etc. So act as if you will bind upon his sword with the crooked-cut or the setting-on, then cut short and drive-through with the point under his sword and wind or pull-through to your right side with the point between you both into a thrust to his right side and stab him in the face just as you come into the flat stance and thrust sharply<ref>severely, precisely, ruthlessly, violently</ref> in.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is when he hews or stands against you in the flat or the fool as closest above, etc. So act as if you will bind upon his sword with the crooked-hew or the setting-on, then hew short and drive-through with the point under his sword and wind or pull-through to your right side with the point between you both into a thrust to his right side and stab him in the face just as you come into the flat stance and thrust sharply<ref>severely, precisely, ruthlessly, violently</ref> in.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 26v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 26v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 469: Line 471:
 
| ''that they do not truthfully know <br/>&emsp;where they are without danger.''
 
| ''that they do not truthfully know <br/>&emsp;where they are without danger.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is when you wish to execute the crooked-cut, you must always give an opening with it and understand it thusly. When you cleave-in from your right side or left side or bind upon his sword, from whichever side you cut, so are you open on the other. If he is also then clever and will cut from the sword to your opening and will make you err with agility, then remain with your sword upon his sword or cut after and wind in crooked or the point into the face and work further with the war or strike to the openings. So he becomes confounded so that he will not feasibly know where he shall guard himself in front of you against cuts or thrusts. Also if he will confound you such that he sets-upon with his sword and does not let up, etc. Then remain against his sword as above and follow-after him as above.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is when you wish to deploy the crooked-hew, you must always give an opening with it and understand it like this. When you cleave-in from your right side or left side or bind upon his sword, from whichever side you hew, so are you open on the other. If he is also then clever and will hew from the sword to your opening and will make you err with agility, then remain with your sword upon his sword or hew after and wind in crooked or the point into the face and work further with the war or strike to the openings. So he becomes confounded so that he will not feasibly know where he shall guard himself in front of you against hews or thrusts. Also if he will confound you such that he sets-upon with his sword and does not let up, etc. Then remain against his sword as above and follow-after him as above.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 26v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 26v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_27r.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_27r.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| <p>'''The thwart-cut with its plays.'''</p>
+
| <p>'''The thwart-hew with its plays.'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>49</small>
 
| <small>49</small>
| ''The thwart-cut takes-away<br/>&emsp;whatever approaches from the roof.''
+
| ''The thwart-hew takes-off<br/>&emsp;whatever approaches from the roof.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' the thwart-cut is nothing other than the middle-cut. It breaks any cut that will either approach or will be hewn from above downward or from the roof. You shall execute it thusly: Stand with the left foot forward and hold you sword in behind in the middle-cut at the midsection or waist by the right foot or side such that the long edge is above. And when someone cleaves-in above from the roof into the opening or the head, then step or spring forth against him with the right foot and set aside his cut with the thwart, that is crooked, well to your left, etc. and after the setting-aside, then wind-in with the short edge to his left into his head if you will remain upon his sword. War if it is a necessity. But if he makes a disengaging and will strike you from his left, then come-against swiftly around that with the crooked under slice into his arm, so long as [you] do not drive away too wide in the setting-aside.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' the thwart-hew is nothing other than the middle-hew. It breaks any hew that will either arrive or will be hewn from above downward or from the roof. You shall deploy it like this: Stand with the left foot forward and hold your sword in the middle-hew in behind at the midsection or waist by the right foot or side such that the long edge is above. And when someone cleaves-in above from the roof into the opening or the head, then step or spring forth against him with the right foot and offset his hew with the thwart, that is crooked, well to your left, etc. And after the offsetting, then wind-in with the short edge to his left into his head if you will remain upon his sword. War if it necessary. But if he makes a disengaging and will strike you from his left, then come-against swiftly around that with the crooked under cut into his arm, so long as [you] do not wander off too widely in the offsetting.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 27r.jpg|1|lbl=27r}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 27r.jpg|1|lbl=27r}}
  
Line 491: Line 493:
 
| ''Thwart with the strong.<br/>&emsp;With that, remember your work.''
 
| ''Thwart with the strong.<br/>&emsp;With that, remember your work.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is so that you shall strongly break and strongly work every thwart with someone and also especially when he will strike down into you from above as from the roof. So \run-in against his cut strongly with the thwart the same as with the slice, also so that your thumb is underneath, and with that strike him upon his left side or head. Thereafter, if upon that he strengthens much against you, then hang well and strike him from the hanging to his right side and step with the left foot well to his right, etc, viz:<ref>videlicet: namely; to wit</ref> Cut-off<ref>abhauen: to sever</ref> or War, etc.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is about how you shall strengthen, break and work strongly with any thwart-strike and like this in particular: when he will initiate a strike from above downwards like from-the-roof. So run inside against his hew strongly with the thwart just like the cut only that your thumb is underneath; and with that, strike him upon his left side or head. Thereafter if he strengthens a lot against you atop of that, then hang well and strike him from the hanging to his right side and tread with the left foot well to his right, etc, viz:<ref>videlicet: namely; to wit</ref> Hew-off<ref>abhauen: to sever or to hew in exit</ref> or War, etc.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 27v.jpg|1|lbl=27v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 27v.jpg|1|lbl=27v}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Item. But if you sense when you bind-upon him with strength and he is weak upon the sword, then lay the short edge across to his right side upon his neck.</p>
+
| <p>Item. But if you sense when you bind on him with strength and he is weak upon the sword, then lay the short edge across to his right side upon his neck.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 27v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 27v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 503: Line 505:
 
| <p>'''A break for the laying-on.'''</p>
 
| <p>'''A break for the laying-on.'''</p>
  
<p>When someone works upon you with the above, laid upon the neck as well, then release your sword from the left hand and shove his sword from the neck with the right and step with the left foot against his left side in front of both of his feet and drive closely with the left arm over both of his arms by his hilt and in front of him into the dance. Or, and better, step behind him in the scales and with the left arm on the neck, ahead or back around and thrown over the foot. Or release your sword from the left hand and strike him with the right through the mouth with the sword over his sword and grasp your sword with the left hand in the middle of the blade and shove him from you with the point, etc. If it is not good, better shove or take his weight from you by the elbow.</p>
+
<p>When someone works upon you with the above, laid upon the neck as well, then release your sword from the left hand and shove his sword from the neck with the right and step with the left foot against his left side in front of both of his feet and drive closely with the left arm over both of his arms by his hilt and in front of him into the dance. Or, and better, step behind him in the scales and with the left arm on the neck, ahead or back around and throwing over the foot. Or release your sword from the left hand and strike him with the right through the mouth with the sword over his sword and grasp your sword with the left hand in the middle of the blade and shove him from you with the point, etc. If it is not good, better shove or take his weight from you by the elbow.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 27v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 27v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
Line 514: Line 516:
 
| ''Thwart into the plow; <br/>&emsp;into the ox, join well.''
 
| ''Thwart into the plow; <br/>&emsp;into the ox, join well.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is when someone lays before you in his stance in the plow or ox. That is, when he stands with the right foot forward and lies with his sword out forward with the point on the ground. So fall upon over that with the thwart. Thereafter work in, to the opening as it gives itself or war. But if he moves the weapon up to the head in the fool, then you may again set and work upon that with it. War. Also in the same way, if someone sets upon you from the thwart or crooked cut, then remain on his sword and work in the after as in the left<ref>letz: reversed, disrupted, perverted, refuting, incorrect, twisted, unjust, left</ref> stance of the plow with the after.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is when someone lays before you in his stance in the plow or ox. That is, when he stands with the right foot forward and lies with his sword out forward with the point on the ground. So fall upon that above<ref>alt: high</ref> with the thwart. Thereafter work in that, into the opening as it gives itself or war. But if he moves the weapon up to the head into the fool, then you may again sit-atop<ref>aufsitzen: to sit on top of something. A rider was sometimes called an 'Aufsitzer'</ref> that and work. War. Also in the same way, if someone sets upon you from the thwart or crooked hew, then remain on his sword and work in the after as in the last stance of the plow with the after.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 27v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 27v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
Line 525: Line 527:
 
| ''Whoever thwarts themselves well, <br/>&emsp;endangers the head with springing.''
 
| ''Whoever thwarts themselves well, <br/>&emsp;endangers the head with springing.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>This is when you stand in the thwart and will endanger his head with strikes. So, in your thwart-cut let your point go through to the left side and in the going through, spring or step well to his left side with your right foot and strike him threateningly with the thwart to the left side of his head with the short edge yet so that you are well covered in it with the sword or hilt. Similarly it also goes to the left side with the going through and striking to his right side with the long edge, etc.</p>
+
<p>This is when you stand in the thwart and will endanger his head with strikes. So, in your thwart-hew let your point go through to the left side and in the going through, spring or step well to his left side with your right foot and strike him threateningly with the thwart to the left side of his head with the short edge yet so that you are well covered in it with the sword or hilt. Similarly it also goes to the left side with the going through and striking to his right side with the long edge, etc.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28r.jpg|1|lbl=28r}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28r.jpg|1|lbl=28r}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''Another play from the thwart-cut called the failer'''</p>
+
| <p>'''Another play from the thwart-hew called the failer'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>53</small>
 
| <small>53</small>
| ''The failer misleads. <br/>&emsp;It contacts from below according to desire.''
+
| ''The failer misleads. <br/>&emsp;It wounds from below according to desire.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' Note, any fencer that likes to parry will be dazzled and misled and easily struck with the failer. Execute it thusly: When you stand in the thwart and act as if you will strike him to his left side to the head from the thwart or from over-cuts and in the cut divert or snatch away the cut and strike him with the thwart into the lower openings under his sword over to the left side of his hip or wherever it may occur to you and is called the contact below if it is sent under under the sword and not from the under opening under the belt. Thus is he contacted according to desire and struck. War.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' Note, any fencer that likes to displace will be dazzled and misled and easily struck with the failer. Deploy it like this: When you stand in the thwart and act as if you will strike him to his left side to the head from the thwart or from over-hews and in the hew divert or snatch away the hew and strike him with the thwart into the lower openings under his sword over to the left side of his hip or wherever it may occur to you and is called the wounding below if it is sent under under the sword and not from the under opening under the belt. Thus is he wounded according to desire and struck. War.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 550: Line 552:
 
| ''Surely take the elbow. <br/>&emsp;Spring to him into the scales.''
 
| ''Surely take the elbow. <br/>&emsp;Spring to him into the scales.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is when you have cut with the failer as was taught above. So strike back around him to the left side with the thwart. If he then falls upon your sword, then swiftly hang and in the hanging run through him and take him by the elbows [and] the balance and step in forward with the left foot and shove him thereover. You may also make also make a wrestling in the running through as so: step behind him with the left foot and drive your left arm forward around his neck and throw him backwards over the foot. You may also properly restrain his back around his neck and throw.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is when you have hewn with the failer as was taught above. So strike it back around him to the left side with the thwart. If he then falls upon your sword, then swiftly hang and in the hanging, run through and take the scales from him by the elbows and step in forward with the left foot and shove him thereover. You may also make also make a wrestling in the running through as so: step behind him with the left foot and drive your left arm forward around his neck and throw him backwards over the foot. You may also properly restrain his back around his neck and throw.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28r.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28v.jpg|1|lbl=28v|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28r.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28v.jpg|1|lbl=28v|p=1}}
Line 556: Line 558:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Others speak thusly: When you have bound upon with someone, so twist your sword so that your thumb comes below, that is, into the thwart and stab him in the face with the point so you overwhelm him so that he must parry and in the parrying, run in and shove his elbow. It wrestles as above, etc.</p>
+
| <p>Others speak like this: When you have bound upon with someone, so twist your sword so that your thumb comes below, that is, into the thwart and stab him in the face with the point so you overwhelm him so that he must displace and in the displacement, run in and shove his elbow which wrestles as above, etc.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 570: Line 572:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>56</small>
 
| <small>56</small>
| ''The failer hits doubly. <br/>&emsp;One makes the old slice with power.''
+
| ''The failer hits one twice. <br/>&emsp;Make the high cut with power.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>According to Hans, [he] says: This is how you have misled with the first failer and struck him to his right side, etc. as above. So strike back around swiftly once more to the other right side. That's called the double, etc. You may withhold trebly as so: Make back around to the opening. If you then come upon his sword, such that he parries, then war or wind with him, etc. If he will then also strike, then go after him in-the-moment with the slice in over his arm and press after.</p>
+
<p>According to Master Hansen, [he] says: This is how you have misled with the first failer and struck him to his right side, etc. as above. So strike it back around swiftly yet once more to the other right side. That's called the double, etc. You can continue trebly like this making it back around to the opening. If you then come upon his sword, such that he displaces, then war or wind with him, etc. If he will then also strike, then go after him in-the-moment with the cut in over his arm and press after.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Others differ and is also called the double failer. With respect to this, one shall execute a double misleading in an onset. The first executes thusly: When you come to him with the onset, so step or spring with the right foot so that your left foot stands in front against him and act as if you will strike to his left side with a thwart and snatch away the strike and spring forwards with the left foot to his right and strike him on the head to the right side if it is arrayed as in the first play, war.</p>
+
| <p>Others differ and is also called the double failer. With respect to this, one shall deploy a double misleading in an approach. The first deploys like this: When you come to him in one approach, so step or spring with the right foot so that your left foot stands in front against him and act as if you will strike to his left side with a thwart and snatch away the strike and spring forwards with the left foot to his right and strike him on the head to the right side if it is arrayed as in the first play, war.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28v.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28v.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
  
Line 588: Line 590:
 
| ''Double it further, <br/>&emsp;step in left and do not be lazy.''
 
| ''Double it further, <br/>&emsp;step in left and do not be lazy.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is the closest play above as Master Hans says, [he] explains with the slice. But others say that when you have struck with the first misleading to the left side to the head, then strike swiftly back around to the right side to the head with the short edge from crossed arms over his arms and spring left, that is to your left side, and slice him through the mouth with the long edge and swiftly extract yourself out.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is the closest play above as Master Hans says, [he] explains with the cut. But others say that when you have struck with the first misleading to the left side to the head, then immediately strike back around to the right side to his head and drive over his sword with the short edge from crossed arms and spring in left, that is, to your left side and cut him through the mouth with the long edge and extract<ref>ausheben: lift out</ref> yourself [to the side]<ref>conjecture, possibly: 'neben'</ref>.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28v.jpg|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29r.jpg|1|lbl=29r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 28v.jpg|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29r.jpg|1|lbl=29r|p=1}}
Line 594: Line 596:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Item you may execute the failer from the over-cuts in the same way as from the thwart-cut whenever you wish and the thwart goes to both sides, though [it is] more effective from the right side when your left foot stands forward.</p>
+
| <p>Item you may deploy the failer from the over-hews in the same way as from the thwart-hew whenever you wish and the thwart goes to both sides, though [it is] more effective from the right side when your left foot stands forward.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_29r.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_29r.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| <p>'''This is the squint-cut with it's plays'''</p>
+
| <p>'''This is the squint-hew with it's plays'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>58</small>
 
| <small>58</small>
| ''The squint-cut breaks-into<br/>&emsp;whatever the buffalo strikes or stabs.''
+
| ''The squinter breaks-into<br/>&emsp;whatever the buffalo strikes or stabs.''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>59</small>
 
| <small>59</small>
| ''Whoever executes the change, <br/>&emsp;the squinter robs him from that.''
+
| ''Whoever deploys the change, <br/>&emsp;the squinter robs him from that.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' The squint-cut is nothing other than the change-cut. Named according to the record, the squint-cut, which is such an exquisite cut, that breaks-into buffaloes or ruffians, which take victory by force in cuts and in stabs. Execute the cut thusly: If you stand with your right foot forward and lay in the squint-cut, then the thumb must be above on the sword. If he then cuts into you from his right side, step into him swiftly in-the-moment with your left foot and set-aside his cut strongly with your short edge and from that, make a rapid strike from your left shoulder, crooked, with the long edge into the right side of his head, but if he comes against it very quickly and parries your cut so that you come upon his sword, then wind-in above with power and lay your sword on his throat. If he will then escape ever with force, then follow after him just mercifully so he may not rightly escape.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' The squint-hew is nothing other than the change-hew. Named according to the record, the squint-hew, which is such an exquisite hew, that breaks-in<ref>alt: breaks-apart, shatters, asunders; burgles; interrupts</ref> buffaloes or thugs, which take victory by force in hews and in stabs. Deploy the hew like this: If you stand with your right foot forward and lay in the squint-hew, so that the thumb must be above on the sword. If he then hews into you from his right side, step into him swiftly in-the-moment with your left foot and offset his hew strongly with your short edge and from that, make a rapid strike from your left shoulder, crooked, with the long edge into the right side of his head, but if he comes against it very quickly and displaces your hew so that you come upon his sword, then wind-in above with power and lay your sword on his throat. If he will then escape ever with force, then follow after him just accordingly so he may not rightly escape.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29r.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29v.jpg|1|lbl=29v|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29r.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29v.jpg|1|lbl=29v|p=1}}
Line 614: Line 616:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>But if you wish to allow him to escape easily, then wind-after him with the war and between his arms as it connects, etc. But if you stand with the left foot forward, then lay your thumb below, so you may again set-aside his over-cut with the short edge and strike to his left side to the head with the short edge and with the right foot stepping-into. Or, setting-aside over his sword, winding-in to his right side to the head or laying upon the throat, etc, war. But if he wishes to change-through in his cut, then wind-in crooked upon his sword and bring forth your work and lay upon him.</p>
+
| <p>But if you wish to let him off easy, then wind-after him with the war and between his arms as it connects, etc. But if you stand with the left foot forward, then lay your thumb below, so you may again offset his over-hew with the short edge and strike to his left side to the head with the short edge and with the right foot stepping-into. Or, offsetting over his sword, winding-in to his right side to the head or laying upon the throat, etc, war. But if he wishes to change-through in his hew, then wind-in crooked upon his sword and bring forth your work and lay upon him.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 625: Line 627:
 
| ''Squint-on if he shortens you. <br/>&emsp;Changing-through brings victory.''<ref>ansiegen: to return with victory</ref>
 
| ''Squint-on if he shortens you. <br/>&emsp;Changing-through brings victory.''<ref>ansiegen: to return with victory</ref>
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is a teaching. When you come to him with the onset, you should squint<ref>glance, discern, glean</ref> whether he stands short or straight against you. So, with this, you shall identify when he cuts into you, if he then does not stretch his arms out long from himself, then the sword is shortened. If you then lay before him in the squinter or lay before you in the fool by the head<ref>Ochs</ref>, then it is again shortened. For all windings or standings crooked in the sword in front of the opponent are short and shorten the sword. To all that hold themselves thusly, you shall freely change-through them with the long point out of cuts and out of stabs into the face. With that you threaten them such that they must parry or allow themselves to be wounded or pierced. War. Master Hans easily<ref>likes to</ref> changes-through if the right foot is before him and stands in the change or squinter and when one is shortened against him, especially standing in the fool<ref>Ochs</ref>.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is a teaching. When you come to him with the approach, you should squint<ref>glance, discern, glean</ref> whether he stands short or badly against you. So, with this, you shall identify when he hews into you, if he then does not stretch his arms out long from himself, then the sword is shortened. If you then lay before him in the squinter or lay before you in the fool by the head<ref>Ochs</ref>, then it is again shortened. For all windings or standings crooked in the sword in front of the opponent are short and shorten the sword. To all that hold themselves like this, you shall freely change-through them with the long point out of hews and out of stabs into the face. With that you threaten them such that they must displace or allow themselves to be wounded or pierced. War. Master Hans likes to change-through if the right foot is before him and stands in the change or squinter and when one is shortened against him, especially standing in the fool<ref>Ochs</ref>.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>''If you stand crookedly or openly in the hanging parrying, as Seydenfaden had taught, it is also shortened and good for you to change-through.''</p>
+
| <p>''If you stand crookedly or openly in the hanging displacement, as Seydenfaden had taught, it is also shortened and good for you to change-through.''</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
Line 641: Line 643:
 
| ''Squint to the point, <br/>&emsp;take the neck without fear.''
 
| ''Squint to the point, <br/>&emsp;take the neck without fear.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is the squinter that breaks the long point with a deception of the eyes. Execute it thusly according to Master Hans lesson: If you stand in the squinter and your right foot stands forward and he also stands in with his right foot forward in the fool<ref>Ochs</ref> with the flat near the left side of his head and hurries the point against you, then squint into that and act as if you will cut into that and run-in past under his sword with the left foot, crooked-cut into his neck and take the neck without any fear. Thereafter work with the war or whatever you wish.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is the squinter that breaks the long point with a deception of the eyes. Deploy it like this according to Master Hans lesson: If you stand in the squinter and your right foot stands forward and he also stands in with his right foot forward in the fool<ref>Ochs</ref> with the flat near the left side of his head and hurries the point against you, then squint into that and act as if you will hew into that and run-in past under his sword with the left foot, crooked-hew into his neck and take the neck without any fear. Thereafter work with the war or whatever you wish.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29v.jpg|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 30r.jpg|1|lbl=30r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 29v.jpg|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 30r.jpg|1|lbl=30r|p=1}}
Line 647: Line 649:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Also do as others say: If you stand with the left foot forward in the squinter and he holds the point long or short against your face, then squint at the point and act as if you will strike into that and strike upon his sword with the short edge and with that shoot-in the point long into the right side of his neck without fear, though also step past with your right foot. War. But if you wish to take the before, then set-upon him crooked, then again strike quickly from the sword with the short edge into his left side. War.</p>
+
| <p>Also do as others say: If you stand with the left foot forward in the squinter and he holds the point long or short against your face, then squint at the point and act as if you will strike into that and strike upon his sword with the short edge and with that shoot-in the point long into the right side of his neck without fear, though also step past with your right foot. War. But if you wish to take the before, then sit-atop him crooked, then again strike quickly from the sword with the short edge into his left side. War.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 30r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 30r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 656: Line 658:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>62</small>
 
| <small>62</small>
| ''Squint to the top of the forehead <br/>&emsp;if you wish to astonish<ref>Can also mean "to tame or incapacitate".</ref> its side.''<ref>This is a markedly different reading of the verse from the usual: "Squint to the top of the forehead if you wish to incapacitate the hands". Hand can either mean "hand" or "side" and Medel adds "sy" which refers to the head.</ref>
+
| ''Squint to the top of the head <br/>&emsp;if you wish to ruin the hands.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Master Hans' Gloss:''' This is when you stand in the squinter with your left foot forward and he also holds himself with the left foot forward in the squinter or otherwise as he will. So snap with your sword or flat to his right side into the head. If he overlooks this, then he will be quite prodigiously<ref>could also mean 'carelessly'</ref> struck and thereafter pull swiftly and from that make a cut upon his sword to his left side into his head with the short edge. War.</p>
+
<p>'''Master Hans' Gloss:''' This is when you stand in the squinter with your left foot forward and he also holds himself with the left foot forward in the squinter or otherwise however he wishes. So snap in with your sword or flat to his right side into the head. If he overlooks this, then he will be quite prodigiously<ref>could also mean 'carelessly'</ref> struck and thereafter pull swiftly and from that make a hew upon his sword to his left side into his head with the short edge. War.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 30r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 30r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Others say as well: When he will cleave-in to you above or stand against you in the long point, then squint with the face as if you will strike atop the head, cut with the short edge against his cut and strike him with the point to the hands upon his sword's edge.</p>
+
| <p>Others speak like this: When he will cleave-in to you above or stand against you in the long point, then squint with the face as if you will strike atop the head, hew with the short edge against his hew and strike him with the point to the hands upon his sword's edge.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 30r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 30r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_30v.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_30v.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 
| <p>'''The squinter with scalper with it's plays'''</p>
 
| <p>'''The squinter with scalper with it's plays'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
Line 677: Line 679:
 
| ''With it's turn, <br/>&emsp;the chest is quickly<ref>Alternately: strongly, firmly, steadfastly.</ref> threatened.''
 
| ''With it's turn, <br/>&emsp;the chest is quickly<ref>Alternately: strongly, firmly, steadfastly.</ref> threatened.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is when you stand in the squinter with the right foot forward and someone hews-into you with over-cuts, etc. So swiftly throw your sword back around into the plunge-cut while he strikes, this is the scalper in the recital and the point opposes him well inside in the scales under his cut or sword into the face or chest. Thereafter, work whatever you wish that is quite threatening to him.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is when you stand in the squinter with the right foot forward and someone initiates a hew at you with over-hews, etc. Then, swiftly flip your sword back around while he strikes in the plunge-hew (that is, the part-hew in the recital) with the point against him well inside in the scales under his hew or sword to the face or chest. Thereafter, work whatever you wish that is quite threatening to him.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 30r.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 30r.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
  
Line 684: Line 686:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Master Hans Seydenfaden also taught the scalper thusly: straight above from the top of the head striking-into with the long edge and swiftly upon that, an under-cut to the right side of his head. Thereafter according to the two plays in his school rules with other strikes, steps and deception.</p>
+
| <p>Master Hans Seydenfaden also taught the scalper like this: initiate a hew straight above from the top of the head with the long edge and swiftly upon that, an under-hew to the right side of his head. Thereafter according to the two plays in his school rules with other strikes, treads and deception.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 30v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 30v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 695: Line 697:
 
| ''What comes from him, <br/>&emsp;the crown takes away.''
 
| ''What comes from him, <br/>&emsp;the crown takes away.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Master Hans' Gloss:''' This is when someone has thrown-in the point at you with the scalper as is first taught. So break the crown against it, because it breaks the scalper thusly: If he also stands as such, then fall into the cut with your hilt over his blade or over the grip between both hands and move aside so he will be struck upon the head, etc. This is called the crown.</p>
+
<p>'''Master Hans' Gloss:''' This is when someone has thrown-in the point at you with the scalper as is first taught. So break the crown against it, because it breaks the scalper like this: If he also stands as such, then fall into the hew with your hilt over<ref>across</ref> his blade or over<ref>across</ref> the grip between both hands and back off so he will be struck upon the head, etc. This is called the crown.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 30v.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 31r.jpg|1|lbl=31r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 30v.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 31r.jpg|1|lbl=31r|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_31r.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_31r.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| <p>Others differ thusly: When you cut-in above with the scalper, if he then parries high with the sword gripped with an armed hand or athwart over the head. That is called the crown against Seydenfaden's scalper and with that run-in with shoving, etc. It also takes away the scalper. It also breaks one as such again as above with the hilt thrown over that and cast down.</p>
+
| <p>Others differ like this: When you hew-in above with the scalper, if he then displaces high with the sword gripped with an armed hand or athwart over the head. That is called the crown against Seydenfaden's scalper and with that run-in with shoving, etc. It also takes-off the scalper. This also breaks someone like this again as above with the hilt thrown over that and cast down.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 31r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 31r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| <p>'''Another play. How the slice breaks the crown.'''</p>
+
| <p>'''Another play. How the cut breaks the crown.'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>66</small>
 
| <small>66</small>
| ''Slice through the crown, <br/>&emsp;so you break the hard beautifully.''
+
| ''Hew through the crown, <br/>&emsp;so you break the hard beautifully.''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>67</small>
 
| <small>67</small>
| ''Press the strike. <br/>&emsp;It moves-aside with slicing.''
+
| ''Press the strike. <br/>&emsp;It backs-off with cutting.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Master Hans' Gloss:''' This is when someone moves the scalper aside with the crown in the same way as above. So follow after him and move him so you slice him in the head, etc. Then you withdraw to the side.</p>
+
<p>'''Master Hans' Gloss:''' This is when someone backs off the scalper with the crown in the same way as above. So follow after him and backing him so you cut him on the head, etc. Then you separate off to the side.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 31r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 31r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Other differ thusly: when he parries the scalper or otherwise a cut with the armed crown and with that runs-in, then take the slice under his hands, into his arms and press firmly upward and with the strike move yourself aside with it.</p>
+
| <p>Others differ like this: when he displaces the scalper or otherwise a hew with the armed crown and with that runs-in, then take the cut under his hands, into his arms and press firmly upward and with the stroke back yourself off with it.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 31v.jpg|1|lbl=31v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 31v.jpg|1|lbl=31v}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_31v.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_31v.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 
| <p>'''About the four positions'''</p>
 
| <p>'''About the four positions'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
Line 742: Line 744:
 
| <p>'''The first position, that is, the ox.'''</p>
 
| <p>'''The first position, that is, the ox.'''</p>
  
<p>Make it thusly according to Master Hans: Stand with the right foot forward and hold your sword upon your left side below the knee, the point against the man, a little upwards such that the thumb stands against you on the sword and the long edge upwards. Also stand in the same way so that your left foot stands forward yet with crooked or crossed arms and again the thumb against you and the short edge upwards.</p>
+
<p>Make it like this according to Master Hans: Stand with the right foot forward and hold your sword upon your left side below the knee, the point against the man, a little upwards such that the thumb stands against you on the sword and the long edge upwards. Also stand in the same way so that your left foot stands forward yet with crooked or crossed arms and again the thumb against you and the short edge upwards.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 31v.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32r.jpg|1|lbl=32r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 31v.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32r.jpg|1|lbl=32r|p=1}}
Line 750: Line 752:
 
| <p>'''The second is the plow.'''</p>
 
| <p>'''The second is the plow.'''</p>
  
<p>Make it thusly: Stand with the right foot forwards and lay your sword out forwards with extended arms with the point upon the ground and the long edge downwards not crooked. If you have the left foot forwards, then you may also make it, although it is somewhat shorter against the man.</p>
+
<p>Make it like this: Stand with the right foot forwards and lay your sword out forwards with extended arms with the point upon the ground and the long edge downwards not crooked. If you have the left foot forwards, then you may also make it, although it is somewhat shorter against the man.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 757: Line 759:
 
| <p>'''The third is the Fool.'''</p>
 
| <p>'''The third is the Fool.'''</p>
  
<p>Make it thusly: Stand with the right foot forwards and hold your sword with the hilt next to your head to the left side, not crooked or crosswise, the point against the opponent or in the flat, the thumb by you. But if the left foot stands forwards, then again hold your sword upon the right side next to your head crooked or crosswise, the point against the man, again the thumb against you.</p>
+
<p>Make it like this: Stand with the right foot forwards and hold your sword with the hilt next to your head to the left side, not crooked or crosswise, the point against the opponent or in the flat, the thumb by you. But if the left foot stands forwards, then again hold your sword upon the right side next to your head crooked or crosswise, the point against the man, again the thumb against you.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
Line 764: Line 766:
 
| <p>'''The fourth position is the from-the-roof.'''</p>
 
| <p>'''The fourth position is the from-the-roof.'''</p>
  
<p>Make it thusly: Stand with the right foot forwards and hold your sword upwards to your right side with extended arms just as in the speaking window.</p>
+
<p>Make it like this: Stand with the right foot forwards and hold your sword upwards to your right side with extended arms just as in the speaking window.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Master Hans makes one thing out of the fool from-the-roof thusly: When he stands with the right foot forwards, then he guilelessly cuts-down from-the-roof and makes no more than three positions, and how you shall fence from the guards or positions, you shall find it before and hereafter. Particularly, you may also make your work from those as follows hereafter in the seven stances, therein other positions are understood if someone wishes to break them, etc.</p>
+
| <p>Master Hans makes one thing out of the fool from-the-roof like this: When he stands with the right foot forwards, then he guilelessly hews-down from-the-roof and hews-through before him upon the left side in the fool. This he calls the 'fool from the roof' and makes no more than three positions. And how you shall fence from the guards or positions, you shall find that before and herafter. Also in particular, you may make your work from those as it follows hereafter in the seven stances. Therein other positions are handled if someone will break yours<ref>your leger</ref>, etc. </p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32r.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32r.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Master Hans also explains the four positions or guards differently than the others, as you generally find in all other glosses (which are not as deceptive to me).</p>
+
| <p>Master Hansen's art also explains the four positions or guards differently than some as you generally find in all other glosses which are not as sensible to me.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32r.jpg|6|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32r.jpg|6|lbl=-}}
  
Line 789: Line 791:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''About the four parries.'''</p>
+
| <p>'''About the four displaces.'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>70</small>
 
| <small>70</small>
| ''Four are the parries <br/>&emsp;that also severely disrupt the four positions.''
+
| ''Four are the displaces <br/>&emsp;that also severely disrupt the four positions.''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>71</small>
 
| <small>71</small>
 
| ''Guard yourself before Interposing. <br/>&emsp;If it happens of necessity, it beleaguers you.''
 
| ''Guard yourself before Interposing. <br/>&emsp;If it happens of necessity, it beleaguers you.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' You have heard before that you shall solely fence from the four positions or guards. But on the other hand, you shall also know that the four parries severely disrupt or break those same four positions. They are the four cuts: crooked, thwart, squinter and scalper and they are nothing other than that which one thence carries him to the work. When he lies before you in a position, then when sword comes upon sword, so is each art with one another, that is, play and break from them both. Thus, you must break one of the four cuts against it.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' You have heard before that you shall solely fence from the four positions or guards. So, you shall also know that the four displacements in return severely disrupt or break those same four positions. They are the four hews: crooked, thwart, squinter and scalper and they are nothing other than what one thence brings with him to the work. When he lies before you in a position, then when sword comes upon sword, so is each art with one another, that is, play and break from them both. Thus, you must break one of the four hews against it.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32r.jpg|8|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32v.jpg|1|lbl=32v|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32r.jpg|8|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32v.jpg|1|lbl=32v|p=1}}
Line 804: Line 806:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>In the same way, if he lies in the oxen, then fall upon that with the crooked-cut or with the thwart. If he then lies before you in the plow, then break the thwart-cut against that. If he then lies in the fool, then break the scalper or wrath-cut against that. When the scalp-cut from the top of the head will be taken, as others say, if he then lies in the position from-the-roof, then break the squinter against that.</p>
+
| <p>In the same way, if he lies in the oxen, then fall upon that with the crooked-hew or with the thwart. If he then lies before you in the plow, then break the thwart-hew against that. If he then lies in the fool, then break the scalper or wrath-hew against that. When the scalp-hew from the top of the head will be taken, as others say, he then lies in the position from-the-roof, then break the squinter against that.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 810: Line 812:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>{{blue|Also, the thwart-cut is good or better, because it alone breaks three positions or guards: the position from-the-roof, also the plow and the oxen according to the text above saying "The thwart takes-away, etc". Similarly, the crooked-cut not only breaks the oxen, but also the plow and the fool if he runs-in under and crooked from the squinter from his left side. Also, in the same way, the scalper not only breaks against the fool, rather also against the oxen and the plow.}}</p>
+
| <p>{{blue|Also, the thwart-hew is good or better, because it alone breaks three positions or guards: the position from-the-roof, also the plow and the oxen according to the text above saying "The thwart takes-off, etc". Also the plow and the oxen according to the text above "Thwart to the plow, the oxen, etc." Similarly, the crooked-hew not only breaks the oxen, but also the plow and the fool. Also the squinter not only breaks from-the-roof, also the fool if he runs-in under and crooked from the squinter from his left side. Also, in the same way, the scalper not only breaks against the fool, rather also against the oxen and the plow.}}</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
Line 816: Line 818:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Therefore whatever you consider the best as such that you may turn and break it with the four cuts against the four positions or cuts. Thus you disrupt it and hence bring it to the work. Thereafter work with winding-in, warring, or cutting and thrusting as it gives itself. You find that written and taught beforehand in the five cuts and stances, and in the setting-aside. Therefore know that there is no parry called for in them,<ref>the leger or hut</ref> because the four cuts that break them are called for. Therefore do not parry, and note when he cuts, then you cut as well. If he stabs, then you stab as well and guard yourself so that you do not parry too much, if you wish to otherwise not become struck as the catch-fencers<ref>rappen: to gather, to snatch, to seize</ref> do (and they can execute nothing but parries).</p>
+
| <p>Therefore whatever you consider yourself the best like this, you may divert and break it with the four hews against the four positions or hews. Thus you disrupt them and hence bring them to the work. Thereafter work with winding-in, warring, or hewing and thrusting as it gives itself. You find that written and taught beforehand in the five hews and stances, and in the offsetting. Therefore know that no displacing is called for in them, because the four hews that break them are called for. Therefore do not displace, and note when he hews, then you hew as well. If he stabs, then you stab as well and guard yourself so that you do not displace too much, if you wish to otherwise not become struck as the catch-fencers<ref>rappen: to gather, to snatch, to seize</ref> do (and they can deploy nothing but displaces).</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''Against the parrying'''</p>
+
| <p>'''Against the displacement'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 828: Line 830:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>73</small>
 
| <small>73</small>
| ''hear what I advise you: <br/>&emsp;sweep- or wrench-aside, cut quickly with haste.''
+
| ''hear what I advise you: <br/>&emsp;stroke- or wrench-off, hew quickly with haste.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is as you come into that, such that you have become parried, so note: if he parries an over-cut, then drive into the parrying with the pommel above his parried hand and with that wrench it aside downward and with the wrenching, strike him upon the head with the sword. Thereafter, you may fall with the left hand well into the blade and step behind him with the left foot and with the left arm in front of the throat and throw and balance him over the foot and that is called an over break-in.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' That is, however it comes to be that you have become parried, then note: if he displaces an over-hew, then drive into the displacement with the pommel above his shifted hand and with that wrench it off downward and with the wrenching, strike him upon the head with the sword. Thereafter, you may fall with the left hand well into the blade and step behind him with the left foot and with the left arm in front of the throat and throw and balance him over the foot and that is called an over break-in.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32v.jpg|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33r.jpg|1|lbl=33r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 32v.jpg|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33r.jpg|1|lbl=33r|p=1}}
Line 838: Line 840:
 
| <p>'''Another play against the scales.'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Another play against the scales.'''</p>
  
<p>When you cut and under-cut from the right side. If he then falls upon that with the sword, such that you cannot come-up with it and pushes you down in the side, so drive timely over his sword with the pommel and strike him with the snapping with the long edge to the head. But if it happens upon the left side, then drive again over his sword with the pommel and step with the right foot forward and strike him with the short edge. But if he comes against it with the after in-the-moment, in the same way with the shove or displacing, then think as you wind-over with the pommel, then step well into him and wind over his arm or hand so he may not properly displace and hold you in the scales.</p>
+
<p>When you hew and under-hew from the right side. If he then falls upon that with the sword, such that you cannot come-up with it and forces you down to the side, then drive swiftly over his sword with the pommel and strike him with the snapping with the long edge to the head. But if it happens upon the left side, then drive again over his sword with the pommel and tread forward with the right foot and strike him with the short edge. But if he comes against it with the after in-the-moment, in the same way with the shove or pushing, then think as you wind-over with the pommel, then tread well into him and wind well over his arm or hand so he may not push well and hold yourself in the scales.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''Another play against the parry. Text:'''</p>
+
| <p>'''Another play against the displacement. Text:'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
Line 849: Line 851:
 
| ''Set upon the four ends, <br/>&emsp;remain thereupon, if you wish to learn to end.''
 
| ''Set upon the four ends, <br/>&emsp;remain thereupon, if you wish to learn to end.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Master Hans' Gloss:''' This is when you [?]<ref>no apparent verb here. A similar construction appears below with the added phrase: "set-upon upon the four endings to both sides"</ref> from the four settings-on, those are: the two crooked settings-on to both sides, the plow with the point out forward upon the ground, not crooked and from-the-roof. You will therein take one of which for yourself or you shall remain upon that and bring-forth your work and finishing the advance with the after.</p>
+
<p>'''Master Hans' Gloss:''' This is when you [?]<ref>no apparent verb here. A similar construction appears below with the added phrase: "set-upon upon the four endings to both sides"</ref> from the four settings-on, those are: the two crooked settings-on to both sides, the plow with the point out forward upon the ground, not crooked and from-the-roof. You will take one of which for yourself. Therein or upon there you shall remain and carry out and finish your work with the after.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>According to the common gloss, others also say: When you cleave-in to him from your right shoulder, if you then wish to quickly end with that, then note when he parries, then strike quickly around with the thwart and grasp your sword in the middle of the blade and set the point into the face or set upon the four openings, to whichever you may or can best arrive.</p>
+
| <p>According to the common gloss, others speak like this: When you cleave-in to him from your right shoulder, if you then wish to immediately end with that, then note when he displaces, then strike immediately around with the thwart and grasp your sword in the middle of the blade and set the point into the face or set upon the four openings, to whichever you may or can best come.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>And if he parries one of the settings-on, then with the pommel, strike the left side of him into the other,  or drive over his right shoulder with the pommel in front of his neck, but spring with your right foot behind his left and move and throw him thereover.</p>
+
| <p>And if he displaces one of your settings-on, then strike him with the pommel into the other on his left side or drive over his right shoulder with the pommel in front of his neck, but spring with your right foot behind his left and backed and thrown thereover.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33v.jpg|1|lbl=33v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33v.jpg|1|lbl=33v}}
  
Line 866: Line 868:
 
| <p>'''Break. Take the elbow.'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Break. Take the elbow.'''</p>
  
<p>Item. You may also set-upon upon the four endings to both sides from the stance of the wrath-point near your left knee as will be taught hereafter in the seven stances. Thereafter he comes to you with over-cuts. Thereafter, set the point upon his neck. But if he comes with under-cuts, again set-on to that and he comes to your side and finish your work.</p>
+
<p>Item. You may also set-upon upon the four endings to both sides from the stance of the wrath-point beside your left knee as will be taught hereafter in the seven stances. Thereafter he comes to you with over-hews. Thereafter, set the point upon his neck. But if he comes with under-hews, again set-on to that and he comes to your side and finish your work.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 875: Line 877:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>75</small>
 
| <small>75</small>
| ''Learn the racing-after. <br/>&emsp;Double or slice into the weapon.''
+
| ''Learn the racing-after. <br/>&emsp;Double or cut into the weapon.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' Firstly note a general lesson that the racings-after are many and diverse and are called to execute with great prudence against the fencer that fences from free and from slow cuts and otherwise does not cut with the proper art of the sword, etc. And this is according to the text: You shall properly learn the racings-after, because they are double.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' Firstly note a general lesson that the racings-after are many and diverse and are called to deploy with great prudence against the fencer that fences from free and from long hews and otherwise does not hew with the proper art of the sword, etc. And this is according to the text: You shall properly learn the racings-after, because they are double.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>The first executes thusly: If he will cleave-in to you above, then note while he pulls up his sword into the strike, race-after him with a cut or with a thrust and hit him in the upper opening before he comes down with the cut. And if he binds-upon you and will thereafter work from the sword, then follow after and in-the-moment take the slice behind with the long edge in over into the arm and press him strongly from you with that, so he has no power. In the same way, always race-after him strongly above into the head.</p>
+
| <p>The first deploys like this: If he will cleave-in to you above, then note while he draws up the sword into the strike, race-after him with a hew or with a thrust and hit him in the upper opening before he comes down with the hew. And if he binds-upon you and will thereafter work from the sword, then follow after and in-the-moment take the cut out after with the long edge in over into the arm and press him strongly from you with that, so he has no power. In the same way, always race-after him strongly above into the head.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
Line 889: Line 891:
 
| <p>'''Another play.'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Another play.'''</p>
  
<p>The second racing-after is when he cleaves-at you from above, if he then releases his sword with the cut into the ground, then race-after him with a cut in above to the head before he comes up with the sword. Or if he will thrust you, then note while he pull the sword to him into the thrust, then race-after him and then stab him before he carries out his thrust, etc.</p>
+
<p>The second racing-after is when he initiates a hew at you from above, if he then with the hew lets his sword go to the ground, then race-after him with a hew in above to the head before he comes up with the sword. Or if he will thrust you, then note while he draw the sword to him into the thrust, then race-after him and then stab him before he carries out his thrust, etc.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33v.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33v.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>But if you fence against someone from under-cuts or the sweeps or lay against him in the fool or plow, if he then falls upon that with the sword before you come up with yours, then remain as such below, on the sword and left upwards. If he will then cleave-in from the parry or wind-in on the sword, then do not let him take-away from the sword, rather follow-after him thereon and work to the nearest opening with the war and the others.</p>
+
| <p>But if you fence against someone from under-hews or the strokes or lay against him in the fool or plow, if he then falls upon that with the sword before you come up with yours, then remain as such below, on the sword and left upwards. If he will then cleave-in from the displacement or wind-in on the sword, then do not let him take-off from the sword, rather follow-after him thereon and work to the nearest opening with the war and the others.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33v.jpg|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 34r.jpg|1|lbl=34r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 33v.jpg|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 34r.jpg|1|lbl=34r|p=1}}
Line 900: Line 902:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Item. Note you shall race-after him from and with all cuts as soon as you realizes he mis-cuts or uncovers himself with the sword.</p>
+
| <p>Item. Note you shall race-after him from and with all hews as soon as you realizes he mis-hews or uncovers himself with the sword.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 34r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 34r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_34r.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_34r.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 
| <p>'''A good lesson about the racing-after'''</p>
 
| <p>'''A good lesson about the racing-after'''</p>
  
<p>When you fence with someone, then bind upon his sword strongly and remain thusly laying strongly and press him strongly to the head. If he will strike-around, then remain upon the sword and press down strongly so he has no power. In the same way, always race-after him strongly above into the head.</p>
+
<p>When you fence with someone, then bind upon his sword strongly and remain like this laying strongly and press him strongly to the head. If he will strike-around, then remain upon the sword and press down strongly so he has no power. In the same way, always race-after him strongly above into the head.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 34r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 34r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
Line 922: Line 924:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''About the two outer marriages<ref>alt: wrongs, falsehoods, meanings, diminishments, mines, minings, manners, ownings, possessings.</ref>and the two inner marriages'''</p>
+
| <p>'''About the two outer cattle-drives and the two inner cattle-drives'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>76</small>
 
| <small>76</small>
| ''The two outer marriages and the two inner marriages, <br/>&emsp;with them your work begins''
+
| ''The two outer cattle-drives and the two inner cattle-drives, <br/>&emsp;with them your work begins''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>77</small>
 
| <small>77</small>
 
| ''and test the attacks <br/>&emsp;whether they are soft or hard.''
 
| ''and test the attacks <br/>&emsp;whether they are soft or hard.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is so that you shall note that the marriages will also be called racing-after and when you come upon his sword with yours, then you shall test with the attack whether he is soft or hard. Thereafter, you shall begin your work. That is as so: When someone stands against you in the outer marriages (because those are two, one to each side) and stands with his right foot forward and hangs with a flat sword from the scalper, the fool or plunge-cut with the point down as with the roof, if he stands in the outer marriage on his right side, then come to his as well with the same outer marriage from your right side countering upon his sword and in the clashing of the sword, wind-in swiftly under his sword into the head, to the opening or quite across to his left shoulder such that your sword comes or lays above and your thumb stands underneath. Wherever he will then protect<ref>alt: exit</ref>, then drive after him in-the-moment or if he throws you over with force, then ward yourself with striking or warring. Then you both come crooked into the winding. But if you do not wish to counter him with that, then you may also set or work with the thwart or other cuts, etc. That is the first outer marriage.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is so that you shall note that the cattle-drives will also be called racing-after and when you come upon his sword with yours, then you shall test amid the attack whether he is soft or hard. Thereafter, you shall begin your work. That is as so: When someone stands against you in the outer cattle-drives (because they are two, one to each side) and stands with his right foot forward and hangs with a flat sword from the scalper, the fool or plunge-hew with the point down as with the roof, if he stands in the outer cattle-drive on his right side, then come to his as well with the same outer cattle-drive from your right side countering upon his sword and in the clashing of the sword, wind-in swiftly under his sword into the head, to the opening or all-the-way across to his left shoulder such that your sword comes or lays above and your thumb stands underneath. Wherever he will then go, then drive after him in-the-moment or if he throws you over with force, then ward yourself with striking or warring. Then you both come crooked into the winding. But if you do not wish to counter him with that, then you may also set or work with the thwart or other hews, etc. That is the first outer cattle-drive.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 34v.jpg|1|lbl=34v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 34v.jpg|1|lbl=34v}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The second''' outer marriage is when he stands with his left foot forward and stands with the arms crooked as if he went up with the under-cut or something and hangs over the left arm. So come to him countering him thusly from your left side crooked on his sword. Wind-in to him as before under his sword to the opening or just above to his right shoulder to the head. Thereafter work or war as before.</p>
+
| <p>'''The second''' outer cattle-drive is when he stands with his left foot forward and stands with the arms crooked as if he went up with the under-hew or something and hangs over the left arm. So come to him countering him like this from your left side crooked on his sword. Wind-in to him as before under his sword to the opening or just above to his right shoulder to the head. Thereafter work or war as before.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 34v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 34v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The first''' inner marriage is as so: If he again stands with the right foot forward and holds his sword down by the leg or knee in the thrust as in the oxen, then also come-forward against it as from your left with the right and in the thrust step into him with the left foot and the swords clash each other. So you both may wind against each other, thus you both come into the work crooked. Thereafter war and work as you wish. You both may also make a disengaging from that with a strike around it to his right shoulder to his left side to the head or take the under-slice, etc. which will double or mutate.</p>
+
| <p>'''The first''' inner cattle-drive is as so: If he again stands with the right foot forward and holds his sword down by the leg or knee for the thrust as in the oxen, then also come against it as from your left with the right forward and in the thrust tread into him with the left foot and the swords clash each into other. So you both may wind against each other, thus you both come into the work crooked. Thereafter war and work as you wish. You both may also make a disengaging from that with a strike around it to his right shoulder to his left side to the head or take the under-cut, etc. which will double or mutate.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 34v.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35r.jpg|1|lbl=35r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 34v.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35r.jpg|1|lbl=35r|p=1}}
Line 947: Line 949:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The other''' inner marriage is when he stands with the left foot forward and holds his sword as before, though it must be crooked to the side, then execute the work against him as before just above. When it is turned to the side, you will again break the pulling then double or mutate as it best joins according to the work or side, thus he will be struck deaf, etc. or sliced. You may also, as before, if you do not wish to break the counter the marriage, working the stance or marriage with other things against that such as the thwart or the wrath-cut or other settings-aside or settings-on and then work as you wish, etc.</p>
+
| <p>'''The other''' inner cattle-drive is when he stands with the left foot forward and holds his sword as before, though it must be crooked to the side, then deploy the work against him as before just above. When it is turned to the side, you will again break the disengaging then double or mutate as it best joins according to the work or side, thus he will be struck deaf, etc. or cut. You may also, as before, if you do not wish to break the counter the cattle-drive, working the stance or cattle-drive with other things against that such as the thwart or the wrath-hew or other offsettings or sittings-atop and then work as you wish, etc.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>In this way you have the four marriages explained with their work. How you shall begin it, the common glosses explain differently, but it has not failed me, etc. The opponent may also execute this work against you.</p>
+
| <p>In this way you have the four cattle-drives explained with their work. How you shall begin it, the common glosses explain differently, but it is not sensible to me, etc. The opponent may also deploy this work against you.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
Line 961: Line 963:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>78</small>
 
| <small>78</small>
| ''Learn the feeling. <br/>&emsp;In-the-moment, the word cuts sharply.''
+
| ''Learn the feeling. <br/>&emsp;In-the-moment, the word hews sharply.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is so that you shall learn and understand the word, in-the-moment, properly, because the two things belong together and one may not exist upon the other and are the great art of fencing. Understand them thusly: When someone binds upon the sword, you shall immediately feel or perceive in that, as the swords clash together, whether he has bound-upon soft or hard and as you have perceived that, then think of the word in-the-moment, This is so that in that perceiving, you shall work swiftly according to the soft or the hard to the nearest opening. Thus he will be easily struck before he becomes aware of his.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' This is so that you shall learn and understand the word, in-the-moment, properly, because the two things belong together and one may not exist upon the other and are the great art of fencing. Understand them like this: When someone binds upon the sword, you shall immediately feel or perceive in that, as the swords clash together, whether he has bound on soft or hard and as you have perceived that, then think of the word in-the-moment, This is so that in that perceiving, you shall work swiftly according to the soft or the hard to the nearest opening. Thus he will be easily struck before he becomes aware of his.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Item. You shall think upon the word in-the-moment in all bindings-on of the sword. Because In-the-moment doubles, in-the-moment mutates, in-the-moment runs, in-the-moment changes-through, in-the-moment takes the slice, in-the-moment wrestles with, in-the-moment takes the sword away from him, in-the-moment does whatever the heart desires in the art. In-the-moment is a sharp word. With it all fencers that do not know of the word become cut and the word in-the-moment is the key. With it, the entire art of fencing will be unlocked. Also with that is the before and especially the after with the strong and the weak, the three things break all plays and art that one may execute or conceive. Because when sword comes upon sword, so is all art simultaneous.</p>
+
| <p>Item. You shall think upon the word in-the-moment in all bindings-on of the sword. Because In-the-moment doubles, in-the-moment mutates, in-the-moment runs, in-the-moment changes-through, in-the-moment takes the cut, in-the-moment wrestles with, in-the-moment takes the sword away from him, in-the-moment does whatever the heart desires in the art. In-the-moment is a sharp word. With it all fencers that do not know of the word become hew and the word in-the-moment is the key. With it, the entire art of fencing will be unlocked. Also with that is the before and especially the after with the strong and the weak, the three things break all plays and art that one may deploy or conceive. Because when sword comes upon sword, so is all art simultaneous.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35r.jpg|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35v.jpg|1|lbl=35v|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35r.jpg|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35v.jpg|1|lbl=35v|p=1}}
Line 978: Line 980:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>79</small>
 
| <small>79</small>
| ''The twofold racings-after. <br/>&emsp;If one hits, combine<ref>mitmachen: join, unite, combine, participate</ref> the high<ref>alternately: old</ref> slice.''
+
| ''The twofold racings-after. <br/>&emsp;If one hits, combine<ref>mitmachen: join, unite, combine, participate</ref> the high<ref>alternately: old</ref> cut.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' Note that you shall execute the racing-after doubly, that is, to both sides and also bring the slice thereon. Understand it thusly: When he mis-cuts himself before you, whether it is from the right or left sides, then cut in freely after to the opening. If he then drives up and binds upon the sword below, so note as soon as one sword clashes upon the other, then slice him by the neck or fall in-the-moment with the long edge upon his arm and take the slice. This executes to both sides.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' Note that you shall deploy the racing-after doubly, that is, to both sides and also bring the cut thereon. Understand it like this: When he mis-hews himself before you, whether it is from the right or left sides, then hew in freely after to the opening. If he then drives up and binds upon the sword below, so note as soon as one sword clashes upon the other, then cut for his neck or fall in-the-moment with the long edge upon his arm and take the cut. This deploys to both sides.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 997: Line 999:
 
| ''Make you work, <br/>&emsp;soft or hard or press twice.''
 
| ''Make you work, <br/>&emsp;soft or hard or press twice.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Master Hans' Gloss:''' This is when someone binds-on with you, then you shall strengthen the binding-on and if he quickly strikes around to your under openings and accordingly aims, then in-the-moment run-over him inside and press-in after above with the slide or push or with the slice. War.</p>
+
<p>'''Master Hans' Gloss:''' This is when someone binds-on with you, then you shall strengthen the binding-on and if he quickly strikes around to your under openings and aims for them, then in-the-moment run-over him inside and press-in after above with the slide or push or with the cut. War.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Others speak thusly according to the common gloss: How you shall run-over when someone initiates fencing you below, understand that thusly: When you come to him with the onset, if he cleaves-into or thrusts you below, do not parry that, rather note when his under-cut or thrust goes against you, then cleave-in long against him above from his right shoulder and shoot-in the point above long into his face or chest and set-upon him so he may not reach you. If he then drives up from below and parries, then remain strong with the long edge (that's called strengthened) upon his sword and quickly work to the nearest opening or await upon the after with the war and any over-cut and any upward setting-on reaches-over the lower attack, thusly he becomes ashamed above.</p>
+
| <p>Others speak like this according to the common gloss: How you shall run-over when someone initiates fencing you below, understand that like this: When you come to him with the approach, if he initiates a hew or thrust at you below, do not displace that, rather note when his under-hew or thrust goes against you, then cleave-in long against him above from his right shoulder and shoot-in the point above long into his face or chest and set-upon him so he may not reach you. If he then drives up from below and displaces, then remain strong with the long edge (that's called strengthened) upon his sword and quickly work to the nearest opening or await upon the after with the war and any over-hew and any upward setting-on reaches-over the lower attack, like this he will be ashamed above.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35v.jpg|4|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36r.jpg|1|lbl=36r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 35v.jpg|4|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36r.jpg|1|lbl=36r|p=1}}
Line 1,008: Line 1,010:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''About the setting-aside'''</p>
+
| <p>'''About the offsetting'''</p>
 
{| class="zettel"
 
{| class="zettel"
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>83</small>
 
| <small>83</small>
| ''Learn to set-aside cut, thrust. <br/>&emsp;Artfully disrupt whoever''
+
| ''Learn to offset hew, thrust. <br/>&emsp;Artfully disrupt whoever''
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| <small>84</small>
 
| <small>84</small>
Line 1,020: Line 1,022:
 
| ''Hit anytime from both sides <br/>&emsp;if you will step.''
 
| ''Hit anytime from both sides <br/>&emsp;if you will step.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Master Hans' Gloss:''' This so that you shall learn to set-aside artfully disrupting cut, thrust also breaking point thusly: If someone cuts or thrusts against you, plainly setting-aside and breaking strike and point from all positions and cuts or stances and setting-upon from all sides as they encroach you and hitting the point with your point or sword and setting-aside well and from that make a strike-in above with the short edge to the head to whichever side it then gives itself up. Thereafter work in-the-moment with the after and war.</p>
+
<p>'''Master Hans' Gloss:''' This so that you shall learn to offset artfully disrupting hew, thrust also breaking point like this: If someone hews or thrusts against you, plainly offsetting and breaking strike and point from all positions and hews or stances and sittings-atop from all sides as they encroach you and hitting the point with your point or sword and offsetting well and from that make a strike-in above with the short edge to the head to whichever side it then gives itself up. Thereafter work in-the-moment with the after and war.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Or<ref>marginalia: 'malz' => bad, weak</ref> else according to the interpretive intent of others as they execute the setting-aside: When you come to him with the onset, if he then positions himself against you as so in the plow, as they call it (but I call it the ox down by the knee) and acts as if he will thrust into you, the set your left foot forward and stand against him as well in the ox to your right side with crossed arms or hands and give yourself an opening with the left side. If he then thrusts into your opening, then wind against his thrust to you left side with your sword on his sword and step into with the right foot and with that set-aside such that the point always remains standing against him and in-the-moment stab him in the face or chest. Thus, your point hits and his does not. Or also make a strike and otherwise do whatever you wish if you would like to work with the warring.</p>
+
| <p>Or<ref>marginalia: 'malz' => bad, weak</ref> else like the other glossing means when they deploy the offsetting: When you come to him with the approach, if he then presents himself against you as so in the plow, as they call it (but I call it the ox down by the knee) and acts as if he will thrust into you, the set your left foot forward and stand against him as well in the ox to your right side with crossed arms or hands and give yourself an opening with the left side. If he then thrusts into your opening, then wind against his thrust to you left side with your sword on his sword and step into with the right foot and with that offset such that the point always remains standing against him and in-the-moment stab him in the face or chest. Thus, your point hits and his does not. Or also make a strike and otherwise do whatever you wish if you would like to work with the warring.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>But if you stand against someone as above in the ox and would like to thrust him, if he then cuts above downward to your left opening, then go up with your sword against his cut and wind-in him to the side (openly or crookedly as it gives itself) and the point sharply into his face or chest and step in with [it]. Thereafter, work or war.</p>
+
| <p>But if you stand against someone as above in the ox and would like to thrust him, if he then hews above downward to your left opening, then go up with your sword against his hew and wind-in him to the side (openly or crookedly as it gives itself) and the point sharply into his face or chest and step in with [it]. Thereafter, work or war.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
Line 1,044: Line 1,046:
 
| ''Whoever binds upon you, <br/>&emsp;the changing-through shortly finds him.''
 
| ''Whoever binds upon you, <br/>&emsp;the changing-through shortly finds him.''
 
|}
 
|}
<p>'''Gloss:''' The changings-through are many and varied. You may execute them from all guards or cuts against the fencer that likes to parry and that cut to the sword and not to the openings of the body. You shall learn to execute it quite well with prudence so that one does not set-on or otherwise come-in while you change-through. Execute it thusly: When you come to him with the onset, cleave-in strongly above to the head. If he then counter-cuts against you into the sword and not to the openings of the body, then let you point slip-through below during the cut before he binds you on the sword and stab him into the other side, etc. If he becomes aware of the stab and shortly drives-after the stab with the sword and will parry, then change-through again to the other side. And always execute it when he drives to your sword with parrying. Execute this to both sides, war.</p>
+
<p>'''Gloss:''' The changings-through are many and varied. You may deploy them from all guards or hews against the fencer that likes to displace and that hew to the sword and not to the openings of the body. You shall learn to deploy it quite well with prudence so that one does not set-on or otherwise come-in while you change-through. Deploy it like this: When you come to him with the approach, cleave-in strongly above to the head. If he then counter-hews against you into the sword and not to the openings of the body, then let you point slip-through below during the hew before he binds you on the sword and stab him into the other side, etc. If he becomes aware of the stab and shortly drives-after the stab with the sword and will displace, then change-through again to the other side. And always deploy it when he drives to your sword with displacement. Deploy this to both sides, war.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36r.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36r.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
  
Line 1,053: Line 1,055:
 
| <p>'''Another play.'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Another play.'''</p>
  
<p>When come to him with the onset, set your left foot forward and hold the long point against his face. If he then cuts to the sword from above or below and will strike it away or bind-on strongly, then let the point sink downward and change-through and stab him against the other side. And execute this against all cuts where someone cuts to your sword and not to the openings of the body.</p>
+
<p>When come to him with the approach, set your left foot forward and hold the long point against his face. If he then hews to the sword from above or below and will strike it away or bind-on strongly, then let the point sink downward and change-through and stab him against the other side. And deploy this against all hews where someone hews to your sword and not to the openings of the body.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 1,060: Line 1,062:
 
| <p>'''Another play.'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Another play.'''</p>
  
<p>Note this play precisely when he parries you and allows the point to go out next to you to one side in the parrying. So boldly change-through and stab against the other side. Or if he remains with point before your face or otherwise against the other openings of your body, then do not change-through and remain on the sword and work to his nearest opening so he cannot race-after nor set-on you. War.</p>
+
<p>Note this play precisely when he displaces you and allows the point to go out next to you to one side in the displacement. So boldly change-through and stab against the other side. Or if he remains with point before your face or otherwise against the other openings of your body, then do not change-through and remain on the sword and work to his nearest opening so he cannot race-after nor set-on you. War.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
|  
+
| class="noline" |  
| <p>'''About the Disengaging'''</p>
+
| class="noline" | <p>'''About the Disengaging'''</p>
  
 
<p>[text ends]</p>
 
<p>[text ends]</p>
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
+
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 36v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|}
 
|}
Line 1,075: Line 1,077:
 
{{master begin
 
{{master begin
 
  | title = Seven Stances
 
  | title = Seven Stances
  | width = 76em
+
  | width = 90em
 
}}
 
}}
{| class="floated master"
+
{| class="master"
 
|-  
 
|-  
! id="thin" | <p>Images</p>
+
! <p>Illustrations</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B}}<br/>by [[Christian Trosclair]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B}}<br/>by [[Christian Trosclair]]</p>
 
! <p>[[Hans Medel Fechtbuch (Cod.I.6.2º.5)|Transcription]]{{edit index|Hans Medel Fechtbuch (Cod.I.6.2º.5)}}<br/>by [[Anton Kohutovič]], [[Andreas Engström]], <br/>and [[Christian Trosclair]]</p>
 
! <p>[[Hans Medel Fechtbuch (Cod.I.6.2º.5)|Transcription]]{{edit index|Hans Medel Fechtbuch (Cod.I.6.2º.5)}}<br/>by [[Anton Kohutovič]], [[Andreas Engström]], <br/>and [[Christian Trosclair]]</p>
Line 1,085: Line 1,087:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''Hereafter follows the seven stances. Therein noteworthy work to utilize against the opponent is explained :~'''</p>
+
| <p>'''Hereafter follows the seven stances. Therein noteworthy work for other common fencing to utilize against the opponent is explained :~'''</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37r.jpg|1|lbl=37r}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37r.jpg|1|lbl=37r}}
  
Line 1,092: Line 1,094:
 
| <p>{{dec|u|'''The seven stances'''}}</p>
 
| <p>{{dec|u|'''The seven stances'''}}</p>
  
<p>'''The first''' is when you stand as in the plunge or the scalper yet with a flat sword upon your right thumb, well forward, in the scales with a sunken point and right foot forward and keep yourself well open with the left side. Called the Fool (others c[all it] the sideways ox)</p>
+
<p>'''The first''' is when you stand as in the plunge or the scalper yet with a flat sword upon your right thumb, well forward, in the scales with a sunken point and right foot forward and provide yourself well open with the left side. Called the Fool (others c[all it] the sideways ox)</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The second''' is: Hold you sword next to your left leg by the pommel and with the point a little upwards against the opponent yet so that the same left foot stands forward. This is commonly called the wrath-point or equally the ox. Just that the left foot alone stands forward.</p>
+
| <p>'''The second''' is: Hold you sword next to your left leg by the pommel and with the point a little upwards against the opponent yet so that that left foot stands forward. This is commonly called the wrath-point or equally the ox. Solely just that the left foot stands forward.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
Line 1,107: Line 1,109:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The fourth''' stance: Fall across from the speaking-window to the left side with the crook against<ref>alt: across</ref> your forward foot. One commonly calls this the iron-gate or the setting-on from the crook[ed-cut]. Against the right foot follows after.</p>
+
| <p>'''The fourth''' stance: Fall across from the speaking-window to the left side with the crook against<ref>alt: across</ref> your forward foot. One commonly calls this the iron-gate or the setting-on from the crook[ed-hew]. Against the right foot follows after.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37r.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37r.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
  
Line 1,127: Line 1,129:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Item. Under them all, the second, third, fourth and fifth are called the four settings-on.</p>
+
| <p>Item. Of them all: the second, third, fourth and fifth are called the four settings-on.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37r.jpg|9|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37r.jpg|9|lbl=-}}
  
Line 1,136: Line 1,138:
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_37v.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_37v.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 
| <p>'''Work from the scalper, plunge or fool according to Master Hans with the after.'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Work from the scalper, plunge or fool according to Master Hans with the after.'''</p>
  
<p>'''First:''' Work from the scalper, plunge or fool according to Master Hans with the after. If you lay before the opponent in the scalper hanging flat as stands above and if you await the work of the opponent against you, if he will then strike-into with an over-cut to your left side or opening, then stand still and go-up straight with the thwart into the left side of his head, thereafter he<ref>alt: it</ref> is open with an unchanged sword. War if it becomes necessary to do.</p>
+
<p>'''First:''' Work from the scalper, plunge or fool according to Master Hans with the after. If you lay before the opponent in the scalper hanging flat as stands above and if you await the work of the opponent against you, if he will then initiate a strike with an over-hew to your left side or opening, then stand still and go-up straight with the thwart into the left side of his head, so that he is open with an uninverted sword. War if it becomes necessary to do.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37r.jpg|11|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37r.jpg|11|lbl=-}}
  
Line 1,145: Line 1,147:
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| <p>'''The second:''' If he then sets upon your sword with his over-cut and strikes back around with an under-cut or otherwise to your right side, then follow-after him swiftly in-the-moment with the stance or extended sword and thrust into his face with whatever you can. War if it becomes necessary. You may well also change-through as soon as he sets-on and thrust into his right side. Thereafter strike to his left.</p>
+
| <p>'''The second:''' If he then sits atop your sword with his over-hew and strikes back around with an under-hew or otherwise to your right side, then follow-after him swiftly in-the-moment with the stance or extended sword and thrust into his face with whatever you can. War if it becomes necessary. You may well also change-through as soon as he sits-atop and thrust into his right side. Thereafter strike to his left.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>{{handr}} Item. In everything after as you come in<ref>alt: inside</ref> you shall remain standing thusly and not turn and work it in-the-moment, then ruin the work of another with striking or mutating however the opponent then holds himself against you.</p>
+
| <p>{{handr}} Item. In every after as you come in<ref>alt: inside</ref> you shall remain standing like this and not turn and work it in-the-moment, then ruin the work of another with striking or mutating however the opponent then holds himself against you.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37v.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38r.jpg|1|lbl=38r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 37v.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38r.jpg|1|lbl=38r|p=1}}
Line 1,156: Line 1,158:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The third:''' If you stand as before and he will change-through you then drive after and step into him and wind-in crooked to his head. War if it is necessary. For one shall wind out after crooked against all changings-through.</p>
+
| <p>'''The third:''' If you stand as before and he will change-through you then drive after and tread into him and wind-in crooked to his head. War if it is necessary. For one shall wind out after crooked against all changings-through.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The fourth:''' If you stand as before and he sets-on crooked so that you shall strengthen against him, if he will then strike to the opening of your left side, then follow after him with the war and sword upon his right shoulder and lay your sword upon his neck. If he will then ward that, then ward yourself again in-the-moment with the war according to the work as it demands. War if it is necessary or always follow after him gently, so he cannot become surely free.</p>
+
| <p>'''The fourth:''' If you stand as before and he sits-atop you crooked so that you shall strengthen against him, if he will then strike to the opening of your left side, then follow after him with the war and sword upon his right shoulder and lay your sword upon his neck. If he will then ward that, then ward yourself again in-the-moment with the war according to the work as it demands. War if it is necessary or always follow after him gently, so he cannot become surely free.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
Line 1,168: Line 1,170:
 
| <p>'''Break.'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Break.'''</p>
  
<p>But if he holds strongly, then wind yourself into him under his sword and step with your left foot behind his right and throw and with the left arm in front of his neck and if the throwing helps in no way, then you follow after him gently. But if he will wind himself out with force, then wind-in with the pommel between his arms. Break there-against, shove the elbow.</p>
+
<p>But if he holds strongly, then wind yourself into him under his sword and tread in with your left foot behind his right and throw and with the left arm in front of his neck and if the throwing helps in no way, then you follow after him gently. But if he will wind himself out with force, then wind-in with the pommel between his arms. Break there-against, shove the elbow.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
Line 1,178: Line 1,180:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The sixth:''' If you stand as before and if he will then stab or thrust you from the ox from his left side to your right, then in-the-moment swiftly step and wind-in crooked into the head. If it is necessary afterwards, then break the war. You may break that in all plays where it offers itself.</p>
+
| <p>'''The sixth:''' If you stand as before and if he will then stab or thrust you from the ox from his left side to your right, then in-the-moment swiftly tread and wind-in crooked into the head. If it is necessary afterwards, then break the war. You may break that in all plays where it offers itself.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38r.jpg|6|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38r.jpg|6|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Cut crooked to the flat of the masters if you wish to weaken them. This is so that the crooked-cut breaks the stance with its work as you wind in his explanation in the recital. Or: Crook not, short cut. this is the changing-through or break the outer marriage there-against. But if he will make a disengaging from the thrust, then fall into the crook as before and remain standing therein.</p>
+
| <p>Hew crooked to the flat of the masters if you wish to weaken them. This is so that the crooked-hew breaks the stance with its work as you wind in his explanation in the recital. Or: Crook not, short hew. this is the changing-through or break the outer cattle-drive there-against. But if he will make a disengaging from the thrust, then fall into the crook as before and remain standing therein.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38r.jpg|7|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38r.jpg|7|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Item. In all plays, if someone binds-upon you or will set-on, then you may disengage and make an under-cut into his right side and back around with the short edge into the other side.</p>
+
| <p>Item. In all plays, if someone binds-upon you or will set-on, then you may disengage and make an under-hew into his right side and back around with the short edge into the other side.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38r.jpg|8|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38r.jpg|8|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_38v.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_38v.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| <p>'''Work from the second stance, the wrath-point with the after'''</p>
+
| <p>'''Work from the second stance, the wrath-point with the after split up'''</p>
  
<p>'''The first''' play: When you stand in the second stance as written and taught above, etc. If someone then draws-up long and wide and if he means he will strike you with an over-cut in the wrath-point from his right, then go straight up in-the-moment with the wrath-point on his throat and thrust, etc. War if it is necessary. In the thrust, go up thusly into the flat so that your thumb comes under.</p>
+
<p>'''The first''' play: When you stand in the second stance as written and taught above, etc. If someone then draws-up long and wide and if he means he will strike you with an over-hew in the wrath-point from his right, then go straight up in-the-moment with the wrath-point on his throat and thrust, etc. War if it is necessary. In the thrust, go up like this into the flat so that your thumb comes under.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38v.jpg|1|lbl=38v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38v.jpg|1|lbl=38v}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| <p>'''The second:''' When you stand as before in the wrath-point, if he then runs and will thrust you from his left to your right side out of the ox, then step forward in-the-moment with your right foot and from your counter-thrust make a disengaging back around and make a strike with the short edge from your right shoulder to his left side. Break the war if it is necessary. In the counter, you may also mutate to his right side to the head.</p>
+
| <p>'''The second:''' When you stand as before in the wrath-point, if he then runs and will thrust you from his left to your right side out of the ox, then tread forward in-the-moment with your right foot and from your counter-thrust make a disengaging back around and make a strike with the short edge from your right shoulder to his left side. Break the war if it is necessary. In this against him, you may also mutate to his right side to the head.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The third:''' When you stand as before and he stands forward in the speaking-window or the guard from-the-roof, then go up against him with the wrath-point into his face. If he then sets upon your sword, then you may well in-the-moment wind-in crooked with a step or as soon as he sets-upon, in-the-moment make an under-cut to his right side to the head and back around with the short edge to the other side. If it is necessary to do, then war. But if he will make an under-cut after the setting-upon, then in-the-moment swiftly step and thrust in forwards with the hands and the sword.</p>
+
| <p>'''The third:''' When you stand as before and he stands forward in the speaking-window or the guard from-the-roof, then go up against him with the wrath-point into his face. If he then sits upon your sword, then you may well in-the-moment wind-in crooked with a tread or as soon as he sits-atop, make an under-hew, in-the-moment, to his right side to the head and back around with the short edge to the other side. If it is necessary to do, then war. But if he will make an under-hew after the sitting-atop, then in-the-moment swiftly tread and thrust on in forwards with the hands and the sword.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38v.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39r.jpg|1|lbl=39r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 38v.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39r.jpg|1|lbl=39r|p=1}}
Line 1,210: Line 1,212:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>You may well also thrust the war after the setting-upon or before changing-through.</p>
+
| <p>You may well war after the sitting-atop or before changing-through and thrusting.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_39r.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_39r.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| <p>'''The fourth:''' If you stand as before and again go up with the wrath-point as before, If he then comes in against on your sword with the outer marriage, then wind-in crooked and step-in after and war if it is necessary to do or work as is taught below in the outer marriage in the recital.</p>
+
| <p>'''The fourth:''' If you stand as before and again go up with the wrath-point as before, If he then comes in against you on your sword with the outer cattle-drive, then wind-in crooked and tread-in after and war if it is necessary to do or work as is taught below in the outer cattle-drive in the recital.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| <p>'''The fifth:''' When you stand as before and go up as before into the thrust and if he then sets upon your sword from the crooked setting-on from the right side, if he will then work to the right side, then swiftly drive after with the thrust into the war. But if he works to the left, then wind-in crooked, krieg, etc. But if he lies in the crooked setting-on upon his left and will strike against you, then wind against him crooked on his sword and stand still. War into his head. But if you do not wish to wind, then stay on him with the after.</p>
+
| <p>'''The fifth:''' When you stand as before and go up as before into the thrust and if he then sits-atop your sword from the crooked setting-on from the right side, if he will then work to the right side, then swiftly drive after with the thrust into the war. But if he works to the left, then wind-in crooked, krieg, etc. Then wind against him crooked on his sword into his and stand still. But if you do not wish to wind, then stay on him with the after.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
Line 1,226: Line 1,228:
 
| <p>'''Work from the third stance, the speaking-window, with the after'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Work from the third stance, the speaking-window, with the after'''</p>
  
<p>'''The first''' play: When you stand as in the third stance as above in the speaking-window, if someone then runs-in with force as with the window with its parrying or sword crossed-over and looks through the arms, then set-upon gently. If he then will continue to work wherever he will go, then follow after him with the war, etc. [The war] goes from both sides. Also, if the war goes from his left side, he needs to run-in crooked.</p>
+
<p>'''The first''' play: When you stand as in the third stance as above in the speaking-window, if someone then runs-in with force as with the window with its displacement or sword crossed-over and looks through the arms, then sit-atop gently. If he then will continue to work wherever he will go, then follow after him with the war, etc. [The war] goes from both sides. Also, if the war goes from his left side, he needs to run-in crooked.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39v.jpg|1|lbl=39v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39v.jpg|1|lbl=39v}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The second:''' When you stand in the speaking-window as before and he will persist with an over-cut upon you and in that throw in the point, etc. Then set-upon him again long. If he will again continue to work, then follow after him with the war as before. But if he takes-away, then you may well double. It does not go well to the other, left side.</p>
+
| <p>'''The second:''' When you stand in the speaking-window as before and he will wait upon you with an over-hew and in that throw in the point, etc. Then sit-atop him again long. If he will again continue to work, then follow after him with the war as before. But if he takes-off, then you may well double. It does not go well to the other, left side.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
Line 1,241: Line 1,243:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The fourth:''' When you stand as before and he will carry-aside your sword in his going-up as before from the crooked setting-on, then disengage again as before. War if it is necessary to do and the disengaging and war goes to both sides. You may again double and mutate him if he disengages.</p>
+
| <p>'''The fourth:''' When you stand as before and he will carry-off your sword in his going-up as before from the crooked setting-on, then disengage again as before. War if it is necessary to do and the disengaging and war goes to both sides. You may again double and mutate him if he disengages.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The fifth:''' When you stand as before in the speaking-window and he will strike-into you from his right side with an over-cut to your right opening and make a disengaging or transferal<ref>alt: misleading</ref> to your right, then, in-the-moment, follow in after him with the crook to his head, etc. War if it is necessary. Upon the other side: parry long or crooked, war.</p>
+
| <p>'''The fifth:''' When you stand as before in the speaking-window and he will initiate a hew at you from his right side with an over-hew to your right opening and make in that a disengaging or misdirection to your right, then, in-the-moment, follow in after him with the crook to his head, etc. War if it is necessary. Upon the other side: displace long or crooked, war.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39v.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39v.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_40r.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_40r.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| <p>'''Work from the fourth stance, the crooked setting-upon with the after.'''</p>
+
| <p>'''Work from the fourth stance, the crooked setting-upon[sic] with the after.'''</p>
  
<p>'''The first:''' When you stand in the crooked setting-on to your left side, if he then means to seek the openings of your right side with thrusts from the ox, or else strikes; then go up against him and set-aside upon his sword with a stepping-into well over<ref>alt: across</ref> his hands and await his work and war. If he will then throw you over with force, then let go so that you come to the war or strike or work-in with him into the crook and lay upon his neck.</p>
+
<p>'''The first:''' When you stand in the crooked setting-on to your left side, if he then means to seek the openings of your right side with thrusts from the ox, or else strikes; then go up against him and offset upon his sword with a tread-in well out over<ref>alt: across</ref> his hands and await his work and war. If he will then throw you over with force, then let go so that you come to the war or strike or work-in him in the crook and lay upon his neck.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39v.jpg|6|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 39v.jpg|6|lbl=-}}
  
Line 1,259: Line 1,261:
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| <p>'''The second:''' When you stand as before and he makes a disengagement from his strike or thrust to your left side, then in-the-moment run swiftly in with the under-slice into his arm well into the air. Wherever he will subsequently ascend, then follow-after him with the war.</p>
+
| <p>'''The second:''' When you stand as before and he makes a disengagement from his strike or thrust to your left side, then in-the-moment run swiftly in with the under-cut into his arm well into the air. Wherever he will subsequently ascend, then follow-after him with the war.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 40r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 40r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The third:''' When you stand as before and he cuts upon you with a free over-cut from his right side, then step into his well inside and set him aside well behind from the crooked setting-on. If he then throws your sword over, then let it go and strike and war.</p>
+
| <p>'''The third:''' When you stand as before and he hews upon you with a free over-hew from his right side, then tread into him well inside and offset him from the crooked setting-on well behind. If he then throws your sword over, then let it go and strike and war.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 40r.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 40v.jpg|1|lbl=40v|p=1}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 40r.jpg|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 40v.jpg|1|lbl=40v|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The fourth:''' When you stand as before and he will act as if he will make an over-cut and disengages and will strike you to your left side, then swiftly fall into your setting-aside or going-up into the under-slice. War.</p>
+
| <p>'''The fourth:''' When you stand as before and he will act as if he will make an over-hew and disengages and will strike you to your left side, then swiftly fall into your offsetting or going-up into the under-cut. War.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 40v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 40v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="3" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_40v.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| rowspan="3" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_40v.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| <p>'''The fifth:''' When you stand as before and he also counters you in the crooked setting-on on his right side and he goes-up and means to strike you crooked to your right side, then you may strike, set-aside, etc. and await the war. You may even also change-through well in that, etc. War if it is necessary.</p>
+
| <p>'''The fifth:''' When you stand as before and he also counters you in the crooked setting-on on his right side and he goes-up and means to strike you crooked to your right side, then you may strike, offset, etc. and await the war. You may even also change-through well in that, etc. War if it is necessary.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 40v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 40v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| <p>Item. Often one does not find the opponent when he disengages, so one should fall in the under-slice.</p>
+
| <p>Item. Often one does not find the opponent when he disengages, so one should fall in the under-cut.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 40v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 40v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
Line 1,284: Line 1,286:
 
| <p>'''Work from the fifth'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Work from the fifth'''</p>
  
<p>'''The first:''' When you stand in the crooked setting-on upon your right side and he counters you on his right and means to strike you with an over-cut, then set-aside with crooked hands and do not uncover<ref>alt: open</ref>. If he then throws you over, then again let go and strike him crooked into his right. War.</p>
+
<p>'''The first:''' When you stand in the crooked setting-on upon your right side and he counters you on his right and means to strike you with an over-hew, then offset with crooked hands and do not open<ref>uncross your hands</ref>. If he then throws you over, then again let go and strike him crooked into his right. War.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 40v.jpg|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41r.jpg|1|lbl=41r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 40v.jpg|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41r.jpg|1|lbl=41r|p=1}}
Line 1,290: Line 1,292:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The second:''' When you stand in the crooked setting-on upon your right side as before and he makes a disengaging over-cut against you from his right and strikes at your to your right, then again, in-the-moment, swiftly make with the under-slice against him crooked, etc. the war is as the other, but reversed with the sides.</p>
+
| <p>'''The second:''' When you stand in the crooked setting-on upon your right side as before and he makes a disengaging over-hew against you from his right and strikes at your to your right, then again, in-the-moment, swiftly make with the under-cut against him crooked, etc. the war is as the other, but reversed with the sides.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The third:''' When you stand right as before and he runs-in from his right side with the window from under, up; then, again, set him aside and war.</p>
+
| <p>'''The third:''' When you stand right as before and he runs-in from his right side with the window from under, up; then, again, offset him and war.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The fourth:''' When you stand as before and he runs again as before and from that makes a disengagement and will strike to your right side, then again curl the crooked slice under against him. War into him.</p>
+
| <p>'''The fourth:''' When you stand as before and he runs again as before and from that makes a disengagement and will strike to your right side, then again make the crooked cut in below against him. War into him.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41r.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_41r.jpg|300x300px|center]]
+
| rowspan="2" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_41r.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| <p>'''The fifth:''' When you stand right as before and he [is] also in the crooked setting-on upon his right as you [are], then go against him on his sword so that you come into the outer marriage and wind-in against him in the crook and war. You may well also wait upon his work. So if he will go up, then counter him with your point, so that he runs onto the point.</p>
+
| <p>'''The fifth:''' When you stand right as before and he [is] also in the crooked setting-on upon his right as you [are], then go against him on his sword so that you come into the outer cattle-drive and wind-in against him in the crook and war. You may well also wait upon his work. So if he will go up, then counter him with your point, so that he runs onto the point.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41r.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41r.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| <p>'''Work from the sixth stance, the crooked-cut out forward, with the after'''</p>
+
| <p>'''Work from the sixth stance, the crooked-hew out forward, with the after'''</p>
  
<p>'''The first:''' When you stand in the crooked-cut out forward with the point upon the ground, the left foot forward and he will strike-into you with an over-cut from his right, then throw the point well out over, upon his hands. If he will then lever you up with force, then lay you sword crooked upon his neck and slice yourself from him or, with his overpowering, let [it] go around into a strike to his left. War.</p>
+
<p>'''The first:''' When you stand in the crooked-hew out forward with the point upon the ground, the left foot forward and he will initiate a strike at you with an over-hew from his right, then throw the point well out over, upon his hands. If he will then lever you up with force, then lay you sword crooked upon his neck and cut yourself from him or, with his overpowering, let [it] go around you into a strike to his left. War.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41v.jpg|1|lbl=41v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41v.jpg|1|lbl=41v}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The second:''' When you stand as before and he will thrust you from his left side from the ox, then, again, throw the point upon the hands as before. War. If he throws you over, etc, as before, but if he thrusts you from the right, then crook against him. but if he disengages with the shove and makes a strike from the left shoulder, then you slice up crooked into his arm.</p>
+
| <p>'''The second:''' When you stand as before and he will thrust you from his left side from the ox, then, again, throw the point upon the hands as before. War. If he overthrows you, etc, as before, but if he thrusts you from the right, then crook up against him. but if he disengages amid the thrust and makes a strike from the left shoulder, then you cut up crooked into his arm.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The third:''' when you stand as before in the crooked-cut and he [is] again in the ox upon his left side and makes a sudden withdrawal from the ox and will strike you into your left, then in-the-moment makes the open-under-slice from his right, if he disengages the slice, crook as above.</p>
+
| <p>'''The third:''' when you stand as before in the crooked-hew and he [is] again in the ox upon his left side and makes a sudden withdrawal from the ox and will strike you into your left, then in-the-moment make the open-under-cut from his right side, if he disengages the cut, crook as above.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41v.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The fourth:''' When you stand as before and he will strike or set-upon from his right side from the crooked setting-on, then draw-up your sword around from your left side to the right shoulder with a step and strike into his upon his left side to the head. War, crook with the short edge or else if you will not do these, then go-up from the crooked-cut on his sword against him with open arms and set him aside and wind the point into his face, so that you come similarly as with in the scalper or in the roof or fool and thrust or go-up straight in in the crook if it is closer.</p>
+
| <p>'''The fourth:''' When you stand as before and he will strike or sit-atop you from his right side from the crooked setting-on, then draw-up your sword around from your left side to the right shoulder with a tread and strike into his upon his left side to the head. War crooked with the short edge or else if you will not do these, then from the crooked-hew, go-up on his sword against him with open arms and offset him and wind the point into his face, so that you come similarly as with in the scalper or in the roof or fool and thrust or go straight to him. Crook up into him if it is closer.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41v.jpg|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The fifth:''' When you stand as before in the crooked-cut and he in the outer marriage, then also go-up against him in the outer marriage. Thereafter: work, etc. Ir go-up into the thrust, work or wind-in, etc.</p>
+
| <p>'''The fifth:''' When you stand as before in the crooked-hew and he in the outer cattle-drive, then also go-up against him in the outer cattle-drive. Thereafter: work, etc. Ir go-up into the thrust, work or wind in, etc.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41v.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 41v.jpg|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
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|-  
| rowspan="3" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_42r.jpg|300x300px|center]]
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| rowspan="3" | [[File:Cod.I.6.2º.5_42r.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 
| <p>'''Work from the seventh stance is the plow with the after'''</p>
 
| <p>'''Work from the seventh stance is the plow with the after'''</p>
  
<p>'''The first:''' When you stand in the plow with the right foot forward and he will run upon you with his sword with strike or thrust, then go straight up and set him aside, step into war, etc. It also goes in the same way with the setting-aside when he runs from his right side. War, etc.</p>
+
<p>'''The first:''' When you stand in the plow with the right foot forward and he will run upon you with his sword with strike or thrust, then go straight up and offset him, tread in, war, etc. It also goes in the same way with the offsetting when he runs from his right side. War, etc.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 42r.jpg|1|lbl=42r}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 42r.jpg|1|lbl=42r}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| <p>'''The second:''' When you stand as before in the plow and he sets-upon upon your sword from his left with the thwart, then remain on his sword and he will work into you above, then remain on his sword and go-up with him into the war, etc.</p>
+
| <p>'''The second:''' When you stand as before in the plow and he sits-atop upon your sword from his left with the thwart, then remain on his sword and go-up with him into the war, etc.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 42r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 42r.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| <p>Also do in the same way when he sets-upon you with the thwart from his right side. Execute the changing-through, if you wish, when he will set-upon or disengage in the changing-through and make a strike into his side according to the work.</p>
+
| <p>Also do in the same way when he sits-atop you with the thwart from his right side. Deploy the changing-through, if you wish, when he will sit-atop or disengage in the changing-through and make a strike into his side according to the work.</p>  
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 42r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 42r.jpg|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>'''The third:''' When you stand as before and he will thrust you from his right side to your right from the ox and, from that, makes a disengagement and will strike you into your left side, then you make the open-under-slice into his arm. War.</p>
+
| <p>'''The third:''' When you stand as before and he will thrust you from his right side to your right from the ox and, from that, makes a disengagement and will strike you into your left side, then you make the open-under-cut into his arm. War.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 42r.jpg|4|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 42v.jpg|1|lbl=42v}}
+
{{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 42r.jpg|4|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 42v.jpg|1|lbl=42v|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
|  
+
| class="noline" |  
| <p>But if you do not wish to slice, then mutate. But if he is from the right, then double him. If you do not wish to slice, then break him and strike. But if he will thrust from his left side and not disengage, then wind-in crooked against him, etc. You may also go-up or set-aside into yours when he thrust upon you, also pulling and striking, etc. War.</p>
+
| class="noline" | <p>But if you do not wish to cut, then mutate. But if he is from the right, then double him. If you do not wish to cut, then break him and strike. But if he will thrust from his left side and not disengage, then wind-in crooked against him, etc. You may also go-up or offset into yours when he thrust upon you, also disengaging and striking, etc. War.</p>
| {{section|Page:Cod.I.6.2º.5 42v.jpg|2|lbl=-}}
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  | work        = Images
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  | work        = Illustrations
 
  | authors    = [[Universitätsbibliothek Augsburg]]
 
  | authors    = [[Universitätsbibliothek Augsburg]]
 
  | source link = http://www.nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:bvb:384-uba002007-6
 
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[[Category:German]]
 
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Latest revision as of 23:17, 14 October 2020

Hans Medel von Salzburg

A play from Medel's fencing manual
Born 15th century
Died 16th century
Occupation Fencing master
Citizenship Salzburg, Germany
Movement Liechtenauer tradition
Influences
Genres Fencing manual
Language Early New High German
Manuscript(s) Codex I.6.2º.5 (1539)
Concordance by Michael Chidester
Translations Magyar fordítás

Hans Medel von Salzburg (Hans Niedel, Hans Mendel) was an early 16th century German fencing master. Salzburg is a city in northern Austria, and he seems to have operated as a burgher and Schirmmeister there from at least 1503.[1] Little else is known about this master, but he seems to have been associated with the tradition of Johannes Liechtenauer. He may have traced his lineage through Hans Seydenfaden von Erfurt, a member of the Fellowship of Liechtenauer,[2] as Medel's text is the only known source that mentions teachings from the earlier master.

Medel's name is attached to a manuscript treatise on swordsmanship from 1539, including an incomplete gloss of Liechtenauer's Recital and an addendum on fencing based on "the Seven Stances"; it seems to have been written by a student or associate of Medel rather than the master himself. This gloss is unique in the Liechtenauer tradition in that it not only offers unique commentary on the Recital, but also both quotes and occasionally offers criticisms of and corrections to the earlier glosses of Sigmund ain Ringeck and Nicolaüs. In a few places the gloss specifically describes a teaching of Hans Seydenfaden or Hans Medel, but in several more it merely attributes the teaching to "Master Hans" without indicating which one.

This manuscript eventually passed into the library of Paulus Hector Mair, who bound it into the current Codex I.6.2º.5 some time after 1566; unfortunately, the extant fragment of the gloss terminates abruptly at the beginning of the section on Zucken, and the remainder is currently lost.

Treatise

Additional Resources

References

  1. Mitteilungen der Gesellschaft für Salzburger Landeskunde, vol. 40. Salzburg, 1900. p 177.
  2. The Fellowship of Liechtenauer is recorded in three versions of Paulus Kal's treatise: MS 1825 (1460s), Cgm 1570 (ca. 1470), and MS KK5126 (1480s).
  3. alt: right
  4. alt: side
  5. alt: defense
  6. the artist/professional doing their work
  7. alt: gladly valuing in the arts
  8. alt: gladly valuing with kindness
  9. alt: right
  10. alt: weapon
  11. eindrohen: to imminently threaten
  12. Zeck: a biting insect, ie: a tick.
  13. alt: closer, sooner
  14. this is usually the term for the severing of limbs/extremities, though it can mean hewing while exiting or just separating
  15. widerschlagen: to strike against, in a reverberating sense
  16. rechnen: compute, take into account, align
  17. towards
  18. In the standard verse it is 'ab', not 'fast'
  19. severely, precisely, ruthlessly, violently
  20. videlicet: namely; to wit
  21. abhauen: to sever or to hew in exit
  22. alt: high
  23. aufsitzen: to sit on top of something. A rider was sometimes called an 'Aufsitzer'
  24. ausheben: lift out
  25. conjecture, possibly: 'neben'
  26. 26.0 26.1 26.2 26.3 26.4 26.5 26.6 26.7 26.8 26.9 The text here is hidden by a crease in the page.
  27. alt: breaks-apart, shatters, asunders; burgles; interrupts
  28. ansiegen: to return with victory
  29. glance, discern, glean
  30. Ochs
  31. Ochs
  32. Ochs
  33. could also mean 'carelessly'
  34. Alternately: strongly, firmly, steadfastly.
  35. across
  36. across
  37. your leger
  38. rappen: to gather, to snatch, to seize
  39. no apparent verb here. A similar construction appears below with the added phrase: "set-upon upon the four endings to both sides"
  40. alt: flying
  41. mitmachen: join, unite, combine, participate
  42. alternately: old
  43. marginalia: 'malz' => bad, weak
  44. Or possibly "maler"
  45. Here some pages apparently have been lost, unfortunately.
  46. alt: across
  47. alt: inside
  48. alt: across
  49. uncross your hands