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Difference between revisions of "Carlo Giuseppe Colombani"

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! <p>Images<br/></p>
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! <p>Illustrations<br/></p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B}}<br/>by [[Piermarco Terminiello]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B}}<br/>by [[Piermarco Terminiello]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Piermarco Terminiello]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Piermarco Terminiello]]</p>
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<p>By which all people are shown how to wield the sword, dagger, cloak, halberd, flag and two-handed spadone, with ease, with the rules that should be followed by one who finds himself with his sword drawn, in order to defend and protect himself.</p>
 
<p>By which all people are shown how to wield the sword, dagger, cloak, halberd, flag and two-handed spadone, with ease, with the rules that should be followed by one who finds himself with his sword drawn, in order to defend and protect himself.</p>
| {{#lst:Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)|1}}
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| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/3|1|lbl=1}}
 
 
{{section|Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)|1|lbl=1}}
 
  
 
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| <p>'''''A work useful to all'''''</p>
 
| <p>'''''A work useful to all'''''</p>
| {{section|Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)|2|lbl=-}}
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| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/3|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>DEDICATED ''TO THE INCOMPARABLE MERIT'' OF THE YOUTH OF VENICE.</p>
 
| <p>DEDICATED ''TO THE INCOMPARABLE MERIT'' OF THE YOUTH OF VENICE.</p>
| {{section|Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)|3|lbl=-}}
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| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/3|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>IN VENICE, M. DCCXI.<br/>Printed by Miloco.<br/>''WITH PERMISSION FROM THE AUTHORITIES''</p>
 
| <p>IN VENICE, M. DCCXI.<br/>Printed by Miloco.<br/>''WITH PERMISSION FROM THE AUTHORITIES''</p>
| {{section|Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)|4|lbl=-}}
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<p>''This work can truly bring you great benefit, having first learned however sound principles from good masters, with figures of the most important positions and guards. And live in happiness.''</p>
 
<p>''This work can truly bring you great benefit, having first learned however sound principles from good masters, with figures of the most important positions and guards. And live in happiness.''</p>
| {{section|Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)|5|lbl=2}}
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| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/4|1|lbl=2}}
  
 
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| <p>''A simple method of learning how to attack well and wield arms correctly, through which the student should apply himself and work diligently; it is not his spirit or even his skill that will bring him success however, but merely a little judgment, since spirit and quickness count for little without the art.''</p>
 
| <p>''A simple method of learning how to attack well and wield arms correctly, through which the student should apply himself and work diligently; it is not his spirit or even his skill that will bring him success however, but merely a little judgment, since spirit and quickness count for little without the art.''</p>
| {{section|Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)|6|lbl=-}}
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<p>These are the principle parries and attacks you should teach your student at the beginning, to ensure he is accomplished ahead of giving him further lessons. He must parry with the heel, that is to say the sword's forte, and you should always keep your eyes open when you know he wishes to assault, so you can correct him when he errs. Similarly you should put him in posture in front of his enemy and show him how he should throw the attack, and once he has done this have him throw directly in front of you.</p>
 
<p>These are the principle parries and attacks you should teach your student at the beginning, to ensure he is accomplished ahead of giving him further lessons. He must parry with the heel, that is to say the sword's forte, and you should always keep your eyes open when you know he wishes to assault, so you can correct him when he errs. Similarly you should put him in posture in front of his enemy and show him how he should throw the attack, and once he has done this have him throw directly in front of you.</p>
 
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{{section|Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)|7|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)|8|lbl=3|p=1}}
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{{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/4|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/5|1|lbl=3|p=1}}
  
 
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<p>To execute everything well however, including these responses, and to deal with every sort of posture and movement, requires great effort. No man can put into practice what he knows without being able to train and exercise the movements in his mind. If we had bodies as sublime as our thoughts, people would be perfect. Our nature is too cumbersome a machine however, and requires great effort to manage and move before it functions without fault. Nonetheless with judgment, patience and endeavour, you will always become more accomplished than many others, if you have applied yourself.</p>
 
<p>To execute everything well however, including these responses, and to deal with every sort of posture and movement, requires great effort. No man can put into practice what he knows without being able to train and exercise the movements in his mind. If we had bodies as sublime as our thoughts, people would be perfect. Our nature is too cumbersome a machine however, and requires great effort to manage and move before it functions without fault. Nonetheless with judgment, patience and endeavour, you will always become more accomplished than many others, if you have applied yourself.</p>
 
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{{section|Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)|9|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)|10|lbl=4|p=1}} {{section|Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)|11|lbl=5|p=1}} {{section|Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)|12|lbl=6|p=1}}
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<p>For this reason the fencer with the sword must quickly resolve, as soon as he sees the sabre fencer and is able, to throw an attack, either at the head, or at another target. He should throw feints to where he knows he can enter most easily, then quickly leap back, because if the fencer with the sword is not overly skilled, he runs a great risk of being harmed by the sabre's fury. Those who keep their guard in a straight ahead in a line however will always be wounded by the sabre, if its wielder has a modicum of experience.</p>
 
<p>For this reason the fencer with the sword must quickly resolve, as soon as he sees the sabre fencer and is able, to throw an attack, either at the head, or at another target. He should throw feints to where he knows he can enter most easily, then quickly leap back, because if the fencer with the sword is not overly skilled, he runs a great risk of being harmed by the sabre's fury. Those who keep their guard in a straight ahead in a line however will always be wounded by the sabre, if its wielder has a modicum of experience.</p>
| {{section|Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)|13|lbl=-}}
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| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/8|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| To defend against a sword as long as a man, with a sword half a foot shorter than your enemy's, the fencer with the shorter sword should not be intimidated by his opponent's feints, whether mezze botte or provocations. Instead as soon as the enemy performs an attack he should quickly parry and close measure, or find the sword, observing the  cavazioni as he closes measure.
+
| <p>To defend against a sword as long as a man, with a sword half a foot shorter than your enemy's, the fencer with the shorter sword should not be intimidated by his opponent's feints, whether mezze botte or provocations. Instead as soon as the enemy performs an attack he should quickly parry and close measure, or find the sword, observing the  cavazioni as he closes measure.</p>
  
If the fencer with the shorter sword throws an attack at his enemy he must then quickly jump backwards, while raising his sword, since his opponent could still wound him easily. If the fencer with the short sword however, due to his great spirit, wishes to carry his blow from distance he runs a risk. This is because his enemy can hold firm with the significant advantage of his weapon, and on being tormented by attacks whose force he might not be able to parry, he becomes obliged to extend his arm and thrust.
+
<p>If the fencer with the shorter sword throws an attack at his enemy he must then quickly jump backwards, while raising his sword, since his opponent could still wound him easily. If the fencer with the short sword however, due to his great spirit, wishes to carry his blow from distance he runs a risk. This is because his enemy can hold firm with the significant advantage of his weapon, and on being tormented by attacks whose force he might not be able to parry, he becomes obliged to extend his arm and thrust.</p>
| ''Per diffendersi contro unà Spada longa un huomo, che habbia una Spada corta dʼun mezo piede poco meno, che suo inimico bisogna, che quello, che lʼhà corta non si spaventi delle finte, che gli fà il suo aversario, tanto à meze botte che à desfida, che subito, che il suo inimico fornisse un colpo deve ricorrere subito parada, & serrarlo, ò stringerlo, & osservar le cavatione nel mentre che voi lo serrate, & se quello che si serve della Spada corta dà al suo inimico deve subito saltare indietro, in levando la sua Spada da se perche quello, che hà ricevuto il colpo potrebbe ancor facilmente offenderlo, & se quello, che si ser''<small>[7]</small>''ve della corta volesse per il suo gran animo portare delle botte in longhezza, corre pericolo perche il suo inimico si tiene forte per il grande avantaggio che hà della sua spada perche vedendosi opresso dai colpi che puol essere non potersi riparargli la forza lʼobbligarebbe à stenderli il braccio per fare un colpo forado.''
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{{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/8|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/9|1|lbl=7|p=1}}
  
 
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| '''''On grappling'''''
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| <p>'''''On grappling'''''</p>
Good judgment is required by those who wish to leap at the body. You should only attempt this when your enemy overextends himself in carrying out his attack. Seeing him slow to recover, you can seize the tempo and employ the grapple.
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| A servirsi della Presa
+
<p>Good judgment is required by those who wish to leap at the body. You should only attempt this when your enemy overextends himself in carrying out his attack. Seeing him slow to recover, you can seize the tempo and employ the grapple.</p>
''Il giuditio non deve manchare à quello che vuole saltare alla persona & non servirsene che quando il suo inimico portandogli un colpo si slonga oltre misura & vedendoli cosi tardi al ritirarsi puol proffittare del tempo è  servirsi della presa.''
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| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/9|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''''To defend yourself with a sword against a halberd'''''
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| <p>'''''To defend yourself with a sword against a halberd'''''</p>
The fencer with the sword is advised to hold it firmly in the hand, and to grasp the middle of the blade with his left hand. If the enemy throws to the inside, you should parry with your right and perform an ''inquartata'' with your body. If he throws to the outside you should parry, passing with your left foot to his right in order to grapple him, which will succeed without any doubt.
+
 
| Per difendersi contro la Labarda con Spada.
+
<p>The fencer with the sword is advised to hold it firmly in the hand, and to grasp the middle of the blade with his left hand. If the enemy throws to the inside, you should parry with your right and perform an ''inquartata'' with your body. If he throws to the outside you should parry, passing with your left foot to his right in order to grapple him, which will succeed without any doubt.</p>
''Deve avertire il giocator di spada, che deve tenere la spada forte in mano e pigliar la Spada con la mano sinistra nel mezo della lama, se lʼinemico tira di dentro para con la destra e inquarta la vita se tira per difouri para e passa il sinistro piede al destro e vada alla presa senza dubio alcuno li ariuscirà.''
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| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/9|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''''Sword and cloak, sword and buckler'''''
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| <p>'''''Sword and cloak, sword and buckler'''''</p>
Once the student has a good understanding of the sword alone, having taken lessons from a good master, he will be able to quickly and very easily learn the sword and dagger, sword and cape and sword and ''targa'', noting that all three consist of but one play.
 
  
He has only to ensure that all of his body is over his left foot, and that the sword is held at his thigh, as low as possible while still being usable. As for his left hand, the point of the dagger should be aimed at the enemy's throat, seeking to unsettle the enemy, so he leaves himself open to a straight thrust either to the outside or inside, whichever is easiest. He should take practice defending against attacks from a good fencer for at least fifteen days, in order to learn how to parry with a dagger in his left hand, and likewise with the cape, ''targa'' and hat.
+
<p>Once the student has a good understanding of the sword alone, having taken lessons from a good master, he will be able to quickly and very easily learn the sword and dagger, sword and cape and sword and ''targa'', noting that all three consist of but one play.</p>
| Spada e capa, Spada e brochiere.
+
 
Quando il Scolaro averà bona congnitione di Spada sola avendo auto lettione da bon Maestro facilissimamente potrà imparar con brevità Spada e pugnale, spada e capa, spada e targa avertendo che tutte tre sono un sol gioco basta solo che si assicuri tutto il corpo sopra il piede sinistro, e la spada la porti con la mano destra alla cossiia più bassa che polle usarsi & alla sinistra il pugnale che guardi con la punta alla golla del nemico cercando di scomponere il nemico e lasciarsi di botta dritta ò per fora ò di dentro che sarà più facile facendosi tirare almeno prima 15. giorni da un bon giocatore per imparare à parare con la mano sinistra il pugnale, e cosi farai di Tabaro, di Targa, e di Capello.
+
<p>He has only to ensure that all of his body is over his left foot, and that the sword is held at his thigh, as low as possible while still being usable. As for his left hand, the point of the dagger should be aimed at the enemy's throat, seeking to unsettle the enemy, so he leaves himself open to a straight thrust either to the outside or inside, whichever is easiest. He should take practice defending against attacks from a good fencer for at least fifteen days, in order to learn how to parry with a dagger in his left hand, and likewise with the cape, ''targa'' and hat.</p>
 +
| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/9|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''''Method of wielding the halberd against a sword, or in the midst of many swords'''''
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| <p>'''''Method of wielding the halberd against a sword, or in the midst of many swords'''''</p>
If it happens that you must retrieve a halberd from your house or workshop to confront a sword, you should grasp the bottom of the halberd with your right hand, with your left hand in the middle. Your right foot should be back and your left foot forward, with your right arm well withdrawn. When you release a thrust you should immediately pull your attack back, and you should never swing the halberd when you know that the swordsman is accomplished, because he will be able to close to the grapple with ease.
 
  
In wishing to join a combat with a halberd you should grasp it a ''palmo'' from its head. By then using ''montanti'', while moving around at speed, you can enter into the fray without danger, the halberd being no more than a ''palmo'' taller than its wielder.
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<p>If it happens that you must retrieve a halberd from your house or workshop to confront a sword, you should grasp the bottom of the halberd with your right hand, with your left hand in the middle. Your right foot should be back and your left foot forward, with your right arm well withdrawn. When you release a thrust you should immediately pull your attack back, and you should never swing the halberd when you know that the swordsman is accomplished, because he will be able to close to the grapple with ease.</p>
| ''Modo di manegiar la Labarda contro la Spada ò in mezo una quantità di Spade.''
+
 
Quando ti succedesse di cavar fori di tua botega ò casa la Labarda contro la Spada deve pigliar con la mano destra in fondo della Labarda con la sinistra in mezo il piede destro dietro, & il sinistro avanti ritirarsi ben adietro con il brazzo destro, e quando tiri la stocata tornerai subito à dietro con il tuo colpo, e mai non darai bastonate con la Labarda quando sai che il giocator di spada la sà manegiare che ti verà facilmente alla presa. Volendo spartire con la Labarda una costione si piglia la Labarda un palmo vicino. l fero poi con li montanti essendenti girandoti à torno con velocità tù potrai entrar nel mezo senza tuo pericolo non essendo la Labarda un palmo più alta di quello che la manegia.
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<p>In wishing to join a combat with a halberd you should grasp it a ''palmo'' from its head. By then using ''montanti'', while moving around at speed, you can enter into the fray without danger, the halberd being no more than a ''palmo'' taller than its wielder.</p>
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| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/9|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
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|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''''The rule for the two-handed spadone against multiple swords'''''
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| <p>'''''The rule for the two-handed spadone against multiple swords'''''</p>
This is applies both to a two-handed ''spadone'' and to long sword. Finding yourself assailed by enemies, and supposing that there are many of them, the situation demands nothing else but attacks like those of a desperate man, that is to say you must enter liberally into the fray. You should never throw thrusts with the point, except at an opponent who seems weaker, instead throwing ''roversi'', such attacks keeping you always in motion, this being the true method of defending yourself.
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| Regola di Spadone à due mano contro à più Spade.
+
<p>This is applies both to a two-handed ''spadone'' and to long sword. Finding yourself assailed by enemies, and supposing that there are many of them, the situation demands nothing else but attacks like those of a desperate man, that is to say you must enter liberally into the fray. You should never throw thrusts with the point, except at an opponent who seems weaker, instead throwing ''roversi'', such attacks keeping you always in motion, this being the true method of defending yourself.</p>
<br/>''Tanto vol dire Spadone a due mani quanto ancora con una Spada longa, e trovandoti assaltato da nemici, e che fossero assia in questa occasione non vol altro che li colpi da disperato cioè entrar liberamente nel mezo, e non tirar mai di punta se non à chi ti pare che sia più debole mà con roversi tali cortelate tenendoti sempre in giro, che questo sarà il vero modo di difenderti.''
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| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/9|6|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''''To defend yourself against one with a great spirit, but who possesses little knowledge of fencing'''''
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| <p>'''''To defend yourself against one with a great spirit, but who possesses little knowledge of fencing'''''</p>
In all the world where I practised, I heard of many instances of men with no knowledge of fencing having killed valiant men. Here I will reflect, and say that it is possible, but not as easy as some believe, because knowing a little is better than having a lot. If I had a great spirit without the art, I would say that the art can achieve more than a great spirit, because in having a great spirit without posture, tempo and measure I would never in any way be accomplished.
 
  
Having to draw my sword from its sheath, I would always pray that heaven might send me an opponent with great spirit but no art (rather than a phlegmatic one with more art than me) because when you are beset by a misadventure such as this you can overcome it without danger.
+
<p>In all the world where I practised, I heard of many instances of men with no knowledge of fencing having killed valiant men. Here I will reflect, and say that it is possible, but not as easy as some believe, because knowing a little is better than having a lot. If I had a great spirit without the art, I would say that the art can achieve more than a great spirit, because in having a great spirit without posture, tempo and measure I would never in any way be accomplished.</p>
  
You should first however try and avoid drawing your sword against one who understands little of the art. If you are wounded your entire reputation is lost but if you wound or kill him it will grant you no honour. If you must draw your sword though, never jest with him or throw cuts, because in not understanding the danger he could charge forward, or leave himself in front of you, whereupon he might shame you.
+
<p>Having to draw my sword from its sheath, I would always pray that heaven might send me an opponent with great spirit but no art (rather than a phlegmatic one with more art than me) because when you are beset by a misadventure such as this you can overcome it without danger.</p>
  
I advise instead that you stand put yourself well in guard and stay covered. It he strikes desperately let him throw, and if he enters into measure you should retreat while always in guard. In the end, after he has thrown ten or twelve thrusts without effect, you can either wound him if you wish, or take his sword by coming to the grapple and leave him for the ignorant that he is. Reason will be yours however, as reason is the foundation of the art of the sword, since it it said that reason conquers all.  
+
<p>You should first however try and avoid drawing your sword against one who understands little of the art. If you are wounded your entire reputation is lost but if you wound or kill him it will grant you no honour. If you must draw your sword though, never jest with him or throw cuts, because in not understanding the danger he could charge forward, or leave himself in front of you, whereupon he might shame you.</p>
  
This being so, I will now give some important advice, from a case I saw in Naples. A great personage, who had completed twenty four combats without ever being injured, was wounded by a young lad of tender years, who to his great shame took his life. May this instance therefore serve as an example to all those who carry a sword at their side, that it is always better to be circumspect and avoid such situations.
+
<p>I advise instead that you stand put yourself well in guard and stay covered. It he strikes desperately let him throw, and if he enters into measure you should retreat while always in guard. In the end, after he has thrown ten or twelve thrusts without effect, you can either wound him if you wish, or take his sword by coming to the grapple and leave him for the ignorant that he is. Reason will be yours however, as reason is the foundation of the art of the sword, since it it said that reason conquers all.</p>
| Per difendersi da un gran core, mà che possieda la scherma poco.
+
 
Per tutto il mondo, che hò praticato intesi à dir moltissimi casi cioè, che molti sen<small>[8]</small>senza sapere lʼarte della scherma abiano amazzato molti bravi hominii, io qui faccio una reflessione, e dico che pol essere, mà non tanto facile quanto si crede perche meglio è il poco sapere che lʼassai possedere, che io possieda gran core e che non abia lʼarte dico che lʼarte pol far più che gran core, perche io avendo il gran core senza pianta ne tempo ne misura non sarò mai niente di bene; pregai sempre il Cielo, che avendo da cavar la Spada dal fodro mi mandassi un gran core senza lʼarte, e non un flematico con più arre di me, perche dico che quando ti succedesse tal disgratia ti poi tegolare senza pericolo, & è questo prima devi schivar lʼoccasione di cavar la Spada con uno che intende poco lʼarte, perche se ti ferisse perdi tutta la tua reputatione, e se lo ferisse lui ò lo mazzi non aquistarai niente di onore è succedendoti di cavar la Spada non scherzar mai con lui ne con tagli, perche non conoscendo il pericolo si pol investire ò lassarsi di incontro e ti pol svergognare, ma dico che si deve ben piantarsi in guardia, e coprirsi, è se tira da disperato lascialo tirare è se entra nella misura tù ritirati in pianta sempre, che al fine avendo tirato dieci ò dodeci stochate senza cognitione, ò lo ferirai se voi, ò li piglierai la spada di mano venendoli alla presa, e lo lasciarai da ignorante come è, avendo però tu la ragione, che è base fondamentale della Spada, perche si dice che la ragione vince tutto, che sia vero quì darò un gran consiglio à tutti dʼun caso che ò veduto in N. di un gran personaggio, che avendo fatto venti quatro dovesi tutti à guera fornita senza mai esser ferito, e un giovineto di tenera età con grandissima sua vergogna lo privò di vita; servirà dunque questo caso dʼesempio à tutti, che chi porta Spada al fianco si deve stimare è sempre schivar lʼoccasione.
+
<p>This being so, I will now give some important advice, from a case I saw in Naples. A great personage, who had completed twenty four combats without ever being injured, was wounded by a young lad of tender years, who to his great shame took his life. May this instance therefore serve as an example to all those who carry a sword at their side, that it is always better to be circumspect and avoid such situations.</p>
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{{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/9|7|lbl=7|p=1}} {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/10|1|lbl=8|p=1}}
  
 
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| '''''When combat takes place at night'''''
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| <p>'''''When combat takes place at night'''''</p>
The rule for combat at night is as follows. You should never thrust except with your foot, and you should seek your enemy's sword by sound and with your sword, and once you find it releasing your thrust over its edge. A cape is better than a ''targa'', for those who know how to use it.
+
 
| ''Quando succede la costione di notte.''
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<p>The rule for combat at night is as follows. You should never thrust except with your foot, and you should seek your enemy's sword by sound and with your sword, and once you find it releasing your thrust over its edge. A cape is better than a ''targa'', for those who know how to use it.</p>
La regola di far costione di notte è questa, che non si tirano mai stocate se non con il piede, e con la voce, e con la spada si cercha quella quella del nemico e trovandola si lassa sopra del suo filo la stoccata, & è bono aver el ferarolo meglio della Targa, à chi la sà maneggiare.
+
| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/10|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''''To learn the play of the flag'''''
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| <p>'''''To learn the play of the flag'''''</p>
Firstly your flag should be the same height as you, and be well counterbalanced both with lead and wood, so that the whole flag weighs as much as the ''palmo'' of lead. Every step that you take should be accompanied by a flourish of the flag, and you should practice with your left as well as your right. In this manner you can also learn without difficulty to play with two flags.
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| ''Per imparar à giocar la Bandiera.''
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<p>Firstly your flag should be the same height as you, and be well counterbalanced both with lead and wood, so that the whole flag weighs as much as the ''palmo'' of lead. Every step that you take should be accompanied by a flourish of the flag, and you should practice with your left as well as your right. In this manner you can also learn without difficulty to play with two flags.</p>
Prima la Bandiera che farai, deve esser tanto alta quanto sei tù, e deve essere ben contrapesata tanto di piombo quanto di legno, tanto deve pesar un palmo del piombo quanto tutta lʼAsta & a tutte le tue passate che farai fa li sempre fare il scartosso alla Bàndiera, & impararai tanto con la destra quanto con la sinistra, e cosi potrai imparare à giocar ancora due con faciltà.
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| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/10|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| rowspan="3" | [[File:Marozzo 6.png|300x300px|center]]
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| rowspan="3" | [[File:Marozzo 6.png|400x400px|center]]
| Every sort of guard should be good for those with some knowledge, but I say the Italian guards are the best.
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| <p>Every sort of guard should be good for those with some knowledge, but I say the Italian guards are the best.</p>
| Tutte le sorte de guardie devono essere buone à quelli che sano qualche cosa dico lʼItaliane esser le meglio.
+
| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/10|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| Those who wish to describe everything in great detail are like those who would seek the Phoenix at the bottom of the sea, since I am sure that if they searched that vast ocean, they would do so in vain.
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| <p>Those who wish to describe everything in great detail are like those who would seek the Phoenix at the bottom of the sea, since I am sure that if they searched that vast ocean, they would do so in vain.</p>
| Chi volesse descrivere il tutto minuto per minuto sarebbe come chi volesse andar cercando la Fenice nel fondo del mare, che sò certo che quando cercasse quel gran Oceano cercarebbe invano
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| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/10|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| It is better to do one thing well, and let everyone take stock, etc.
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| <p>It is better to do one thing well, and let everyone take stock, etc.</p>
| Facciamo una cosa ben fatta che ogni uno pigli bene le sue misure &c.
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| {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/10|6|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
| class="noline" | [[File:Marozzo 9.png|300x300px|center]]
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| class="noline" | [[File:Marozzo 9.png|400x400px|center]]
| class="noline" | '''THE END.'''
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| class="noline" | <p>'''THE END.'''</p>
| class="noline" | '''IL FINE.'''
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| class="noline" | {{section|Page:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf/10|7|lbl=-}}
  
 
|}
 
|}
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<section begin="sourcebox"/>{{sourcebox header}}
 
<section begin="sourcebox"/>{{sourcebox header}}
 
{{sourcebox
 
{{sourcebox
  | work        = Images
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  | work        = Illustrations
 
  | authors    = [[Achille Marozzo]]
 
  | authors    = [[Achille Marozzo]]
 
  | source link =  
 
  | source link =  
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  | authors    = [[Piermarco Terminiello]]
 
  | authors    = [[Piermarco Terminiello]]
 
  | source link =  
 
  | source link =  
  | source title= [[Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani)]]
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  | source title= [[Index:L'Arte maestra (Carlo Giuseppe Colombani).pdf]]
 
  | license    = noncommercial
 
  | license    = noncommercial
 
}}
 
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[[Category:Sword and Cloak]]
 
[[Category:Sword and Cloak]]
  
[[Category:Old format]]
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[[Category:New format]]

Latest revision as of 02:49, 15 October 2020

Carlo Giuseppe Colombani

Colombani performing a dentistry exhibition
Born 21 January 1676
San Bartolomeo, Italy
Died 1735 or 1736
Venice, Italy
Spouse(s) Apollonia Colombani di Livorno
Relative(s)
  • Francesco (father)
  • Isabella (mother)
Occupation
Movement Dardi tradition
Influences Achille Marozzo
Genres Fencing manual
Language Italian
Notable work(s) L'Arte maestra (1711)

Carlo Giuseppe Colombani (1676 - 1735/6) was an Italian soldier, fencing master, and dentist at the turn of the 18th century. He was born on 21 January 1676 in San Bartolomeo to Francesco and Isabella Colombani, who seem to have been of high social status. In 1693 at the age of 17, he joined the army of Vittorio Amedeo of Savoy to fight in the war with the French. Colombani participated in several battles (Guastella, Pinerolo, Orbassano, Santa Brigida, and Staffarda) and ultimately became an officer and color guard; for his valor he gained the title Alfier Lombardo ("the Pride of Lombardy").[1]

Colombani traveled for a time after the war, passing through Barcelona, Spain before returning to travel around his native Italy. He supported himself as a fencing master during this time, teaching private lessons and performing public exhibitions; he also dabbled in other forms of performance including charlatanism, puppetry, and tightrope walking. In 1700, he seems to have become involved with a Spanish woman and embarked on another international journey through France, Holland, and England, eventually exhausting all of the wealth he had acquired.[1]

In 1709, he married Apollonia, the daughter of a respected tooth-puller, and then moved to Venice and received an official diploma in dentistry. Between 1710 and 1712, Colombani practiced charlatan dentistry and minor medical care in the public piazza in Venice, proving himself the most capable dentist in the city (other than his wife).[1] In 1711 (during this same period), he also published a brief treatise on fencing with at least some tenuous connection to the tradition of Filippo di Bartolomeo Dardi entitled L'Arte maestra ("The Master Art").

After 1712, Appolonia convinced him to give up public exhibition and they devoted themselves to a more scientific approach to dentistry. He lived the rest of his life in Venice, practicing his trade and become extremely wealthy. Colombani went on to publish several other books on various topics, including a fairly sensationalized memoir in 1724; his wife was also a writer, publishing a treatise on dentistry in 1719.[1]

Treatise

Additional Resources

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Roberto Lasagni. Dizionario biografico dei Parmigiani. Trans. Piermarco Terminiello. Parma: PPS Editrice, 1999.