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'''Antonio Manciolino''' was a [[century::16th century]] [[nationality::Italian]] [[fencing master]]. Little is known about this master's life; he seems to have been Bolognese by birth and he is thought to have been a student of [[Guido Antonio di Luca]],{{cn}} the master who also taught [[Achille Marozzo]]. His fencing manual is dedicated to Don Luisi de Cordoba, Duke of Sessa, Orator of the Most Serene Emperor to Adrian VI; this dedication may indicate that Manciolino was attached as fencing master to the ducal court.
 
'''Antonio Manciolino''' was a [[century::16th century]] [[nationality::Italian]] [[fencing master]]. Little is known about this master's life; he seems to have been Bolognese by birth and he is thought to have been a student of [[Guido Antonio di Luca]],{{cn}} the master who also taught [[Achille Marozzo]]. His fencing manual is dedicated to Don Luisi de Cordoba, Duke of Sessa, Orator of the Most Serene Emperor to Adrian VI; this dedication may indicate that Manciolino was attached as fencing master to the ducal court.
  
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! <p>Images</p>
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! <p>Illustrations</p>
! <p>{{rating}}</p>
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! <p>{{rating|start}}</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
  
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| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
| class="noline" | <p>Dedication: To the Most Illustrious Don Luisi de Cordola, Duke of Sessa, Orator of the Most Serene Emperor to Adrian VI.</p>
+
| class="noline" | <p>[1] Dedication: To the Most Illustrious Don Luisi de Cordola, Duke of Sessa, Orator of the Most Serene Emperor to Adrian VI.</p>
 
| class="noline" | {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|12|lbl=1v}}
 
| class="noline" | {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|12|lbl=1v}}
  
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{| class="master"
 
{| class="master"
 
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! <p>Images</p>
+
! <p>Illustrations</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B}}<br/>by [[W. Jherek Swanger]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B}}<br/>by [[W. Jherek Swanger]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
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| [[file:Manciolino 2.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[file:Manciolino 2.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| <p>NEW WORK FOR LEARNING to combat and fence with every sort of weapon, composed by Antonio Manciolino of Bologna.</p>
+
| <p>'''New work for learning to combat and fence with every sort of weapon, composed by Antonio Manciolino of Bologna.'''</p>
  
<p>It is the wont of the majority of the commonest maestri of the art of the rational blows of fencing to affix in the highest and most solemn corner of their school a long array of paper, wherein they claim their chapters are written. And in truth, whosoever reads them does find them to be chapters, but rather those that wine vendors place on barrels, a thing more monstrous than human. And how can he be human, if the greed and rapacity of the maestro is openly displayed? But how human of a thing is it to help others, and to bear witness by oneself that some are not born thus rapacious and hardhearted of instinct? And in my opinion things are placed into the school only for their profit, and not that of others. Hundreds are their chapters, for in them is contained nothing other than the putting of a price on the masterful play of this art, as the virtue of arms has fallen to such baseness that it is wished by them to find her holy members sold at a price through the schools, boasting, without consideration that the dull and the subtle wits can not equally bear this yoke upon their shoulders, and that the art is not a harlot to suffer itself to be sold. And I wish to hold to a more useful path, noting that the school should be devoted to offering some instruction of the art. It is of more worth to me to be useful to my scholars with this work than, through the putting of a price to the play, to provide myself alone with great benefit. Accordingly, it will suffice me to have from scholars three things: namely reverence, faith, and reward; reverence as maestro, and likewise faith, because it behooves the student to believe according to the saying of the philosopher, that scholars are held to be the proper reward of their maestro; because without that (it is the sentiment of Cicero) the arts would perish. If, therefore, I call myself satisfied by the three aforesaid things, what loss of time in some other profit of mine could be of aid with this, my work?</p>
+
<p>[1] It is the wont of the majority of the commonest maestri of the art of the rational blows of fencing to affix in the highest and most solemn corner of their school a long array of paper, wherein they claim their chapters are written. And in truth, whosoever reads them does find them to be chapters, but rather those that wine vendors place on barrels, a thing more monstrous than human. And how can he be human, if the greed and rapacity of the maestro is openly displayed? But how human of a thing is it to help others, and to bear witness by oneself that some are not born thus rapacious and hardhearted of instinct? And in my opinion things are placed into the school only for their profit, and not that of others. Hundreds are their chapters, for in them is contained nothing other than the putting of a price on the masterful play of this art, as the virtue of arms has fallen to such baseness that it is wished by them to find her holy members sold at a price through the schools, boasting, without consideration that the dull and the subtle wits can not equally bear this yoke upon their shoulders, and that the art is not a harlot to suffer itself to be sold. And I wish to hold to a more useful path, noting that the school should be devoted to offering some instruction of the art. It is of more worth to me to be useful to my scholars with this work than, through the putting of a price to the play, to provide myself alone with great benefit. Accordingly, it will suffice me to have from scholars three things: namely reverence, faith, and reward; reverence as maestro, and likewise faith, because it behooves the student to believe according to the saying of the philosopher, that scholars are held to be the proper reward of their maestro; because without that (it is the sentiment of Cicero) the arts would perish. If, therefore, I call myself satisfied by the three aforesaid things, what loss of time in some other profit of mine could be of aid with this, my work?</p>
 
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{{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|13|lbl=2|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|14|lbl=2v|p=1}}
 
{{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|13|lbl=2|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|14|lbl=2v|p=1}}
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| <p>HERE BEGIN SOME principal rules, or instructions, regarding the valorous art of fencing.</p>
+
| <p>[3] '''Here begin some principal rules, or instructions, regarding the valorous art of fencing.'''</p>
  
 
<p>One wishing to play must always attach himself to the most valorous of deed and reputation. Because as the glory of the victor depends on the valor of the vanquished, thus the loss is not censurable if the reputation of the victor embellishes it.</p>
 
<p>One wishing to play must always attach himself to the most valorous of deed and reputation. Because as the glory of the victor depends on the valor of the vanquished, thus the loss is not censurable if the reputation of the victor embellishes it.</p>
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| <p>The delight of playing with varied and diverse players makes a man cunning, perceptive, and nimble of hand, because from the variety of such practiced wits stems the shrewd and learned mother-experience of things.</p>
+
| <p>[4] The delight of playing with varied and diverse players makes a man cunning, perceptive, and nimble of hand, because from the variety of such practiced wits stems the shrewd and learned mother-experience of things.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/15|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/15|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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|  
 
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| <p>When one in playing has doubt of the other, he must never fix himself in a single guard, but change immediately from one into another. The reason being that the enemy will not be able to form some opinion.</p>
+
| <p>[5] When one in playing has doubt of the other, he must never fix himself in a single guard, but change immediately from one into another. The reason being that the enemy will not be able to form some opinion.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/15|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/15|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>Against those players who make their blows with great impetus, so that they often engender fear in their partner, there are two things that can be done: either to let his blow go in vain and to thrust immediately, shrewdly feigning to ward it; or to throw yourself forward to ward before the blow has come to force. One could also strike him in the hand, the reason being that it would interfere with his forceful throwing.</p>
+
| <p>[6] Against those players who make their blows with great impetus, so that they often engender fear in their partner, there are two things that can be done: either to let his blow go in vain and to thrust immediately, shrewdly feigning to ward it; or to throw yourself forward to ward before the blow has come to force. One could also strike him in the hand, the reason being that it would interfere with his forceful throwing.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/15|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/15|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>The wounding of the hand, not of the enemy, is registered in the account of blows in play. Because the hand is the chief in exposing itself, thus in combat for earnest it is the most singular wound, because that member of the enemy must be offended which offends more than others, and this is the hand.</p>
+
| <p>[7] The wounding of the hand, not of the enemy, is registered in the account of blows in play. Because the hand is the chief in exposing itself, thus in combat for earnest it is the most singular wound, because that member of the enemy must be offended which offends more than others, and this is the hand.</p>
 
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/15|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|1|lbl=3v|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/15|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|1|lbl=3v|p=1}}
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| <p>The most genteel of blows is the mandritto, because that one is the most genteel and noble which is done with more difficulty and danger; but to strike with the mandritto is done with more danger than the riverso, since it makes a man go entirely uncovered in that tempo; therefore the mandritto is more genteel.</p>
+
| <p>[8] The most genteel of blows is the mandritto, because that one is the most genteel and noble which is done with more difficulty and danger; but to strike with the mandritto is done with more danger than the riverso, since it makes a man go entirely uncovered in that tempo; therefore the mandritto is more genteel.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>One must always keep one’s eyes on the sword hand of the enemy more than on his face, because there is to be seen all that he wishes to do.</p>
+
| <p>[9] One must always keep one’s eyes on the sword hand of the enemy more than on his face, because there is to be seen all that he wishes to do.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>The genteel warding of a blow is of no little profit nor small beauty, rather it is of equal or perhaps greater loveliness than to make a beautiful blow since many know how to throw a beautiful blow, but few have the knowledge of warding them, so that they are not offended. And such guardians rest satisfied.</p>
+
| <p>[10] The genteel warding of a blow is of no little profit nor small beauty, rather it is of equal or perhaps greater loveliness than to make a beautiful blow since many know how to throw a beautiful blow, but few have the knowledge of warding them, so that they are not offended. And such guardians rest satisfied.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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|  
 
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| <p>It is a necessary thing to know the tempos, without which the play is imperfect; accordingly be aware that when the enemy’s blow has passed your body, that the period there is a tempo to follow it with a response, more convenient than a parry.</p>
+
| <p>[11] It is a necessary thing to know the tempos, without which the play is imperfect; accordingly be aware that when the enemy’s blow has passed your body, that the period there is a tempo to follow it with a response, more convenient than a parry.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
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|-  
 
|  
 
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| <p>All players that look short are also to place in their hands short weapons, because their puissance would not extend to long ones.</p>
+
| <p>[12] All players that look short are also to place in their hands short weapons, because their puissance would not extend to long ones.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|6|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|6|lbl=-}}
  
 
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|  
 
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| <p>To whomsoever as well in playing, the short weapon, or the short sword, is of greater virtue. Because it forces the players to approach, from whence they are made ideal at warding and of good eye.</p>
+
| <p>[13] To whomsoever as well in playing, the short weapon, or the short sword, is of greater virtue. Because it forces the players to approach, from whence they are made ideal at warding and of good eye.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|7|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|7|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
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| <p>In every respect it is an optimal thing to train both hands in every play with every weapon, and to know as well with one as with the other how to strike and to ward.</p>
+
| <p>[14] In every respect it is an optimal thing to train both hands in every play with every weapon, and to know as well with one as with the other how to strike and to ward.</p>
 
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|8|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/17|1|lbl=4r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/16|8|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/17|1|lbl=4r|p=1}}
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| <p>Thus do the high guards relate to the low wards: that the principles of the high guards is striking, and naturally the warding subsequently; and of the low guards contrarily is warding the principle, and then striking subsequently; but in these low ones alone is the giving of the thrust the natural strike.</p>
+
| <p>[15] Thus do the high guards relate to the low wards: that the principles of the high guards is striking, and naturally the warding subsequently; and of the low guards contrarily is warding the principle, and then striking subsequently; but in these low ones alone is the giving of the thrust the natural strike.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/17|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/17|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>As strikes without shieldings are not done sensibly, so shieldings without a following of a strike should not be made, waiting for the tempos nonetheless. Therefore if one always wards without responding with a blow, he would give his enemy a manifest sign of his timidity; unless with such warding one drives the enemy back, the enemy would proceed with great courage; and in truth warding should be done going forward and not back, being thus more apt to reach the enemy, as well as to weaken the enemy’s blow, if he comes against you; because striking you at close quarters he cannot harm you with that part of the sword which is from the middle back toward the hilt; but it would be far worse from the middle forward.</p>
+
| <p>[16] As strikes without shieldings are not done sensibly, so shieldings without a following of a strike should not be made, waiting for the tempos nonetheless. Therefore if one always wards without responding with a blow, he would give his enemy a manifest sign of his timidity; unless with such warding one drives the enemy back, the enemy would proceed with great courage; and in truth warding should be done going forward and not back, being thus more apt to reach the enemy, as well as to weaken the enemy’s blow, if he comes against you; because striking you at close quarters he cannot harm you with that part of the sword which is from the middle back toward the hilt; but it would be far worse from the middle forward.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/17|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/17|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>The good player, when he plays with one who flees him, (which removes much grace from his valor, because seeing that one flee, he cannot do a perfect thing) must also himself feign to flee, because it will give spirit to the first who fled to come forward, and thus gracefully redress the miscarriage of his play.</p>
+
| <p>[17] The good player, when he plays with one who flees him, (which removes much grace from his valor, because seeing that one flee, he cannot do a perfect thing) must also himself feign to flee, because it will give spirit to the first who fled to come forward, and thus gracefully redress the miscarriage of his play.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/17|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/17|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>The players who make many blows without tempo or measure, although these may connect their enemies, are nonetheless censurable, and sooner are said to be children of luck than of art, but those are called grave and well-positioned players who seek to strike their adversary with tempo and grace.</p>
+
| <p>[18] The players who make many blows without tempo or measure, although these may connect their enemies, are nonetheless censurable, and sooner are said to be children of luck than of art, but those are called grave and well-positioned players who seek to strike their adversary with tempo and grace.</p>
 
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/17|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/18|1|lbl=4v|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/17|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/18|1|lbl=4v|p=1}}
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| <p>If one finds himself close to the enemy, he must never throw a full blow, because the sword must not distance itself from the presence for the safety of him who holds it, and this throwing of an imperfect blow is called “mezzo tempo”.</p>
+
| <p>[19] If one finds himself close to the enemy, he must never throw a full blow, because the sword must not distance itself from the presence for the safety of him who holds it, and this throwing of an imperfect blow is called “mezzo tempo”.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/18|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/18|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>Two players finding each other to be of equal knowledge of the art, is the reason why one will not know how to give a blow to his companion with safety; and by my counsel, in one of two ways can he put himself, with luck, in hope of victory: namely, to have an eye toward throwing in that very same tempo that the enemy will have taken; or he can give to him whence it seems better for him to approach, and immediately throw himself upon him, embracing him, which having done, any will esteem that one the victor.</p>
+
| <p>[20] Two players finding each other to be of equal knowledge of the art, is the reason why one will not know how to give a blow to his companion with safety; and by my counsel, in one of two ways can he put himself, with luck, in hope of victory: namely, to have an eye toward throwing in that very same tempo that the enemy will have taken; or he can give to him whence it seems better for him to approach, and immediately throw himself upon him, embracing him, which having done, any will esteem that one the victor.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/18|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/18|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>If someone wants to cause the enemy to throw a blow that he will parry in order to reach him in that tempo, it behooves him to make such a blow three or four times one after the other almost in the manner of an invitation, and because the custom of players is to ape, the adversary will be compelled to make a semblance, by which you will make him throw the blow that you wished.</p>
+
| <p>[21] If someone wants to cause the enemy to throw a blow that he will parry in order to reach him in that tempo, it behooves him to make such a blow three or four times one after the other almost in the manner of an invitation, and because the custom of players is to ape, the adversary will be compelled to make a semblance, by which you will make him throw the blow that you wished.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/18|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/18|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>If you would wound the enemy in his upper body it will be necessary to begin the quarrel at his lower body; and similarly, wanting to reach him at the lower body; for that you will make a blow above, because defending himself in those portions with beats, it is necessary that the others will be uncovered.</p>
+
| <p>[22] If you would wound the enemy in his upper body it will be necessary to begin the quarrel at his lower body; and similarly, wanting to reach him at the lower body; for that you will make a blow above, because defending himself in those portions with beats, it is necessary that the others will be uncovered.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/18|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/18|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>Because no blow can be thrown against which arguably there is some guard in which there is no risk, it follows that in the rising and falling from guards is shown the virtue of the players; on the great field the victory is seen to go to him, who assaults his enemy from the outset before he settles his weapons in guard, because standing caught in thought, he can be struck more easily.</p>
+
| <p>[23] Because no blow can be thrown against which arguably there is some guard in which there is no risk, it follows that in the rising and falling from guards is shown the virtue of the players; on the great field the victory is seen to go to him, who assaults his enemy from the outset before he settles his weapons in guard, because standing caught in thought, he can be struck more easily.</p>
 
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/18|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/19|1|lbl=5r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/18|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/19|1|lbl=5r|p=1}}
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| <p>In defending his person, a man must always hold his arms well extended, not only so that he will come to drive the blows of the enemy to the outside at a distance from his body, but it also makes him stronger and swifter in striking.</p>
+
| <p>[24] In defending his person, a man must always hold his arms well extended, not only so that he will come to drive the blows of the enemy to the outside at a distance from his body, but it also makes him stronger and swifter in striking.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/19|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/19|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>The employment of heavy weapons and the delight in throwing with length and extension nourishes good energy and ideal strength, so that then coming to blows with a light weapon, a man becomes more agile.</p>
+
| <p>[25] The employment of heavy weapons and the delight in throwing with length and extension nourishes good energy and ideal strength, so that then coming to blows with a light weapon, a man becomes more agile.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/19|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/19|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>In the art of the spada da filo, one is not to depart from the low guards, because they are safer than the high ones, and the reason is, that lying in high guard, you can be reached by a thrust or a cut to the leg, and in the low ones there is not this danger.</p>
+
| <p>[26] In the art of the spada da filo, one is not to depart from the low guards, because they are safer than the high ones, and the reason is, that lying in high guard, you can be reached by a thrust or a cut to the leg, and in the low ones there is not this danger.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/19|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/19|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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|  
| <p>Those who will take delight in shielding against given blows with the false of the sword will turn out to be valiant players, because there cannot be parries better and stronger for them than these, since they are able to ward and to strike almost in one tempo.</p>
+
| <p>[27] Those who will take delight in shielding against given blows with the false of the sword will turn out to be valiant players, because there cannot be parries better and stronger for them than these, since they are able to ward and to strike almost in one tempo.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/19|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/19|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Neither combating nor playing must one permit winning by an overabundance of blows, nor of presumption, because one would entirely deprive oneself of spirit, and give it to the enemy.</p>
+
| <p>[28] Neither combating nor playing must one permit winning by an overabundance of blows, nor of presumption, because one would entirely deprive oneself of spirit, and give it to the enemy.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/19|6|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/19|6|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>The delight in the unaccompanied sword is more useful than that in other weapons, inasmuch as others less often accompany the human body; one has neither a rotella always, nor a buckler always, but one can always have the unaccompanied sword.</p>
+
| <p>[29] The delight in the unaccompanied sword is more useful than that in other weapons, inasmuch as others less often accompany the human body; one has neither a rotella always, nor a buckler always, but one can always have the unaccompanied sword.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/19|7|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/20|1|lbl=5v|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/19|7|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/20|1|lbl=5v|p=1}}
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|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>During combat with a left-handed person, stepping continuously against his sword is the optimal protection; and when he throws a riverso, throwing a mandritto to his sword hand, or when he throws a mandritto, throwing a riverso to his hand or to his sword arm, it is not to be doubted that victory is assured.</p>
+
| <p>[30] During combat with a left-handed person, stepping continuously against his sword is the optimal protection; and when he throws a riverso, throwing a mandritto to his sword hand, or when he throws a mandritto, throwing a riverso to his hand or to his sword arm, it is not to be doubted that victory is assured.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/20|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/20|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>It is an entirely genteel and profitable thing in playing to step equally with one or the other foot according to the tempo and the need; nonetheless it seems to me that stepping with even feet is of great utility, because thus one can both advance forward and retreat back without inconvenience of the body, adding this as well: that a man plays more strongly thereby than by other means. And when I say “with even feet” I mean that the feet are no more distanced than something beyond a half a braccio, accompanying always the hand with the foot, and the foot with the hand.</p>
+
| <p>[31] It is an entirely genteel and profitable thing in playing to step equally with one or the other foot according to the tempo and the need; nonetheless it seems to me that stepping with even feet is of great utility, because thus one can both advance forward and retreat back without inconvenience of the body, adding this as well: that a man plays more strongly thereby than by other means. And when I say “with even feet” I mean that the feet are no more distanced than something beyond a half a braccio, accompanying always the hand with the foot, and the foot with the hand.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/20|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/20|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>One may not be called perfect in this art, as it is likewise in others, if he does not know how to teach somebody else. Because as the philosopher says in the Ethics: that the sign of knowledge is to know how to teach.</p>
+
| <p>[32] One may not be called perfect in this art, as it is likewise in others, if he does not know how to teach somebody else. Because as the philosopher says in the Ethics: that the sign of knowledge is to know how to teach.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/20|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/20|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Playing with the two handed sword in the giuoco largo, you will always keep an eye on the distal half of the sword toward the point. But having come to the straits of the half sword, you will keep an eye on the left hand, given that the enemy cannot execute a presa other than with that one.</p>
+
| <p>[33] Playing with the two handed sword in the giuoco largo, you will always keep an eye on the distal half of the sword toward the point. But having come to the straits of the half sword, you will keep an eye on the left hand, given that the enemy cannot execute a presa other than with that one.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/20|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/20|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>The art of the half sword is quite necessary to the knowledge of whomever wishes to be a good player, insofar as that if he knew only how to play at wide measure, and were at close quarters, he would have to flee backwards in shame and danger, and would often place the victory into the hands of his enemy, or at least reveal to observers his ignorance of such art.</p>
+
| <p>[34] The art of the half sword is quite necessary to the knowledge of whomever wishes to be a good player, insofar as that if he knew only how to play at wide measure, and were at close quarters, he would have to flee backwards in shame and danger, and would often place the victory into the hands of his enemy, or at least reveal to observers his ignorance of such art.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/20|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/21|1|lbl=6r|p=1}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/20|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/21|1|lbl=6r|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>If one finds himself to be at blows with one more powerful and stronger than him, he must not in any way be reduced to presas, because in such case the weaker would be compelled to lie fallen.</p>
+
| <p>[35] If one finds himself to be at blows with one more powerful and stronger than him, he must not in any way be reduced to presas, because in such case the weaker would be compelled to lie fallen.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/21|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/21|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Granting the choice of arms to the stronger, he must armor the weak weightily; the reason being that in the press he will be more victorious, because reason entirely requires that the less strong have light armor.</p>
+
| <p>[36] Granting the choice of arms to the stronger, he must armor the weak weightily; the reason being that in the press he will be more victorious, because reason entirely requires that the less strong have light armor.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/21|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/21|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>One of large stature combating with a short one, and the choice of arms going to the large, he must by every means armor them on the lower body, and not the upper, for he will have to be more apt to strike the upper body through his height. But if the choice goes to the little one, it will behoove him to make the upper body armored and leave the lower unarmored.</p>
+
| <p>[37] One of large stature combating with a short one, and the choice of arms going to the large, he must by every means armor them on the lower body, and not the upper, for he will have to be more apt to strike the upper body through his height. But if the choice goes to the little one, it will behoove him to make the upper body armored and leave the lower unarmored.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/21|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/21|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Combatants of equal valor, strength, and size can choose armor without a difference.</p>
+
| <p>[38] Combatants of equal valor, strength, and size can choose armor without a difference.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/21|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/21|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>When the weapons are too short, they are said to be as much more dangerous, because that which offends at closer distance is of greater peril, since such blows, through arriving immediately, cannot easily be awarded; from whence it follows that the partisan carries more danger than the lance, and the dagger moreso than the sword.</p>
+
| <p>[39] When the weapons are too short, they are said to be as much more dangerous, because that which offends at closer distance is of greater peril, since such blows, through arriving immediately, cannot easily be awarded; from whence it follows that the partisan carries more danger than the lance, and the dagger moreso than the sword.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/21|6|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/21|6|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>Of two playing together, he who strikes in response is more praiseworthy than the one who strikes the first blow, because he reveals himself sooner to become enraged than to lose vigor after the received hit.</p>
+
| <p>[40] Of two playing together, he who strikes in response is more praiseworthy than the one who strikes the first blow, because he reveals himself sooner to become enraged than to lose vigor after the received hit.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/21|7|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|1|lbl=6v|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/21|7|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|1|lbl=6v|p=1}}
Line 298: Line 297:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>It is not licit after the received blow to make more than one response stepping forward with a crossing step; the reason being that one must do well with all of one’s wit, since with that one can recover honor.</p>
+
| <p>[41] It is not licit after the received blow to make more than one response stepping forward with a crossing step; the reason being that one must do well with all of one’s wit, since with that one can recover honor.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>The blow to the head, considering the excellence of that member, counts for three; and the blow to the foot is taken for two, having regard for the difficulty of making it so low.</p>
+
| <p>[42] The blow to the head, considering the excellence of that member, counts for three; and the blow to the foot is taken for two, having regard for the difficulty of making it so low.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>A valorous player is he who redoubles his blows.</p>
+
| <p>[43] A valorous player is he who redoubles his blows.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>The longer weapons are opposed to the shorter ones, and therefore the lance is sooner chosen than the spiedo, holding it against the spiedo not by the base owing to the peril of its length, but in the middle with such advantage. And similarly the partisan is taken sooner than the two handed sword.</p>
+
| <p>[44] The longer weapons are opposed to the shorter ones, and therefore the lance is sooner chosen than the spiedo, holding it against the spiedo not by the base owing to the peril of its length, but in the middle with such advantage. And similarly the partisan is taken sooner than the two handed sword.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| <p>The enemy is made fearful by throwing blows at him from the middle upwards, rather than from the middle downwards, because the eyes and consequently the heart of them do not remain very brave from glimpsing vanquishment.</p>
+
| <p>[45] The enemy is made fearful by throwing blows at him from the middle upwards, rather than from the middle downwards, because the eyes and consequently the heart of them do not remain very brave from glimpsing vanquishment.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|6|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|6|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
|  
+
| <p>[46] </p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|7|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|7|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
| class="noline" | <p>One must never reveal to the other any of his intentions regarding blows, but understand well those of the adversary. Because quarreling with a plain mind one must make good the other’s plans; but coming to play where honor is at stake, there it is a laudable thing to show the opposite of one’s intent.</p>
+
| class="noline" | <p>[47] One must never reveal to the other any of his intentions regarding blows, but understand well those of the adversary. Because quarreling with a plain mind one must make good the other’s plans; but coming to play where honor is at stake, there it is a laudable thing to show the opposite of one’s intent.</p>
 
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|8|lbl=-}}
 
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/22|8|lbl=-}}
  
Line 340: Line 339:
 
{| class="master"
 
{| class="master"
 
|-  
 
|-  
! <p>Images</p>
+
! <p>Illustrations</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B}}<br/>by [[W. Jherek Swanger]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B}}<br/>by [[W. Jherek Swanger]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
Line 346: Line 345:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[file:Manciolino 3.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[file:Manciolino 3.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| OF THE FASHION OF COMBATING AND FENCING WITH ALL SORTS OF ARMS, DIVIDED INTO SIX BOOKS.
+
| <p>'''Of the Fashion of Combating and Fencing with All Sorts of Arms, Divided into Six Books.'''</p>
  
FIRST BOOK.
+
<p>'''First Book.'''</p>
  
Because the valorous art of arms carries with it continuously for its safety the protective guards, of which there are 10 famous ones, and it has twenty different names, I have judged it useful to tell of those in the first place; as the spacious and easy field appears prior to the hay, so will they rather give greater light to the remainder of the work. Therefore with the divine aid we will turn to the first.
+
<p>[1] Because the valorous art of arms carries with it continuously for its safety the protective guards, of which there are 10 famous ones, and it has twenty different names, I have judged it useful to tell of those in the first place; as the spacious and easy field appears prior to the hay, so will they rather give greater light to the remainder of the work. Therefore with the divine aid we will turn to the first.</p>
 
| {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|23|lbl=7r}}
 
| {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|23|lbl=7r}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Of the high guard.'''
+
| <p>[2] '''Of the high guard.'''</p>
The first guard will be called “alta”, because meeting in combat we must gracefully hold the sword over the body, and gripped with the arm elevated as much as it can be, in such a fashion that the sword comes to rest to the rear, and the arm with the buckler must extend well forward toward the enemy as much as it can, and the right foot must stretch out about four fingers ahead of the left, with the heel a little raised, and both knees being straight and not bent.
+
 
 +
<p>The first guard will be called “alta”, because meeting in combat we must gracefully hold the sword over the body, and gripped with the arm elevated as much as it can be, in such a fashion that the sword comes to rest to the rear, and the arm with the buckler must extend well forward toward the enemy as much as it can, and the right foot must stretch out about four fingers ahead of the left, with the heel a little raised, and both knees being straight and not bent.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/24|1|lbl=7v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/24|1|lbl=7v}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| One can also do this guard in two other ways, namely either with the right foot making a large pace forward, or with the left, also with the same large pace, holding the sword and the buckler in the way as above, and always the sword is found gripped with the arm extended into the air, the feet being in the way that comfort requires; always it is called “guardia alta” because of the designation, not of the feet, but of the settlement that is taken by the sword.
+
| <p>[3] One can also do this guard in two other ways, namely either with the right foot making a large pace forward, or with the left, also with the same large pace, holding the sword and the buckler in the way as above, and always the sword is found gripped with the arm extended into the air, the feet being in the way that comfort requires; always it is called “guardia alta” because of the designation, not of the feet, but of the settlement that is taken by the sword.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/24|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/24|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Of the head guard.'''
+
| <p>[4] '''Of the head guard.'''</p>
The second is called “guardia di testa” which is made with equal and even extension of both arms toward the enemy in this fashion: that when you will have extended your fists, they will be found between and at the height of the shoulders, differing only in this, that the sword hand must lie somewhat lower than that of the buckler. But coming to the feet, I say that they can be found in two ways, either with the right or with the left forward in large pace, and nonetheless it will be the same guard, for the aforesaid reason.
+
 
 +
<p>The second is called “guardia di testa” which is made with equal and even extension of both arms toward the enemy in this fashion: that when you will have extended your fists, they will be found between and at the height of the shoulders, differing only in this, that the sword hand must lie somewhat lower than that of the buckler. But coming to the feet, I say that they can be found in two ways, either with the right or with the left forward in large pace, and nonetheless it will be the same guard, for the aforesaid reason.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/24|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/24|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Of the face guard.'''
+
| <p>[5] '''Of the face guard.'''</p>
The third is called “guardia di faccia” which agrees with the previous one in two things, and differs in only one; namely, that is that it agrees not only in that the disposition of the feet can be with the right foot as well as with the left facing, but also in the height of the arms. But in this alone is the difference, that the aforesaid was having the sword on the diagonal, and this one holds it straight with the point toward the enemy’s face, and the hand armed with the buckler above the hand appointed to the sword.
+
 
 +
<p>The third is called “guardia di faccia” which agrees with the previous one in two things, and differs in only one; namely, that is that it agrees not only in that the disposition of the feet can be with the right foot as well as with the left facing, but also in the height of the arms. But in this alone is the difference, that the aforesaid was having the sword on the diagonal, and this one holds it straight with the point toward the enemy’s face, and the hand armed with the buckler above the hand appointed to the sword.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/25|1|lbl=8r}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/25|1|lbl=8r}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Of the over the arm guard.'''
+
| <p>[6] '''Of the over the arm guard.'''</p>
The fourth is called “guardia di sopra il braccio” because the hand that grips the sword comes to lie in the manner of a cross in the middle of the left arm, holding the point to the rear, and in consequence the buckler arm is very extended toward the enemy.
+
 
 +
<p>The fourth is called “guardia di sopra il braccio” because the hand that grips the sword comes to lie in the manner of a cross in the middle of the left arm, holding the point to the rear, and in consequence the buckler arm is very extended toward the enemy.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/25|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/25|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Regarding the feet, I say that in this first manner the right must be only so far forward of the left as not to touch it. One could furthermore do this same guard when the right foot makes the pace large, bending itself inward somewhat with the height of grace. And thus arranged in this guard, although the sword hand does not move from the place where it was above, that is, from the middle of the arm (because otherwise it would change the name for the reason said in the first guard) nonetheless the arms would come to elongate themselves somewhat, which previously were tucked in, so that the right shoulder comes to face opposite the enemy in the manner of delivering a blow to him wherever it seems best to you.
+
| <p>[7] Regarding the feet, I say that in this first manner the right must be only so far forward of the left as not to touch it. One could furthermore do this same guard when the right foot makes the pace large, bending itself inward somewhat with the height of grace. And thus arranged in this guard, although the sword hand does not move from the place where it was above, that is, from the middle of the arm (because otherwise it would change the name for the reason said in the first guard) nonetheless the arms would come to elongate themselves somewhat, which previously were tucked in, so that the right shoulder comes to face opposite the enemy in the manner of delivering a blow to him wherever it seems best to you.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/25|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/25|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Of the under the arm guard.'''
+
| <p>[8] '''Of the under the arm guard.'''</p>
The fifth is called “guardia di sotto il braccio”, because the sword hand must lie under the buckler arm, that is, holding the sword under the armpit, so that the point faces toward the rear, but the buckler arm will be well extended toward the enemy; but of the feet, I say that the right must adopt the manner described above here, that is, forward of the left, either a little or in large pace. But if you will hold it in large pace, it behooves you to arrange your right shoulder toward the enemy in the appointed fashion described in the fourth guard.
+
 
 +
<p>The fifth is called “guardia di sotto il braccio”, because the sword hand must lie under the buckler arm, that is, holding the sword under the armpit, so that the point faces toward the rear, but the buckler arm will be well extended toward the enemy; but of the feet, I say that the right must adopt the manner described above here, that is, forward of the left, either a little or in large pace. But if you will hold it in large pace, it behooves you to arrange your right shoulder toward the enemy in the appointed fashion described in the fourth guard.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/26|1|lbl=8v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/26|1|lbl=8v}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Of the narrow iron gate guard.'''
+
| <p>[9] '''Of the narrow iron gate guard.'''</p>
The sixth guard is called “porta di ferro stretta”. In which the body must be arranged diagonally in such fashion that the right shoulder (as is said above) faces the enemy, but both the arms must be stretched out to encounter the enemy, so that the sword arm is extended straight down in the defense of the right knee, and so that the sword fist be near and centered on the aforesaid knee. But that of the buckler must be extended and straight indeed toward the enemy, neither higher nor lower than in guardia di testa. Regarding the feet, the right must be settled in large pace with the knee similarly opposite from the enemy, thereby defended by the guard, and somewhat bent, and the left on the diagonal, also with its knee somewhat bent. And this is therefore called “narrow iron door” through being the most secure among all the others, and exceedingly strong like iron, and that unlike the wide (of which will be treated immediately below), the sword draws nigh to the enemy, restraining itself equally in defense of the knee.
+
 
 +
<p>The sixth guard is called “porta di ferro stretta”. In which the body must be arranged diagonally in such fashion that the right shoulder (as is said above) faces the enemy, but both the arms must be stretched out to encounter the enemy, so that the sword arm is extended straight down in the defense of the right knee, and so that the sword fist be near and centered on the aforesaid knee. But that of the buckler must be extended and straight indeed toward the enemy, neither higher nor lower than in guardia di testa. Regarding the feet, the right must be settled in large pace with the knee similarly opposite from the enemy, thereby defended by the guard, and somewhat bent, and the left on the diagonal, also with its knee somewhat bent. And this is therefore called “narrow iron door” through being the most secure among all the others, and exceedingly strong like iron, and that unlike the wide (of which will be treated immediately below), the sword draws nigh to the enemy, restraining itself equally in defense of the knee.</p>
 
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| '''Of the wide iron gate guard.'''
+
| <p>[10] '''Of the wide iron gate guard.'''</p>
The seventh guard is called “porta di ferro larga”, and this originates from the previously described, because neither the feet nor the body are moved from the appearance of the above. Only that the sword hand is moved from the knee and hangs with the point toward the ground going to the inside of the right knee, making the body more uncovered than does the preceding guard.
+
 
 +
<p>The seventh guard is called “porta di ferro larga”, and this originates from the previously described, because neither the feet nor the body are moved from the appearance of the above. Only that the sword hand is moved from the knee and hangs with the point toward the ground going to the inside of the right knee, making the body more uncovered than does the preceding guard.</p>
 
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| '''Of the wild boar iron gate guard.'''
+
| <p>[11] '''Of the wild boar iron gate guard.'''</p>
The eighth guard is called “cingiara porta di ferro”, in which the left foot is settled diagonally, bending the knee a little, but the right leg must remain straight. And as for the hands, that of the sword must rest with the fist in front of the left knee as you did in that of porta di ferro,<ref>I.e., as it was in front of the right knee in porta di ferro stretta.</ref> whence also it derived a large part of its name, but the left will be extended in defense of the head, with the buckler forward as was said a little while ago; and therefore it is called “wild boar” after the animal that has such a name, which while it approaches attacking, arranges itself with its head and tusks diagonally in the aforesaid manner of striking.
+
 
 +
<p>The eighth guard is called “cingiara porta di ferro”, in which the left foot is settled diagonally, bending the knee a little, but the right leg must remain straight. And as for the hands, that of the sword must rest with the fist in front of the left knee as you did in that of porta di ferro,<ref>I.e., as it was in front of the right knee in porta di ferro stretta.</ref> whence also it derived a large part of its name, but the left will be extended in defense of the head, with the buckler forward as was said a little while ago; and therefore it is called “wild boar” after the animal that has such a name, which while it approaches attacking, arranges itself with its head and tusks diagonally in the aforesaid manner of striking.</p>
 
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| '''Of the high long tail guard.'''
+
| <p>[12] '''Of the high long tail guard.'''</p>
The ninth guard is called “coda lunga alta”, with the left foot forward, the knee bent a little, and the foot must be straight toward the enemy in large pace, the right arm well extended toward the enemy with the sword well gripped diagonally, so that the point is aimed well at the enemy, the buckler arm well extended also toward the enemy’s face; and not only this guard but also the following have their origins from a guard called “coda lunga alta” in which the feet are arranged in the aforesaid fashion, but the arm is held with the sword extended straight back, which gave it its name through metaphor, as is said in the common proverb, that one must not meddle with great masters because they have the long tail, that is, they can harm you through their numerous followers; thus, such guard gives the same name to this ninth, and to the tenth. Because of being very apt for reaching and harming your companion, it therefore holds the name of “coda lunga alta”.
+
 
 +
<p>The ninth guard is called “coda lunga alta”, with the left foot forward, the knee bent a little, and the foot must be straight toward the enemy in large pace, the right arm well extended toward the enemy with the sword well gripped diagonally, so that the point is aimed well at the enemy, the buckler arm well extended also toward the enemy’s face; and not only this guard but also the following have their origins from a guard called “coda lunga alta” in which the feet are arranged in the aforesaid fashion, but the arm is held with the sword extended straight back, which gave it its name through metaphor, as is said in the common proverb, that one must not meddle with great masters because they have the long tail, that is, they can harm you through their numerous followers; thus, such guard gives the same name to this ninth, and to the tenth. Because of being very apt for reaching and harming your companion, it therefore holds the name of “coda lunga alta”.</p>
 
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| '''Of the narrow long tail guard.'''
+
| <p>[13] '''Of the narrow long tail guard.'''</p>
The tenth guard is called “coda lunga stretta”, with the right foot forward in large pace, in a way nonetheless that the knee is a little bent somewhat diagonally, and both arms must lie as was said above, except that the sword arm reposes somewhat lower. And the aforesaid ten guards will be sufficient for our work.
+
 
 +
<p>The tenth guard is called “coda lunga stretta”, with the right foot forward in large pace, in a way nonetheless that the knee is a little bent somewhat diagonally, and both arms must lie as was said above, except that the sword arm reposes somewhat lower. And the aforesaid ten guards will be sufficient for our work.</p>
 
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| '''Second Chapter. Of the blows.'''
+
| <p>[14] '''Second Chapter. Of the blows.'''</p>
It is to be known that all of this spirited art is divided into two virtues. The first is to protect oneself first; therefore the chapter above on guards was done. The second is knowing how to strike your enemy in tempo, so that you cannot be equally harmed by him, because you would report no victory if you were stricken while striking, making yourself victor and vanquished at once. It is not to be wished then to make the enemy a participant in your victory, nor you in his shame.
+
 
 +
<p>It is to be known that all of this spirited art is divided into two virtues. The first is to protect oneself first; therefore the chapter above on guards was done. The second is knowing how to strike your enemy in tempo, so that you cannot be equally harmed by him, because you would report no victory if you were stricken while striking, making yourself victor and vanquished at once. It is not to be wished then to make the enemy a participant in your victory, nor you in his shame.</p>
 
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| But before we teach you to strike, it is necessary that the names of the blows not be secret to you. Of which five are principal, and two are not. The first is the mandritto. The second riverso. The third fendente. The fourth stoccata, or punta. The fifth falso. And because the sword has two edges, that which faces the enemy is called the true edge, and that which stays toward you is called false. If, then, you will naturally throw a blow at your enemy traveling beginning at his left ear and continuing toward his right knee, or to whatever part you want, provided that the blow was thrown at the left side of the enemy, it is called “mandritto”. But if you were to throw that contrarily, that is, to his right side, either low or high as you wish, it will be called “riverso”. And if dropping the sword between the middle of the division of the two aforesaid blows, that is, straight down through the head, it will be called “fendente”. But any blow that you would deliver from the ground upwards toward the face of the enemy, if you wish either from the right or the left side, it will be called “falso”. And if you will push the point into the enemy, it is known by all to be called “stoccata”, either with the right foot or with the left forward, either over or under hand.
+
| <p>[15] But before we teach you to strike, it is necessary that the names of the blows not be secret to you. Of which five are principal, and two are not. The first is the mandritto. The second riverso. The third fendente. The fourth stoccata, or punta. The fifth falso. And because the sword has two edges, that which faces the enemy is called the true edge, and that which stays toward you is called false. If, then, you will naturally throw a blow at your enemy traveling beginning at his left ear and continuing toward his right knee, or to whatever part you want, provided that the blow was thrown at the left side of the enemy, it is called “mandritto”. But if you were to throw that contrarily, that is, to his right side, either low or high as you wish, it will be called “riverso”. And if dropping the sword between the middle of the division of the two aforesaid blows, that is, straight down through the head, it will be called “fendente”. But any blow that you would deliver from the ground upwards toward the face of the enemy, if you wish either from the right or the left side, it will be called “falso”. And if you will push the point into the enemy, it is known by all to be called “stoccata”, either with the right foot or with the left forward, either over or under hand.</p>
 
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| Beyond these five there are two which are not principal because they only occur in the play of sword and buckler. The first is called “tramazzone”, which is done with the wrist of the hand that has the sword, with that winding from below upwards toward your left side in the manner of a fendente; the other is called “montante”, because it is thrown from below upwards in the fashion of a falso which ascends to finish in guardia alta.
+
| <p>[16] Beyond these five there are two which are not principal because they only occur in the play of sword and buckler. The first is called “tramazzone”, which is done with the wrist of the hand that has the sword, with that winding from below upwards toward your left side in the manner of a fendente; the other is called “montante”, because it is thrown from below upwards in the fashion of a falso which ascends to finish in guardia alta.</p>
 
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|  
| '''Third Chapter, of the offenses that arise from guardia alta.'''
+
| <p>[17] '''Third Chapter, of the offenses that arise from guardia alta.'''</p>
Having already treated of the guards and of the names of the blows, and how they are done, we now begin to teach to strike, and following the strikes, to parry. And because ideal players always settle themselves in their guards for their safety, we will instruct you of the marring and wounding of an enemy reposed in any of the ten said guards, and then how he must defend himself; and first we present the offenses that can be done in guardia alta.
+
 
 +
<p>Having already treated of the guards and of the names of the blows, and how they are done, we now begin to teach to strike, and following the strikes, to parry. And because ideal players always settle themselves in their guards for their safety, we will instruct you of the marring and wounding of an enemy reposed in any of the ten said guards, and then how he must defend himself; and first we present the offenses that can be done in guardia alta.</p>
 
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| Accordingly, posing the case that you and your enemy are in guardia alta, and that you are the attacker, you can throw a mandritto at his sword hand which will go over your arm, and then turn a riverso also to that hand. Then ascend with a montante to return to guardia alta; if you will do these three blows, your enemy will be unable to throw anything toward you that could offend you, because he would always come to collide his hand into your sword. But if it does not please you to throw the three aforesaid blows, you can turn a riverso to his thigh. And if the enemy throws to your head, meet his sword hand with a falso crossed over your arm.
+
| <p>[18] Accordingly, posing the case that you and your enemy are in guardia alta, and that you are the attacker, you can throw a mandritto at his sword hand which will go over your arm, and then turn a riverso also to that hand. Then ascend with a montante to return to guardia alta; if you will do these three blows, your enemy will be unable to throw anything toward you that could offend you, because he would always come to collide his hand into your sword. But if it does not please you to throw the three aforesaid blows, you can turn a riverso to his thigh. And if the enemy throws to your head, meet his sword hand with a falso crossed over your arm.</p>
  
Or you can make a show of raising a montante, and in that tempo step forward into large pace with your left foot, and go with your sword into guardia di testa, there awaiting the enemy’s blow upon your sword. Which done, then you will immediately be able to step your right foot toward his left side, giving to him in that tempo a mandritto upon his head, so that your left foot follows behind your right, and going with your sword into guardia di testa for your shelter.
+
<p>Or you can make a show of raising a montante, and in that tempo step forward into large pace with your left foot, and go with your sword into guardia di testa, there awaiting the enemy’s blow upon your sword. Which done, then you will immediately be able to step your right foot toward his left side, giving to him in that tempo a mandritto upon his head, so that your left foot follows behind your right, and going with your sword into guardia di testa for your shelter.</p>
  
Alternately you also could pretend to drop a riverso to his thigh, keeping an eye well on the enemy’s hand, and when he throws to your face, you would immediately have to throw a mandritto under your arm to his sword hand, making your buckler be the good preserver of your head, and retreating back to the rear with your right foot for your safety.
+
<p>Alternately you also could pretend to drop a riverso to his thigh, keeping an eye well on the enemy’s hand, and when he throws to your face, you would immediately have to throw a mandritto under your arm to his sword hand, making your buckler be the good preserver of your head, and retreating back to the rear with your right foot for your safety.</p>
  
Moreover, you could have cut a tramazzone falling into porta di ferro, thereby leaving yourself entirely uncovered, so that he would have cause to throw some blow at you; immediately going with your sword into guardia di testa and advancing forward somewhat with your right foot, whereby you will defend yourself, throwing thereafter a mandritto, either to the face or the thigh, warding your head equally with the buckler, you will then retreat back to the rear with your right foot for your protection.
+
<p>Moreover, you could have cut a tramazzone falling into porta di ferro, thereby leaving yourself entirely uncovered, so that he would have cause to throw some blow at you; immediately going with your sword into guardia di testa and advancing forward somewhat with your right foot, whereby you will defend yourself, throwing thereafter a mandritto, either to the face or the thigh, warding your head equally with the buckler, you will then retreat back to the rear with your right foot for your protection.</p>
  
You will also be able, making a passing step with your left foot, to throw a tramazzone to his right side, and then you will lead him to believe that you will strike him with a riverso, but in spite of all that you will throw a mandritto at him. Alternately, making a show of attacking him with a tramazzone, you will strike him with a mandritto. And if that is not to your liking, you can throw an overhand thrust, following it with a tramazzone or two.
+
<p>You will also be able, making a passing step with your left foot, to throw a tramazzone to his right side, and then you will lead him to believe that you will strike him with a riverso, but in spite of all that you will throw a mandritto at him. Alternately, making a show of attacking him with a tramazzone, you will strike him with a mandritto. And if that is not to your liking, you can throw an overhand thrust, following it with a tramazzone or two.</p>
 
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| Or, striking him with a fendente, give a following tramazzone. And hereby are finished the various ways by one of which you can offend someone who lies opposite you in the aforesaid guard; but if you were the offended, here are the counters, or responses, to the aforesaid offenses, briefly, below.
+
| <p>[19] Or, striking him with a fendente, give a following tramazzone. And hereby are finished the various ways by one of which you can offend someone who lies opposite you in the aforesaid guard; but if you were the offended, here are the counters, or responses, to the aforesaid offenses, briefly, below.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/31|2|lbl=-}}  
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/31|2|lbl=-}}  
  
 
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| '''Chapter Four: Of the counters that can be done by one who was attacked in guardia alta.'''
+
| <p>[20] '''Chapter Four: Of the counters that can be done by one who was attacked in guardia alta.'''</p>
The enemy makes some blow that pleases him, in order to offend you, who are in guardia alta. You must beat the rim of your buckler up and down, that is, [in response to] the fendente or the falso of his sword [respectively], doing which, you will come to render yourself safe from any offensive blow.
+
 
 +
<p>The enemy makes some blow that pleases him, in order to offend you, who are in guardia alta. You must beat the rim of your buckler up and down, that is, [in response to] the fendente or the falso of his sword [respectively], doing which, you will come to render yourself safe from any offensive blow.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/32|1|lbl=11v}}
 
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| You can also attack against each one, drawing your right foot behind your left into large pace, extending a thrust in the gesture of a montante, which goes into guardia di faccia.
+
| <p>[21] You can also attack against each one, drawing your right foot behind your left into large pace, extending a thrust in the gesture of a montante, which goes into guardia di faccia.</p>
 
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| '''Chapter 5, of the offenses that can be given against one who was in guardia di testa.'''
+
| <p>[22] '''Chapter 5, of the offenses that can be given against one who was in guardia di testa.'''
Both of you lying in guardia di testa, you wanting to offend the enemy, then throw a mandritto<sup>1</sup> to his face, or flanks, or if you wish, to his leg.  
+
 
 +
<p>Both of you lying in guardia di testa, you wanting to offend the enemy, then throw a mandritto<sup>1</sup> to his face, or flanks, or if you wish, to his leg.</p>
 
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| Or extend a thrust<sup>2</sup> to his face and throw a tramazzone. Or pretend to attack with a mandrittom,<sup>3</sup> but throw a riverso. Or if you prefer, do two mandritti.<sup>4</sup> As well, pretend instead to throw a tramazzone<sup>5</sup> and nonetheless strike him with a mandritto.
+
| <p>[23] Or extend a thrust<sup>2</sup> to his face and throw a tramazzone. Or pretend to attack with a mandrittom,<sup>3</sup> but throw a riverso. Or if you prefer, do two mandritti.<sup>4</sup> As well, pretend instead to throw a tramazzone<sup>5</sup> and nonetheless strike him with a mandritto.</p>
 
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/32|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| '''Chapter 6: Of the counters that should be done against one attacking another in guardia di testa.'''
+
| <p>[24] '''Chapter 6: Of the counters that should be done against one attacking another in guardia di testa.'''</p>
The counters that you can make against the aforesaid attacks are these: namely against the mandritto<sup>1</sup> to the flank, leg, or face, you can withdraw your right foot behind your left into large pace, and in this tempo you will avoid the mandritto however it may be done.
+
 
 +
<p>The counters that you can make against the aforesaid attacks are these: namely against the mandritto<sup>1</sup> to the flank, leg, or face, you can withdraw your right foot behind your left into large pace, and in this tempo you will avoid the mandritto however it may be done.</p>
 
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| And finding yourself in coda lunga alta, thereafter you will extend a thrust to his face, and in this extension you will step forward with your right foot into large pace, giving him in this tempo a mandritto to the face. But if the enemy turns a thrust<sup>2</sup> with a tramazzone you will protect against such a thrust with the sword. And when he turns tramazzoni at you, you will put your sword hand under your buckler, directing the point of your sword toward the enemy’s hand. If, however, he throws a mandritto,<sup>3</sup> you will go with your sword into guardia di faccia.
+
| <p>[25] And finding yourself in coda lunga alta, thereafter you will extend a thrust to his face, and in this extension you will step forward with your right foot into large pace, giving him in this tempo a mandritto to the face. But if the enemy turns a thrust<sup>2</sup> with a tramazzone you will protect against such a thrust with the sword. And when he turns tramazzoni at you, you will put your sword hand under your buckler, directing the point of your sword toward the enemy’s hand. If, however, he throws a mandritto,<sup>3</sup> you will go with your sword into guardia di faccia.
  
And when he turns a riverso at you, either high or low, you will ward it with your sword, immediately turning a mandritto at him in whatever way seems best to you. But against the two mandritti<sup>4</sup> you will be able to hinder them by cutting the enemy’s sword hand with a mezzo mandritto inside the rim of your buckler, subsequently adapting your sword into porta di ferro stretta, and however he throws the other mandritto, you will ward it with a falso, throwing a mandritto downwards toward his face, and stepping forward with the right foot in that same tempo in order to have a better way to strike him.
+
<p>And when he turns a riverso at you, either high or low, you will ward it with your sword, immediately turning a mandritto at him in whatever way seems best to you. But against the two mandritti<sup>4</sup> you will be able to hinder them by cutting the enemy’s sword hand with a mezzo mandritto inside the rim of your buckler, subsequently adapting your sword into porta di ferro stretta, and however he throws the other mandritto, you will ward it with a falso, throwing a mandritto downwards toward his face, and stepping forward with the right foot in that same tempo in order to have a better way to strike him.</p>
  
But if he pretends to throw a tramazzone<sup>5</sup> in order to give you a mandritto, you will hinder that pretense with a turning of a mandritto, reposing your sword into porta di ferro stretta, and when the enemy will then throw the mandritto to give it to you, you will hit it immediately with a falso, giving him a riverso to the thigh.
+
<p>But if he pretends to throw a tramazzone<sup>5</sup> in order to give you a mandritto, you will hinder that pretense with a turning of a mandritto, reposing your sword into porta di ferro stretta, and when the enemy will then throw the mandritto to give it to you, you will hit it immediately with a falso, giving him a riverso to the thigh.</p>
 
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/33|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| '''Chapter 7, of the offenses that can be done against one settled in guardia di faccia.'''
+
| <p>[26] '''Chapter 7, of the offenses that can be done against one settled in guardia di faccia.'''</p>
Both being in guard, and you wanting to offend your enemy, you can extend a thrust<sup>1</sup> into his face. Or provoke him with a strong mandritto<sup>2</sup> or with a tramazzone;<sup>3</sup> and if you prefer, with the false edge of your sword you will hit<sup>4</sup> that of your enemy, striking him in the face. Or making a show of throwing a riverso<sup>5</sup> upwards from beneath, you will be able to give him a mandritto.
+
 
 +
<p>Both being in guard, and you wanting to offend your enemy, you can extend a thrust<sup>1</sup> into his face. Or provoke him with a strong mandritto<sup>2</sup> or with a tramazzone;<sup>3</sup> and if you prefer, with the false edge of your sword you will hit<sup>4</sup> that of your enemy, striking him in the face. Or making a show of throwing a riverso<sup>5</sup> upwards from beneath, you will be able to give him a mandritto.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/34|1|lbl=12v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/34|1|lbl=12v}}
  
 
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| '''Chapter 8, of the counters in response to aforesaid offenses in guardia di faccia.'''
+
| <p>[27] '''Chapter 8, of the counters in response to aforesaid offenses in guardia di faccia.'''</p>
You will be careful that when the enemy extends some thrust,<sup>1</sup> you will pass with your left foot toward his right, and in this passing you will make a half turn with the fist that holds your sword, in such a way that the enemy will rest on the outside, and then following this you will strike his face. But if he throws a mandritto,<sup>2</sup> in the raising that is done of the fist that holds his sword, you will immediately offer to that the point of yours in order that he will lie in fear of lowering it.
+
 
 +
<p>You will be careful that when the enemy extends some thrust,<sup>1</sup> you will pass with your left foot toward his right, and in this passing you will make a half turn with the fist that holds your sword, in such a way that the enemy will rest on the outside, and then following this you will strike his face. But if he throws a mandritto,<sup>2</sup> in the raising that is done of the fist that holds his sword, you will immediately offer to that the point of yours in order that he will lie in fear of lowering it.</p>
 
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| If however he throws a tramazzone<sup>3</sup> you will defend with a falso, that is you will turn that well toward his left side in order that it will not only come to ward that tramazzone, but also you will give him the edge in the face, and if he hits your sword<sup>4</sup> in order to give you a blow in the face, you will immediately make a half turn with the fist that holds your sword and thus you will remain secure.
+
| <p>[28] If however he throws a tramazzone<sup>3</sup> you will defend with a falso, that is you will turn that well toward his left side in order that it will not only come to ward that tramazzone, but also you will give him the edge in the face, and if he hits your sword<sup>4</sup> in order to give you a blow in the face, you will immediately make a half turn with the fist that holds your sword and thus you will remain secure.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/34|3|lbl=-}}
 
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| But if he pretends to make a riverso<sup>5</sup> upwards from beneath in order to give you a mandritto, you in that pretense will join together your sword hand with that of your buckler, and as he makes the mandritto, withdrawing your right foot to large pace behind your left you will press your true edge into his sword hand.
+
| <p>[29] But if he pretends to make a riverso<sup>5</sup> upwards from beneath in order to give you a mandritto, you in that pretense will join together your sword hand with that of your buckler, and as he makes the mandritto, withdrawing your right foot to large pace behind your left you will press your true edge into his sword hand.</p>
 
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| '''Chapter 9, of the offenses that can be done against one in guardia sopra braccio.'''
+
| <p>[30] '''Chapter 9, of the offenses that can be done against one in guardia sopra braccio.'''</p>
You can throw a riverso, or make a show of throwing two riversi,<sup>1</sup> nonetheless offending him with a mandritto,<sup>2</sup> and such offenses are understood to be done with both lying in that same guard, and such may be said once for all.
+
 
 +
<p>You can throw a riverso, or make a show of throwing two riversi,<sup>1</sup> nonetheless offending him with a mandritto,<sup>2</sup> and such offenses are understood to be done with both lying in that same guard, and such may be said once for all.</p>
 
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| Continuing then, you can also throw a riverso<sup>3</sup> inside the edge of the buckler, or feint to give a riverso<sup>4</sup> and strike him with a mandritto, or pass with your left foot toward his right side, and feinting to give him a riverso,<sup>5</sup> pass with your right foot toward his left side and give him a fendente upon his head, so that your left leg follows behind your right.
+
| <p>[31] Continuing then, you can also throw a riverso<sup>3</sup> inside the edge of the buckler, or feint to give a riverso<sup>4</sup> and strike him with a mandritto, or pass with your left foot toward his right side, and feinting to give him a riverso,<sup>5</sup> pass with your right foot toward his left side and give him a fendente upon his head, so that your left leg follows behind your right.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/35|3|lbl=-}}
 
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| You can also pretend to extend a punta riversa<sup>6</sup> over your arm, nonetheless throwing a tramazzone, or you can do together a riverso,<sup>7</sup> a fendente, and a tramazzone. Or you can step forward with your left foot and extend a thrust<sup>8</sup> over your buckler, and then pass with your right foot, and then you will be able to throw a mandritto or tramazzone as you wish. You could, moreover, step toward his right side with your left foot throwing out a riverso,<sup>9</sup> or undoing him with a mandritto.<sup>10</sup>
+
| <p>[32] You can also pretend to extend a punta riversa<sup>6</sup> over your arm, nonetheless throwing a tramazzone, or you can do together a riverso,<sup>7</sup> a fendente, and a tramazzone. Or you can step forward with your left foot and extend a thrust<sup>8</sup> over your buckler, and then pass with your right foot, and then you will be able to throw a mandritto or tramazzone as you wish. You could, moreover, step toward his right side with your left foot throwing out a riverso,<sup>9</sup> or undoing him with a mandritto.<sup>10</sup></p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/35|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/35|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Chapter 10, of the counters to the previously named offenses of guardia sopra braccio.'''
+
| <p>[33] '''Chapter 10, of the counters to the previously named offenses of guardia sopra braccio.'''</p>
When the enemy throws the aforesaid two riversi,<sup>1</sup> you will parry the first with the sword, and as he will wish to do the second, immediately recoiling your right foot near to your left, you will pass forward with the said left giving him in this tempo a riverso driven out into his face; and if he pretends to do two riversi in order to give a mandritto,<sup>2</sup> you will throw your right foot behind your left, going with your sword into cingiara porta di ferro, and as he will want to strike with the mandritto, immediately returning your right foot forward and hitting that<ref>I.e. his mandritto.</ref> together with the false edge of your sword, you will strike him with a riverso. But if he hits with a riverso<sup>3</sup> inside the rim of the buckler, you will turn a mandritto to his face. But if he makes a show of a riverso<sup>4</sup> in order to give you a mandritto, to such a show you will go into guardia di faccia; and as he throws in order to give you the aforesaid mandritto, you will make your sword a little lower, parrying that, and you will immediately pass your left foot toward his right side extending to him a riverso into his right temple, so that your right leg follows behind your left. But if he passes with the left foot in order to feint to give you a riverso,<sup>5</sup> you will immediately settle yourself with your sword into guardia di faccia, and as he passes toward your left side in order to give you a fendente, you will immediately strike his right temple diagonally with a riverso.
 
  
But if he extends a punta riversa,<sup>6</sup> you will ward it with the sword; and he throwing two tramazzoni* at you, you will immediately go with your sword into guardia di testa and then you will ward those, striking him with a mandritto to the face.
+
<p>When the enemy throws the aforesaid two riversi,<sup>1</sup> you will parry the first with the sword, and as he will wish to do the second, immediately recoiling your right foot near to your left, you will pass forward with the said left giving him in this tempo a riverso driven out into his face; and if he pretends to do two riversi in order to give a mandritto,<sup>2</sup> you will throw your right foot behind your left, going with your sword into cingiara porta di ferro, and as he will want to strike with the mandritto, immediately returning your right foot forward and hitting that<ref>I.e. his mandritto.</ref> together with the false edge of your sword, you will strike him with a riverso. But if he hits with a riverso<sup>3</sup> inside the rim of the buckler, you will turn a mandritto to his face. But if he makes a show of a riverso<sup>4</sup> in order to give you a mandritto, to such a show you will go into guardia di faccia; and as he throws in order to give you the aforesaid mandritto, you will make your sword a little lower, parrying that, and you will immediately pass your left foot toward his right side extending to him a riverso into his right temple, so that your right leg follows behind your left. But if he passes with the left foot in order to feint to give you a riverso,<sup>5</sup> you will immediately settle yourself with your sword into guardia di faccia, and as he passes toward your left side in order to give you a fendente, you will immediately strike his right temple diagonally with a riverso.</p>
  
But if he throws a riverso,<sup>7</sup> you will turn him a thrust to the hand in the company of the buckler, and if he throws a fendente, you will parry that by going with your sword into guardia di testa.
+
<p>But if he extends a punta riversa,<sup>6</sup> you will ward it with the sword; and he throwing two tramazzoni* at you, you will immediately go with your sword into guardia di testa and then you will ward those, striking him with a mandritto to the face.</p>
  
But if he turns the tramazzone, immediately stepping forward with your left foot into large pace, you will ward that with the buckler, giving him a stoccata to the flank, and removing yourself with a leap to the rear.
+
<p>But if he throws a riverso,<sup>7</sup> you will turn him a thrust to the hand in the company of the buckler, and if he throws a fendente, you will parry that by going with your sword into guardia di testa.</p>
  
But if he passes forward with his left foot and extends a thrust<sup>8</sup> over his arm toward your face, you will parry that with your sword.
+
<p>But if he turns the tramazzone, immediately stepping forward with your left foot into large pace, you will ward that with the buckler, giving him a stoccata to the flank, and removing yourself with a leap to the rear.</p>
  
And as he passes with his right foot in order to give you a mandritto, while that blow has not yet reached you, in that moment you will give him a riverso in his right thigh.
+
<p>But if he passes forward with his left foot and extends a thrust<sup>8</sup> over his arm toward your face, you will parry that with your sword.</p>
  
And when he throws two tramazzoni<ref>Note that these “two tramazzoni” were, in both cases, singular in Ch. 9</ref> at you, you will ward them with your right foot forward and with your sword in guardia di testa, throwing a thrust to his face.
+
<p>And as he passes with his right foot in order to give you a mandritto, while that blow has not yet reached you, in that moment you will give him a riverso in his right thigh.</p>
  
But if he passes with his left foot toward your right side in order to give you a riverso<sup>9</sup> extended to your face, you will immediately turn a falso to his right temple, so that your buckler is a good defender of your head.
+
<p>And when he throws two tramazzoni<ref>Note that these “two tramazzoni” were, in both cases, singular in Ch. 9</ref> at you, you will ward them with your right foot forward and with your sword in guardia di testa, throwing a thrust to his face.</p>
  
And when he looses a mandritto,<sup>10</sup> you will immediately draw your right foot near your left, lifting together your sword arm into the air, blocking that, and then you will cast your right foot forward striking him with an answering mandritto to the head.
+
<p>But if he passes with his left foot toward your right side in order to give you a riverso<sup>9</sup> extended to your face, you will immediately turn a falso to his right temple, so that your buckler is a good defender of your head.</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>And when he looses a mandritto,<sup>10</sup> you will immediately draw your right foot near your left, lifting together your sword arm into the air, blocking that, and then you will cast your right foot forward striking him with an answering mandritto to the head.</p>
 
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/35|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|36|lbl=13v|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/37|1|lbl=14r|p=1}}
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| '''Chapter 11, of the offenses that can be made against one who was in guardia di sotto braccio.'''
+
| <p>[34] '''Chapter 11, of the offenses that can be made against one who was in guardia di sotto braccio.'''</p>
You can throw a riverso to the face,<sup>1</sup> or raise a falso,<sup>2</sup> throwing nonetheless a mandritto to the face. You could also throw a riverso<sup>3</sup> retreating backward with the left foot. Or extend a thrust<sup>4</sup> to the enemy’s hand. Or with the left foot forward raise a falso<sup>5</sup> into the air, and in this tempo extend a thrust in the gesture of a montante passing forward soon with your right foot and turning a tramazzone which falls into porta di ferro stretta.
+
 
 +
<p>You can throw a riverso to the face,<sup>1</sup> or raise a falso,<sup>2</sup> throwing nonetheless a mandritto to the face. You could also throw a riverso<sup>3</sup> retreating backward with the left foot. Or extend a thrust<sup>4</sup> to the enemy’s hand. Or with the left foot forward raise a falso<sup>5</sup> into the air, and in this tempo extend a thrust in the gesture of a montante passing forward soon with your right foot and turning a tramazzone which falls into porta di ferro stretta.</p>
 
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| '''Chapter 12, of the counters to the said offenses in guardia di sotto braccio.'''
+
| <p>[35] '''Chapter 12, of the counters to the said offenses in guardia di sotto braccio.'''</p>
As the enemy throws a riverso<sup>1</sup> to your face, you will pass forward with your left foot toward his right side throwing in that tempo a riverso at him toward his right temple.
 
  
But if he makes a falso<sup>2</sup> with a following mandritto, you will raise the false edge of your sword against him, and during his throwing of the mandritto, casting your right foot behind your left in large pace you will give a mezzo mandritto to his sword, placing it<ref>I.e. yours.</ref> into cingiara porta di ferro, and then with your right foot you will immediately pass forward into large pace, pushing a thrust into the enemy’s face, and throwing thereafter a mandritto into the shins of his legs.
+
<p>As the enemy throws a riverso<sup>1</sup> to your face, you will pass forward with your left foot toward his right side throwing in that tempo a riverso at him toward his right temple.</p>
  
But if he throws a riverso<sup>3</sup> while retreating backwards, you will step forward with your left foot, therewith throwing a riverso to his face.
+
<p>But if he makes a falso<sup>2</sup> with a following mandritto, you will raise the false edge of your sword against him, and during his throwing of the mandritto, casting your right foot behind your left in large pace you will give a mezzo mandritto to his sword, placing it<ref>I.e. yours.</ref> into cingiara porta di ferro, and then with your right foot you will immediately pass forward into large pace, pushing a thrust into the enemy’s face, and throwing thereafter a mandritto into the shins of his legs.</p>
  
And when he extends a thrust<sup>4</sup> toward your sword hand, promptly casting your right foot behind your left in large pace you will go with your sword into coda lunga alta, and if perchance he throws a falso<sup>5</sup> going into guardia alta, you will immediately go into the same guard, and while he wishes to stick a thrust in the gesture of a montante, withdrawing your right foot behind your left, you will go into cingiara porta di ferro, and if he throws a tramazzone, returning forward with your right foot into large pace, you will parry that with a falso, giving him a mandritto to the face.
+
<p>But if he throws a riverso<sup>3</sup> while retreating backwards, you will step forward with your left foot, therewith throwing a riverso to his face.</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>And when he extends a thrust<sup>4</sup> toward your sword hand, promptly casting your right foot behind your left in large pace you will go with your sword into coda lunga alta, and if perchance he throws a falso<sup>5</sup> going into guardia alta, you will immediately go into the same guard, and while he wishes to stick a thrust in the gesture of a montante, withdrawing your right foot behind your left, you will go into cingiara porta di ferro, and if he throws a tramazzone, returning forward with your right foot into large pace, you will parry that with a falso, giving him a mandritto to the face.</p>
 
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| '''Chapter 13, of the offenses that can be made against the guardia di porta di ferro stretta.'''
+
| <p>[36] '''Chapter 13, of the offenses that can be made against the guardia di porta di ferro stretta.'''</p>
You can turn a tramazzone,<sup>1</sup> or step forward with your left foot extending a thrust<sup>2</sup> to the face, and then pass forward with your right foot, turning two tramazzoni. You can also pretend to throw a tramazzone,<sup>3</sup> yet give him a riverso to his thigh.
+
 
 +
<p>You can turn a tramazzone,<sup>1</sup> or step forward with your left foot extending a thrust<sup>2</sup> to the face, and then pass forward with your right foot, turning two tramazzoni. You can also pretend to throw a tramazzone,<sup>3</sup> yet give him a riverso to his thigh.</p>
  
You could moreover extend a thrust<sup>4</sup> to his face, and passing forward with your left foot pretend to give him a riverso to the head, and give him thereby a mandritto to the head or to the leg as you wish.
+
<p>You could moreover extend a thrust<sup>4</sup> to his face, and passing forward with your left foot pretend to give him a riverso to the head, and give him thereby a mandritto to the head or to the leg as you wish.</p>
  
Or extend a thrust<sup>5</sup> with your left leg forward, and then stepping forward with your right foot into large pace, throw a riverso from low to high to his arms, and immediately thereafter you will turn a mandritto to his head or leg, and for your protection you will do a riverso to his sword hand, casting your right foot behind your left in large pace; and this is the parry of the last two blows.
+
<p>Or extend a thrust<sup>5</sup> with your left leg forward, and then stepping forward with your right foot into large pace, throw a riverso from low to high to his arms, and immediately thereafter you will turn a mandritto to his head or leg, and for your protection you will do a riverso to his sword hand, casting your right foot behind your left in large pace; and this is the parry of the last two blows.</p>
 
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| '''Chapter 14, of the counters that can be made in the preceding porta di ferro stretta.'''
+
| <p>[37] '''Chapter 14, of the counters that can be made in the preceding porta di ferro stretta.'''
When the enemy wants to hit you with a tramazzone,<sup>1</sup> in the turning that he makes of his fist, you will turn a falso toward his left side, thereby shielding yourself from that, and throwing at him with the true edge in his face; but if he passes forward with his left foot to give you a thrust<sup>2</sup> in the face, you will hit such a thrust so as to end in guardia di faccia; and while he turns the tramazzone, lowering your sword a little you will go into guardia di faccia, thereby shielding yourself from that with the true edge, and you will immediately pass into large pace toward his right side with your left foot, striking him in the right temple with a riverso in such a manner that your right leg follows behind your left.
+
 
 +
<p>When the enemy wants to hit you with a tramazzone,<sup>1</sup> in the turning that he makes of his fist, you will turn a falso toward his left side, thereby shielding yourself from that, and throwing at him with the true edge in his face; but if he passes forward with his left foot to give you a thrust<sup>2</sup> in the face, you will hit such a thrust so as to end in guardia di faccia; and while he turns the tramazzone, lowering your sword a little you will go into guardia di faccia, thereby shielding yourself from that with the true edge, and you will immediately pass into large pace toward his right side with your left foot, striking him in the right temple with a riverso in such a manner that your right leg follows behind your left.</p>
  
But if he pretends to give you a tramazzone,<sup>3</sup> you will go with your sword into guardia di faccia and as he throws the riverso to your thigh, immediately casting your right foot behind your left you will throw a riverso to his sword arm.
+
<p>But if he pretends to give you a tramazzone,<sup>3</sup> you will go with your sword into guardia di faccia and as he throws the riverso to your thigh, immediately casting your right foot behind your left you will throw a riverso to his sword arm.</p>
  
But as he extends the thrust<sup>4</sup> with his left foot forward in order to strike you in the face, you will ward it with a falso; and if he pretends to do a riverso, against him you will make a half turn of your fist, and as the enemy turns a mandritto, you will, in opposition, throw a mezzo mandritto to the said fist; and when he extends a thrust<sup>5</sup> with his left foot in order to give it to you in the face, casting your right foot behind your left, and diagonally, you will go into cingiara porta di ferro.
+
<p>But as he extends the thrust<sup>4</sup> with his left foot forward in order to strike you in the face, you will ward it with a falso; and if he pretends to do a riverso, against him you will make a half turn of your fist, and as the enemy turns a mandritto, you will, in opposition, throw a mezzo mandritto to the said fist; and when he extends a thrust<sup>5</sup> with his left foot in order to give it to you in the face, casting your right foot behind your left, and diagonally, you will go into cingiara porta di ferro.</p>
  
But if the enemy steps with his right foot making a riverso in order to strike you in the head with a mandritto, parrying his mandritto with a falso you will pass forward with your right foot, throwing an answering mandritto to his face.
+
<p>But if the enemy steps with his right foot making a riverso in order to strike you in the head with a mandritto, parrying his mandritto with a falso you will pass forward with your right foot, throwing an answering mandritto to his face.</p>
 
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| '''Chapter 15, of the offenses against porta di ferro larga.'''
+
| <p>[38] '''Chapter 15, of the offenses against porta di ferro larga.'''</p>
You can do a falso<sup>1</sup> and a riverso. Or raise a falso<sup>2</sup> and throw a mandritto to the face so that your left foot drives your foot forward.
 
  
You can also throw two thrusts;<sup>3</sup> the one, passing with your left foot toward his right side, straight into his face; the other, passing thereafter toward his left side with your right foot, and withdrawing your hand back, you will extend the thrust into his flank, and so that you can more freely perform such a thrust, when you wish to perform it you will block his sword with your buckler, and in such a way that your left foot follows your right, and having done so, you will hit him in the head with a fendente.
+
<p>You can do a falso<sup>1</sup> and a riverso. Or raise a falso<sup>2</sup> and throw a mandritto to the face so that your left foot drives your foot forward.</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>You can also throw two thrusts;<sup>3</sup> the one, passing with your left foot toward his right side, straight into his face; the other, passing thereafter toward his left side with your right foot, and withdrawing your hand back, you will extend the thrust into his flank, and so that you can more freely perform such a thrust, when you wish to perform it you will block his sword with your buckler, and in such a way that your left foot follows your right, and having done so, you will hit him in the head with a fendente.</p>
 
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| You can also step forward with your right foot, and throw a riverso<sup>4</sup> to his head, or you can raise a falso<sup>5</sup> until in guardia di faccia, thereafter turning a tramazzone. You will also have the power to throw a falso<sup>6</sup> at him, into guardia alta. Or throw a penetrating thrust<sup>7</sup> at him, following it with a tramazzone.
+
| <p>[39] You can also step forward with your right foot, and throw a riverso<sup>4</sup> to his head, or you can raise a falso<sup>5</sup> until in guardia di faccia, thereafter turning a tramazzone. You will also have the power to throw a falso<sup>6</sup> at him, into guardia alta. Or throw a penetrating thrust<sup>7</sup> at him, following it with a tramazzone.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/41|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/41|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| '''Chapter 16, of the counters to the aforesaid offenses in guardia di porta di ferro larga.'''
+
| <p>[40] '''Chapter 16, of the counters to the aforesaid offenses in guardia di porta di ferro larga.'''</p>
  
When the enemy throws a falso<sup>1</sup> or riverso, the falso you will hit simultaneously with a falso, and in defense of the riverso, you will turn a mandritto to his left temple.
+
<p>When the enemy throws a falso<sup>1</sup> or riverso, the falso you will hit simultaneously with a falso, and in defense of the riverso, you will turn a mandritto to his left temple.</p>
  
And when he raises a falso,<sup>2</sup> throwing a mandritto, immediately pretending similarly to reach him with a falso you will draw your sword to yourself with your fist and extend a thrust to his face in that tempo in which the enemy will throw the mandritto, and then with all speed you will step toward his right side with your left foot, throwing a riverso to his head.
+
<p>And when he raises a falso,<sup>2</sup> throwing a mandritto, immediately pretending similarly to reach him with a falso you will draw your sword to yourself with your fist and extend a thrust to his face in that tempo in which the enemy will throw the mandritto, and then with all speed you will step toward his right side with your left foot, throwing a riverso to his head.</p>
  
But if he throws two thrusts,<sup>3</sup> as he extends the first, you will immediately ward it with the false edge of your sword, and during the stepping that he will make with his right foot in order to give you the second, you will parry that with the true edge.
+
<p>But if he throws two thrusts,<sup>3</sup> as he extends the first, you will immediately ward it with the false edge of your sword, and during the stepping that he will make with his right foot in order to give you the second, you will parry that with the true edge.</p>
  
And when he turns the fendente to your head, you will ward that in guardia di faccia, throwing a riverso to his thigh, and when<ref>This counter has no antecedent in Ch. 15.</ref> he passes toward his right side with his left foot to give you a falso in the face, you will ward that with a falso. But as he passes with his right foot to give you a riverso,<sup>4</sup> you will immediately go into guardia di testa, parrying that, and throwing thereafter a mandritto to his face or leg as you wish, and if he throws a falso<sup>5</sup> in order to strike you in the face, you will go with your sword into guardia di faccia, warding that. But if he turns the tramazzoni, you will go with your sword into guardia di faccia, and thereby will be safe. And when he throws a falso<sup>6</sup> that goes into guardia alta, avoiding that you will allow it to go into empty space, and when he throws the stoccata,<sup>7</sup> you will ward it with a falso, but if he throws the tramazzone, stepping with your left foot toward his right side you will throw a tramazzone to his sword arm so that your right leg follows your left.
+
<p>And when he turns the fendente to your head, you will ward that in guardia di faccia, throwing a riverso to his thigh, and when<ref>This counter has no antecedent in Ch. 15.</ref> he passes toward his right side with his left foot to give you a falso in the face, you will ward that with a falso. But as he passes with his right foot to give you a riverso,<sup>4</sup> you will immediately go into guardia di testa, parrying that, and throwing thereafter a mandritto to his face or leg as you wish, and if he throws a falso<sup>5</sup> in order to strike you in the face, you will go with your sword into guardia di faccia, warding that. But if he turns the tramazzoni, you will go with your sword into guardia di faccia, and thereby will be safe. And when he throws a falso<sup>6</sup> that goes into guardia alta, avoiding that you will allow it to go into empty space, and when he throws the stoccata,<sup>7</sup> you will ward it with a falso, but if he throws the tramazzone, stepping with your left foot toward his right side you will throw a tramazzone to his sword arm so that your right leg follows your left.</p>
 
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| '''Chapter 17, of the offenses that can be done against cingiara porta di ferro.'''
+
| <p>[41] '''Chapter 17, of the offenses that can be done against cingiara porta di ferro.'''</p>
Being in cingiara porta di ferro, you can extend a thrust<sup>1</sup> to the face with your right foot [stepping] forward, and thereafter a mandrittoa against your enemy who was also in such a guard, or after you have extended the thrust, you will throw a riversob to his leg.
 
  
Or, also having done the said thrust, you will be able to pass toward his right side with your left foot, and putting your buckler under his sword hand, you will throw a mandrittoc to his leg so that your right foot follows your left.
+
<p>Being in cingiara porta di ferro, you can extend a thrust<sup>1</sup> to the face with your right foot [stepping] forward, and thereafter a mandrittoa against your enemy who was also in such a guard, or after you have extended the thrust, you will throw a riversob to his leg.</p>
  
You could also extend two thrusts,<sup>2</sup> one with the right foot forward, promptly passing toward his right side with your left foot, and thereafter you will have withdrawn your fist somewhat toward yourself, and you will extend the other thrust into his face.
+
<p>Or, also having done the said thrust, you will be able to pass toward his right side with your left foot, and putting your buckler under his sword hand, you will throw a mandrittoc to his leg so that your right foot follows your left.</p>
  
You can moreover raise a falso<sup>3</sup> into guardia di faccia, passing forward with your right foot, and strike him with a mandritto. Or extend a thrust<sup>4</sup> followed by a tramazzone,<sup>a</sup> also with the right foot forward. Or, after you will have made the thrust, pretending to give him a riverso,<sup>b</sup> you will strike him with a mandritto. Or follow the said thrust with another penetrating thrust,<sup>c</sup> drawing your fist back in the making thereof.
+
<p>You could also extend two thrusts,<sup>2</sup> one with the right foot forward, promptly passing toward his right side with your left foot, and thereafter you will have withdrawn your fist somewhat toward yourself, and you will extend the other thrust into his face.</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>You can moreover raise a falso<sup>3</sup> into guardia di faccia, passing forward with your right foot, and strike him with a mandritto. Or extend a thrust<sup>4</sup> followed by a tramazzone,<sup>a</sup> also with the right foot forward. Or, after you will have made the thrust, pretending to give him a riverso,<sup>b</sup> you will strike him with a mandritto. Or follow the said thrust with another penetrating thrust,<sup>c</sup> drawing your fist back in the making thereof.</p>
 
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| '''Chapter 18, of the counters to the offenses of the aforesaid guardia cingiara porta di ferro.'''
+
| <p>[42] '''Chapter 18, of the counters to the offenses of the aforesaid guardia cingiara porta di ferro.'''</p>
  
As the enemy extends a thrust<sup>1</sup> with the right foot, you will parry that with a falso, and when he wants to strike you with a mandritto,<sup>a</sup> casting your left foot behind your right, you will give him a mezzo mandritto to his sword arm. But if he is extending you will ward that with the false edge, and as you see the riverso<sup>b</sup> approaching your face, passing forward with your right foot into guardia di testa you will protect yourself, striking him thereafter with a mandritto to the face.
+
<p>As the enemy extends a thrust<sup>1</sup> with the right foot, you will parry that with a falso, and when he wants to strike you with a mandritto,<sup>a</sup> casting your left foot behind your right, you will give him a mezzo mandritto to his sword arm. But if he is extending you will ward that with the false edge, and as you see the riverso<sup>b</sup> approaching your face, passing forward with your right foot into guardia di testa you will protect yourself, striking him thereafter with a mandritto to the face.</p>
  
But if he extends the thrust with his right foot forward, passing also forward similarly with your right foot you will ward that with the false edge. But during the passing forward that he will make with his left foot in order to strike you in the leg in the traverse with a mandritto,<sup>c</sup> immediately casting your right foot behind your left you will strike him in the sword hand with a mezzo mandritto, and if he extends the two thrusts,<sup>2</sup> you will hit the first with the false edge, passing forward with your right foot, and the second with the true edge, stepping forward thereafter with your left foot, and striking him with a falso to the face.
+
<p>But if he extends the thrust with his right foot forward, passing also forward similarly with your right foot you will ward that with the false edge. But during the passing forward that he will make with his left foot in order to strike you in the leg in the traverse with a mandritto,<sup>c</sup> immediately casting your right foot behind your left you will strike him in the sword hand with a mezzo mandritto, and if he extends the two thrusts,<sup>2</sup> you will hit the first with the false edge, passing forward with your right foot, and the second with the true edge, stepping forward thereafter with your left foot, and striking him with a falso to the face.</p>
  
But if he raises the falso<sup>3</sup> in order to give you a mandritto, having his right foot forward, casting your left foot behind your right and going into porta di ferro larga, as he lets the mandritto fall toward your head, you will ward that with the false edge, giving him a mandritto to the face.
+
<p>But if he raises the falso<sup>3</sup> in order to give you a mandritto, having his right foot forward, casting your left foot behind your right and going into porta di ferro larga, as he lets the mandritto fall toward your head, you will ward that with the false edge, giving him a mandritto to the face.</p>
  
But if he extends a thrust4 with his right foot forward followed by a tramazzone, you will similarly shield yourself from that with the false edge, and when he turns the tramazzone,<sup>a</sup> you will recover yourself into guardia di faccia. And when he will wish to extend a thrust with his right leg forward, you will hit it with the false edge without stepping.
+
<p>But if he extends a thrust4 with his right foot forward followed by a tramazzone, you will similarly shield yourself from that with the false edge, and when he turns the tramazzone,<sup>a</sup> you will recover yourself into guardia di faccia. And when he will wish to extend a thrust with his right leg forward, you will hit it with the false edge without stepping.</p>
 
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| And when he wishes to pretend to throw a riverso,<sup>b</sup> passing forward with your right foot you will turn your true edge against such pretense.
+
| <p>[43] And when he wishes to pretend to throw a riverso,<sup>b</sup> passing forward with your right foot you will turn your true edge against such pretense.</p>
  
And he wishing to throw a mandritto to your head, you will go into guardia di testa defending yourself from that, and giving him a similar blow to the face.
+
<p>And he wishing to throw a mandritto to your head, you will go into guardia di testa defending yourself from that, and giving him a similar blow to the face.</p>
  
But if he extends a thrust to your face with his right foot forward, without moving your feet you will turn a tramazzone over that.
+
<p>But if he extends a thrust to your face with his right foot forward, without moving your feet you will turn a tramazzone over that.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/44|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/44|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| And if he extends the penetrating thrust,<sup>c</sup> passing forward into large pace with your right foot you will ward that with the false edge, extending to him a good one to the face.
+
| <p>[] And if he extends the penetrating thrust,<sup>c</sup> passing forward into large pace with your right foot you will ward that with the false edge, extending to him a good one to the face.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/44|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/44|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| '''Chapter 19, of the offenses that would have to be done in coda lunga alta with the left foot forward.'''
+
| <p>[44] '''Chapter 19, of the offenses that would have to be done in coda lunga alta with the left foot forward.'''</p>
You can step forward with your right foot and do a falso,<sup>1</sup> and a mandritto. Or passing also with the same foot do a falso<sup>2</sup> and pretend to do a mandritto, but rather throw a riverso at him. You can also, after you will have passed with the aforesaid foot, extend a thrust<sup>3</sup> and throw a mandritto. Or passing also with the same foot, throw a thrust<sup>4</sup> followed by a riverso.  
+
 
 +
<p>You can step forward with your right foot and do a falso,<sup>1</sup> and a mandritto. Or passing also with the same foot do a falso<sup>2</sup> and pretend to do a mandritto, but rather throw a riverso at him. You can also, after you will have passed with the aforesaid foot, extend a thrust<sup>3</sup> and throw a mandritto. Or passing also with the same foot, throw a thrust<sup>4</sup> followed by a riverso.</p>
 
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| As well, drawing your left foot near to your right, and next passing forward with your right, you can strike him with a fendente.<sup>5</sup> Or with your right foot [stepping] forward you can extend a thrust<sup>6</sup> followed by a tramazzone.<sup>a</sup>
+
| <p>[45] As well, drawing your left foot near to your right, and next passing forward with your right, you can strike him with a fendente.<sup>5</sup> Or with your right foot [stepping] forward you can extend a thrust<sup>6</sup> followed by a tramazzone.<sup>a</sup></p>
  
Or throwing such a thrust into his face with the aforesaid foot forward, you will be able to pass toward his right side with your left foot, and putting your buckler under his sword you will throw a mandritto<sup>b</sup> to this leg in such a manner that your left foot follows behind your right.
+
<p>Or throwing such a thrust into his face with the aforesaid foot forward, you will be able to pass toward his right side with your left foot, and putting your buckler under his sword you will throw a mandritto<sup>b</sup> to this leg in such a manner that your left foot follows behind your right.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/45|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/45|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
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| '''Chapter 20, of the counters that can be done to the aforesaid offenses of coda lunga alta.'''
+
| <p>[46] '''Chapter 20, of the counters that can be done to the aforesaid offenses of coda lunga alta.'''</p>
When the enemy, passing forward with his right foot, will do a falso<sup>1</sup> and a mandritto, without stepping you will assume cingiara porta di ferro, and when he will throw the mandritto, you will pass forward with your right foot, hitting that with the false edge, and immediately throw a mandritto to his face or leg as you wish. But when he does a falso<sup>2</sup> and pretends to do a mandritto, passing forward with your right foot you will go into guardia di faccia.
+
 
 +
<p>When the enemy, passing forward with his right foot, will do a falso<sup>1</sup> and a mandritto, without stepping you will assume cingiara porta di ferro, and when he will throw the mandritto, you will pass forward with your right foot, hitting that with the false edge, and immediately throw a mandritto to his face or leg as you wish. But when he does a falso<sup>2</sup> and pretends to do a mandritto, passing forward with your right foot you will go into guardia di faccia.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/45|3|lbl=-}}
 
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| And in the turning of a riverso that he makes to your right thigh, passing forward with your left foot, and turning your point toward the ground you will protect yourself, extending immediately thereafter a thrust to his face.
+
| <p>[47] And in the turning of a riverso that he makes to your right thigh, passing forward with your left foot, and turning your point toward the ground you will protect yourself, extending immediately thereafter a thrust to his face.</p>
  
And if he extends a thrust<sup>3</sup> with his right leg forward in order to give you a mandritto, as he extends the thrust you will pass forward with your right foot warding that with the true edge. And when he will wish to strike you with a mandritto, you will push a thrust into his face without moving your feet.
+
<p>And if he extends a thrust<sup>3</sup> with his right leg forward in order to give you a mandritto, as he extends the thrust you will pass forward with your right foot warding that with the true edge. And when he will wish to strike you with a mandritto, you will push a thrust into his face without moving your feet.</p>
  
But when he passes with the same right foot in order to extend a thrust<sup>4</sup> and turn a riverso, during the extension of the thrust that he makes, passing similarly with your right foot you will ward yourself from that with your true edge.
+
<p>But when he passes with the same right foot in order to extend a thrust<sup>4</sup> and turn a riverso, during the extension of the thrust that he makes, passing similarly with your right foot you will ward yourself from that with your true edge.</p>
  
And when he wants to throw a riverso to your leg, you will cast your right foot back to the right, striking him in his sword arm with a riverso.
+
<p>And when he wants to throw a riverso to your leg, you will cast your right foot back to the right, striking him in his sword arm with a riverso.</p>
  
And when he makes a change of foot in order to give you a fendente,<sup>5</sup> you will immediately recover yourself into porta di ferro.
+
<p>And when he makes a change of foot in order to give you a fendente,<sup>5</sup> you will immediately recover yourself into porta di ferro.</p>
 
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| And as he passes with his right foot in order to strike you with a fendente, you will arrange yourself into guardia di testa, warding that and throwing a mandritto to his face or thigh as you wish. But if, with the same foot, he extends a thrust<sup>6</sup> in order to give you a tramazzone,<sup>a</sup> you will hit that with the false edge, and passing toward his left side with your right foot you will throw a mandritto to his head, so that your left foot must follow behind your right. But if he extends a thrust with the same foot forward, passing thereafter with his left foot in order to give you a mandritto to the leg, as he extends the thrust, you will hit it with the false edge of your sword. And when he wishes to pass in order to strike you with a mandritto,<sup>b</sup> casting your left foot to the rear you will hit him in his sword hand with a mezzo mandritto.
+
| <p>[48] And as he passes with his right foot in order to strike you with a fendente, you will arrange yourself into guardia di testa, warding that and throwing a mandritto to his face or thigh as you wish. But if, with the same foot, he extends a thrust<sup>6</sup> in order to give you a tramazzone,<sup>a</sup> you will hit that with the false edge, and passing toward his left side with your right foot you will throw a mandritto to his head, so that your left foot must follow behind your right. But if he extends a thrust with the same foot forward, passing thereafter with his left foot in order to give you a mandritto to the leg, as he extends the thrust, you will hit it with the false edge of your sword. And when he wishes to pass in order to strike you with a mandritto,<sup>b</sup> casting your left foot to the rear you will hit him in his sword hand with a mezzo mandritto.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/46|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/46|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| '''Chapter 21, of the offenses that can be done in coda lunga stretta, finding oneself with the right foot forward.'''
+
| <p>[49] '''Chapter 21, of the offenses that can be done in coda lunga stretta, finding oneself with the right foot forward.'''</p>
With the left foot [stepping] forward you will be able to extend a thrust,<sup>1</sup> and then passing with your right foot give him a mandritto.<sup>a</sup> Or, also making the aforesaid thrust, you can step forward with your right foot and turn a tramazzone.<sup>b</sup>
+
 
 +
<p>With the left foot [stepping] forward you will be able to extend a thrust,<sup>1</sup> and then passing with your right foot give him a mandritto.<sup>a</sup> Or, also making the aforesaid thrust, you can step forward with your right foot and turn a tramazzone.<sup>b</sup></p>
  
Or, after you will have extended the said thrust, passing forward with your right foot, you will pretend to give him a mandritto,<sup>c</sup> striking him nonetheless with a riverso to the face or the leg. You will also be able, after the said thrust is extended, to pass forward with your right foot, throwing a fendented to his head.
+
<p>Or, after you will have extended the said thrust, passing forward with your right foot, you will pretend to give him a mandritto,<sup>c</sup> striking him nonetheless with a riverso to the face or the leg. You will also be able, after the said thrust is extended, to pass forward with your right foot, throwing a fendented to his head.</p>
 
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| '''Chapter 22, of the counters that can be done in coda lunga stretta, with the right foot forward.'''
+
| <p>[50] '''Chapter 22, of the counters that can be done in coda lunga stretta, with the right foot forward.'''</p>
As he extends the thrust<sup>1</sup> with his left foot forward for the reason of striking you with a mandritto, you will hit it with the false edge. And wanting to offend you with the mandritto,<sup>a</sup> you will strike his sword hand with a mezzo mandritto without stepping.
+
 
 +
<p>As he extends the thrust<sup>1</sup> with his left foot forward for the reason of striking you with a mandritto, you will hit it with the false edge. And wanting to offend you with the mandritto,<sup>a</sup> you will strike his sword hand with a mezzo mandritto without stepping.</p>
 
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| class="noline" | But if after he has extended the aforesaid thrust he wants to give you a tramazzone,<sup>b</sup> you will block that with your true edge, and thereafter in order to be safe from the tramazzone you will settle yourself into guardia di faccia without moving your foot.
+
| class="noline" | <p>[51] But if after he has extended the aforesaid thrust he wants to give you a tramazzone,<sup>b</sup> you will block that with your true edge, and thereafter in order to be safe from the tramazzone you will settle yourself into guardia di faccia without moving your foot.</p>
  
And if after the previously named thrust he pretends to throw a mandritto,<sup>c</sup> but throws a riverso instead, for defense from the thrust, in the manner of your enemy you will extend a similar one, so that both swords encounter each other by their true edges, and for the warding of the mandritto, without any movement you will assume the guardia di faccia.
+
<p>And if after the previously named thrust he pretends to throw a mandritto,<sup>c</sup> but throws a riverso instead, for defense from the thrust, in the manner of your enemy you will extend a similar one, so that both swords encounter each other by their true edges, and for the warding of the mandritto, without any movement you will assume the guardia di faccia.</p>
  
And in the riverso that he makes to your face, making a half turn of your hand you will hit that, throwing a mandritto to his leg or face.
+
<p>And in the riverso that he makes to your face, making a half turn of your hand you will hit that, throwing a mandritto to his leg or face.</p>
  
But if the aforesaid riverso comes to your leg, immediately going forward toward his right side with your left foot you will extend a thrust to his face, letting your right foot go behind to the left.
+
<p>But if the aforesaid riverso comes to your leg, immediately going forward toward his right side with your left foot you will extend a thrust to his face, letting your right foot go behind to the left.</p>
  
And if, after the thrust, he wants to strike you in the head with a fendente,<sup>d</sup> in order to ward yourself from the thrust you will hit his sword hand with a mezzo mandritto, and for defense from the fendente you will immediately go into guardia di testa, and thus protected, in response you will give him a mandritto to the face or legs as you wish.
+
<p>And if, after the thrust, he wants to strike you in the head with a fendente,<sup>d</sup> in order to ward yourself from the thrust you will hit his sword hand with a mezzo mandritto, and for defense from the fendente you will immediately go into guardia di testa, and thus protected, in response you will give him a mandritto to the face or legs as you wish.
 
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/47|3|lbl=-}}
 
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{| class="master"
 
{| class="master"
 
|-  
 
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! <p>Images</p>
+
! <p>Illustrations</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B}}<br/>by [[W. Jherek Swanger]]</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|B}}<br/>by [[W. Jherek Swanger]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
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|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[file:Manciolino 4.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[file:Manciolino 4.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| '''SECOND BOOK.'''
+
| <p>'''Second Book.'''</p>
The ten famous guards and the offenses that can originate from them being sufficiently treated of in the above book, in this following one it appears to me that you would diligently wish for speech offering instruction in the sword and small buckler, in three masterful plays, or assaults; and as much as the students should be grateful, so should the body, legs, and hands gaily and freely render thanks; nor is it to be marveled at a bit, why I say "the legs", for one who will not take delight in stepping in tempo and in the way of which we will teach, and have taught, will never be able to report of grace nor victory from the play; indeed not, because of such ornament as are rich clothes to the charming and beautiful Nymphs that cavort on Mt. Menalo or in the Lyceum, such is the grace imparted to the blows of the glittering sword, to which, when deprived of laudable footsteps, such disgrace is brought, that it were as if serene night were widowed of the twinkling stars; and how can the candidate be victorious, where genteel grace is lacking? Accordingly neither will we reasonably hold one to have won if he triumphs through luck, and if a crude peasant has thrown unruly blows at him, neither will he have lost who has done his duty; it is a thing more praiseworthy, according to men of understanding, to lose graciously than to win through luck, devoid of any grace, as in vile disgrace sometimes fortunate luck does hold the place; thus always in overbearing grace does the longed for victory reside, because one concludes that the gracious man can never lose, although through misfortune he were struck.
 
  
But before we begin to speak of the proposition, we will teach how to come to the play, not only so that good players are made apt in attacking and defending, but moreover to give good form to their blows, interposed with smooth motions of their bodies.
+
<p>[1] The ten famous guards and the offenses that can originate from them being sufficiently treated of in the above book, in this following one it appears to me that you would diligently wish for speech offering instruction in the sword and small buckler, in three masterful plays, or assaults; and as much as the students should be grateful, so should the body, legs, and hands gaily and freely render thanks; nor is it to be marveled at a bit, why I say "the legs", for one who will not take delight in stepping in tempo and in the way of which we will teach, and have taught, will never be able to report of grace nor victory from the play; indeed not, because of such ornament as are rich clothes to the charming and beautiful Nymphs that cavort on Mt. Menalo or in the Lyceum, such is the grace imparted to the blows of the glittering sword, to which, when deprived of laudable footsteps, such disgrace is brought, that it were as if serene night were widowed of the twinkling stars; and how can the candidate be victorious, where genteel grace is lacking? Accordingly neither will we reasonably hold one to have won if he triumphs through luck, and if a crude peasant has thrown unruly blows at him, neither will he have lost who has done his duty; it is a thing more praiseworthy, according to men of understanding, to lose graciously than to win through luck, devoid of any grace, as in vile disgrace sometimes fortunate luck does hold the place; thus always in overbearing grace does the longed for victory reside, because one concludes that the gracious man can never lose, although through misfortune he were struck.</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>But before we begin to speak of the proposition, we will teach how to come to the play, not only so that good players are made apt in attacking and defending, but moreover to give good form to their blows, interposed with smooth motions of their bodies.</p>
 
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| '''THE FIRST ASSAULT'''
+
| <p>[2] '''The First Assault'''</p>
Firstly, opposite your enemy, you will place yourself at one end of the hall or of some other spacious field, arranging your body over your legs, and your sword and buckler in your hands, in such a manner that each movement, each act, each gesture is full of grace. And wanting to come towards your enemy, you will pass diagonally toward your right side with your right foot, and in such passage you will give a blow with your false edge to the dome of your buckler, putting your sword into guardia alta, and your buckler must lie toward your face in the manner of a mirror, and passing forward thereafter with your left foot, you will touch your buckler again, arranging your sword into guardia di testa, the buckler falling along your left thigh, and then you will step forward with your right foot, lifting your sword into guardia alta, and then passing with your left foot you will do a montante followed by an over-arm mandritto.<ref>I.e. a mandritto that goes over your own left arm.</ref> Then you will go with your sword into guardia di testa, and stepping forward with your right foot you will touch the dome of your buckler with the false edge, and you will do a montante that rises into guardia alta, and after that you will embellish the play, which is done by sending forth first your right foot, then your left, and cutting the edge of your buckler with a fendente so that having done this the sword must fall and immediately re-ascend to the rear into guardia alta. And drawing your left foot near your right, you will subsequently retouch your buckler and then you will step forward with your left foot into large pace, replacing your sword into guardia di testa.
 
  
Then, passing forward similarly with your right, you will hit the dome with a falso, and do a montante into guardia alta, throwing your right foot alongside your left, so that the buckler guards your head well, and thus far to this point is contained the fashion whereby you must come to find your enemy. And do not forget, reader, such embellishment of play, because in more places in the present assault we will refer to it without redescribing it.
+
<p>Firstly, opposite your enemy, you will place yourself at one end of the hall or of some other spacious field, arranging your body over your legs, and your sword and buckler in your hands, in such a manner that each movement, each act, each gesture is full of grace. And wanting to come towards your enemy, you will pass diagonally toward your right side with your right foot, and in such passage you will give a blow with your false edge to the dome of your buckler, putting your sword into guardia alta, and your buckler must lie toward your face in the manner of a mirror, and passing forward thereafter with your left foot, you will touch your buckler again, arranging your sword into guardia di testa, the buckler falling along your left thigh, and then you will step forward with your right foot, lifting your sword into guardia alta, and then passing with your left foot you will do a montante followed by an over-arm mandritto.<ref>I.e. a mandritto that goes over your own left arm.</ref> Then you will go with your sword into guardia di testa, and stepping forward with your right foot you will touch the dome of your buckler with the false edge, and you will do a montante that rises into guardia alta, and after that you will embellish the play, which is done by sending forth first your right foot, then your left, and cutting the edge of your buckler with a fendente so that having done this the sword must fall and immediately re-ascend to the rear into guardia alta. And drawing your left foot near your right, you will subsequently retouch your buckler and then you will step forward with your left foot into large pace, replacing your sword into guardia di testa.</p>
  
But when you will be already near your enemy the blows will no more be committed to the wind. You will pass forward with your right foot into large pace, throwing a mandritto to his head that goes over-arm, and return a riverso making your sword fall into coda lunga stretta. Then you will make your buckler a good defender of your head, immediately returning a montante that goes into guardia alta, where it will behoove you to throw your right foot along your left. our right foot along your left.
+
<p>Then, passing forward similarly with your right, you will hit the dome with a falso, and do a montante into guardia alta, throwing your right foot alongside your left, so that the buckler guards your head well, and thus far to this point is contained the fashion whereby you must come to find your enemy. And do not forget, reader, such embellishment of play, because in more places in the present assault we will refer to it without redescribing it.</p>
  
And then, passing with your right foot, you will throw a fendente that ends in guardia di faccia, and you will thereafter pass with your left foot toward your right side, in which tempo you will throw a tramazzone falling into cingiara porta di ferro. And you will oppose your buckler to your head. Then passing with your right foot into large pace, you will make a falso traversale to your enemy’s face, so that your sword subsequently rises into guardia alta, throwing an overarm mandritto to the head or face, and retiring your right foot near your left; and then you will pass again with your right foot into large pace, casting your sword fist high and throwing a mandritto to the face, which goes under-arm. Then redraw your right foot even with your left, making your buckler good.
+
<p>But when you will be already near your enemy the blows will no more be committed to the wind. You will pass forward with your right foot into large pace, throwing a mandritto to his head that goes over-arm, and return a riverso making your sword fall into coda lunga stretta. Then you will make your buckler a good defender of your head, immediately returning a montante that goes into guardia alta, where it will behoove you to throw your right foot along your left. our right foot along your left.</p>
  
And then, stepping forward similarly with your right you will do a falso that ends in guardia di faccia, followed by two tramazzoni, so that the last will have its finish in porta di ferro stretta.
+
<p>And then, passing with your right foot, you will throw a fendente that ends in guardia di faccia, and you will thereafter pass with your left foot toward your right side, in which tempo you will throw a tramazzone falling into cingiara porta di ferro. And you will oppose your buckler to your head. Then passing with your right foot into large pace, you will make a falso traversale to your enemy’s face, so that your sword subsequently rises into guardia alta, throwing an overarm mandritto to the head or face, and retiring your right foot near your left; and then you will pass again with your right foot into large pace, casting your sword fist high and throwing a mandritto to the face, which goes under-arm. Then redraw your right foot even with your left, making your buckler good.</p>
  
And from here, throwing your right foot to the left, you will do a montante into guardia alta, and thus done, embellish the play as has been instructed above.
+
<p>And then, stepping forward similarly with your right you will do a falso that ends in guardia di faccia, followed by two tramazzoni, so that the last will have its finish in porta di ferro stretta.</p>
  
Then passing forward with your right, you will throw an over-arm mandritto, and the right foot near the left.
+
<p>And from here, throwing your right foot to the left, you will do a montante into guardia alta, and thus done, embellish the play as has been instructed above.</p>
  
Then you will return forward with the same right, making two riversi, one to the face, and the other to the thigh, and letting go an overhand stoccata that goes over-arm, you will withdraw your right foot near your left.
+
<p>Then passing forward with your right, you will throw an over-arm mandritto, and the right foot near the left.</p>
  
Then you will step with your left foot, extending a punta riversa into your enemy’s face.
+
<p>Then you will return forward with the same right, making two riversi, one to the face, and the other to the thigh, and letting go an overhand stoccata that goes over-arm, you will withdraw your right foot near your left.</p>
  
Then with your right foot forward in large pace you will throw a riverso from low to high, and you will immediately turn a falso to the left temple, and thrust thereafter a riverso stuck in the right side of the face.
+
<p>Then you will step with your left foot, extending a punta riversa into your enemy’s face.</p>
  
And you will immediately cast your right foot in large pace behind your left, and you will throw a mandritto to end in guardia di faccia. Then you will make a half turn of your hand so that your sword lies in coda lunga alta, making your buckler a good defender of your head.
+
<p>Then with your right foot forward in large pace you will throw a riverso from low to high, and you will immediately turn a falso to the left temple, and thrust thereafter a riverso stuck in the right side of the face.</p>
  
Then you will draw your left foot near your right, and pass forward thereafter with your right, extending a thrust to his face, followed by a riverso to the thigh, and this done, your sword must fall into coda lunga stretta. Then you will pass forward with the left foot, extending a thrust to the face, and crossing forward afterwards with your right foot, you will therewith turn a tramazzone to the head that falls into porta di ferro stretta, defending your head well with your buckler; afterwards you will do a montante, reducing your sword into guardia alta and throwing your right foot alongside your left, and here you will embellish the play in the already described fashion.
+
<p>And you will immediately cast your right foot in large pace behind your left, and you will throw a mandritto to end in guardia di faccia. Then you will make a half turn of your hand so that your sword lies in coda lunga alta, making your buckler a good defender of your head.</p>
  
And then you will throw an over-arm mandritto with your right foot forward, and having done the blow, you will retire it even with your left.
+
<p>Then you will draw your left foot near your right, and pass forward thereafter with your right, extending a thrust to his face, followed by a riverso to the thigh, and this done, your sword must fall into coda lunga stretta. Then you will pass forward with the left foot, extending a thrust to the face, and crossing forward afterwards with your right foot, you will therewith turn a tramazzone to the head that falls into porta di ferro stretta, defending your head well with your buckler; afterwards you will do a montante, reducing your sword into guardia alta and throwing your right foot alongside your left, and here you will embellish the play in the already described fashion.</p>
  
Then you will pass forward with the same right, throwing a stoccata riversa to the face, and immediately stepping toward his right side with your left foot, you will turn a tramazzone to the face, and then crossing forward with your right foot, you will turn another tramazzone, also to the face, and thereafter a thrust, accompanied with your buckler into guardia di faccia.
+
<p>And then you will throw an over-arm mandritto with your right foot forward, and having done the blow, you will retire it even with your left.</p>
  
Then you will turn the third tramazzone to the head, which falls into porta di ferro stretta, and you will do a montante into guardia alta, drawing your right foot near your left, and (here as above) you will embellish the play. Which done, you will make a close to the half sword, that is, you will step forward with your right foot into large pace, throwing a mandritto below your arm, and then reducing your right foot even with your left, and thereafter you will return to large pace with the right foot forward, making a traversed falso to finish in guardia di faccia.
+
<p>Then you will pass forward with the same right, throwing a stoccata riversa to the face, and immediately stepping toward his right side with your left foot, you will turn a tramazzone to the face, and then crossing forward with your right foot, you will turn another tramazzone, also to the face, and thereafter a thrust, accompanied with your buckler into guardia di faccia.</p>
  
Then passing similarly with your left, you will make a half turn of your fist followed by a thrust, which you must thrust into the face, and then you will cross toward his left side with your right foot, therewith pretending to give him a mandritto to his left side, in which tempo your right leg must return to the rear, extending a riverso to the right temple and then similarly retiring the left you will strike the enemy with a mezzo mandritto which goes into guardia di faccia.
+
<p>Then you will turn the third tramazzone to the head, which falls into porta di ferro stretta, and you will do a montante into guardia alta, drawing your right foot near your left, and (here as above) you will embellish the play. Which done, you will make a close to the half sword, that is, you will step forward with your right foot into large pace, throwing a mandritto below your arm, and then reducing your right foot even with your left, and thereafter you will return to large pace with the right foot forward, making a traversed falso to finish in guardia di faccia.</p>
  
Following which, you will put your right foot alongside your left, settling yourself into guardia alta, from whence you will render the play beautiful as is described above.
+
<p>Then passing similarly with your left, you will make a half turn of your fist followed by a thrust, which you must thrust into the face, and then you will cross toward his left side with your right foot, therewith pretending to give him a mandritto to his left side, in which tempo your right leg must return to the rear, extending a riverso to the right temple and then similarly retiring the left you will strike the enemy with a mezzo mandritto which goes into guardia di faccia.</p>
  
And having thus furnished the play, you will make a withdrawal back no less beautiful than the coming to play which was done in the first part of the present assault, which you will do by returning your right foot to the rear in such a way that it goes behind the left, and in that tempo you will throw an under-arm mandritto; then similarly returning your left to the rear you will execute a montante from your left side so that your sword rises into guardia alta, then you will execute another montante, from your right side, returning your sword into guardia alta and drawing your right foot likewise near your left.
+
<p>Following which, you will put your right foot alongside your left, settling yourself into guardia alta, from whence you will render the play beautiful as is described above.</p>
  
Then you will throw an under-arm mandritto, retiring back with your right foot, and then you will make a half turn of your body toward your right side, and in this turning your sword must go out from under your arm, turning it once about the upper part of your head so that the sword will lie in the guardia di Alicorno,<ref>Unicorn.</ref> that is, with the fist high and the point aimed at the ground. Then you will cast your left foot back into large pace, extending a thrust from low to high, risen into guardia alta, and drawing your right foot even with your left, and thus will you be returned whence you began.
+
<p>And having thus furnished the play, you will make a withdrawal back no less beautiful than the coming to play which was done in the first part of the present assault, which you will do by returning your right foot to the rear in such a way that it goes behind the left, and in that tempo you will throw an under-arm mandritto; then similarly returning your left to the rear you will execute a montante from your left side so that your sword rises into guardia alta, then you will execute another montante, from your right side, returning your sword into guardia alta and drawing your right foot likewise near your left.</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>Then you will throw an under-arm mandritto, retiring back with your right foot, and then you will make a half turn of your body toward your right side, and in this turning your sword must go out from under your arm, turning it once about the upper part of your head so that the sword will lie in the guardia di Alicorno,<ref>Unicorn.</ref> that is, with the fist high and the point aimed at the ground. Then you will cast your left foot back into large pace, extending a thrust from low to high, risen into guardia alta, and drawing your right foot even with your left, and thus will you be returned whence you began.</p>
 
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| '''THE SECOND ASSAULT'''
+
| <p>[3] '''The Second Assault'''
It must already be plain to the reader of the previously described first assault, that each of them is divided into three parts.
 
  
The first has the fashion of coming to the play. The second, of the playing. The third, of returning from the play; and as the second has the offensive blows, thus do the first and the third have the fanciful and the playful.
+
<p>It must already be plain to the reader of the previously described first assault, that each of them is divided into three parts.</p>
  
Beginning, therefore, the second assault at its first part, which is going to the play, I say that similarly you will settle yourself in one corner of the room as you did in your previous graceful arrangement, and you will cross toward your right side with your right foot, striking the dome of your buckler with the false edge, and raising your sword into guardia alta, so that your buckler is turned toward your face in the manner of a mirror, and thence you will pass forward with your left foot into large pace, making a great leap toward your enemy, in which tempo your sword must make a tramazzone into porta di ferro stretta, and thus you will abide with your feet even.
+
<p>The first has the fashion of coming to the play. The second, of the playing. The third, of returning from the play; and as the second has the offensive blows, thus do the first and the third have the fanciful and the playful.</p>
  
Then you will immediately cross forward with your right foot into large pace, making a montante into guardia alta, and here you will embellish the play, not in the fashion in which you did in the first assault, for each of these three assaults has separated its embellishment, which it pleases us to name thus, and for the entirety of the play in which it is found, from the beginning, it is licit to speak of again.
+
<p>Beginning, therefore, the second assault at its first part, which is going to the play, I say that similarly you will settle yourself in one corner of the room as you did in your previous graceful arrangement, and you will cross toward your right side with your right foot, striking the dome of your buckler with the false edge, and raising your sword into guardia alta, so that your buckler is turned toward your face in the manner of a mirror, and thence you will pass forward with your left foot into large pace, making a great leap toward your enemy, in which tempo your sword must make a tramazzone into porta di ferro stretta, and thus you will abide with your feet even.</p>
  
The embellishing of this second assault will be, accordingly, that cutting with a fendente to the edge of your buckler which falls into cingiara porta di ferro, and throwing the right foot to the rear in the same tempo, you will retreat with your left foot behind your right, and therewith you will strike the dome of your buckler. Then you will do a montante that ends in guardia alta, drawing your right foot even with your left.
+
<p>Then you will immediately cross forward with your right foot into large pace, making a montante into guardia alta, and here you will embellish the play, not in the fashion in which you did in the first assault, for each of these three assaults has separated its embellishment, which it pleases us to name thus, and for the entirety of the play in which it is found, from the beginning, it is licit to speak of again.</p>
  
Then, wanting at last to assault your enemy, you will lead your left foot forward into large pace, throwing a thrust in the gesture of a montante, which goes to end in the face of the enemy, and immediately passing forward with the right foot again into large pace, you will throw a penetrating riverso to the face, redoubling two tramazzoni to the head, so that the last falls into porta di ferro stretta, and you will immediately do a montante into guardia alta, drawing your right foot near your left, and then passing forward with your right foot you will throw an over-arm mandritto, recoiling similarly your right foot near your left.
+
<p>The embellishing of this second assault will be, accordingly, that cutting with a fendente to the edge of your buckler which falls into cingiara porta di ferro, and throwing the right foot to the rear in the same tempo, you will retreat with your left foot behind your right, and therewith you will strike the dome of your buckler. Then you will do a montante that ends in guardia alta, drawing your right foot even with your left.</p>
  
Then stepping forward with your left, you will do a mezzo riverso to end in guardia di faccia. And pretending to do another riverso, you will carry your right foot forward, giving him moreover a show as if to strike him in the head with a mandritto, and during this show, crossing with your left foot you will stick him in the face with a thrust in the gesture of a montante.
+
<p>Then, wanting at last to assault your enemy, you will lead your left foot forward into large pace, throwing a thrust in the gesture of a montante, which goes to end in the face of the enemy, and immediately passing forward with the right foot again into large pace, you will throw a penetrating riverso to the face, redoubling two tramazzoni to the head, so that the last falls into porta di ferro stretta, and you will immediately do a montante into guardia alta, drawing your right foot near your left, and then passing forward with your right foot you will throw an over-arm mandritto, recoiling similarly your right foot near your left.</p>
  
Then, with the right foot forward, you will throw a riverso from low to high, and a mandritto going over your arm, and thereafter casting your right foot behind your left you will deliver a riverso to his sword hand, so that your buckler is a good defender of your head, and that your sword is taken into coda lunga [alta]. Then with your left foot forward you will settle yourself with your sword in guardia di testa, and then passing with your right foot toward his left side, you will throw a fendente to his head, in which tempo your left leg must follow behind your right.
+
<p>Then stepping forward with your left, you will do a mezzo riverso to end in guardia di faccia. And pretending to do another riverso, you will carry your right foot forward, giving him moreover a show as if to strike him in the head with a mandritto, and during this show, crossing with your left foot you will stick him in the face with a thrust in the gesture of a montante.</p>
  
Then you will recover your sword into porta di ferro stretta, going thereafter into guardia di faccia, and from here you will guide your left forward toward his left side, so that your right leg follows behind your left, and having done this you will throw a riverso to his face.
+
<p>Then, with the right foot forward, you will throw a riverso from low to high, and a mandritto going over your arm, and thereafter casting your right foot behind your left you will deliver a riverso to his sword hand, so that your buckler is a good defender of your head, and that your sword is taken into coda lunga [alta]. Then with your left foot forward you will settle yourself with your sword in guardia di testa, and then passing with your right foot toward his left side, you will throw a fendente to his head, in which tempo your left leg must follow behind your right.</p>
  
Then you will extend a stoccata, lifting yourself gracefully with a hop backwards, and passing forward from here with your right you will do a montante into guardia alta, and will draw your right foot behind your left, which, having done, you will then embellish the play in the fashion described a little above.
+
<p>Then you will recover your sword into porta di ferro stretta, going thereafter into guardia di faccia, and from here you will guide your left forward toward his left side, so that your right leg follows behind your left, and having done this you will throw a riverso to his face.</p>
  
And resuming the play with your right foot forward you will throw a fendente to end in guardia di faccia, recoiling your right foot even with your left, and then with your left forward you will throw a tramazzone to the head, and placing your right forward thereafter, you will make a show of turning another tramazzone, but you will strike his leg opposite you with a mandritto instead, so that your sword goes under your arm, and your buckler to the defense of your head. Then you will throw a riverso from low to high to your enemy’s hand, hopping gaily back so that after finishing the leap you will find yourself with even feet in coda lunga alta.
+
Then you will extend a stoccata, lifting yourself gracefully with a hop backwards, and passing forward from here with your right you will do a montante into guardia alta, and will draw your right foot behind your left, which, having done, you will then embellish the play in the fashion described a little above.</p>
  
Then crossing forward with your right you will do a montante into guardia alta. Then throwing a tramazzone into porta di ferro larga, entirely uncovered, you will remain alert, so that if perchance your enemy wants to strike you in the head, immediately casting your left foot forward and letting your sword go into coda lunga [alta] you will take the said blow with your buckler, and you will respond to him with a falso across his left temple in such a way that your sword goes under your arm.
+
<p>And resuming the play with your right foot forward you will throw a fendente to end in guardia di faccia, recoiling your right foot even with your left, and then with your left forward you will throw a tramazzone to the head, and placing your right forward thereafter, you will make a show of turning another tramazzone, but you will strike his leg opposite you with a mandritto instead, so that your sword goes under your arm, and your buckler to the defense of your head. Then you will throw a riverso from low to high to your enemy’s hand, hopping gaily back so that after finishing the leap you will find yourself with even feet in coda lunga alta.</p>
  
Casting thereafter your left foot behind your right you will throw a riverso to his face, falling into coda lunga so that your head is well guarded by your buckler. Then, with your right foot retired to the rear, you will extend a thrust to his face, and then returning forward with the same right foot you will redouble two tramazzoni upon each other, of which the last falls into porta di ferro stretta, following with a montante into guardia alta, and here for the third time you will embellish the play in the aforesaid fashion.
+
<p>Then crossing forward with your right you will do a montante into guardia alta. Then throwing a tramazzone into porta di ferro larga, entirely uncovered, you will remain alert, so that if perchance your enemy wants to strike you in the head, immediately casting your left foot forward and letting your sword go into coda lunga [alta] you will take the said blow with your buckler, and you will respond to him with a falso across his left temple in such a way that your sword goes under your arm.</p>
  
Crossing forward with your right next, you will cut a tramazzone fallen into porta di ferro larga. And you will cause your apposed buckler to guard your head well. Then drawing your left foot near your right you will do a falso from low to high going into guardia di faccia. And casting your right foot immediately forward, you will throw a mandritto traversale to the face so that your sword falls into porta di ferro.<ref>Not specified.</ref>
+
<p>Casting thereafter your left foot behind your right you will throw a riverso to his face, falling into coda lunga so that your head is well guarded by your buckler. Then, with your right foot retired to the rear, you will extend a thrust to his face, and then returning forward with the same right foot you will redouble two tramazzoni upon each other, of which the last falls into porta di ferro stretta, following with a montante into guardia alta, and here for the third time you will embellish the play in the aforesaid fashion.</p>
  
You will then go into guardia di testa with your sword, and will throw a mandritto to his leg, going under your arm, and immediately recoiling your right foot to the rear, you will throw a riverso to his sword hand in such fashion that it falls into coda lunga, and stepping forward from here with your right, you will extend a thrust to his face, and as he raises his sword to block that, you will immediately place your buckler under that, and in that tempo you will pass toward his right side with your left foot, giving him a mandritto to the leg, and making your right foot then immediately follow behind your left, and thereafter retiring your left behind your right into large pace, you will make a half turn of your hand, so that your sword is finally reposed into coda lunga stretta.
+
<p>Crossing forward with your right next, you will cut a tramazzone fallen into porta di ferro larga. And you will cause your apposed buckler to guard your head well. Then drawing your left foot near your right you will do a falso from low to high going into guardia di faccia. And casting your right foot immediately forward, you will throw a mandritto traversale to the face so that your sword falls into porta di ferro.<ref>Not specified.</ref></p>
  
Then you will extend a thrust to the face without moving your feet, and immediately after having done this, you will step toward his right side with your left foot, throwing a riverso to his right temple so that thereafter your right foot follows behind your left, and that your buckler is a good guardian of your head. Then you will extend a stoccata into your enemy's face, lifting yourself to the rear with an easy leap, causing your sword to be reduced into coda lunga alta.
+
<p>You will then go into guardia di testa with your sword, and will throw a mandritto to his leg, going under your arm, and immediately recoiling your right foot to the rear, you will throw a riverso to his sword hand in such fashion that it falls into coda lunga, and stepping forward from here with your right, you will extend a thrust to his face, and as he raises his sword to block that, you will immediately place your buckler under that, and in that tempo you will pass toward his right side with your left foot, giving him a mandritto to the leg, and making your right foot then immediately follow behind your left, and thereafter retiring your left behind your right into large pace, you will make a half turn of your hand, so that your sword is finally reposed into coda lunga stretta.</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>Then you will extend a thrust to the face without moving your feet, and immediately after having done this, you will step toward his right side with your left foot, throwing a riverso to his right temple so that thereafter your right foot follows behind your left, and that your buckler is a good guardian of your head. Then you will extend a stoccata into your enemy's face, lifting yourself to the rear with an easy leap, causing your sword to be reduced into coda lunga alta.</p>
 
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| Passing forward then with your right foot, you will extend another thrust to the face. Pretending to strike him in the head with a mandritto, nonetheless you will strike him across the right temple with a riverso, dropping your sword into coda lunga.
+
| <p>[4] Passing forward then with your right foot, you will extend another thrust to the face. Pretending to strike him in the head with a mandritto, nonetheless you will strike him across the right temple with a riverso, dropping your sword into coda lunga.</p>
  
Then you will throw a falso traversale to the sword hand, that goes over-arm, and raising the sword hand into the air, you will throw a mandritto to the face going under-arm. Then immediately drawing your right foot back you will strike his sword hand with a riverso.
+
<p>Then you will throw a falso traversale to the sword hand, that goes over-arm, and raising the sword hand into the air, you will throw a mandritto to the face going under-arm. Then immediately drawing your right foot back you will strike his sword hand with a riverso.</p>
  
Then stepping forward with the right foot you will extend a thrust to the face, and pretending to throw a riverso to the face, you will give him a mandritto across the left temple, reducing your sword into porta di ferro stretta, where you will shield your head well with your buckler. Then withdrawing your right foot back you will make a half turn of your fist, recovering your sword into coda lunga stretta, and here cutting the enemy's hand with a mezzo mandritto falling into cingiara porta di ferro without moving your feet, thereafter you will step forward with your right foot and will extend a thrust to the face, redoubling two tramazzoni to the head, and making your buckler good, and then you will do a montante into guardia alta, retiring your right foot even with your left. Having furnished such, you will embellish the play in the fashion already described above thrice.
+
<p>Then stepping forward with the right foot you will extend a thrust to the face, and pretending to throw a riverso to the face, you will give him a mandritto across the left temple, reducing your sword into porta di ferro stretta, where you will shield your head well with your buckler. Then withdrawing your right foot back you will make a half turn of your fist, recovering your sword into coda lunga stretta, and here cutting the enemy's hand with a mezzo mandritto falling into cingiara porta di ferro without moving your feet, thereafter you will step forward with your right foot and will extend a thrust to the face, redoubling two tramazzoni to the head, and making your buckler good, and then you will do a montante into guardia alta, retiring your right foot even with your left. Having furnished such, you will embellish the play in the fashion already described above thrice.</p>
 
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| Then making a close to the half sword, which is done by throwing a tramazzone that falls into porta di ferro larga, you will immediately advance your left foot forward, extending a thrust to the right side of the face, and as he raises in order to protect himself from the said thrust, taking his sword to the inside with your left hand, you will throw a mandritto to his head or wherever it seems better to you, and thus you will have satisfactorily furnished the play.
+
| <p>[] Then making a close to the half sword, which is done by throwing a tramazzone that falls into porta di ferro larga, you will immediately advance your left foot forward, extending a thrust to the right side of the face, and as he raises in order to protect himself from the said thrust, taking his sword to the inside with your left hand, you will throw a mandritto to his head or wherever it seems better to you, and thus you will have satisfactorily furnished the play.</p>
  
But wanting, as is custom, to return gracefully from the play, going with your back to the rear, in such going you will cast your right foot back, throwing a mandritto under-arm. Then similarly retiring your left foot to the rear, you will execute a montante from your left side, and another from your right, in which your sword goes into guardia alta. Then casting your right foot back another time you will throw a mandritto underarm. Then leaning your weight over your fixed feet toward your right side you will throw a riverso so that your sword is turned overhead, lowering that into guardia di Alicorno, which has been described above. Subsequently, casting your left foot back, you will extend a thrust that goes into guardia alta, drawing your right foot near your left, and thus you will be returned to the first place from whence you began to come to the play.
+
<p>But wanting, as is custom, to return gracefully from the play, going with your back to the rear, in such going you will cast your right foot back, throwing a mandritto under-arm. Then similarly retiring your left foot to the rear, you will execute a montante from your left side, and another from your right, in which your sword goes into guardia alta. Then casting your right foot back another time you will throw a mandritto underarm. Then leaning your weight over your fixed feet toward your right side you will throw a riverso so that your sword is turned overhead, lowering that into guardia di Alicorno, which has been described above. Subsequently, casting your left foot back, you will extend a thrust that goes into guardia alta, drawing your right foot near your left, and thus you will be returned to the first place from whence you began to come to the play.</p>
 
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| '''THE THIRD ASSAULT'''
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| <p>[5] '''The Third Assault'''
Not otherwise than was described above in the two previously discussed assaults, finding yourself with every genteel manner at one end of the fencing hall, and wanting to assault your enemy, you will pass diagonally with your right foot toward your right side, executing a molinetto, that is, a circling turn of the sword outside the arm, and then similarly passing with the left foot you will do a riverso from low to high that goes over your arm. Then stepping forward with your right you will throw two riversi so that at the end of the last one your sword will lie in guardia alta. Then you will step forward with your left, retouching your buckler, and reducing your sword into guardia di testa. Then similarly crossing forward with your right you will do a montante in the gesture of a thrust, that is resolved into guardia alta, and in this tempo done thus, you will withdraw your right foot near your left, and having done such, you will embellish the play, not as in the two previous fashions, as it is already plain that each assault has a separate embellishment, and this one is thus: that you will cut the edge of your buckler, throwing your right foot back in this tempo, and making your sword successively fall and rise into guardia alta, whence you will make another molinetto to the inside of the head with your wrist, that is, a revolution in the manner of a circled turn, and then you will draw your left foot near your right, retouching your buckler with a good blow. Then you will step your left foot forward, setting yourself into guardia di testa, and crossing forward with your right foot, you will do a montante in the gesture of a thrust, recovering your sword into guardia alta, and in this tempo you will draw your right foot near the left.
+
 
 +
<p>Not otherwise than was described above in the two previously discussed assaults, finding yourself with every genteel manner at one end of the fencing hall, and wanting to assault your enemy, you will pass diagonally with your right foot toward your right side, executing a molinetto, that is, a circling turn of the sword outside the arm, and then similarly passing with the left foot you will do a riverso from low to high that goes over your arm. Then stepping forward with your right you will throw two riversi so that at the end of the last one your sword will lie in guardia alta. Then you will step forward with your left, retouching your buckler, and reducing your sword into guardia di testa. Then similarly crossing forward with your right you will do a montante in the gesture of a thrust, that is resolved into guardia alta, and in this tempo done thus, you will withdraw your right foot near your left, and having done such, you will embellish the play, not as in the two previous fashions, as it is already plain that each assault has a separate embellishment, and this one is thus: that you will cut the edge of your buckler, throwing your right foot back in this tempo, and making your sword successively fall and rise into guardia alta, whence you will make another molinetto to the inside of the head with your wrist, that is, a revolution in the manner of a circled turn, and then you will draw your left foot near your right, retouching your buckler with a good blow. Then you will step your left foot forward, setting yourself into guardia di testa, and crossing forward with your right foot, you will do a montante in the gesture of a thrust, recovering your sword into guardia alta, and in this tempo you will draw your right foot near the left.</p>
 
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| And wanting at last to come to blows with your enemy, you will pass forward with your right foot and will throw an over-arm mandritto, recovering similarly your right foot near the left, and immediately returning the said right foot forward, you will do a mezzo riverso to end in guardia di faccia, and then you will throw a fendente overhead, followed by two tramazzoni, making the last fall into porta di ferro stretta, and here the buckler must make itself a good guardian of your head. Then you will throw a montante into guardia alta, recoiling your right foot near the left, and (following this) pass forward with your right, and you will throw a mezzo mandritto to end in guardia di faccia, and thereafter you will strike him in the head with two tramazzoni, of which you will do the last for pretend, that is, you will make a pretense of giving him a tramazzone, and yet you will strike him in the leg with a mandritto, dropping your sword into porta di ferro larga, and then you will raise a falso to end in guardia di faccia, and then retiring your right foot to the rear, you will assume coda lunga alta; that accomplished, you will draw your left foot near your right, and then you will step forward with the same foot, extending a thrust to the face, and then pretending to give him a tramazzone to the head, you will strike him in the thigh with a riverso, driving a thrust into his face followed by a tramazzone falling into porta di ferro stretta, defending your head well with your buckler; and thereafter drawing your right foot near your left, you will do a montante into guardia alta, and here you will embellish the play in the aforesaid fashion.
+
| <p>[] And wanting at last to come to blows with your enemy, you will pass forward with your right foot and will throw an over-arm mandritto, recovering similarly your right foot near the left, and immediately returning the said right foot forward, you will do a mezzo riverso to end in guardia di faccia, and then you will throw a fendente overhead, followed by two tramazzoni, making the last fall into porta di ferro stretta, and here the buckler must make itself a good guardian of your head. Then you will throw a montante into guardia alta, recoiling your right foot near the left, and (following this) pass forward with your right, and you will throw a mezzo mandritto to end in guardia di faccia, and thereafter you will strike him in the head with two tramazzoni, of which you will do the last for pretend, that is, you will make a pretense of giving him a tramazzone, and yet you will strike him in the leg with a mandritto, dropping your sword into porta di ferro larga, and then you will raise a falso to end in guardia di faccia, and then retiring your right foot to the rear, you will assume coda lunga alta; that accomplished, you will draw your left foot near your right, and then you will step forward with the same foot, extending a thrust to the face, and then pretending to give him a tramazzone to the head, you will strike him in the thigh with a riverso, driving a thrust into his face followed by a tramazzone falling into porta di ferro stretta, defending your head well with your buckler; and thereafter drawing your right foot near your left, you will do a montante into guardia alta, and here you will embellish the play in the aforesaid fashion.</p>
  
Then stepping forward with your right foot, you will follow it with the left in a similar step, sending a thrust from beneath upwards into the enemy’s face, and promptly opposing your right foot to your left again, you will strike him in the arms with a ridoppio riverso. Then you will throw a fendente to the head which falls into porta di ferro stretta, and then crossing forward with your left, you will extend a shrewd thrust to his face, and as he raises to ward it, you will strike him in the thigh opposite you with a riverso, going into guardia di testa, and returning your left foot to the rear, you will strike him in the sword hand with a mezzo mandritto falling into porta di ferro larga. Then, pretending to hit his sword with your false edge, as he wishes to block it, you will thrust your sword from beneath his into his face, and if he wants to protect himself from this thrust, you will immediately strike him in the right thigh with a riverso. Then for your safety you will strike his sword hand with a falso followed by a mandritto to the face, that falls into porta di ferro larga.
+
<p>Then stepping forward with your right foot, you will follow it with the left in a similar step, sending a thrust from beneath upwards into the enemy’s face, and promptly opposing your right foot to your left again, you will strike him in the arms with a ridoppio riverso. Then you will throw a fendente to the head which falls into porta di ferro stretta, and then crossing forward with your left, you will extend a shrewd thrust to his face, and as he raises to ward it, you will strike him in the thigh opposite you with a riverso, going into guardia di testa, and returning your left foot to the rear, you will strike him in the sword hand with a mezzo mandritto falling into porta di ferro larga. Then, pretending to hit his sword with your false edge, as he wishes to block it, you will thrust your sword from beneath his into his face, and if he wants to protect himself from this thrust, you will immediately strike him in the right thigh with a riverso. Then for your safety you will strike his sword hand with a falso followed by a mandritto to the face, that falls into porta di ferro larga.</p>
  
Then you will push a thrust into his same sword hand in such fashion that your sword hand goes covered by that of your buckler. And then you will immediately redouble two tramazzoni to his head, and executing a montante into guardia alta you will draw your right foot even with your left, and embellish the play in the above fashion.
+
<p>Then you will push a thrust into his same sword hand in such fashion that your sword hand goes covered by that of your buckler. And then you will immediately redouble two tramazzoni to his head, and executing a montante into guardia alta you will draw your right foot even with your left, and embellish the play in the above fashion.</p>
  
Afterwards you will step across with your left foot, and throwing a mandritto in pretense of descending, you will swiftly propel your right forward, placing your false edge beneath his sword. Thereafter, passing forward with your left foot, you will make a turn of your hand, extending a thrust into his face, and then carrying your right forward into large pace, you will redouble two tramazzoni to his head, of which the last must go into porta di ferro stretta, so that your buckler guards your head well, and afterwards you will do a montante into guardia alta, retiring your right foot feet even with your left. And passing forward with your right, you will throw a mandritto which will go over-arm to his leg, and similarly crossing with your left foot toward his right side, you will throw a riverso to his face. And then you will make your sword fall into coda lunga, letting your right leg go behind your left. Then you will cross forward with your right foot, throwing a falso from low to high, to end in guardia di faccia, and immediately pretending to strike him with a riverso to this right temple, you will reach his forward leg with a mandritto going under-arm, so that your buckler guards your head well.
+
<p>Afterwards you will step across with your left foot, and throwing a mandritto in pretense of descending, you will swiftly propel your right forward, placing your false edge beneath his sword. Thereafter, passing forward with your left foot, you will make a turn of your hand, extending a thrust into his face, and then carrying your right forward into large pace, you will redouble two tramazzoni to his head, of which the last must go into porta di ferro stretta, so that your buckler guards your head well, and afterwards you will do a montante into guardia alta, retiring your right foot feet even with your left. And passing forward with your right, you will throw a mandritto which will go over-arm to his leg, and similarly crossing with your left foot toward his right side, you will throw a riverso to his face. And then you will make your sword fall into coda lunga, letting your right leg go behind your left. Then you will cross forward with your right foot, throwing a falso from low to high, to end in guardia di faccia, and immediately pretending to strike him with a riverso to this right temple, you will reach his forward leg with a mandritto going under-arm, so that your buckler guards your head well.</p>
  
And following this, you will draw your right foot near your left, and stepping forward with your right foot you will throw a riverso to his face which falls into coda lunga stretta, and making then a montante into guardia alta you will draw your right foot near your left, embellishing the play in the above said fashion.
+
<p>And following this, you will draw your right foot near your left, and stepping forward with your right foot you will throw a riverso to his face which falls into coda lunga stretta, and making then a montante into guardia alta you will draw your right foot near your left, embellishing the play in the above said fashion.</p>
  
Then you will pass forward with your right foot, striking him with an over-arm mandritto in such a way that your right shoulder is placed with its point toward the breast of your enemy. Then throwing a riverso at him in the manner of a fendente that falls into coda lunga stretta you will strike is sword hand with a falso returned over-arm, and thereafter raising your sword hand into guardia alta, you will throw a mandritto at him under-arm, recovering your right foot near your left, and immediately stepping toward his right side with your right foot, you will strike him with a falso going to end in guardia di faccia; then, driving your left foot forward, you will pretend to give him a riverso to his right temple, but promptly crossing toward the left side of your enemy with your right foot, you will give him a fendente to the face which falls into porta di ferro larga in such fashion that your right leg will be the follower of your left to the rear, and here you will make your buckler guard your head well.
+
<p>Then you will pass forward with your right foot, striking him with an over-arm mandritto in such a way that your right shoulder is placed with its point toward the breast of your enemy. Then throwing a riverso at him in the manner of a fendente that falls into coda lunga stretta you will strike is sword hand with a falso returned over-arm, and thereafter raising your sword hand into guardia alta, you will throw a mandritto at him under-arm, recovering your right foot near your left, and immediately stepping toward his right side with your right foot, you will strike him with a falso going to end in guardia di faccia; then, driving your left foot forward, you will pretend to give him a riverso to his right temple, but promptly crossing toward the left side of your enemy with your right foot, you will give him a fendente to the face which falls into porta di ferro larga in such fashion that your right leg will be the follower of your left to the rear, and here you will make your buckler guard your head well.</p>
  
Then retiring your left foot near your right, you will propel a falso to end in guardia di faccia, and then crossing forward with your right foot, you will go with your sword into guardia alta, and you will immediately strike him in the head with a fendente followed by two tramazzoni to the face, and your buckler defending your head well, you will next do a montante into guardia alta, drawing your right foot near your left. Then stepping forward with your right foot you will throw a fendente to end in guardia di faccia; doing similarly with your left, but towards his right side, you will throw a tramazzone at him falling into cingiara porta di ferro, and from here you will pass with your right foot, making a show of giving him a tramazzone to the head; nonetheless you will strike him in the leg with a mandritto that goes under your arm. Then retiring your right foot to the rear you will strike his sword hand with a riverso, in such fashion that your head is well protected by your buckler. Then stepping forward with your right foot you will do a falso to end in guardia di faccia, and then immediately pretending to strike him with a mandritto, you will reach him with a riverso, passing forward with your left foot. Then you will retire your left foot to the rear, throwing a mandritto in that tempo that goes into guardia di faccia, and casting your right foot back next, you will make a turn of your hand, setting yourself into coda lunga alta; then, recovering your left foot near your left,<ref>N.B. original says “…piede manco appresso il sinestro”, i.e. “left foot near your left”—this should be “left foot near your right”.</ref> you will next pass forward with your right foot, extending a thrust to the face, followed by a fendente which does not go through guardia di faccia.
+
<p>Then retiring your left foot near your right, you will propel a falso to end in guardia di faccia, and then crossing forward with your right foot, you will go with your sword into guardia alta, and you will immediately strike him in the head with a fendente followed by two tramazzoni to the face, and your buckler defending your head well, you will next do a montante into guardia alta, drawing your right foot near your left. Then stepping forward with your right foot you will throw a fendente to end in guardia di faccia; doing similarly with your left, but towards his right side, you will throw a tramazzone at him falling into cingiara porta di ferro, and from here you will pass with your right foot, making a show of giving him a tramazzone to the head; nonetheless you will strike him in the leg with a mandritto that goes under your arm. Then retiring your right foot to the rear you will strike his sword hand with a riverso, in such fashion that your head is well protected by your buckler. Then stepping forward with your right foot you will do a falso to end in guardia di faccia, and then immediately pretending to strike him with a mandritto, you will reach him with a riverso, passing forward with your left foot. Then you will retire your left foot to the rear, throwing a mandritto in that tempo that goes into guardia di faccia, and casting your right foot back next, you will make a turn of your hand, setting yourself into coda lunga alta; then, recovering your left foot near your left,<ref>N.B. original says “…piede manco appresso il sinestro”, i.e. “left foot near your left”—this should be “left foot near your right”.</ref> you will next pass forward with your right foot, extending a thrust to the face, followed by a fendente which does not go through guardia di faccia.</p>
  
Then going immediately into guardia di testa you will throw a mandritto at him that goes under your arm, reducing your right foot near your left. Then, stepping forward with your left foot toward the enemy’s right side, you will throw a falso from low to high, to end in guardia di faccia; crossing subsequently forward with your right, you will go with your sword into guardia alta, throwing a fendente to his head, which will descend into porta di ferro stretta, so that your buckler is a good defender of your head. Afterwards, you will do a montante into guardia alta, retiring your right foot near your left and embellishing the play, as was said above.
+
<p>Then going immediately into guardia di testa you will throw a mandritto at him that goes under your arm, reducing your right foot near your left. Then, stepping forward with your left foot toward the enemy’s right side, you will throw a falso from low to high, to end in guardia di faccia; crossing subsequently forward with your right, you will go with your sword into guardia alta, throwing a fendente to his head, which will descend into porta di ferro stretta, so that your buckler is a good defender of your head. Afterwards, you will do a montante into guardia alta, retiring your right foot near your left and embellishing the play, as was said above.</p>
  
Then, driving your right foot forward, you will throw a less than full mandritto over your arm, and that done, you will pass with your left foot toward his right side, turning your buckler over your hand, and going with your sword into cingiara porta di ferro, and immediately passing forward with your right foot, you will hit the enemy’s sword with a falso that goes into guardia alta, and immediately throwing a mandritto to the leg, that goes under your arm, you will make your buckler guard your head well, and then, casting your right foot back, you will strike his sword hand with a riverso, so that that falls into coda lunga larga.<ref>Note that this guard is not described in the text—see [[Achilles Marozzo|Marozzo]], Cap. 143, for description and illustration.</ref> Then, drawing your left foot near your right, you will pass forward with your right, and will extend a thrust to the face. Thereafter, passing with your left toward your right side, you will pretend to give him a riverso; nevertheless, you will pass with your right toward his left side, throwing a fendente to his face in such a way that your sword descends into porta di ferro larga, and the left foot follows behind the right.
+
<p>Then, driving your right foot forward, you will throw a less than full mandritto over your arm, and that done, you will pass with your left foot toward his right side, turning your buckler over your hand, and going with your sword into cingiara porta di ferro, and immediately passing forward with your right foot, you will hit the enemy’s sword with a falso that goes into guardia alta, and immediately throwing a mandritto to the leg, that goes under your arm, you will make your buckler guard your head well, and then, casting your right foot back, you will strike his sword hand with a riverso, so that that falls into coda lunga larga.<ref>Note that this guard is not described in the text—see [[Achilles Marozzo|Marozzo]], Cap. 143, for description and illustration.</ref> Then, drawing your left foot near your right, you will pass forward with your right, and will extend a thrust to the face. Thereafter, passing with your left toward your right side, you will pretend to give him a riverso; nevertheless, you will pass with your right toward his left side, throwing a fendente to his face in such a way that your sword descends into porta di ferro larga, and the left foot follows behind the right.</p>
  
Then withdrawing your left foot near your right,<ref>This action may describe a gathering step forward with the left, as the left foot is presumably already to the rear.</ref> you will do a falso gone to end in guardia di faccia, accompanying it with your buckler, then immediately stepping forward with your right foot, you will throw a riverso to the face that falls into coda lunga stretta, and you will make your buckler defend your head well. Then, passing forward with the left, you will stick a thrust into his face, and doing similarly with the right, you will redouble two tramazzoni to his head, of which the last falls into porta di ferro stretta, and subsequently you will do a montante into guardia alta, drawing your right foot near your left, and embellishing the play in the fashion already described above.
+
<p>Then withdrawing your left foot near your right,<ref>This action may describe a gathering step forward with the left, as the left foot is presumably already to the rear.</ref> you will do a falso gone to end in guardia di faccia, accompanying it with your buckler, then immediately stepping forward with your right foot, you will throw a riverso to the face that falls into coda lunga stretta, and you will make your buckler defend your head well. Then, passing forward with the left, you will stick a thrust into his face, and doing similarly with the right, you will redouble two tramazzoni to his head, of which the last falls into porta di ferro stretta, and subsequently you will do a montante into guardia alta, drawing your right foot near your left, and embellishing the play in the fashion already described above.</p>
  
Then you will make a close to half sword, that is, you will pass forward with your right without moving your sword or buckler, and then you will step forward to large pace with your left foot, extending a thrust to him that goes in the gesture of a montante, to end in guardia di faccia.
+
<p>Then you will make a close to half sword, that is, you will pass forward with your right without moving your sword or buckler, and then you will step forward to large pace with your left foot, extending a thrust to him that goes in the gesture of a montante, to end in guardia di faccia.</p>
  
Then, crossing forward with the right foot, you will pretend to strike him in the head with a mandritto, giving that to him across the legs instead; then you will make yourself be a little bit beneath your sword by going into guardia di faccia, and here you will protect yourself from the enemy’s blow. Then, stepping forward toward his right side with your left foot, you will throw a riverso at his right temple in such a way that your right foot follows behind your left, and your head is well cared for by your buckler. Then extending a stoccata into his face, you will lift yourself with a leap back, so that your sword remains in coda lunga alta.
+
<p>Then, crossing forward with the right foot, you will pretend to strike him in the head with a mandritto, giving that to him across the legs instead; then you will make yourself be a little bit beneath your sword by going into guardia di faccia, and here you will protect yourself from the enemy’s blow. Then, stepping forward toward his right side with your left foot, you will throw a riverso at his right temple in such a way that your right foot follows behind your left, and your head is well cared for by your buckler. Then extending a stoccata into his face, you will lift yourself with a leap back, so that your sword remains in coda lunga alta.</p>
  
Then, with your right foot come forward, you will do a montante that goes into guardia alta, and withdrawing your right foot near to your left, you will have furnished the play.
+
<p>Then, with your right foot come forward, you will do a montante that goes into guardia alta, and withdrawing your right foot near to your left, you will have furnished the play.</p>
 
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| Wanting then to return with the victory to the place from whence you started in the beginning, going as usual with your back to the rear you will cast your right foot back, throwing a mandritto under your arm. Then, similarly withdrawing your left foot in this second step you will do a montante towards your left side that goes into guardia alta, and you will promptly do another montante toward your right side, recoiling your right foot near your left, and then the same right to the rear, and you will throw a mandritto under your arm, and reducing your left even with your right, you will lead the sword to your chest and then over your buckler arm.  
+
| <p>[6] Wanting then to return with the victory to the place from whence you started in the beginning, going as usual with your back to the rear you will cast your right foot back, throwing a mandritto under your arm. Then, similarly withdrawing your left foot in this second step you will do a montante towards your left side that goes into guardia alta, and you will promptly do another montante toward your right side, recoiling your right foot near your left, and then the same right to the rear, and you will throw a mandritto under your arm, and reducing your left even with your right, you will lead the sword to your chest and then over your buckler arm.</p>
 
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| class="noline" | Then crossing forward with your left you will do a molinetto outside your arm that falls into coda lunga stretta, and then you will replace your right foot at ease, so that its heel touches the point of the left foot, lifting your sword in this tempo into guardia alta with your buckler well extended toward the enemy.
+
| class="noline" | <p>[7] Then crossing forward with your left you will do a molinetto outside your arm that falls into coda lunga stretta, and then you will replace your right foot at ease, so that its heel touches the point of the left foot, lifting your sword in this tempo into guardia alta with your buckler well extended toward the enemy.</p>
 
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/68|3|lbl=-}}
 
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! <p>Images</p>
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! <p>Illustrations</p>
! <p>{{rating|B}}<br/>by [[W. Jherek Swanger]]</p>
+
! <p>{{rating|start}}<br/>by [[W. Jherek Swanger]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
  
 
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| [[file:Manciolino 5.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[file:Manciolino 5.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| '''THIRD BOOK.'''<ref>N.B. I have glossed over sections of the short introduction of this particular book, skipping straight to the swordplay</ref>
+
| <p>'''Third Book.'''<ref>N.B. I have glossed over sections of the short introduction of this particular book, skipping straight to the swordplay</ref></p>
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<p>[1] </p>
 
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| …as it does not occur that "mandritti", "riversi", "falsi", "punti", and similar such words (which need to be understood in the art) can be changed into other names, as the signification of "to pass" does, which occurs to me continuously while writing with the pen, whence many times one comes to say that players “pass” with the left or the right foot, since one can say "pass", "cross", "glide", "guide", or "direct" the feet, and so where "right"<ref>''Destro.''</ref> is said, we will sometimes say "straight", or "strong", or "able", because man naturally has more strength in his right side than in his left, and equally sometimes "sinister", sometimes "left", or "weak", in order to avoid tedious regret, there being nothing more odious than the frequent repetition of the same word…
+
| class="noline" | …as it does not occur that "mandritti", "riversi", "falsi", "punti", and similar such words (which need to be understood in the art) can be changed into other names, as the signification of "to pass" does, which occurs to me continuously while writing with the pen, whence many times one comes to say that players “pass” with the left or the right foot, since one can say "pass", "cross", "glide", "guide", or "direct" the feet, and so where "right"<ref>''Destro.''</ref> is said, we will sometimes say "straight", or "strong", or "able", because man naturally has more strength in his right side than in his left, and equally sometimes "sinister", sometimes "left", or "weak", in order to avoid tedious regret, there being nothing more odious than the frequent repetition of the same word…
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| Hence following my decision, I say that in this third book we will teach the art of playing at half sword. Often, in playing with your enemy, in such do you bring yourself to a strait, so that it behooves you to play at half sword, but not without the greatest wit and art. Accordingly, among all others this is held to be chief, and one who does not have perfect knowledge of and an ideal foundation in this cannot otherwise be a good master; and if nonetheless he happens to be a good player or defender of himself through being gifted with quickness of hand, and yet does not know how to teach others the true art, which consists of being most secure, it has already been said of these such [persons] that they are not to be called knowledgeable, but lucky, when yet they wound someone; and it must be made manifest that all of this third book will be divided not into chapters, but into offenses and their counters, and that it be understood that the play is with the sword and small buckler.
+
| <p>[2] Hence following my decision, I say that in this third book we will teach the art of playing at half sword. Often, in playing with your enemy, in such do you bring yourself to a strait, so that it behooves you to play at half sword, but not without the greatest wit and art. Accordingly, among all others this is held to be chief, and one who does not have perfect knowledge of and an ideal foundation in this cannot otherwise be a good master; and if nonetheless he happens to be a good player or defender of himself through being gifted with quickness of hand, and yet does not know how to teach others the true art, which consists of being most secure, it has already been said of these such [persons] that they are not to be called knowledgeable, but lucky, when yet they wound someone; and it must be made manifest that all of this third book will be divided not into chapters, but into offenses and their counters, and that it be understood that the play is with the sword and small buckler.</p>
 
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| Finding yourself hence with your enemy at the close of half sword, and wanting to be the agent, it will behoove you to be quickest of hand, more so than in other play, because if you will be sluggish, you will always be the patient. Beyond this, it is to be known that in not other than two ways can you find yourself with your enemy in this play: either true edge to true edge, in such fashion that the points of your swords face each other's left shoulders; or false edge to false edge, so that your swords are directed with their points at each other's right shoulders; and accordingly certain blows in order to offend and defend are born from the one manner, and others from the other.
+
| <p>[3] Finding yourself hence with your enemy at the close of half sword, and wanting to be the agent, it will behoove you to be quickest of hand, more so than in other play, because if you will be sluggish, you will always be the patient. Beyond this, it is to be known that in not other than two ways can you find yourself with your enemy in this play: either true edge to true edge, in such fashion that the points of your swords face each other's left shoulders; or false edge to false edge, so that your swords are directed with their points at each other's right shoulders; and accordingly certain blows in order to offend and defend are born from the one manner, and others from the other.</p>
  
But taking first, that which can be done finding each other false edge with false edge, I say that:
+
<p>But taking first, that which can be done finding each other false edge with false edge, I say that:</p>
 
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| Being in the aforesaid way with your enemy in such fashion that the false edges of the swords are in contact, and you with your right foot forward, you will make yourself agent if you turn your false edge across his left temple in a gesture of a tramazzone, and immediately for your defense you must retire back with the same strong (or right, as you care to say) foot, delivering a riverso to his right temple.
+
| <p>[4] Being in the aforesaid way with your enemy in such fashion that the false edges of the swords are in contact, and you with your right foot forward, you will make yourself agent if you turn your false edge across his left temple in a gesture of a tramazzone, and immediately for your defense you must retire back with the same strong (or right, as you care to say) foot, delivering a riverso to his right temple.</p>
 
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| The counter to this close will be for that one who wishes to defend himself, when the falso in the gesture of a tramazzone is turned at you in the aforesaid fashion, immediately stepping forward with your weak, or left, foot (as it pleases you to say) toward his right side, you will give him a riverso returned from low to high into his right temple.
+
| <p>[5] The counter to this close will be for that one who wishes to defend himself, when the falso in the gesture of a tramazzone is turned at you in the aforesaid fashion, immediately stepping forward with your weak, or left, foot (as it pleases you to say) toward his right side, you will give him a riverso returned from low to high into his right temple.</p>
 
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| And if you don’t succeed in offending him in the aforesaid fashion, being thus at the half sword you will give him your right foot in the belly, and then immediately retiring that same foot to the rear, you will give him in that tempo a fendente atop his head.
+
| <p>[6] And if you don’t succeed in offending him in the aforesaid fashion, being thus at the half sword you will give him your right foot in the belly, and then immediately retiring that same foot to the rear, you will give him in that tempo a fendente atop his head.</p>
 
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| The counter to the offense is, that when he wants to give you the shoe, you will immediately strike him in the shin of the offending leg with your buckler, because his plan will not [therefore] come to fruition.
+
| <p>[7] The counter to the offense is, that when he wants to give you the shoe, you will immediately strike him in the shin of the offending leg with your buckler, because his plan will not [therefore] come to fruition.</p>
 
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| The third way of offending will be that finding yourself with your left forward you will cross toward his left side with your right foot, pretending to strike him in the head with a mandritto; nonetheless in that pretense you will let your sword fall to the ground behind you, and immediately crossing toward his right side with your left foot, you will stick your head under his right armpit and your hand inside the thigh of his leg, and lifting him from the ground you will make him fall behind your shoulders.
+
| <p>[8] The third way of offending will be that finding yourself with your left forward you will cross toward his left side with your right foot, pretending to strike him in the head with a mandritto; nonetheless in that pretense you will let your sword fall to the ground behind you, and immediately crossing toward his right side with your left foot, you will stick your head under his right armpit and your hand inside the thigh of his leg, and lifting him from the ground you will make him fall behind your shoulders.</p>
 
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| The counter of the previous close and offense is that when he pretends to give you the mandritto, you will not make any response to that pretense. But as he drops his sword in order to put his head under your armpit, retiring your right foot into large pace, you will give him a riverso to the neck.
+
| <p>[9] The counter of the previous close and offense is that when he pretends to give you the mandritto, you will not make any response to that pretense. But as he drops his sword in order to put his head under your armpit, retiring your right foot into large pace, you will give him a riverso to the neck.</p>
 
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| The fourth fashion of offending will be that having your right foot forward, you will make a show of striking his left temple with a mandritto, but in that show you will let your sword turn in the manner of a molinetto, and immediately stepping with your left foot toward his right side, you will give him a riverso in his right temple.
+
| <p>[10] The fourth fashion of offending will be that having your right foot forward, you will make a show of striking his left temple with a mandritto, but in that show you will let your sword turn in the manner of a molinetto, and immediately stepping with your left foot toward his right side, you will give him a riverso in his right temple.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/73|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/73|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The counter to this is that when he makes the show of the mandritto, you will close your sword hand together with that of your buckler, and in the step that he takes of his left foot in order to give you a riverso, you will immediately cast your left leg behind your right, and deliver a mezzo mandritto to his left temple in the manner of guardia di faccia, doing which, his riverso cannot offend you.
+
| <p>[11] The counter to this is that when he makes the show of the mandritto, you will close your sword hand together with that of your buckler, and in the step that he takes of his left foot in order to give you a riverso, you will immediately cast your left leg behind your right, and deliver a mezzo mandritto to his left temple in the manner of guardia di faccia, doing which, his riverso cannot offend you.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/73|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/73|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The fifth way of offending will be, that having the aforesaid right foot forward you will point your sword hand up from beneath on the inside of his sword hand, knocking that down enough that you can stick your false edge into his neck.
+
| <p>[12] The fifth way of offending will be, that having the aforesaid right foot forward you will point your sword hand up from beneath on the inside of his sword hand, knocking that down enough that you can stick your false edge into his neck.</p>
  
The counter to this offense is that when the enemy wants to place his hand in the described fashion, you will push his sword arm toward his left side with your hand and thereby he will not achieve his intent.
+
<p>The counter to this offense is that when the enemy wants to place his hand in the described fashion, you will push his sword arm toward his left side with your hand and thereby he will not achieve his intent.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/73|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/73|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The sixth way is, that finding yourself again with your right foot forward, you can cross toward his right side with your left foot, giving him your buckler hand to the outside of his sword hand, and subsequently a riverso to his neck or head.
+
| <p>[13] The sixth way is, that finding yourself again with your right foot forward, you can cross toward his right side with your left foot, giving him your buckler hand to the outside of his sword hand, and subsequently a riverso to his neck or head.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/74|1|lbl=32v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/74|1|lbl=32v}}
  
 
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| The counter to this sixth fashion is, that while he directs his left foot forward in order to give you his buckler hand, you will immediately give him the edge of your buckler to his approaching arm.
+
| <p>[14] The counter to this sixth fashion is, that while he directs his left foot forward in order to give you his buckler hand, you will immediately give him the edge of your buckler to his approaching arm.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/74|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/74|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The seventh trap, also with the right foot forward, is that you can cross into large pace with your left foot toward his right side throwing a riverso at him from low to high, and then immediately passing toward his left side with your right foot, you will give him a mandritto in the manner of a fendente, making your left leg follow behind your right.
+
| <p>[15] The seventh trap, also with the right foot forward, is that you can cross into large pace with your left foot toward his right side throwing a riverso at him from low to high, and then immediately passing toward his left side with your right foot, you will give him a mandritto in the manner of a fendente, making your left leg follow behind your right.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/74|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/74|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The counter of this seventh fashion is that while he steps forward with his left foot in order to strike you with the aforesaid riverso, you will go into guardia di faccia with your buckler under your sword hand so that your hand is touched and covered by your buckler, and as he turns the mandritto in the manner of a fendente, immediately casting your right foot back you will give him a mezzo mandritto to his sword hand.
+
| <p>[16] The counter of this seventh fashion is that while he steps forward with his left foot in order to strike you with the aforesaid riverso, you will go into guardia di faccia with your buckler under your sword hand so that your hand is touched and covered by your buckler, and as he turns the mandritto in the manner of a fendente, immediately casting your right foot back you will give him a mezzo mandritto to his sword hand.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/74|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/74|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The eighth manner is, that having your left foot forward, you will step toward his left side with your right foot, throwing your sword back beneath his and in that same tempo you will put your buckler under his sword hand, striking him with your false edge in the left side of his neck. Then letting your left leg go behind your right you will arrange yourself with your sword in guardia di faccia, and then retiring to the rear with your right foot you will strike him in the temple with an extended riverso.
+
| <p>[17] The eighth manner is, that having your left foot forward, you will step toward his left side with your right foot, throwing your sword back beneath his and in that same tempo you will put your buckler under his sword hand, striking him with your false edge in the left side of his neck. Then letting your left leg go behind your right you will arrange yourself with your sword in guardia di faccia, and then retiring to the rear with your right foot you will strike him in the temple with an extended riverso.</p>
 
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/74|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/75|1|lbl=33r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/74|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/75|1|lbl=33r|p=1}}
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| The counter to the previous is that when the enemy throws his sword back under yours, presently withdrawing your right foot back, you will assume guardia di faccia.
+
| <p>[18] The counter to the previous is that when the enemy throws his sword back under yours, presently withdrawing your right foot back, you will assume guardia di faccia.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/75|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/75|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The ninth fashion, which will also be with the left foot forward, is that you can step forward with your right foot pretending to strike the enemy in the head with a mandritto, and in this pretense you will execute the Perugian Maneuver, that is, casting your sword and buckler away from yourself you will take him in both your arms, and having him thus strongly pressed, without detaching yourself, you will fall to a seated position and immediately you will give him your evenly raised feet heavily in his belly, and falling because of this impact, he will be found cast behind your shoulders.
+
| <p>[19] The ninth fashion, which will also be with the left foot forward, is that you can step forward with your right foot pretending to strike the enemy in the head with a mandritto, and in this pretense you will execute the Perugian Maneuver, that is, casting your sword and buckler away from yourself you will take him in both your arms, and having him thus strongly pressed, without detaching yourself, you will fall to a seated position and immediately you will give him your evenly raised feet heavily in his belly, and falling because of this impact, he will be found cast behind your shoulders.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/75|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/75|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The counter to this aforesaid offense is that while he crosses with his right foot in order to feint a mandritto, being alert, you will have your eyes on his hands owing to the presa, and when you see him drop his sword and buckler, immediately retiring your right foot to the rear, you will strike him in the head with a riverso.
+
| <p>[20] The counter to this aforesaid offense is that while he crosses with his right foot in order to feint a mandritto, being alert, you will have your eyes on his hands owing to the presa, and when you see him drop his sword and buckler, immediately retiring your right foot to the rear, you will strike him in the head with a riverso.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/75|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/75|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The tenth fashion of offending, with the left foot forward, will be that you can pass toward his right side with your right foot, striking his sword with a winning mandritto, and then crossing toward that same right side with your left foot you will give him a riverso in the neck, making your right foot follow your left.
+
| <p>[21] The tenth fashion of offending, with the left foot forward, will be that you can pass toward his right side with your right foot, striking his sword with a winning mandritto, and then crossing toward that same right side with your left foot you will give him a riverso in the neck, making your right foot follow your left.</p>
 
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/75|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/76|1|lbl=33v|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/75|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/76|1|lbl=33v|p=1}}
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| The counter will be that when he directs his right foot as said above in order to give you a mandritto to your sword, you will hit him/it with your sword, expecting that, but as he passes to give you the riverso, in that tempo you will turn a mezzo mandritto to his face.
+
| <p>[22] The counter will be that when he directs his right foot as said above in order to give you a mandritto to your sword, you will hit him/it with your sword, expecting that, but as he passes to give you the riverso, in that tempo you will turn a mezzo mandritto to his face.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/76|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/76|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The eleventh fashion of offending is that finding yourself also with the left foot forward, you will cross with your right foot toward his left side and in this passing you will make a sign of striking him with a mandritto, but you will hit his thigh with a lovely riverso, and you will remain uncovered in your upper parts in order to provoke your enemy to attack those, but as he does as you wished, gliding your sword into guardia di testa you will protect yourself there, and then with your buckler hand you will take his sword to the inside of yours, giving him a fendente to the head or a thrust to the face.
+
| <p>[23] The eleventh fashion of offending is that finding yourself also with the left foot forward, you will cross with your right foot toward his left side and in this passing you will make a sign of striking him with a mandritto, but you will hit his thigh with a lovely riverso, and you will remain uncovered in your upper parts in order to provoke your enemy to attack those, but as he does as you wished, gliding your sword into guardia di testa you will protect yourself there, and then with your buckler hand you will take his sword to the inside of yours, giving him a fendente to the head or a thrust to the face.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/76|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/76|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The counter to this will be that right as he is past pretending to do a mandritto, you will not make any move against that, but as he wishes to strike you in the thigh with a riverso, you will turn the point of your sword toward the ground, thereby protecting yourself from that, and throwing a fendente to his head in response.
+
| <p>[24] The counter to this will be that right as he is past pretending to do a mandritto, you will not make any move against that, but as he wishes to strike you in the thigh with a riverso, you will turn the point of your sword toward the ground, thereby protecting yourself from that, and throwing a fendente to his head in response.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/76|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/76|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The twelfth way of offending will be, that finding yourself with your right foot forward, you can throw a mandritto to his head, and if he is a good player he will hit that, so that immediately making a sign with your bent fist of giving him a riverso, despite that you will reach him with the same mandritto.
+
| <p>[25] The twelfth way of offending will be, that finding yourself with your right foot forward, you can throw a mandritto to his head, and if he is a good player he will hit that, so that immediately making a sign with your bent fist of giving him a riverso, despite that you will reach him with the same mandritto.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/76|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/76|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The counter to this is, that as he wishes to offend your head with the mandritto, you will throw a riverso from low to high that goes into guardia di testa, protecting yourself from his mandritto. Then with your buckler hand you will immediately smack down his sword hand, striking him in the upper body, or wherever appears best to you, with a riverso.
+
| <p>[26] The counter to this is, that as he wishes to offend your head with the mandritto, you will throw a riverso from low to high that goes into guardia di testa, protecting yourself from his mandritto. Then with your buckler hand you will immediately smack down his sword hand, striking him in the upper body, or wherever appears best to you, with a riverso.</p>
 
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/76|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/77|1|lbl=34r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/76|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/77|1|lbl=34r|p=1}}
Line 1,078: Line 1,112:
 
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| The thirteenth way would be that finding yourself again with your right foot forward, you will pretend to give him a mandritto to the head, but nonetheless you will throw a riverso in the gesture of a drilled thrust.
+
| <p>[27] The thirteenth way would be that finding yourself again with your right foot forward, you will pretend to give him a mandritto to the head, but nonetheless you will throw a riverso in the gesture of a drilled thrust.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/77|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/77|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The counter is, that when he does the aforesaid pretense, despite that you will make no motion, but in his throwing of a riverso you will recoil your right foot back, and your sword into guardia di faccia.
+
| <p>[28] The counter is, that when he does the aforesaid pretense, despite that you will make no motion, but in his throwing of a riverso you will recoil your right foot back, and your sword into guardia di faccia.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/77|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/77|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The fourteenth way is that having the same right foot forward, you will pass forward with your left and make a half-turn of your fist with the sword, sticking him in that same turning with a thrust to the face.
+
| <p>[29] The fourteenth way is that having the same right foot forward, you will pass forward with your left and make a half-turn of your fist with the sword, sticking him in that same turning with a thrust to the face.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/77|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/77|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The counter to this is that in the passing that he makes with his left foot, diverting your right foot promptly to the rear, you will arrange yourself in coda lunga alta.
+
| <p>[30] The counter to this is that in the passing that he makes with his left foot, diverting your right foot promptly to the rear, you will arrange yourself in coda lunga alta.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/77|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/77|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The fifteenth offense is that being with the aforesaid foot forward you will pretend to strike him in the head with a mandritto, and the enemy, taking fear, will want to protect himself from that, and you will give him a riverso to the thigh, settling yourself into guardia di faccia.
+
| <p>[31] The fifteenth offense is that being with the aforesaid foot forward you will pretend to strike him in the head with a mandritto, and the enemy, taking fear, will want to protect himself from that, and you will give him a riverso to the thigh, settling yourself into guardia di faccia.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/77|6|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/77|6|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| Its counter will be that during the pretense shown by your enemy, you will not make a motion, but when he wants to hit you in the thigh with a riverso, recoiling your right leg to the rear you will give him a riverso of your own to his sword arm.
+
| <p>[32] Its counter will be that during the pretense shown by your enemy, you will not make a motion, but when he wants to hit you in the thigh with a riverso, recoiling your right leg to the rear you will give him a riverso of your own to his sword arm.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/77|7|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/77|7|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The sixteenth offensive method, also with the right foot forward, is that you can indicate to give him a riverso to the head, reaching him despite this with a mandritto to the flank, and arranging yourself in guardia di faccia.
+
| <p>[33] The sixteenth offensive method, also with the right foot forward, is that you can indicate to give him a riverso to the head, reaching him despite this with a mandritto to the flank, and arranging yourself in guardia di faccia.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/78|1|lbl=34v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/78|1|lbl=34v}}
  
 
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| Its counter is that in the sign of the riverso that the enemy will make, you will throw your right foot back, and when he deems to strike you in the flank with a mandritto, you will ruin his sword hand with a mezzo mandritto accompanied by your buckler.
+
| <p>[34] Its counter is that in the sign of the riverso that the enemy will make, you will throw your right foot back, and when he deems to strike you in the flank with a mandritto, you will ruin his sword hand with a mezzo mandritto accompanied by your buckler.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/78|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/78|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The seventeenth manner is that finding yourself still with the right foot forward, you will put your buckler under your enemy's sword and simultaneously crossing toward his right side with your left foot you will give him a mandritto across his right thigh so that your right foot follows your left.
+
| <p>[35] The seventeenth manner is that finding yourself still with the right foot forward, you will put your buckler under your enemy's sword and simultaneously crossing toward his right side with your left foot you will give him a mandritto across his right thigh so that your right foot follows your left.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/78|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/78|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The counter is that when he wants to put his buckler under your sword, promptly retiring your right foot back you will give him a mandritto to his sword hand, accompanied by your buckler.
+
| <p>[36] The counter is that when he wants to put his buckler under your sword, promptly retiring your right foot back you will give him a mandritto to his sword hand, accompanied by your buckler.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/78|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/78|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| Having already written of that which one can do at the strait of the half sword when false edge to false edge, the second manner thereof follows, that is, if the swords are to be found to be [true] edge to [true] edge, adding what can be done for and against, observing the proposed order, for as has already been said above, there are no other ways of attacking at the half sword other than these two.
+
| <p>[37] Having already written of that which one can do at the strait of the half sword when false edge to false edge, the second manner thereof follows, that is, if the swords are to be found to be [true] edge to [true] edge, adding what can be done for and against, observing the proposed order, for as has already been said above, there are no other ways of attacking at the half sword other than these two.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/78|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/78|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| Therefore, the swords being true edge to true edge, and you wanting to be the agent and initiator, when you are with your right foot forward, crossing toward his right side with your left foot, you will give him a riverso to his right temple, making your right foot follow behind your left.
+
| <p>[38] Therefore, the swords being true edge to true edge, and you wanting to be the agent and initiator, when you are with your right foot forward, crossing toward his right side with your left foot, you will give him a riverso to his right temple, making your right foot follow behind your left.</p>
 
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/78|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/79|1|lbl=35r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/78|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/79|1|lbl=35r|p=1}}
Line 1,139: Line 1,173:
 
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| The counter to this first way will be that when he crosses to give you the riverso you will turn a mezzo mandritto to his head, which will rise to end in guardia di faccia.
+
| <p>[39] The counter to this first way will be that when he crosses to give you the riverso you will turn a mezzo mandritto to his head, which will rise to end in guardia di faccia.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/79|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/79|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The second fashion of attacking will be that still having your right foot forward, you will cross toward his right side with your left foot, giving him a riverso from beneath to above, to his sword arm, and then you will immediately withdraw your left foot back, giving him in that same tempo a mandritto to the face.
+
| <p>[40] The second fashion of attacking will be that still having your right foot forward, you will cross toward his right side with your left foot, giving him a riverso from beneath to above, to his sword arm, and then you will immediately withdraw your left foot back, giving him in that same tempo a mandritto to the face.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/79|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/79|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The counter to this is that when he steps to give you the riverso, putting your buckler low you will be shielded, but when he withdraws his left foot in order to strike you with the mandritto, you will reach his right temple with a riverso traversale.
+
| <p>[41] The counter to this is that when he steps to give you the riverso, putting your buckler low you will be shielded, but when he withdraws his left foot in order to strike you with the mandritto, you will reach his right temple with a riverso traversale.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/79|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/79|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| The third fashion is that, still having your right foot forward as in any of the above attacks, which we will not repeat in order to avoid tedium, you will turn a riverso to his right temple, and if the enemy protects himself from that, you will, with the hilt (or guard as you wish to say) of your sword hit that<ref>I.e. the sword.</ref> of your enemy on the outside giving him a fendente to the head.
+
| <p>[42] The third fashion is that, still having your right foot forward as in any of the above attacks, which we will not repeat in order to avoid tedium, you will turn a riverso to his right temple, and if the enemy protects himself from that, you will, with the hilt (or guard as you wish to say) of your sword hit that<ref>I.e. the sword.</ref> of your enemy on the outside giving him a fendente to the head.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/79|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/79|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Its counter will be that when he turns the aforesaid riverso, you will ward that with the true edge of your sword and when he wants to hit your sword with his hilt, you will swiftly raise yours up, because his blow will miss, and in this tempo you will give him a riverso to his head.
+
| <p>[43] Its counter will be that when he turns the aforesaid riverso, you will ward that with the true edge of your sword and when he wants to hit your sword with his hilt, you will swiftly raise yours up, because his blow will miss, and in this tempo you will give him a riverso to his head.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/79|6|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/79|6|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The fourth way of attacking is that you can lead him to believe that you will do a riverso, and immediately crossing toward his right side with your left foot you will turn the pommel of your sword over the enemy's wrist from the outside, and you will drive it<ref>His hand.</ref> down in such a manner that you can strike his head with a riverso.
+
| <p>[44] The fourth way of attacking is that you can lead him to believe that you will do a riverso, and immediately crossing toward his right side with your left foot you will turn the pommel of your sword over the enemy's wrist from the outside, and you will drive it<ref>His hand.</ref> down in such a manner that you can strike his head with a riverso.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/80|1|lbl=35v}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/80|1|lbl=35v}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The counter to this is that in the show that he makes of giving you a riverso, you will not make any motion, but as he wishes to make the turn of his pommel, swiftly placing your buckler under his sword, you will reach his right thigh with a traversale riverso.
+
| <p>[45] The counter to this is that in the show that he makes of giving you a riverso, you will not make any motion, but as he wishes to make the turn of his pommel, swiftly placing your buckler under his sword, you will reach his right thigh with a traversale riverso.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/80|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/80|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The fifth manner of offending is that you can direct your left foot toward his left side, pretending to strike him with a riverso, and yet you will return your left foot to the rear, giving him a fendente to the head.
+
| <p>[] The fifth manner of offending is that you can direct your left foot toward his left side, pretending to strike him with a riverso, and yet you will return your left foot to the rear, giving him a fendente to the head.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/80|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/80|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The counter is, that when he makes the show of the riverso, you will not move yourself, but as he wishes to turn the fendente to your head, you will immediately throw a riverso from below to above, that goes so as to end in guardia di testa.
+
| <p>[46] The counter is, that when he makes the show of the riverso, you will not move yourself, but as he wishes to turn the fendente to your head, you will immediately throw a riverso from below to above, that goes so as to end in guardia di testa.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/80|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/80|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The sixth way of offending will be that you will cross forward toward his left side with your left foot into large pace, throwing a riverso to his sword arm from low to high, and subsequently you will do a presa, that is, pretending to give him your buckler to his face, as he moves his head due to fear, immediately shooting your buckler arm inside his sword arm, you will bind that, recoiling it with a great clenching under your left armpit. Then retiring your right foot behind to your left you will make it so that he cannot harm you with his buckler.
+
| <p>[47] The sixth way of offending will be that you will cross forward toward his left side with your left foot into large pace, throwing a riverso to his sword arm from low to high, and subsequently you will do a presa, that is, pretending to give him your buckler to his face, as he moves his head due to fear, immediately shooting your buckler arm inside his sword arm, you will bind that, recoiling it with a great clenching under your left armpit. Then retiring your right foot behind to your left you will make it so that he cannot harm you with his buckler.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/80|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/81|1|lbl=36r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/80|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/81|1|lbl=36r|p=1}}
Line 1,190: Line 1,224:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The counter to this will be that when he directs his left foot in the said fashion to give you the riverso, you will stick your sword hand well forward, covered by your superimposed buckler, and during the pretense that he makes of giving you his buckler in your face, you will extend it<ref>Your hand.</ref> well forward with the sword, so that he will have reason to find your arm in the aforesaid way; and while he takes your measure, you will beat the arm coming toward you, driving it forcefully downwards, and feeling this crushing he will drop his buckler due to the consequent pain, whence at your will you may strike him in the face with a riverso.
+
| <p>[48] The counter to this will be that when he directs his left foot in the said fashion to give you the riverso, you will stick your sword hand well forward, covered by your superimposed buckler, and during the pretense that he makes of giving you his buckler in your face, you will extend it<ref>Your hand.</ref> well forward with the sword, so that he will have reason to find your arm in the aforesaid way; and while he takes your measure, you will beat the arm coming toward you, driving it forcefully downwards, and feeling this crushing he will drop his buckler due to the consequent pain, whence at your will you may strike him in the face with a riverso.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/81|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/81|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The seventh way of offending will be that you will make a show of giving him a riverso, and you will immediately give him a mandritto to the leg, recovering yourself with your sword into guardia di faccia.
+
| <p>[49] The seventh way of offending will be that you will make a show of giving him a riverso, and you will immediately give him a mandritto to the leg, recovering yourself with your sword into guardia di faccia.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/81|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/81|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The counter is that while he pretends to do a riverso you will not move, but as he wishes to strike you with the aforesaid mandritto, you will cast your right foot back, giving him a traversale mandritto to his sword arm.
+
| <p>[50] The counter is that while he pretends to do a riverso you will not move, but as he wishes to strike you with the aforesaid mandritto, you will cast your right foot back, giving him a traversale mandritto to his sword arm.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/81|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/81|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The eighth mode is that you will pretend to give him a riverso to the head, and then you will cross toward his right side with your left foot and place your buckler under his sword, throwing a mandritto to his leg so that your right ft follows behind your left.
+
| <p>[51] The eighth mode is that you will pretend to give him a riverso to the head, and then you will cross toward his right side with your left foot and place your buckler under his sword, throwing a mandritto to his leg so that your right ft follows behind your left.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/81|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/81|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Its counter is that while he pretends to give you the riverso, you will keep an eye on his hands without moving, but when he steps with his left foot to give you the mandritto, immediately withdrawing your right foot back, you will give him a mezzo mandritto to his sword hand.
+
| <p>[52] Its counter is that while he pretends to give you the riverso, you will keep an eye on his hands without moving, but when he steps with his left foot to give you the mandritto, immediately withdrawing your right foot back, you will give him a mezzo mandritto to his sword hand.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/81|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/82|1|lbl=36v|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/81|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/82|1|lbl=36v|p=1}}
Line 1,216: Line 1,250:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The ninth manner of offending is that you will step toward his right side with your left foot, hitting him in the right temple with a riverso, and immediately give him the edge of your buckler in his face.
+
| <p>[53] The ninth manner of offending is that you will step toward his right side with your left foot, hitting him in the right temple with a riverso, and immediately give him the edge of your buckler in his face.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/82|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/82|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The counter to this is that in the stepping that he makes in order to attack you with a riverso, withdrawing your right foot back, you will assume guardia di faccia.
+
| <p>[54] The counter to this is that in the stepping that he makes in order to attack you with a riverso, withdrawing your right foot back, you will assume guardia di faccia.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/82|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/82|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The tenth way is that you will step toward his right side with your left foot, giving him a riverso to his right temple. Then you will return your left foot back somewhat pretending to give him a mandritto to his head, and subsequently returning the aforesaid left foot towards his right side, you will strike him in the head with a riverso, letting your right foot go behind the left.
+
| <p>[55] The tenth way is that you will step toward his right side with your left foot, giving him a riverso to his right temple. Then you will return your left foot back somewhat pretending to give him a mandritto to his head, and subsequently returning the aforesaid left foot towards his right side, you will strike him in the head with a riverso, letting your right foot go behind the left.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/82|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/82|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| Its counter will be that in the stepping that the enemy makes to give you the riverso, you will hit it with the true edge of your sword, and as he makes the pretense of the mandritto, you will go with your sword into guardia di faccia, but when he wants to give you the other riverso, immediately casting your right foot toward his left side you will strike him in the left temple with a mezzo mandritto.
+
| <p>[56] Its counter will be that in the stepping that the enemy makes to give you the riverso, you will hit it with the true edge of your sword, and as he makes the pretense of the mandritto, you will go with your sword into guardia di faccia, but when he wants to give you the other riverso, immediately casting your right foot toward his left side you will strike him in the left temple with a mezzo mandritto.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/82|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/82|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The eleventh offense is that you will throw a riverso to his right temple, giving him your left shoe in his belly. Then, returning your left foot to the rear you will hit him in the head with a mandritto.
+
| <p>[57] The eleventh offense is that you will throw a riverso to his right temple, giving him your left shoe in his belly. Then, returning your left foot to the rear you will hit him in the head with a mandritto.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/82|6|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/82|6|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The counter to this is that in his throwing of the riverso, you will hit it with the true edge, and when he wishes to hit you with his shoe, you will immediately give him your buckler in his shin, and thence you will go into guardia di faccia, warding yourself thereby from his mandritto.
+
| <p>[58] The counter to this is that in his throwing of the riverso, you will hit it with the true edge, and when he wishes to hit you with his shoe, you will immediately give him your buckler in his shin, and thence you will go into guardia di faccia, warding yourself thereby from his mandritto.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/82|7|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/83|1|lbl=37r|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/82|7|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/83|1|lbl=37r|p=1}}
Line 1,247: Line 1,281:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The twelfth offense is that you will cross toward his right side into large pace with your left foot, pretending to give him a riverso, but despite that, you will draw back your sword fist, placing your buckler under his sword hand and giving him a thrust to the face.
+
| <p>[59] The twelfth offense is that you will cross toward his right side into large pace with your left foot, pretending to give him a riverso, but despite that, you will draw back your sword fist, placing your buckler under his sword hand and giving him a thrust to the face.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/83|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/83|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The counter to this is that in his pretense of a riverso, you will oppose your true edge against that, but as he draws his sword back to give you the thrust, you will oppose one more time still with your true edge, driving the enemy's sword toward your left side, and thereby you will have defended yourself against his thrust, hitting him as soon as you can with a falso to his face.
+
| <p>[60] The counter to this is that in his pretense of a riverso, you will oppose your true edge against that, but as he draws his sword back to give you the thrust, you will oppose one more time still with your true edge, driving the enemy's sword toward your left side, and thereby you will have defended yourself against his thrust, hitting him as soon as you can with a falso to his face.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/83|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/83|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The thirteenth offense is that you will cross toward his right side with your left foot simultaneously throwing a riverso traversale to his right thigh, and you will arrange yourself into guardia di testa, so that your right leg follows behind your left.
+
| <p>[61] The thirteenth offense is that you will cross toward his right side with your left foot simultaneously throwing a riverso traversale to his right thigh, and you will arrange yourself into guardia di testa, so that your right leg follows behind your left.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/83|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/83|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The counter is that when he steps to give you the riverso, drawing your right foot back you will give him one done thus in his sword arm.
+
| <p>[62] The counter is that when he steps to give you the riverso, drawing your right foot back you will give him one done thus in his sword arm.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/83|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/83|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The fourteenth offense is that you will advance your left foot to his right side, making a show of hitting him with a riverso to the head, but nonetheless you will step with your right toward his left side, striking him in the head with a fendente in such a fashion that your right leg follows behind your left.
+
| <p>[63] The fourteenth offense is that you will advance your left foot to his right side, making a show of hitting him with a riverso to the head, but nonetheless you will step with your right toward his left side, striking him in the head with a fendente in such a fashion that your right leg follows behind your left.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/83|6|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/83|6|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The counter to this is that in the stepping that he does with the show of a riverso, you will close together your sword and buckler, and as he advances to give you the fendente, you will turn a riverso to his right temple.
+
| <p>[64] The counter to this is that in the stepping that he does with the show of a riverso, you will close together your sword and buckler, and as he advances to give you the fendente, you will turn a riverso to his right temple.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/83|7|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/84|1|lbl=37v|p=1}}
 
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/83|7|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/84|1|lbl=37v|p=1}}
Line 1,278: Line 1,312:
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The fifteenth offense is drawing your sword back and sticking a thrust into his right temple in the company of your buckler so that the right foot is the follower of the left, [and thus] will you have evaded every deadly blow.
+
| <p>[65] The fifteenth offense is drawing your sword back and sticking a thrust into his right temple in the company of your buckler so that the right foot is the follower of the left, [and thus] will you have evaded every deadly blow.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/84|2|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/84|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The counter is that while he does the aforesaid thrust, you will hit that with the false edge of your sword, striking him with a mandritto to the face.
+
| <p>[66] The counter is that while he does the aforesaid thrust, you will hit that with the false edge of your sword, striking him with a mandritto to the face.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/84|3|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/84|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The sixteenth offense is that you will cross toward his right side into large pace with your left foot, and in such stepping you will take the enemy's sword at the middle with your buckler hand, striking him in the right temple with a riverso.
+
| <p>[67] The sixteenth offense is that you will cross toward his right side into large pace with your left foot, and in such stepping you will take the enemy's sword at the middle with your buckler hand, striking him in the right temple with a riverso.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/84|4|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/84|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The counter of the aforesaid is that in the crossing that he makes for the purpose of the presa, you will strike him in the face with a mezzo mandritto.
+
| <p>[68] The counter of the aforesaid is that in the crossing that he makes for the purpose of the presa, you will strike him in the face with a mezzo mandritto.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/84|5|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/84|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| The seventeenth offense is that crossing toward his right side with your left foot you will turn a riverso to his right temple. Then you will grasp your sword in the middle with your buckler hand, giving him your hand in his face via the inside route, or, if you wish, a good yank of his hair.
+
| <p>[69] The seventeenth offense is that crossing toward his right side with your left foot you will turn a riverso to his right temple. Then you will grasp your sword in the middle with your buckler hand, giving him your hand in his face via the inside route, or, if you wish, a good yank of his hair.</p>
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/84|6|lbl=-}}
 
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/84|6|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| class="noline" |  
 
| class="noline" |  
| class="noline" | The counter is that as he approaches to give you the riverso, you will immediately make a half-turn of your fist, protecting yourself from that, and as he grasps his sword in the middle in order to give you a box in the face, you will hit the approaching arm with the edge of your buckler, giving him beyond that a mandritto to the face.
+
| class="noline" | <p>[70] The counter is that as he approaches to give you the riverso, you will immediately make a half-turn of your fist, protecting yourself from that, and as he grasps his sword in the middle in order to give you a box in the face, you will hit the approaching arm with the edge of your buckler, giving him beyond that a mandritto to the face.</p>
 
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/84|7|lbl=-}}
 
| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/84|7|lbl=-}}
  
Line 1,309: Line 1,343:
 
{{master end}}
 
{{master end}}
  
== Temp ==
 
 
{{master begin
 
{{master begin
 
  | title = Fourth Book (Sword and Shield, Double Swords, Single Sword)
 
  | title = Fourth Book (Sword and Shield, Double Swords, Single Sword)
Line 1,316: Line 1,349:
 
{| class="master"
 
{| class="master"
 
|-  
 
|-  
! <p>Images</p>
+
! <p>Illustrations</p>
! <p>{{rating|C}}<br/>by [[Gindi Wauchope]]</p>
+
! <p>{{rating|start}}<br/>by [[Gindi Wauchope]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| [[file:Manciolino 6.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 
| [[file:Manciolino 6.jpg|400x400px|center]]
| [http://www.hemac.org/data/Manciolino%20sword%20and%20dagger%20translation%20by%20Craig%20Pitt-Pladdy.doc Chapters 1-10 - Sword and Shield]
+
| <p>'''Fourth Book.'''</p>
 +
 
 +
<p>[1]</p>
 +
 
 +
[http://www.hemac.org/data/Manciolino%20sword%20and%20dagger%20translation%20by%20Craig%20Pitt-Pladdy.doc Chapters 1-10 - Sword and Shield]</p>
  
[http://www.hemac.org/data/Manciolino%20double-sword%20translation%20by%20Craig%20Pitt-Pladdy.doc Chapter 11 - Double Swords]
+
<p>[http://www.hemac.org/data/Manciolino%20double-sword%20translation%20by%20Craig%20Pitt-Pladdy.doc Chapter 11 - Double Swords]</p>
  
[http://www.hemac.org/data/Manciolino%20single%20sword%20translation%20by%20Craig%20Pitt-Pladdy%20and%20Samy%20Degli%20Orsetti.doc Chapter 12 - Single Sword]
+
<p>[http://www.hemac.org/data/Manciolino%20single%20sword%20translation%20by%20Craig%20Pitt-Pladdy%20and%20Samy%20Degli%20Orsetti.doc Chapter 12 - Single Sword]</p>
| '''[E6] LIBRO QVARTO'''
+
|  
'''I'''O hauerui detto di sopra, che la presen te opra non puote seco recar ornamento ueruno, hora a mostrarui la ragione animosi lettori, mi conduce, che se occhiutamente giudicar uorrete, nessuno di uoi sera, che non dica molte cose esser in uno di loda degne, che in uno altro biasmeuoli sarebbono o senza conuenimento, et chi è colui, che molto lodando la politezza l’arteficiosa anda tura, il uiso non sconciamente depinto di una uaga donna, che se cotali cose in uno giouane uedesse, che non le biasi masse: molte parole bambe anchora in uno pargolo lodiamo, che se nelli maturi anni la tenesse, come rinfanciullito da tutti sarebbe deriso perche si dimostra, una istessa cosa poter si lodare et biasimare, non per suo, ma per riguardo di colui, cui si congiunge, et nel uero, chi non loda gli belli colo ri della soaue eloquentia, gli dotti congiungimenti delle '''[E6v]''' sue bene composte uoci, el tanto armonizzante suono, è fuori del diritto conoscimento, et chi anchora quella istessa eloquentia in cui non fosse conueneuole, uituperasse, sarebbe giudicioso detto.
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{{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|85|lbl=38r|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|86|lbl=38v|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/87|1|lbl=39r|p=1}}
  
 
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| <p>[2] </p>
 
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| Quindi gli saui scrittori secon do le conditioni delle persone nelle loro opre introdotte parlare, & rispondere le fanno, che come non conuiene ad uno gia carico di senno e di anni di giouenili uestimenti ornarsi, ne di cose amorose far contezza, cosi ad uno militante, & macchiato di rugine per le sempre por tate armi disdicerebbe con quella lingua proferere alcuna elegantia, alla quale ha fatto sostenere tanta sete & di giuni nelli continoui disagi della guerra & piu uolte del la poluere per il spatioso aere uolante renduta satolla, se tale non fusse, quale il magnanimo Aiace contra il segace Vlisse nella contesa dell’armi di Achille dauanti gli Prencipi di tutta la Grecia pronuntio, tutto che Aiace di Soldato, & Vlisse di Oratore facendo mostrassono gli effetti, ne è percio, l’oratione di Vlisse (se delli colori per suasibili priuata fosse) a quella di Aiace soprana, anzi co me una Diana spogliata de gli suoi belli ornamenti e Venere, appresso la sempre ignuda ma bella Pales Dea de gli pastori. Perche chiudere uolgio, che quantunque io dauanti gli conspetti de gli huomini per cagion di ora re non uenghi, non fia per cio il parlar mio si iregolato per tutto, che pareggiar non si possi se non di fuori, almeno sotto gli ornati panni a molte moderne opre, da quelli intorniate. Ma seguitando la mia fatica quarta, dico, che in quella comporro l’arte di spada da filo & targa, ouer brocchero largo, laquale essendo bene appre'''[E7]'''sa potranno anchor gli buoni giocatori alla spada da gioco trasferire, facendogli chiaro, che nel fine del libro duo altri giochi seranno apponuti cioè, quello di due spa de, & di spada sola, ma ripigliando quello della spada & brocchero largo, ouer targa, dico, che.
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/87|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/88|1|lbl=39v|p=1}}
  
 
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| <p>[3] </p>
| '''CAPITOLO PRIMO.'''
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/88|2|lbl=-}}
Essendo bene agiato con la spada & per caso con il brocchero largo & hauendo il piede manco innan zi, & il braccio del brocchero ben disteso uerso il nemico, & la spada in coda lunga alta, tu raccoglierai il piede destro appresso il manco. Indi scorrerai innanzi col pie de manco sanza tirare anchora alcuno colpo. Perche tro uandosi il tuo nemico cosi stretto, di due cose l’una far gli sera forza, ouero tirare, ouero fuggire al indietro, ma poniamo che gli tirasse una stoccata con il manco in nanzi, a cotale stoccata piu contrari potrai fare.
 
  
 
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| <p>[4] </p>
| Per che, ouero passerai con il destro uerso le sue sinistre par ti tirandogli in quel medesimo tempo di uno riuerso nel braccio della spada, si, che la gamba manca seguiti la destra per di dietro, & per tuo riparo tosto ritirerai in dietro il piede destro agiandoti in coda lunga alta come sopra detto.
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/88|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>[5] </p>
| Ouero gittando il piede manco uerso le sue deboli parti cacciare potrai il falso sotto quella, & uarcando con il piede dritto uerso le sue sinistre parti gli ferirai la gamba manca di uno mandritto, si, chel piede manco seguiti il destro per di dietro. Indi gittan do in dietro il piede destro farai una mezza uolta di pu'''[E7v]'''ngo, per il che ti trouerai nella prenomata guardia.
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/88|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>[6] </p>
| Tu potrai anchora scorrer con il piede destro uerso le sue sinistre parti spignendogli una punta nel fianco in guisa, chel piede manco del destro per dietro seguitatore sia. Indi trahendo in dietro il piede predetto forte ti rac coglierai agiatamente nella predetta quardia.
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/88|5|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>[7] </p>
 
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| Tu puoi etiandio uarcar con il destro innanzi alquan to uerso le sue manche parti cacciando il falso della tua spada sotto la sua stoccata dal brocchero accompagnato.
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/88|6|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/89|1|lbl=40r|p=1}}
  
 
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| <p>[8] </p>
| Indi gli percoterai li subito la sinistra gamba di uno riuerso, & per tuo riparo ritirerai in dietro il piede destro riducendoti con la spada in guardia di faccia, et seguentemente ti assetterai nella guardia tante fiate sopra detta.
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/89|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>[9] </p>
 
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| Potresti anchora passare con il piede forte innanzi alquanto uerso le sue deboli parti affondando in quel tempo la spinta stoccata con il dritto filo della tua spada. Indi uolgendogli uno riuerso per la faccia tirerai il piede destro in dietro. Dopoi spignerai una punta in guar dia di faccia per tuo schermo, & agieraiti nella sopranomata guardia et cosi li contrari della stoccata finiti sono.
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/89|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/90|1|lbl=40v|p=1}}
  
 
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| <p>[10] </p>
| '''S'''Eguentemente comporre intendo gli contrari, che far si ponno ad uno, che spignesse una stoccata per ferirti di uno mandritto posto caso, che amenduo ui trouiati con il piede manco innanzi in coda lunga alta.
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/90|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>[11] </p>
| A schifezza di cotale punta tu potrai tirare di uno mez zo mandritto per la mano della spada facendo la testa ben riparare dal brocchero in guisa, che la spada cali in cingiara porta di ferro, & com’egli tirera il mandritto per '''[E8]''' ferirti la testa, subito ualicherai innanzi con il piede dritto & poi ti raccoglierai in guardia di testa iui riparandoti da quello, & dandogli a trauerso le gambe di uno si mile mandritto. quindi ritirando al indietro il piede destro uolgerai la mano della spada per lo cui uolgimento ti trouerai agiato in coda lunga alta con il piede manco innanzi.
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/90|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>[12] </p>
| Ouero tu coglierai il piede debole appo il forte, & di presente guiderai il piede destro innanzi cacciando il dritto filo della tua spada in cotal punta, et quando egli uolgera il mandritto per ferirti la gamba, tu tantosto por rai la tua spada sotto’l tuo brocchero uerso le sue destre parti iui schifandoti dal predetto colpo. Ilche fatto, gli giugnerai la gamba destra di uno trauersale riuerso, & poi ritirerai il piede dritto al indietro spignendo insieme una punta andante per insino in guardia di faccia per tuo schermo, & agieraiti nella sopradetta guardia coda lunga alta.
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/90|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>[13] </p>
| Potrai anchora riporre il piede manco dietro al destro tirandogli uno mandritto per la mano della spada, che cali in porta di ferro larga, & com’egli ti uorra ferire la testa del mandritto, tu con il falso lo urterai scorrendo alquanto innanzi con il piede destro, et ti randogli insieme uno riuerso per gamba, poscia tornerai il medesimo piede in dietro spignendo una punta per sot to il tuo brocchero, che uadi in guardia di faccia per tuo riparo & assetteraiti nella gia detta guardia.
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/91|1|lbl=41r}}
  
 
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| <p>[14] </p>
 
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| Potrai ancho passare con il piede destro uerso le sue sinistre parti et il cotale passamento con il brocchero la da ta punta rintuzzare ferendogli la gamba di uno mandritto, si, ch’el tuo piede manco seguiti il dritto per dietro. '''[E8v]''' Indi trahendo pur al indietro il destro & uolgendo la mano della spada nella gia detta guardia ti trouerai.
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/91|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/92|1|lbl=41v|p=1}}
  
 
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| <p>[15] </p>
| Ouero scorrerai col piede dritto uerso le sue forti par ti cacciando il dritto filo della tua spada nella sua punta, & subito gli uolgerai uno riuerso per la faccia, si, che non potra fare il mandritto quindi trahendo in dietro il destro piede gli tirerai una stoccata nella faccia leuandoti al in dietro con tutta la persona gaiamente, & cosi ritornerai nella antidetta guardia.
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/92|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| <p>[16] </p>
 
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| Poi entiando mentr’egli tirera la punta ferirgli la ma no spignente quella con uno falso di sotto in su per sino in guardia di faccia, & com’egli tirera il mandritto, tu di presente uarcar con il piede destro uerso le sue sinistre parti percotendogli il braccio della spada con uno man dritto, si, ch’el piede debole seguiti il forte per dietro in tuo riparo, & uolgendo la mano della spada ti ritrouaressi nella detta guardia.
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/92|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/93|1|lbl=42r|p=1}}
  
 
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| <p>[17] </p>
| '''CAPITOLO SECONDO.'''
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/93|2|lbl=-}}
'''M'''A sel nemico tirasse una stoccata & poi il piede manco appo’l destro, et scorgesse seguentemen te il piede destro innanzi per darti di uno mandritto, oue ro di uno fendente, tu per la primiera alla stocccata non farai mossa, ma com’egli uenera col mandritto, tu quello urterai andando in guardia di testa con il piede forte in nanci & ferendogli la gamba di uno mandritto seguente mente traherai al indietro il piede destro et uolgendo la ma no al usato nella tante fiate celebrata guardia ti agierai.
 
  
 
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| <p>[18] </p>
 
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| '''[F1] CAPITOLO TERZO.'''
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/93|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/94|1|lbl=42v|p=1}}
'''M'''A s’egli spignesse una punta per giugnerti di uno riuerso per faccia, o per gamba, tu hauutogli l’oc chio alla mano, come cacciera la detta punta, tu passerai innanzi con il destro piede con il falso scansando quella, & mentre uorra offenderti con il riuerso per testa, tu pas serai innanzi con il piede manco schifandoti da quello con il dritto filo della tua spada in modo chel brocchero guar di bene la testa. Indi ritirerai al indietro il pugno della spada spignendogli per faccia una stoccata & leuandoti con uno salto balzato al in dietro ritornerai nella detta sopra guardia. Et quando egli tirasse il detto riuerso per gamba, Tu scorgerai innanzi il manco piede uolgendo il dritto filo della spada di rimpetto al riuerso, in guisa, che la punta della tua spada guardi uerso terra, & poi gli spi gnerai una stoccata per faccia balzandoti al indietro, & al fine ti agierai nella tanto detta guardia.
 
  
 
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| <p>[19] </p>
| '''CAPITOLO QVARTO.'''
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/94|2|lbl=-}}
'''H'''Auendo detto quello, che far si puote in coda lunga alta, parimente seguitando dir intendo delle offese & contrari che far si ponno in coda lunga stretta con il piede destro innanzi, & sia manifesto non esser la piu sicura guardia per ripararsi ne piu atta per offender che questa. Volendo adunque tu strigner il nemico in questa guardia, tu tirerai il piede manco appo’l destro, & seguentemente passerai innanzi con il piede destro. Per '''[F1v]''' che hauendolo cosi stretto, gli conuerra di due cose una a forza scegliere, ouero tirare o in dietro andare, e sel perdera spatio alcuno del campo gli fia non poca uergogna.
 
  
 
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| <p>[20] </p>
 
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| Poniamo percio che egli spinga una punta con il piede manco innanzi per sconciarti, & esser in suo arbitrio di ferirti mandritto, o di qualunque altro colpo, che gli piacesse, tu per sicurarti da cotale punta, ritirando il piede destro in dietro anderai con la spada in cingiara por ta di ferro. Et com’egli uorra offenderti con il mandritto, o con altro colpo, tu subito scorgerai il destro piede in nanzi, urtando il datto colpo con il falso, & seguitando gli giugnerai la gamba dritta con uno riuerso, et poi per schermo tuo una punta nella faccia gli spignerai per sotto il tuo brocchero. Indi ritirando in dietro a grande passo il piede destro, tu uolgerai la mano della spada in gui sa, che la punta il nemico uolto rimici, et poi un’altra pun ta medesimamente farai balzandoti con uno gaio salto al undietro, & cio fatto, nella guardia sopra detta coda lunga stretta con il piede dritto innanzi ti riporrai.
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/94|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|95|lbl=43r|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|96|lbl=43v|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/97|1|lbl=44r|p=1}}
  
 
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| <p>[21] </p>
 
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| '''CAPITOLO QVINTO.'''
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/97|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/98|1|lbl=44v|p=1}}
RItrouandoui ammenduo nella predetta guardia di coda lunga stretta con il piede dritto innanzi, sel nemico spignera una punta con il piede manco innanzi per darti di uno mandritto, tu quella con il dritto filo schiferai, ma mentre uedrai uenire il mandritto, tu spigne rai una punta per insino in guardia di faccia iui schifan doti da quello. Dopoi tu scorgerai il piede debole uerso le sue dritte parti dandogli insieme di uno riuerso nella co '''[F2]''' scia destra. Indi spignendogli una stoccata nella faccia ti leuerai al indietro con uno salto et assetteraiti nella pre detta guardia di coda lunga stretta con il piede destro auanti. Ma ponendo, che dopoi la punta il nemico non tirasse il mandritto, ma uno riuerso per testa, tu scorgerai il piede destro auanti, et quello con il dritto filo della tua spada scanserai, si, che la testa sia bene dal brocchero guar data. Indi uarcherai con il piede forte uerso le sue sinistre parti dandogli insieme di uno mandritto nella sua co scia manca, si, ch’el piede debole seguiti il forte per dietro, & per tuo schermo raccoglierai il piede destro in dietro uolgendo la mano della spada, si, che ti troui in coda lun ga stretta con il piede manco auanti. Indi ritirandoti al indietro con duo, o con tre passi, tu uarcherai innanzi con il piede destro & assetteraiti nella sopra detta guardia.
 
  
 
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| <p>[22] </p>
 
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| Ma se per caso egli di quello riuerso non accennasse la testa. Ma ferir uolesse la gamba, tu uarcando con il pie de manco innanzi quello con il dritto filo della spada urterai, in modo, che la punta guardi uerso terra. Ilche fat to, gli tirerai una stoccata per fianco leuandoti al indietro con uno salto, & se non uolessi saltar fia basteuole il tirarti dietro tre ouer quatro passi, si, che nella predetta guardia ritorni.
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/98|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/99|1|lbl=45r|p=1}}
  
 
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| <p>[23] </p>
| '''CAPITOLO SESTO.'''
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/99|2|lbl=-}}
'''M'''A sel nemico tirasse uno mandritto per ferirti la testa, tu tirerai in dietro il piede destro percotendo il suo braccio della spada di uno mandritto, si, che quella cali in cingiara porta di ferro & ch’el '''[F2v]''' brocchero sicuri bene il capo. Indi ritierai al indietro il piede sinistro & uolgerai la mano della spada, perche ti trouerai agiato al usato nella predetta guardia coda lun ga stretta con il piede dritto innanzi.
 
  
 
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| <p>[24] </p>
| '''CAPITOLO SETTIMO.'''
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/99|3|lbl=-}}
'''E'''T quando il nemico tirasse una stoccata, ouero uno mandritto, o riuerso che uogli, a qualunque di cotali colpi per tua schifezza farai uno trauersale falso per il tuo braccio della spada in modo, che la testa bene difesa sia dal brocchero non trapassante la guardia di faccia. Indi rassetteraiti nella prenomata guardia. Et se per caso egli tirera uno mandritto per la tua dritta gamba, tu subito guiderai il piede debole uerso le sue forti parti cacciando insieme il falso della tua spada per sotto il brocchero, iui schifandoti da quello. Dopoi subito darai di uno riuerso per la sua destra gamba seguitato da una buona stoccata per faccia, laquale tantosto, che farai, ti conuerra leuar ti al indietro con uno gentile salto. Indi ritornando innan zi con il destro, medesimamente nella guardia antiponuta ti assetterai.
 
  
 
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| <p>[25] </p>
 
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| '''CAPITOLO OTTAVO.'''
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/99|4|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/100|1|lbl=45v|p=1}}
'''T'''Rouandomi ispedito da quello che uertuosa & maestreuolemente far si puo nelle predette due guardie, coda lunga alta, & coda lunga stretta con il pie de destro innanzi restar ueggio due altre guardie nel pre '''[F3]''' detto combattimento, nelle quali è cosa necessaria render aueduto il Lettore, conciosiacosa che a molti modi ancho in queste, offender, & difender uno si possi, cioè, guardia cingiara porta di ferro, & porta di ferro stretta, & pigliando la prima dico, che, Trouandoui amenduo con le predette armi spada da filo, & brocchero largo, ouero targa in cingiara porta di ferro, qualunque puote dar al la pugna il prencipio, Ma colui che procaccia ottener la uettoria per alcuno modo non deue esser quello, che comin ciera, ma nella guardia con sottile auedimento stante. Et quando il nemico spignesse una punta con il piede destro innanzi per giugnerti di uno mandritto per testa, tu ti op porrai a cotale punta con il falso della spada senza mouer piede. Et mentr’egli tirera il mandritto per testa, tu subito uarcando innanzi con il piede destro, anderai con la spada in guardia di testa iui schifando quello, & di uno cotale ferendolo per gamba. Indi per tua sicurezza farai il brocchero buono guardatore della testa. Seguentemente in dietro ritirerai il piede destro spignendogli una pun ta in guardia di faccia, & poi ti agierai nella predetta guardia, che hauemo posta in campo, cioè cingiara porta di ferro.  
 
  
 
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| <p>[26] </p>
| Ma s’egli spignesse una punta per ferirti la gam ba d’uno mandritto con il falso la schiferai. Ma se tal col po egli far uolesse per gamba, tu fuggendo al indietro con il piede debole gli percoterai il braccio della spada di uno cosi fatto responsiuo mandritto, & fatto questo, per sicurtate tua ti ritirerai in dietro con duo o tre passi rassettan doti nella gia detta guardia, di cui disputiamo. Et quando egli spignesse una punta con il piede dritto auanti per '''[F3v]''' renderti ferita la testa di uno mandritto, ouer fendente, tu quella con il falso manderai uana, ma come seguitar uedrai gli predetti colpi, tu tirando in dietro il piede manco lo giugnerai nel braccio della spada di uno mezzo mandritto.  
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/100|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 +
| <p>[27] </p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/100|3|lbl=-}}
 +
|-
 
|  
 
|  
| Indi medesimamente trahendo il sinistro, ti agierai nella predetta guardia. Et s’egli cacciasse cotal punta pur con il piede destro innanzi per offenderti d’uno mandritto per gamba, tu cotal punta medesimamente con il falso annullerai.  
+
| <p>[28] </p>
 +
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/100|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 +
| <p>[29] </p>
 
|  
 
|  
| Ma nel uolger del mandritto tu subito scorrerai auanti con il piede destro uerso le sue ancho dritte parti locando il falso della tua spada sotto il predet to mandritto, si, che la accompagnato brocchero lo sottotocchi, & gli darai di uno riuerso per coscia. Indi per tuo riparo fuggirai con il piede destro al indietro spignendogli una stoccata nella faccia & leuandoti al indietro con uno salto. Ilquale fatto, nella guardia ti agie rai.  
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/100|5|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/101|1|lbl=46r|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 +
| <p>[30] [http://www.hemac.org/data/Manciolino%20double-sword%20translation%20by%20Craig%20Pitt-Pladdy.doc Chapter 11 - Double Swords]</p>
 
|  
 
|  
| Ma se per caso dopoi che haura sospinta la punta con il destro auanti ti uorra dare di uno riuerso per faccia, cotal punta tu prima pur con il falso dannerai in mo do, ch’el falso la guardia di faccia non trascorra. Et com’egli uolgera il riuerso per testa, tu porrai il piede man co a grande passo al indietro dopoi il destro facendo il brocchero buono schifatore della testa. Indi gli darai di uno mandritto trauersale nel braccio della spada, poi rac coglierai il forte piede al indietro et assetteraiti nella det ta guardia.  
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/101|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/102|1|lbl=46v|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 +
| <p>[31] </p>
 
|  
 
|  
| Et quando dopoi la cacciata punta ti uoles se ferire di riuerso per gamba, al usato quella con il falso urterai, & ritirando in dietro poi il piede manco gli giu gnerai il braccio della spada di uno mezzo riuerso, et se'''[F4]'''guentemente tirerai il piede dritto in dietro tornando al agio della guardia come è detto.
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/102|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|103|lbl=47r|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/104|1|lbl=47v|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
|  
+
| <p>[32] </p>
| '''CAPITOLO NONO.'''
+
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/104|2|lbl=-}}
'''I'''N questo si trattera delli colpi che far si ponno quando amenduo ui trouaste con le sornomate armi in por ta di ferro stretta. Vogliendo adunque tu stringer il ne mico & essendo con il piede destro innanzi appo quello il sinistro raccoglierai. Indi scorgerai il medesimo drit to alquanto innanzi. Et ponendo ch’el nemico ti spignes se una punta per darti segacemente di uno mandritto, o ri uerso, o fendente per testa, cotal punta urtar dei al usato con il falso, et com’egli ualichera con il piede destro per darti uno delli predetti colpi, tu ritirando il piede destro in dietro, gli darai di uno mandritto a trauerso il brocchero della spada. Indi trahendo similmente in dietro il sinistro, ti agie rai nella tua detta guardia porta di ferro stretta.  
 
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
|  
+
| <p>[33] </p>
| Ma s’egli spignesse una punta con il piede manco innanzi per ferir ti l’antiponuta gamba di uno mandritto cotal punta prima (come è detto) con il falso renderai annullata. Et mentr’egli passera con il destro per cagione di darti del mandritto, tu fuggendo in dietro con il forte piede, caccierai uno consimile colpo al suo per dentro del suo braccio, et per tua sicurezza tirerai similmente ancho il sinistro riducendoti nella insegnata guardia. Et se dopo la spinta punta con il piede manco innanzi, uorra egli uarcar con il piede destro et guastarti la testa con uno mandritto, o fendente, tu ritornando al indietro il destro piede et calando con la spada in cingiara porta di fer ro, cosi haurai prima fuggita la punta.  
+
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/104|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 +
| <p>[34] </p>
 
|  
 
|  
| Ma com’egli scorrera per ferirti con il mandritto, o fendente, tu scorgerai '''[F4v]''' il piede destro innanzi facendo uno trauersale falso di sot to in su per la nemica spada, & subito gli darai di uno riuerso per gamba, & poscia fuggirai per tuo riparo con il piede destro in dietro sospignendogli una punta nella faccia per sotto il tuo brocchero. Indi tornando medesima mente al indietro il sinistro, ti agierai nella prenomata guardia.  
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/104|4|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/105|1|lbl=48r|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
|  
+
| <p>[35] </p>
| Et quando dopoi la cacciata punta con manco innanzi, passar uolesse pur con il destro per ferirti di uno mandritto per gamba, tu prima cotale punta al usato con il falso schermirai, et com’egli uarchera per giugnerti del mandritto, tu subito scorrerai innanzi con il piede manco uerso le tue destre parti cacciando il falso della tua spada per sotto il tuo brocchero & iui schermandoti dal antidet to colpo, et seguentemente gli darai di uno riuerso per gam ba, poi gli tirerai di una stoccata nella faccia & ti leuerai al indietro con uno salto riducendoti nella guardia predetta. Ma s’egli spignesse una punta con il piede man co innanzi per ferirti di uno riuerso per testa, a cotale pun ta uolgerai il falso per schermirla senza mouere il piede.
+
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/105|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
|  
+
| <p>[36] '''Capitolo 12 of the sword alone.'''
| Et mentr’egli uarchera per darti del riuerso, subito tu scorrerai con il piede manco innanzi, et tu farai una mez za uolta del pugno della spada schermendoti da quello fa cendo chel brocchero guardi bene la testa, & subito spignerai il detto brocchero nella nemica spada tirandogli una stoccata per faccia, o per il petto, che uuoi, & poi leueraiti con uno salto al indietro rassettandoti nella detta guardia. Et sel cacciasse una punta con il piede manco innanzi per darti di uno riuerso per gamba, In schifatione di tal punta tu uar'''[F5]'''cherai con il piede manco uerso le sue destre parti tirandogli di un falso in quella ilquale non tracorra oltre la guardia di faccia.
 
  
|-
+
<p>Desiring combat against your opponent with only the sharp sword, first settle yourself with the right foot forward and with the sword in porta di ferro stretta, and without casting any blow you will constrain him in this way, recall the left foot near the right, and then direct your right forward.</p>
|
 
|
 
| Et com’egli uolgera il predetto ri uerso per gamba, tu subito passerai innanzi con il piede destro uolgendo uno mezzo riuerso di sotto in su, in modo, che la punta guardi uerso terra, & cosi ti haurai scher mito. Indi di uno trauersale mandritto gli percoterai il braccio della spada facendo chel brocchero ben custodisca la testa. Poi ritirando in dietro il piede destro anderai con la spada in guardia di faccia, & seguentemen te ritirerai il piede manco in dietro agiandoti nella predetta guardia.
 
  
|-
+
<p>The opponent finding himself so constrained will either attack or retreat, but if he pushes a thrust, you shall hit it with the false edge turning a mezzo riverso to the thigh and to defend yourself throw a falso to the sword hand from below not exceeding Guardia di Faccia and finish cutting into Porta di Ferro Stretta.</p>
|
 
 
|  
 
|  
| '''CAPITOLO DECIMO.'''
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/105|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/106|1|lbl=48v|p=1}}
'''H'''Auendo fornito tutto quello che maestreuolmente far si puo nelle predette quattro guardie con la spa da da filo & brocchero largo, ouero targa in mano, tralasciando molti altri colpi che in se tanto magisterio non hanno per fuggir lungezza, delliquali nondimeno ho in stituito far separato capitolo togliendo prencipio da coda lunga alta che fu la prima guardia, & chiudendo in porta di ferro, che è la quarta et ultima, dico adunque, che da coda lunga alta con il piede manco innanzi tu puoi spigner una punta facendo sembiante di tirargli di uno riuerso per testa, nondimeno giugneraigli la gamba di uno mandritto.
 
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
|  
+
| <p>[37] But if he drives a thrust to the face in order to beset you with a mandritto or a riverso cancel it with the false edge and when he throws the mandritto to the head avoid the blow going with your sword into Guardia di Testa and wound him with the same blow (a mandritto) to the head or leg as you wish.</p>
| Tu puoi anchora spigner una punta con il piede destro innanzi facendogli ueduta di dargli di uno mandrit'''[F5v]'''to per testa, ma gli tirerai di riuerso per gamba.
+
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/106|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
|  
+
| <p>[38] But in the case he wants to give a riverso, or a mandritto to the leg. Against the mandritto withdraw the right foot to the rear, giving him a mezzo mandritto to the sword hand. But wanting to resolve the riverso, you retreat backwards with the aforementioned foot in order to wound his sword arm with a mezzo riverso, and finish in the said guard porta di ferro stretta.</p>
| Puoi spigner anchora una punta pur con il piede destro innanzi, et guidando il piede debole uerso le forti par ti sue gli giugnerai la gamba di uno mandritto, si, che la testa sia bene dal brocchero schermita, & chel piede destro seguiti il sinistro per dietro
+
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/106|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
|  
+
| class="noline" |  
|  
+
| class="noline" | <p>[39] And when he pushes a thrust to give you a riverso to the head or the leg, but supposing the head, cancel it with the false edge of the sword without moving the feet and against the coming riverso, pass with with the left foot forwards making a mezza volta of the hand warding the blow. Then immediately traversing with the right [foot] towards his left side, give him a mandritto to the head or the leg, as you wish, that done, the left leg must follow the right.</p>
| Ouero tirerai una stoccata senza mossa di piede, et poi raccoglierai il piede manco appo il destro, ilche fatto, uar cherai con il dritto innanzi insiememente tirando uno mandritto, o fendente, o riuerso, che uuoi.
 
  
|-
+
<p>And if the riverso was thrown to the leg, you (passing forwards with the left foot) shall turn the point towards the ground pushing a stoccata to the flank , & removing yourself from presence with a jump backwards, where at the end settle yourself in the aforesaid guard of Porta di Ferro Stretta.</p>
|
 
|
 
| Anchora potrai tirare uno mezzo mandritto per la nemica mano, & tornare con uno riuerso per gamba sen za mouer piede. Ouero puoi tirare di uno falso di sotto in su per la mano della spada senza alcuno passeggiamento.
 
  
|-
+
<p>But if you see coming from above a mandritto, or riverso, or fendente, or a thrust, whatever of these cover strongly with the false edge in order to avoid it, not exceeding Guardia di faccia. Then Immediately pass with the front foot, making a turn of the fist.</p>
|
 
|
 
| O spignere una stoccata sopra mano con il piede destro innanzi, laquale cali in porta di ferro lar ga, & quinci potrai fare falso & mandritto, & seguentemente falso et riuerso, oltre a cio ancho potresti fare uno falso andante per sino in guardia di faccia, & passando dopoi con il piede manco innanzi farai una mezza uolta di pugno spignendogli una punta in faccia, ouer nel pet to, & questo colpo è signolare contra uno mancino, Per cio, che da qualunque colpo da lui tirato, schermito saresti.
 
  
 +
<p>That done, push him a thrust in the face or in the chest, as you wish, you can also then having covered with the aforesaid false edge, cast at him a mandritto to the face, that glides below the arm and to the chest advancing the right foot somewhat forward as much as this blow requires, & that is one of the singular defenses, that this style makes possible.</p>
 +
| class="noline" |
 +
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/106|4|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/107|1|lbl=49r|p=1}}
 +
 +
|}
 +
{{master end}}
 +
 +
{{master begin
 +
| title = Fifth Book (Sword and Cape, Sword and Dagger)
 +
| width = 90em
 +
}}
 +
{| class="master"
 
|-  
 
|-  
|
+
! <p>Illustrations</p>
|
+
! <p>{{rating}}<br/></p>
| Ma sel tirasse per gamba uno mancino, el ti conuiene tenere questo regolato ordine, cioè passare con il manco innanzi, & uolger la punta della spada uerso terra, iui schifandoti dal suo colpo, & cacciandogli una stoccata nella faccia.
+
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 +
| [[file:Manciolino 7.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 +
| <p>'''Fifth Book.'''</p>
 +
<p>[1] </p>
 +
 +
<p>[http://www.hemac.org/data/Manciolino%20sword%20and%20dagger%20translation%20by%20Craig%20Pitt-Pladdy.doc Chapter 3 - Sword and Dagger]</p>
 +
 +
<p>[http://digilander.libero.it/mandritto/Manciolino5content.html Chapter 4 - Sword and Shield]</p>
 
|  
 
|  
|  
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/107|2|lbl=49r|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|108|lbl=49v|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|109|lbl=50r|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|110|lbl=50v|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/111|1|lbl=51r|p=1}}
| Et quando il detto mancino ti uolgesse uno mandritto, la uegnente mano di uno riuerso gli '''[F6]''' ferirai, & sel tirasse di riuerso, medesimamente la detta mano di uno mandritto gli guasterai, cotali regole adun que tenir si deue contra gli mancini passeggiando sempre contra la sua spada.
 
  
 
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 +
| <p>[2] </p>
 
|  
 
|  
| Seguitando hora il combatter con uno altro che mancino non fosse, dei auertire, che sel ti uorra giugner di uno mandritto per testa, tu ri tirerai il piede manco in dietro dandogli di uno mandritto per la mano della spada.
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/111|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/112|1|lbl=51v|p=1}}
  
 
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 +
| <p>[3] </p>
 
|  
 
|  
| Et sel tirera di mandritto per gamba, tu raccoglierai il piede sinistro al indietro percotendogli la mano della spada di uno mezzo mandritto.
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/112|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|113|lbl=52r|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|114|lbl=52v|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/115|1|lbl=53r|p=1}}
  
 
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 +
| <p>[4] </p>
 
|  
 
|  
| Ma ritrouandoti con il nemico nella predetta guardia coda lunga alta con il piede man co innanzi, tu puoi spigner una stoccata senza mouer pie de. Indi riducer il piede manco appo’l sinistro, si, che la spada uadi distesa in dietro, & subito uarcherai con il piede dritto innanzi spignendogli una altra punta sopra mano. Ilche fatto raccoglierai il piede destro appo il manco, et la spada sotto braccio, et subito passando con il piede debole innanzi spigneraigli una riuersa punta nella faccia, et tosto uarcherai con il piede dritto uerso le sue manche parti offendendogli la testa di uno mandritto o la antiposta gamba, & se meglio ti auerra di riuerso fare lo puoi.
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/115|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|116|lbl=53v|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/117|1|lbl=54r|p=1}}
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| [http://www.hemac.org/data/Manciolino%20double-sword%20translation%20by%20Craig%20Pitt-Pladdy.doc Chapter 11 - Double Swords]
+
| <p>[5] </p>
| '''Cap. xi. del giuoco di due spade.'''
+
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/117|2|lbl=-}}
'''P'''Erche il giuoco di due spade una per mano è molto utile & bello, in questo capitolo componer diuisiamo cio che in quello maestreuolmente far si puote.
 
  
 
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+
| <p>[6] </p>
| '''[F6v]''' Ritrouandoti adunque da uno capo della sala di rimpetto al tuo nemico & uolendo uenir seco alla pugna in mo do, che tu habbi il piede dritto alquanto dauanti al manco, & la spada della mano dritto in porta di ferro stretta, & quella della manca in guardia di testa, tu in prima passerai con il piede destro alquanto per trauerso & uer so le tue parti manche & similemente scorrerai con il sinistro, facendo la spada della destra falso & riuerso, & quella della sinistra falso et mandritto calando con questa della debole in porta di ferro stretta & con quella in guardia di testa, si, chel piede destro seguiti il sinistro per dietro.
+
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/117|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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|  
 
|  
|  
+
| <p>[7] </p>
| Indi passando con il piede destro innanzi la spada della manca deue far falso & riuerso, & quella della destra falso & mandritto calando in porta di ferro con la forte, si come con la debole in guardia di testa riporre ti dei. Seguentemente uarcherai con il piede destro uerso le sue manche parti, & poi con il sinistro in nanzi facendo falso & riuerso con la mano destra andan te la spada in guardia di testa, & con la manca falso et mandritto agiandosi in porta di ferro stretta in guisa, che la gamba destra seguiti la manca, & cosi è fonito il uenir al gioco, sottoponendo gli colpi che nel gioco si fanno & il ritornare al luoco primiero, come nelli assalti di spada & brocchero nel secondo libro facemmo.
+
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/117|4|lbl=-}}
  
 
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|  
 
|  
|  
+
| <p>[8] </p>
| '''H'''Ora essendo giunto con il nemico il uolendolo fe rire, tu scorrerai con il piede destro innanzi spignen dogli una punta nella faccia, & tirando poi uno riuerso per gamba, si, che la spada della destra cali in coda lun ga stretta, et quella della manco uadi in guardi di testa, '''[F7]''' & tosto guiderai il piede manco uerso le sue diritte parti tirandogli di uno fendente per la testa con la spada del la debole, laquale calera in porta di ferro stretta in modo chel piede destro seguiti il sinistro. Indi caccierai amen due le punte innanzi incrociando le spade per tuo schermo in modo, che la spada della forte sia soprana a quella della debole.
+
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/118|1|lbl=54v|p=1}}
  
 
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 +
| <p>[9] [http://www.hemac.org/data/Manciolino%20sword%20and%20dagger%20translation%20by%20Craig%20Pitt-Pladdy.doc Chapter 3 - Sword and Dagger]</p>
 
|  
 
|  
| Seguentemente con il piede destro passe rai uerso le sue manche parti tirandogli uno mandritto per testa colla spada destra in porta di ferro stretta, & quella della manca si dee riporre in guardia di testa, el pie de manco dietro al destro, quinci scorrerai con il piede destro uerso le sue diritte parti et poi ancho con il sinistro et in cotale passamento la spada della destra far deue falso & riuerso, & quella della sinistra falso & mandritto con la debole in porta di ferro stretta, ma con la forte in guar dia di testa ricourandosi, si, che la dritta gamba seguitatri ce sia della manca. Poscia scorgendo il piede destro innanzi gli spignerai nella faccia una punta con la spada della dritta mano.
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/118|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|119|lbl=55r|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/120|1|lbl=55v|p=1}}
  
 
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|-  
 
|  
 
|  
 +
| <p>[10] [http://digilander.libero.it/mandritto/Manciolino5content.html Chapter 4 - Sword and Shield]</p>
 
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| Indi ualicando con il manco piede uerso le sue parti destre gli darai di uno mandritto a tra uerso la tempia dritta con la spada manca, si, che la destra gamba seguiti la sinistra, & la spada della medesi ma manca cali in porta di ferro stretta, & quella della destra in guardia di faccia, & poi passerai con il piede destro innanzi spignendo una punta per faccia accompagnata da uno mandritto in porta di ferro stretta calante, & la spada della debole andara in guardia di testa, subito poi spignerai anche una punta in faccia con la mano manca, et con il tuo sinistro piede innanzi. ilche '''[F7v]''' fatto, seguentemente passerai con il destro uerso le sue manche parti tirandogli con la spada della destra uno mandritto nella tempia manca calando in porta di ferro, si, che la gamba manca seguiti la diritta per dietro, & che la spada della sinistra in guardia di testa si truoui.
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| class="noline" |  
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| class="noline" | <p>[11] </p>
| Et se per auentura il nemico ti uorra risponder con la spada della dritta tirandoti uno mandritto per testa, tu quello con la spada della debole mano urterai, & con quella della destra gli darai di una punta nel petto.
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| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/125|2|lbl=-}}
  
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{{master end}}
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| Ma se egli rispondesse di riuerso, quello medesimamen te con la spada della forte mano andar farai uano, et con quella della manca gli guasterai con uno mandritto la faccia.
 
  
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{{master begin
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| title = Sixth Book (Polearms)
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| width = 90em
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}}
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{| class="master"
 
|-  
 
|-  
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! <p>Illustrations</p>
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! <p>{{rating|Start}}<br/>Author unknown</p>
| Et quando il risposto predetto suo mandritto ti fusse offerto con la spada della manca, tu quello con il diritto filo della spada della man destra scanserai, dando gli con quella della manca di uno fendente per faccia.
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! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
  
 
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| [[file:Manciolino 8.jpg|400x400px|center]]
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| <p>'''Sixth Book.'''</p>
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<p>[1] </p>
 
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/125|3|lbl=58r|p=1}} {{pagetb|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf|126|lbl=58v|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/127|1|lbl=59r|p=1}}
| Similemente sel riuerso dal nemico fosse tirato con la mano manca, tu con il dritto filo della sinistra urtar lo dei, spignendogli una punta nella faccia della spada destra, & poscia raccogliendo il piede manco appresso il diritto scorrerai seguentemente con il destro innanzi fa cendo falso & riuerso con la mano destra, & con la spa da della manca uno mezzo mandritto per sino in guardia di faccia. Indi tirerai il piede destro appo il manco, & di presente uarcherai innanzi con il piede debole sospignendogli una punta nella faccia con la spada della manca, & tosto guidando il piede destro uerso le sue sini stre parti, gli giugnerai la testa di uno mandritto calante in porta di ferro stretta, & in guisa, chel piede man'''[F8]'''co sia del destro seguitatore, & che la spada della sinistra in guardia di testa si truoui.
 
  
 
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| <p>[2] '''Partisan and Rotella Play'''
| '''F'''Ornito il gioco, & uolendo con leggiadre maniere al capo della sala ritornare donde facesti la pri ma partita, tu traherai al indietro il piede destro facendo falso et riuerso con la spada della destra andante in guar dia di testa, & con quella della manca falso et mandritto calando in porta di ferro stretta. Dopoi ritirando medesimamente il manco in dietro con uno altro passo alla spada della manca farai falso et mandritto tirare saglien do con quella in guardia di testa, & a quella della destra falso & mandritto in porta di ferro calando. Indi con uno altro passo raccoglierai in dietro il piede destro facendo falso & riuerso con la spada della destra in guardia di testa sagliente, & con quella della manca falso & mandritto in porta di ferro stretta calante, & cosi haurai fornito la bella ritornata.
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<p>First arrange yourself at ease with the rotella on the arm, holding the partigiana in the hand in the act of thrusting against your enemy in front of you with the same weapons in the same way. And if by chance he wanted to give you a Partigianata holding in hand, to your left leg, you will cross with the right to the left side<ref>Of the enemy, I think.</ref> and directing the iron of your partigiana to the ground you will extend deeply forward towards his right part. And from that blow you will be able to avoid in a way that the left will follow your right. Then you will give him a punta riversa in the chest and towards yourself you will retire backwards with a leap, do a mezza volta above the head, finnishing in the same position as the begining. If you want to be the offender of the said Partigiana as said before, and your enemy was to defend in the way said before; as he passes with his right foot in order to ward himself you will immediately jump back with the left foot infront.</p>
  
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<p>You will still be able to get to his side and you will still be able to feint a punta for the face, and as he, fore fear of the blow, will raise the rotella you will immediately change the partigana giving him a punta on the body and moving with a jump backwards you will withdraw into the aformemtioned position. But if by change he wanted to hurl<ref>Clash.</ref> the partigiana one against the other but the enemy was first, you will pass with the right foot across towards your right side stretching the partigiana arm out so that the iron looks towards the ground, and the left foot follows the right backwards, this done, you will be warded from the throw.</p>
|
 
| '''Capitolo 12 of the sword alone.'''
 
Desiring combat against your opponent with only the sharp sword, first settle yourself with the right foot forward and with the sword in porta di ferro stretta, and without casting any blow you will constrain him in this way, recall the left foot near the right, and then direct your right forward.
 
| '''Cap. xii. Del gioco di spada sola.'''
 
'''V'''Olendo combatter contra il tuo nemico con la spada da filo sola, prima ti assetterai con il piede destro innanzi et con la spada in porta di ferro stretta, et sen za tirare alcuno colpo tu lo stringerai in questa guisa, cioè tu ritirerai il piede manco appo’l destro, et poi scorge rai esso destro innanzi.  
 
  
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<p>And if he hurls another partigianata, you will take back the left foot across towards the left side extending the partigiana widely out toward your right side in a way that the strong foot follows the weak one.</p>
 
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| The opponent finding himself so constrained will either attack or retreat, but if he pushes a thrust, you shall hit it with the false edge turning a mezzo riverso to the thigh and to defend yourself throw a falso to the sword hand from below not exceeding Guardia di Faccia and finish cutting into Porta di Ferro Stretta.
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| Che trouandosi il nemico cosi stretto gli conuerra, o ferire, o fuggire a rietro, ma se egli sospignesse una punta, tu la urterai con il falso uolgendogli uno mezzo riuerso per coscia, & per schermo tuo gli tire rai uno falso di sotto in su per la mano della spada non '''[F8v]''' trappassante la guardia di faccia, & alla perfine nella guardia di porta di ferro stretta taglierai.
 
  
 
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| But if he drives a thrust to the face in order to beset you with a mandritto or a riverso cancel  it with the false edge and when he throws the mandritto to the head avoid the blow going with your sword into Guardia di Testa and wound him with the same blow (a mandritto) to the head or leg as you wish.
+
| <p>[3] And so that the iron looks towards the ground and so you will ward from this other partigianata and in the said way of thrusting you will go back.</p>
| Ma s’egli cacciasse una punta per faccia per cagione di guastarti di uno mandritto, o riuerso, tu con il falso l’addannerai, & quando tirasse il mandritto per testa, tu con la spada in guardia di testa anderai iui schifandoti da quello, di uno cotale colpo ferendolo per testa, o per gamba, che uorrai.
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/129|2|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| But in the case he wants to give a riverso, or a mandritto to the leg. Against the mandritto withdraw the right foot to the rear, giving him a mezzo mandritto to the sword hand. But wanting to resolve the riverso, you retreat backwards with the aforementioned foot in order to wound his sword arm with a mezzo riverso, and finish in the said guard porta di ferro stretta.
+
| <p>[4] '''Another Play of the Presaid Arms'''
| Se per caso percio uorra di riuerso, o di mandritto giu gnerti per gamba. In opposto del mandritto, tu raccoglierai il piede destro a rietro dandogli di uno mezzo mandritto per la mano della spada. Ma uolendo render uano il riuerso, tu fuggirai in dietro pur con il predetto piede ferendogli il braccio della spada di uno mez zo riuerso, & finalmente nella detta guardia porta di ferro stretta ti agierai.
 
  
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<p>Following on you call on another gioco di rotella & partigiana. & although not so beautiful that the aforesaid, it will be the same very useful. To begin with, you will take with the right hand the partigiana at the pedale with left the other side of that so that you will hold well the rotella in a way that the joint<ref>''Nodi''.</ref> of both hands look upward & that the partigiana is positioned towards his right parts with the left foot advanced not very much in grande passo, waiting that the enemy strikes. If he were to make a partiginata at your leg, that you will parry that with your partigiana towards the outside, to his left side, so that the right hand is higher and able to ward better. Pulling immediately a cut in the leg, you return in the above position of the casting.</p>
|
 
| And when he pushes a thrust to give you a riverso to the head or the leg, but supposing the head, cancel it with the false edge of the sword without moving the feet and against the coming riverso, pass with with the left foot forwards making a mezza volta of the hand warding the blow. Then immediately traversing with the right [foot] towards his left side, give him a mandritto to the head or the leg, as you wish, that done, the left leg must follow the right.
 
| Et quando egli spignesse una punta per darti di uno riuerso per testa, o per gamba, ma poniamo per testa, tu quella con il falso della spada senza mouer piede an nullerai, & in contrario del uegnente riuerso tu passerai con il piede manco innanzi facendo una mezza uolta di pugno cosi schermendoti da quello.Poi subito uarcan do con il destro uerso le sue manche parti, gli darai di uno mandritto per testa o per gamba, che uuoi, ilche fatto, la gamba debole seguir la forte deue.
 
  
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+
<p>But if he trusts a partiginata at the face, you will lower the right hand towards the ground, so that the iron looks toward the above, and in this you will be safe from that slam. And you will give a partigiana punta in the turn, or for the leg, as you wish retreating in the waiting position.</p>
 
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|  
| And if the riverso was thrown to the leg, you (passing forwards with the left foot) shall turn the point towards the ground pushing a stoccata to the flank , & removing yourself from presence with a jump backwards, where at the end settle yourself in the aforesaid guard of Porta di Ferro Stretta.
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{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/129|3|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/130|1|lbl=60v|p=1}}
| Et se cotal riuerso per gamba tirato fosse, tu (passando innanzi con il piede manco) la punta uerso terra uolgerai spingendogli una stoccata per fianco, & leuandoti di presente con uno salto a rietro, oue alla fine nella gia detta guardia porta '''[G1]''' di ferro stretta ti locherai.
 
  
 
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| But if you see coming from above a  mandritto, or riverso, or fendente, or a thrust, whatever of these cover strongly with the false edge in order to avoid it, not exceeding Guardia di faccia.  Then Immediately pass with the front foot, making a turn of the fist.
+
| <p>[5] '''Partisan Play one on one'''
| Ma se dalle soprane parti tue uenir uedessi uno mandritto, o riuerso, o fendente, o punta tirata, tu qualunque di questo con il falso serai possente scansare pur che la guardia di faccia non traccorri. Indi subito col piede innanzi ualicherai, facendo una uolta di pugno.
 
  
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<p>Firstly you will take the partigiana in hand in a way that the left hand is ahead and that the knuckles of both hands are turned above, and the partigiana is across<ref>Traverses.</ref> towards your left side. If your enemy ajusts himself in the same manner or any other that he wishes, both of you may injure first. For if your enemy gives injury first thrusting a punta on your leg, you will hit<ref>Parry.</ref> it with your partigiana pushing it very outwards towards his left parts and seeing to that your right hand is placed high and to that the piont of the partigiana is quite turned to the ground and thus making yourself safe. Then immediately you will thrust a Partigianata for the flank, or the leg as you wish, retire back with a leap and come to rest as in the above. But if your enemy extends a thrust at the face or a cut<ref>Slice.</ref> to any of these, you will bend<ref>Or bow.</ref> your right towards the ground, so that the iron of the partigiana is infront of the enemy’s face, there ward from the said blows.<ref>Punta at the face.</ref> Immediately thrust him a partiginata on the flank.</p>
| class="noline" |
 
| class="noline" | That done, push him a thrust in the face or in the chest, as you wish, you can also then having covered with the aforesaid false edge, cast at him a mandritto to the face, that glides below the arm and to the chest advancing the right foot somewhat forward as much as this blow requires, & that is one of the singular defenses, that this style makes possible.  
 
| class="noline" | Ilche fatto, spigneraigli una punta nel uolto, o nel petto, che uuoi, tu puoi anchora dopoi che con il predetto falso ti haurai schermito, tirargli di uno man dritto per faccia, che scorra al in giu per le braccia & per il petto crescendo alquanto auanti con il piede destro quanto tal colpo far uolessi, & questa è delle singolari defensioni, che in questo gioco far si possa.
 
  
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<p>But if he wanted to hurt you on the leg, you will ward from it, as you have been taught in the afformentioned game. If it was hurled in one of your upper parts, you will with your left hand near the iron doing so your knuckles must look upwards.<ref>Turned above.</ref> Then you will traverse with your right foot towards his left parts warding from it with the pedale of yours, so that the left leg follows the right backwards. But he having two partigiane, if he wants to hurl you with the second in the same way, you will pass with the left [foot] across, and towards his left parts doing a volta of partigiana so that the iron looks downwards<ref>To the ground.</ref> and the left hand is under the right. And the right leg follows the left, placing in the said position of the hurtling.</p>
{{master end}}
 
 
 
{{master begin
 
| title = Fifth Book (Sword and Cape, Sword and Dagger)
 
| width = 90em
 
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{| class="master"
 
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! <p>Images</p>
 
! <p>{{rating}}<br/></p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
 
 
 
|-
 
| [[file:Manciolino 7.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 
| [http://www.hemac.org/data/Manciolino%20sword%20and%20dagger%20translation%20by%20Craig%20Pitt-Pladdy.doc Chapter 3 - Sword and Dagger]
 
 
 
[http://digilander.libero.it/mandritto/Manciolino5content.html Chapter 4 - Sword and Shield]
 
| '''LIBRO QVINTO.'''
 
'''S'''Ouente auiene nelli abondeuoli, ma poco ordinati conuiti per il copioso comolo delle uiuande tutte in uno tempo apponute che gli a quelli conuitati senza al'''[G1v]'''tro gustamento satolli si chiamino, non senza tacitamente dolersi delli mescenti ministri, e quali o per fuggir fatica del recarsi frequentemente gli carichi piatti, o per uoler insiememente alla horreuole mensa manicare, fanno a gli seduti intorno al sordinato Corredo contata ingiuria.
 
 
 
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| Nel cui dannato errore non uolendo io incorrere, non ui ho uoluto (Saui Lettori) appor nel prencipio della opra dauanti ogni cosa, ma nel recamento di qualunque suo libro (che è a guisa di cibo) con lo antiposto prologo partorir diletto, si perche con il sapore del continouato libro tocchi il uostro gusto, come per difendermi da molti morsi della inui dia nell guisa, che son per fare al presente. Perche molti sono, che ignorantemente dicono l’opra mia douer esser mancheuole, conciosiacosa, che non contenghi li modi d’in uitar il nemico al combattere, nelle giuste cagioni che alla mortale pugna conducer gli guerrieri possano, ne cui la elettione del campo o delle armi partenghi, & simili so le. Fole chiamo, percio che follemente costoro giudicano douer pertenere al schermitore quello, che all’arte sua è piu alieno, che se degli uiaggi del sole, & della luna uolesse trattare, & per cio gli rispondo, che come di qualun que delli cinque sentimenti è uno solo oggetto, cosi di qualunque arte non puote essere piu di uno soggetto, che la potentia uisiua non potra mai hauer per oggetto altro, chel colore, la ascoltatiua, il suono, la gustatiua, il sapore, & cosi del rimanente di cotali sia detto, & come sciocco sarebbe chi dicesse la uerture della orecchia non solamente poter udire, ma ancho uedere, o gustare gli sapori, cosi '''[G2]''' priuo di intelletto è, chi dice l’arte schermitoria non hauer solamente a discernere la uertute delli colpi, ma ancho le cagioni ch’al combattere promouer ci possano, & le altre antidette cianze, & chi è si cieco, che udito il nome della arte che è schermitoria dal schermire cioè dal difendere detta, che non uenghi in cognitione del suo soggetto? che è il conoscer gli colpi & dare il modo de saper schifarsi da quelli, Et se tu uuoi pur che ancho essa giudichi la ragione delli combattitori, & tratti a cui la elettione dell’armi & del combatter partenghi, sera di bisogno, che la habbi altro nome, chi di schermire, & che cosi schermitoria, come giudicatoria, anzi insegnante l’imperiali leggi chiamare si possi, o ignoranti, o capi di ingegno rintuzzato, non ui accorgete anchora del errore, nelquale uuoi sete? Lasciati in uostra malhora le legge alli giuristi, & se sapete l’arte del schermire, parlati solamente quello che spetta al schermire cioè del grande giudicio che conuiene hauere ad uno nel sicurarsi dalle offese, & parimente come deue offendere il nemico, & poscia quando sarete scientiati nelle leggi, parlarete di cio, ma come leggisti, & non come schermitori. Perche di una istessa cosa piu consideratori essere ponno, come un corpo humano puote essere considerato dal naturale Philosopho, dal medico & dal Astrologo.
 
 
 
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| Dal Philosopho inquanto è uno congiungimento di Anima & di Corpo, o di materia, & di forma. Del medico, inquanto è composto di quattro elementi, & per gli signoriggianti '''[G2v]''' esser soggetto a tali passioni, & oltre a cio egli lo giudica come signato indiuiduo, chel Philosopho come uniuersale lo stimaua, ma dal astrologo sera considerato il medesimo corpo humano pur in indiuiduo: inquanto sotto tale celeste influsso nacque, ne sera lecito (poniamo) al medico mentre uorra parlare di tale corpo humano, oltra le sue dette complessioni, dir ancho degli influssi celesti cagionanti quelle, & quando pur dira de gli influssi, no parlera come medico, ma come astrologo.
 
 
 
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| Cosi duo uenuti al punto del combattere possono esser dal giurista & dal schermitore diuersamente considerati, dal giurista, inquanto il combattimento è giusto, o ingiusto dando la ragione, & la elettione al tale, ma dal schermitore si considera, inquanto sel tale stara in tale guardia sera sicuro, & con tale colpo potra offendere, onde piu è conueneuole al medico parlare della astrologia per la uicinitate delle scientie, che al schermitore delle ragioni cittadinesche, o imperiali, tutto che in questo la schermitoria alla medicina si assomigli, che come la medicina iui comincia torre il prencipio doue il Philosopho ha fatto fine. Cosi la schermitoria comincia la sua uertute, oue gia fece fine il giurista. Percio, che il giurista iui finio quando per tale ragione alla pugna gli conduce assignando perche cotale combattimento fosse lecito, & il schermitore piglio il prencipio quando le armi gia date gli forono, si come ancho il scrittore, ilquale comincia adoperare la carta dopoi che dal suo artifice è fornita, ne spetta a lui uedere di che straccia sia fatta, come ha gia la penna in mano, che cio parteneua al maestro di '''[G3]''' quella, & come auiene al scrittore ancho scriuer spesse fiate sopra la carta, che non è buona, per non hauerne di altra maniera, cosi al schermitore senza molta ne buona ragione operare l’arme, non è adunque la ragione ciuile che fa buona & perfetta quest’arte, ma solamente il saper defendersi & offender, per che è manifesto il sogget to di quella essere il conoscimento delli colpi et non altro, liquali se io basteuolemente nella opra mia insegnero, in che hauero io mancato? in che errato? in che non sodisfatto a tutto quello, che alla mia arte partenghi: hauranno ben errato quelli (se alcun si presontuosi sono) che proponendo parlare della arte schermitoria, hauranno delle dette cianze trattato, ne altrimenti sono da chiamare appresso loro. Ignoranti del precetto di Aristotele nel primo delli posteriori, che non è lecito andar di genere in genere cioe di soggetto in soggetto.
 
 
 
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| Ma per far ritorno al nostro instituto i quattro giochi diuideremo questo quin to libro. Il primo & secondo fieno di spada da filo et cappa, ma il primo nel combattimento di uno solo con uno altro, & il secondo in quello di duo contra altri tan ti. Il seguente gioco sera di spada da filo nella destra, & del pugnale nella manca. Il quarto fia di spada & di rotello. Incominciando adunque dal primo dico, che.
 
 
 
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| '''Cap. primo del gioco di spada & cappa.'''
 
'''S'''E per auentura tu haurai la cappa a torno, la lascerai cader giuso dal homero destro per sino al mezzo del sinistro braccio. Ilche fatto, tantosto uolgerai la man '''[G3v]''' ca mano per di fuori, la detta ricaduta cappa sopra il braccio raccogliendo, & di presente con l’altra mano suaginando la spada in coda lunga alta con il piede manco innanzi ti agierai leggiadramente.
 
 
 
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| Et se per caso medesimamente il tuo nemico in cotale guardia agiato uedrai, tu senza far colpo anchora ti strignerai forte contra lui, per ilquale strengimento gli conuerra, o tirare, o fuggire al indietro, ma s’egli tirasse una stoccata con il piede manco innanzi, tu uarcherai, uerso le sue deboli parti con il forte piede rispondendogli di uno riuerso a guisa di fendente a trauerso il suo braccio della spada, si, chel piede manco seguiti il destro, & poi rittran do il piede dritto al indietro in coda lunga alta come è sopra detto con il sinistro piede innanzi ti assetterai.
 
 
 
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| Nellaquale guardia ritrouandoti agiato tu scorrerai con il piede destro innanzi spignendogli una mezza punta. Indi subito tireraigli di uno mezzo riuerso nel pu gno della cappa senza mouer la spada da quel luoco. Impero, che per tale colpo nel pugno datogli, egli ti rispondera douutamente di punta, o di mandritto, o di fendente. Et quando egli spignesse la punta, tu quella con il dritto filo della spada uerso terra affonderai di una tua punta riuersale offendendogli il petto.
 
 
 
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| Ouero gli tirerai d’uno riuerso nel uolto. Ma se egli facesse il man dritto, ol fendente, per qualunque di questi, tu scorrerai in nanzi con il manco schifandoti con la cappa, & giungendolo di una stoccata ne gli fianchi.
 
 
 
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| Ilche fatto, ti leuerai a rietro uno salto nella di sopra insegnata guardia.
 
 
 
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| Nellaquale anchora essendo con il nemico '''[G4]''' & egli spignendoti una stoccata con il piede sinistro innanzi raccogliesse il detto piede appo il dritto, Et indi uarcasse con il destro innanzi & insiememente la testa di uno mandritto guastar ti uolesse. Tu primieramente alla stoccata non ti mouerai, ma come egli tirera il mandritto per testa, tu fuggirai con il manco piede al indietro tirandogli uno mandritto per la mano della spada, & poi tu fuggirai con il piede destro a rietro facendo una mez za uolta di pugno & assettandoti nella gia detta guardia.
 
 
 
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| Nellaquale essendo con il nemico, & egli uolendoti sospignere una punta, o mandritto, o fendente, per ciascheduno di questi colpi tu scorrerai innanzi con il pie de manco uerso le sue sinistre parti cacciando la spada con la punta uerso terra & poi in guisa di rota facendola gi re in su uenerai a raccogliere qualunque delli detti offen siui colpi. Indi ualicando con il destro uerso le sue sini stre parti, gli ferirai la testa di uno mandritto o la gamba in modo chel piede debole seguiti il forte, & cio fatto, ritirerai il piede destro al indietro facendo la sopradetta uolta di pugno per cui ti uerrai ad agiare nella guardia antidetta. Potresti anchora per cagione di tentar il nemico, quando egli non uolesse uscir dalla guardia, spigner una mezza punta con il piede destro innanzi et tirare uno mezzo riuerso per coscia cosi aspettando risposta. Ilquale se tirera di punta, tu quella con il diritto filo urterai affondandola uerso terra, & subito gli darai di un’altra punta riuersa nel petto, ouero di uno riuerso nella faccia.
 
 
 
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| Ma s’egli tirasse di mandritto, o di fendente per testa, tu anderai con la spada in guardia '''[G4v]''' di testa iui schifandoti da quelli, & dandogli in risposta di uno mandritto per testa, o per gamba, come uuoi. Et se cotali colpi tirar uolesse per gamba, tu passando con il piede manco innanzi caccierai il falso sotto la nemica spa da dandogli di uno riuerso per gamba in modo, chel tuo piede destro seguiti il sinistro per dietro, & poscia gli spignerai una stoccata per faccia leuandoti subito con uno salto al indietro, & finalmente nella guardia che dicemmo riducendoti.
 
 
 
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| Ma sel Nemico fosse quello, che ti tentasse sconciar dalla guardia con una sospinta punta et con il piede destro innanzi per cagione di ferirti la testa o la antiponuta gamba con uno riuerso, quando per caso la uedesti uenire alla testa, tu primieramente in defensione della punta gli ferirai la mano della spada con uno mezzo mandritto in cingiara porta di ferro calante.
 
 
 
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| Et com’egli tirera il riuerso, tu scorrendo con il pie de destro innanzi, anderai con la spada in guardia di te sta dal detto colpo schermendoti et facendo la cappa buo na guardatrice del capo gli darai di uno mandritto per testa, o per gamba che uuoi.
 
 
 
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| Et s’egli tirasse il riuerso per gamba, tu uarcherai con il destro innanzi facendo in questo tempo una mezza uolta del pugno, si, che la punta della spada guardi uerso terra, & iui il detto riuerso urterai. Dopoi subito gli darai di uno mandritto per testa, & per tuo schermo con il piede destro all’indietro fuggirai rassettandoti nella solita guardia.
 
 
 
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| Vogliendoti anchora sconciare il nemico dalla guardia con uno mandritto ouero fendente per testa, per cagione di schifar ti da qualunque di questi colpi, tu ritirerai il piede manco '''[G5]''' indietro dandogli d’uno mezzo mandritto nel braccio della spada, et similemente fuggendo con il destro, ti agie rai nella guardia al usato. Ma s’egli tirasse il mandrit to per gamba, tu raccoglierai il piede manco pur al indietro tirandogli di uno mandritto per la mano della spa da, & poi medesimamente ritirando il destro nella guardia solita ti acconcierai. Et se per caso il nemico tirasse di uno mandritto per testa, tu scorrendo con il piede destro innanzi uerso le sue destre parti, gli spignerai una punta per la faccia & per il braccio della spada facendoti sotto quella picciolo et cosi dal colpo ti renderai scher mito. Dopoi guiderai il piede manco uerso le sue destre parti ferendolo di uno trauersale riuerso per la dritta gam ba, si, chel piede destro uadi rietro al manco, et per tuo riparo gli spignerai una stoccata per fianco leuandoti al indietro con uno salto & al usato nella guardia riducen doti. Se ancho il nemico ti uorra offender la testa pur di mandritto, o di riuerso in riparo di qualunque cotale colpo, tu passerai con il piede destro innanzi schifandoti con l’urtante cappa, et nel medesimo tempo gli caccierai una stoccata nel petto, & poi ritirando il piede destro al indietro, anderai con la spada in guardia di faccia per tuo riparo, & seguentemente ritirando il piede manco al indietro, ti assetterai, in coda lunga stretta con il piede destro innanzi.
 
 
 
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| '''H'''Auendo detto di quelli colpi che in guardia coda lunga alta con il piede manco innanzi far si pon no con la spada da filo & cappa, quiui soggiungero de alcuni altri non di menore profitteuolezza, che con la pre'''[G5v]'''detta spada & cappa fare si potrebbono in coda lunga stretta con il piede destro innanzi, nellaquale essendo agiato. tu porrai mente che sel nemico tirera di mandritto o fendente, ti conuerra andare in guardia di testa schifandoti iui dal tirato colpo con risposta subita di uno mandritto per gamba, & poi per tuo riparo ritirerai il piede destro all’indietro sospignendo insieme una punta, che uadi in guardia di faccia in compagnia della cappa. Indi raccoglierai il piede manco a rietro uolgendo la mano della spada per il cui uolgimento ti assetterai nella detta guardia coda lunga stretta con il pie de destro innanzi.
 
 
 
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| Potresti anchora in contrario del mandritto spigner una punta per faccia facendoti sotto la tua spada picciolo & cosi schermendoti da quello, Ilche fatto, subito uarcherai con il piede debole uerso le sue destre parti dandogli di uno riuerso per gamba in guisa, ch’el piede destro seguiti il manco. Indi per tuo riparo gli spignerai una stoccata per faccia leuandoti con uno salto all’indietro. Dopoi ilquale ti riporrai nella detta guardia.
 
 
 
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| Ouero potrai uarcare con il piede manco innanzi schifandoti con la cappa dal detto mandritto per testa, ilche fatto, spignerai una stoccata per fianco, & leueraiti con uno salto all’indietro ritornando ad agiarti nella solita guardia di cui hora parliamo.
 
 
 
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| Ouero leuerai la cappa alla guardia di testa dandogli in quel tempo di uno mezzo mandritto nel suo braccio offendente, si, che la tua spada uadi in porta di ferro stretta, & per tuo schermo ritirerai il piede destro in dietro andando con la spada in guar'''[G6]'''dia di faccia accompagnando quella con la cappa.
 
 
 
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| Indi fuggirai con il manco piede al indietro assettandoti nella gia detta guardia.
 
 
 
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|
 
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| Ma se per caso egli tirasse il mandritto per gamba, tu scorrerai con il piede manco uerso le sue diritte parti cacciando il falso della spada sotto il detto colpo, & subito gli darai di uno riuerso per gamba, in modo, chel piede destro sia del manco seguitatore per dietro. Et per tuo schermo gli tirerai una stoccata per faccia leuandoti con uno salto gaiamente all’indietro, et alla per fine ritrouandoti nella detta guardia.
 
 
 
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| Ouero tu fuggirai con il piede destro all’indietro ferendolo di uno mezzo mandritto nel braccio della spa da & poi ritirerai all’indietro il sinistro piede agiandoti nella tua predetta guardia.
 
 
 
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| Trouandoui anchora ambiduo nella predetta coda lunga stretta con il piede destro innanzi, & uolendo tu offendere, uarcherai con il piede manco innanzi uerso le sue destre parte spignendogli una punta nella faccia.
 
 
 
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| Et com’egli uorra schifarsi da quella, tu scorrerai con il piede destro innanzi cacciando la tua cappa sotto la sua spada & in cotal tempo il pugno della spada tirerai in dietro, & gli darai d’un’altra punta ne gli fianchi. Indi in tuo schermo fuggirai con il piede destro all’indietro ferendogli il braccio della spada d’uno mezzo mandritto in guisa, che poi la spada cali in cingiara porta di ferro, poscia con tre, o quattro passi in ricourerai a rietro agiandoti nella antidetta guardia.
 
 
 
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|
 
|
 
| '''[G6v] Gioco di duo contra duo con le spade da filo & cappe imbracciate.'''
 
'''I'''N questo gioco o combattere mortale tu ti dei agiare con il tuo compagno di rimpetto alli duo altri insieme compagni similemente, ma nemici uostri, si, che ciascu no habbi in contrario il suo in guisa di guadrangulo, ilche fatto, conuenirai tacitamente con il tuo sotio di cangiar nemico con andamento incrociato in questa maniera, che hauendo teco il tuo compagno dalla tua manca mano o dalla destra, che uuoi, quello di uoi, che si truouera alla sinistra (secondo l’ordine tra uoi da nascoso dato) fara sembiante di spigner una stoccata a quello nemico, che gli sera di rimpetto a lui, non dimeno abbando nando il sembiante deue uarcare grandemente con il pie de destro uerso il nemico del suo compagno, defendendosi con la cappa, da colui, che egli abbandona, & ferendo quello che assalisce nelli fianchi con quella stoccata che uscite dal sembiante. Ilche deue ancho fare il suo compa gno contra il nemico non suo, ma del suo sotio con simile andamento incrocicchiato & pur con una consimile pun ta ne gli fianchi sospinta, che trouando ciascheduno il compagno del suo nemico inauertito, haura balia di riportare dal gentile combattimento la disiata uettoria.
 
 
 
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|
 
| [http://www.hemac.org/data/Manciolino%20sword%20and%20dagger%20translation%20by%20Craig%20Pitt-Pladdy.doc Chapter 3 - Sword and Dagger]
 
| '''Gioco di spada da filo a filo nella destra, & con il pugnale nella manca.'''
 
'''P'''Rima ti agierai con il piede manco innanzi, et con la spada in coda lunga alta, & con il pugnale in '''[G7]''' porta di ferro stretta, & ritirando il piede destro appo il manco scorrerai poscia innanzi con il detto manco. Ilche fatto, il nemico sera astretto, o tirare, o andare in dietro.
 
 
 
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| Ma se egli tirasse di uno mandritto per testa, tu anderai con il pugnale in guardia di testa et iui da quel lo ti schiferai passando tosto con il piede destro uerso le sue manche parti et in cotale passamento gli darai di uno mandritto per gamba; o di una punta per fianco, si, che la gamba manca seguiti la destra per dietro, et per schermo tuo te ritirerai tre o quattro passi al indietro nella predet ta guardia agiandoti.
 
 
 
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| Ma s’egli spignesse una stocca ta, tu con il falso del pugnale la urterai cacciandogli una consimile nello fianco in modo, che tu cresci alquanto con il piede manco innanzi, & per tuo riparo ti leuerai con uno salto a rietro agiandoti nella sopra insegnata guardia.
 
 
 
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| Et se la nemica punta uedesti uenire per faccia ac cioche offender ti potesse l’antiponuta gamba d’uno mandritto, tu con il pugnale da quella ti schermirai, ma com’egli uorra ferirti del mandritto, tu caccierai sotto, il fal so della spada. Indi subito passerai con il destro uerso le sue manche parti, uolgendogli uno mandritto per testa, o per gamba, si, chel piede manco seguiti il sinistro, et il pu gnale si troui in guardia di testa. Poscia per tuo riparo tre o quattro passi ti raccoglierai a rietro agiandoti nel la soprana guardia.
 
 
 
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| Se ancho il nemico spignera una punta per guastarti la testa, o la antiposta gamba di uno riuerso, tu con il pugnale ti renderai schifato, Ma come ue drai uenire il riuerso per gamba, tu ancho con il pugna le l’urterai facendo che la punta guardi uerso terra, & '''[G7v]''' in questo medesimo tempo con la spada nel petto gli spignerai una punta, o gli percoterai il braccio della spada di uno falso.
 
 
 
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|
 
| [http://digilander.libero.it/mandritto/Manciolino5content.html Chapter 4 - Sword and Shield]
 
| '''Gioco di Spada, & di Rotella.'''
 
I porrai da uno canto della sola con la spada in mano & la rotella in braccio con quella leggiadria, che ti fia possible. Et uolendo assalir il nemico, tu uarcherai con il piede manco uerso le sue destre parti scorrendo innanzi con il destro piede, et in tale passamen to tu farai falso et mandritto, si, che la spada cali in por ta di ferro larga el piede & il piede manco segua il destro. Indi guiderai il piede destro alquanto uerso le sue manche parti, & seguentemente con il sinistro a grande passo & in questo tempo tu farai falso & riuerso in modo, chel forte piede segua il debole, & la spada si tro ui in coda lunga alta. Dopoi tu passerai con il piede manco alquanto uerso le tue destre parti scorrendo con il destro a grande passo innanzi & facendo falso & man dritto in quello tempo.
 
 
 
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| Dopoi la spada calera in porta di ferro larga el piede manco seguitera il destro. Indi passando il dritto alquanto uerso le tue manche parti & seguentemente con il manco innanzi a grande uarco, farai falso & riuerso, el piede destro seguira il sinistro per dietro & la spada si trouera in coda lunga alta, & cosi serai uenuto a gioco.
 
 
 
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| Ma uolendo gia accender la pugna con il nemico homai prossimano, tu spignerai una stoccata con il piede manco innanzi.
 
 
 
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| Indi raccoglierai il detto manco appo il destro lasciando andar la spade '''[G8]''' distesa al indietro, & subito uarcherai con il piede destro innanzi facendo sembiante di dargli uno mandritto per testa, ma com’egli leuera la rotella per timore del detto colpo, tu sceglierai di fare una di queste due cose, cioè, Ouero gli giugnerai la gamba con uno riuerso, ouer passando con il piede manco innanzi gli caccierai una stoccata per fianco leuandoti con uno salto al indietro, ma in schermo del riuerso detto di sopra tu fuggirai con il piede destro indietro tirando uno falso sotto la tua rotella, et iui dalla nemica risposta ti farai sicuro. Et poi ti allargarai il braccio della spada ritornando in coda lunga.
 
 
 
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| Indi guiderai il piede manco uerso le sue deboli parti, et seguen temente con il destro innanzi tirandogli falso et mandrit to per la mano della spada, si, che finalmente cali in porta di ferro larga, & che la gamba manca seguisca la destra poi tu ualicherai con il piede destro uerso le sue dritte par ti, et poi con il manco innanzi a grande passo, & in questo tempo tu farai falso et riuerso per il suo braccio della spada in guisa, chel piede destro destro seguiti il manco. Poi subito ritirando il piede debole appo il forte, spignerai una punta con il piede dritto innanzi, che uadi nella faccia del nemico. Indi farai sembiante di dargli di uno riuerso et nondimeno gli giugnerai la antiponuta gamba con uno mandritto et farai che la tua spada cali in porta di ferro larga, et che la rotella sia bunoa schermitrice della testa. poscia guiderai il piede manco uerso le sue parti in questo uarco simile con la rotella dal nemico colpo ti ser uerai tirandogli di uno riuerso per coscia, el piede tuo dritto deue seguire il manco.
 
 
 
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| Poi prestamente per tuo ri'''[G8v]'''paro gli tirerai una stoccata per fianco leuandoti al indietro con uno salto & passerai con il piede destro gran de passo innanzi & in questo tempo gli spignerai una punta nella faccia accompagnata da uno riuerso per coscia. Ilche fatto, guiderai il manco piede uerso le sue diritte parti cacciando il falso della spada sotto la tua rotel la, & cosi serai schifato dal mandritto, che tirar potesse il nemico, dandogli tu d’uno riuerso a trauerso la antiposta coscia. Poi fuggirai con il piede manco al indietro andando con la spada in guardia di faccia per il quale andamento serai preseruato dal nemico colpo. Poscia passerai con il tuo piede manco uerso le sue destre parti tiran dogli uno riuerso in guisa di fendente & la gamba destra seguira la manca per dietro.
 
 
 
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| Indi uarcherai con il piede manco uerso le sue manche parti, & medesimamente con il destro spignendogli una punta nella faccia & tirandogli per gamba uno mandritto, che cali in por ta di ferro larga, in guisa, chel piede manco seguiti il destro per dietro. Poi tu passerai con il piede destro uerso le sue destre parti & seguentemente innanzi con il man co facendo insieme falso & riuerso, si, che la spada cali in coda lunga bene distesa al indietro. Dopoi tu tirerai la gamba dritta appo la manca, et tosto passerai con il pie de manco innanzi, leuando in suso la rotella, & guastan dogli la faccia con uno falso, poi tu fuggirai con il piede manco a rietro tirandogli uno riuerso per faccia, & ritirandoti medesimamente con il destro spigneraigli una punta per sotto la tua rotella, che uadi in guardia di faccia, seguentemente allargherai il braccio della spada asset'''[H1]'''tandoti in coda lunga alta.
 
 
 
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| Ma sel nemico tirasse uerso te colpo alcuno, tu gli darai di uno falso nella mano della spada per sotto la tua rotella, & subito ritornerai nella tua guardia. Indi caccierai una stoccata con il pie de manco innanzi ritirando il detto piede dopoi il destro & la spada andando distesa al indietro.
 
 
 
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| Et subito uar cherai con il piede destro innanzi ferendogli la testa di uno fendente, che cali in porta di ferro larga. Poi tu tire rai il piede destro appo il manco. Et come egli uorra ac cennarti di qualche colpo, tu passando con il piede destro innanzi da quello con il falso ti schiferai ferendogli la testa o la antiposta gamba di uno riuerso, & per tuo scher mo tu fuggirai con il piede destro al in dietro spingnen do una punta sotto la tua rotella, che uadi in guardia di faccia, & iui dal suo colpo ti schermirai, assettandoti poscia nella detta guardia coda lunga alta.
 
 
 
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| Seguentemen te tu spigneraigli una punta nel uolto con il piede destro innanzi, & quando fare la uorrai, habbi mente chel nemi co si troui con il piede destro innanzi. Indi passando con il manco uerso le sue diritte parti gli tirerai d’uno mandritto per gamba facendo che la rotella guardi bene la testa in modo, chel piede destro seguitatore sia del manco. Poi gli spignerai una stoccata nella faccia leuandoti con uno salto al indietro, & cosi nella detta guardia ti agierai.
 
 
 
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| Ma se per uentura egli tirasse uno mandritto, ouero fendente per testa, tu scorrerai con il piede diritto uerso le sue diritte parti cacciandogli una punta nel uolto per sotto la tua rotella, laquale punta uadi per sino in guar dia di faccia, & in modo che ti facci picciolo sotto la tua '''[H1v]''' spada con quella quiui urtando il nemico colpo. Poi subito passerai con il piede manco uerso le sue diritte parti offendendogli la antiponuta gamba di uno riuerso, in modo, chel tuo piede destro seguiti il manco, et per tuo schermo gli spignerai una stoccata nella faccia leuandoti con uno salto al indietro, & alla per fine nella detta guardia coda lunga alta ti agierai.
 
 
 
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| Et s’egli ti uolesse giugner la gamba con uno mandritto, tu uarcando con il piede de stro innanzi, caccierai il falso della spada per sotto la tua rotella & cosi ti hauerai da cotale colpo sicurato, ferendogli in risposta di uno riuerso l’antiposta gamba, poscia per tuo riparo fuggirai con il piede destro al indietro spignen do una punta per sotto la tua rotella, che uadi in guardia di faccia. Et medesimamente ritirando il manco gli darai di uno mandritto in guisa di fendente, che cali in por ta di ferro stretta.
 
 
 
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| Indi tu caccerai una punta con il pie de manco innanzi, & seguentemente passerai con il piede destro uerso le sue manche parti guastandogli la testa o la gamba con uno mandritto, che uenghi in porta di fer ro stretta et il piede manco dee seguitare il destro. Dopoi tu raccoglierai il piede destro in dietro agiandoti pur in coda lunga alta.
 
 
 
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| Et quando egli ti uolesse giugner la testa di uno mandritto, tu quello con la rotella urterai facendo una mezza uolta di persona senza mouimento di piede, et poi gli darai di uno mezzo mandritto per il suo braccio della spada che s’acquetti in cingiara porta di ferro, et subito uarcherai con il piede destro innanzi tiran dogli di sotto in su uno falso per la mano della spada accompagnato da uno riuerso per coscia et la spada calerai '''[H2]''' in coda lunga stretta con il piede destro innanzi, & in questa guardia non si puote far colpo che cosi non si dau ni, ne miglior di questa nel presente gioco esser giudico.
 
 
 
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| class="noline" |
 
| class="noline" |
 
| class="noline" | Fornita adunque la pugna, et uolendo con gratia da lei al usato ritornare, prima raccoglierai a rietro il piede destro facendo falso et mandritto, si, che la spada cali in cingiara porta di ferro. Indi rittrattando medesimamen te il manco, farai falso et riuerso con il calare in coda lun ga stretta, et pur con il destro uarcando in dietro riuoche rai falso & mandritto, in guisa, che la spada cali in cingiara porta di ferro, & finalmente riponendo il manco piede appo il destro allargherai il braccio della spada, & ricourandoti in coda lunga alta ti ritrouerai nel luoco, donde ti partisti.
 
 
 
|}
 
{{master end}}
 
 
 
{{master begin
 
| title = Sixth Book (Polearms)
 
| width = 90em
 
}}
 
{| class="master"
 
|-
 
! <p>Images</p>
 
! <p>{{rating|Start}}<br/>Author unknown</p>
 
! <p>Transcription<br/>by [[Steven Reich]]</p>
 
 
 
|-
 
| [[file:Manciolino 8.jpg|400x400px|center]]
 
|
 
| '''LIRO SESTO '''
 
'''D'''I quanto ingannati siano quelli, che dicono la buona arte del combattere non esser nella disci'''[H2v]'''plina con le ottuse & non taglienti spade appresa, quiui mostrar intendo.
 
 
 
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|
 
| Et per la primiera gli dimando, se l’intelletto è quello che imprende, o gli piedi? liquali essen do astretti a dire, che l’intelletto è lo imprendente, un’altra richiesta faccio, se l’intelletto piglia quelle medesime cose reali, che gli sono dauanti parate, o pur le loro similitudini? nel uero non seranno si stolti, che dire presumino gli miei discepoli hauer imparata quella medesima arte che in me siede, ma una a lei consimile, ne il peregrino da Roma ritornato, recca nella sua mente Roma propria (che le sue mura non gli entrarebbono nel capo) ma bene la sua somiglianza sopra cui piegandosi lo’ntelletto (ben che in Bologna fosse) a suo piacere uedrebbe Roma, come se in quella fosse. Sono adunque le similitudini tanto uicine al uero et alle cose da loro rappresentate, che hauute quelle, uengono insieme ancho le cose conosciute, lequali di due maniere sono, alcune entrano solamente nel intellet to, come le predette, & queste non da altrui che solo da quello, di cui è lo’ntelletto ueder si ponno alcuni sono in altre cose fuori del intelletto, & queste da tutti ad uno modo medesimo si rendono manifeste come se uno altro hauesse la mia somiglianza, ne questa maniera è inferiore alla soprana, che gli uolanti augelli piu uolte ueggendo ne gli muri le natiuamente depinte uue stimando di quelle (rappresentanti le uere) pascersi sono ingannati, & il giouane Narciso nel mirar la fonte in cui si mostraua la sua bella imagine, quella (ignorante che sua fosse) ad amar si mise. Noi anchora nelle sacre chiese dauanti gli effigiati marmi, o depinture. Il uero Iddio adoriamo sa'''[H3]'''peuoli percio quello esser marmo, o colore & non Iddio, tutto che la sua maestate ci rappresenti, onde seguita l’adoratione esser buona. Et per discender homai a lo stitu to non solamente auiene l’arte nostra hauere gli suoi simolacri a guisa delle prenarrate cose, come le spade senza filo & altre armi di non molta offensione, che le offen sibili rappresentano, ma fina li seruitori delle mense (se perfetti esser disiano) prima che alla uera carne tagliar si diano a loro uolanti coltelli le radici e li naoni, ouer rapi sopponeno, & molti hanno li agnelli, et seluaggiumi sno dati di fabricato legno, dal tagliamento de liquali alle ue re canri poscia si trasferiscono, cessi adunque l’ignorante uolgo dire quello che non sa, percio che colui che ferira del rintuzzato ferro, molto meglio ferira del tagliante, ne ho nesto sarebbe, che gli rozzi discepoli con le offensibili arme amaestrati fossono, ne ancho con tali istrumenti che nel le percossure doler non faccino accio che li nouelli defendersi imparino.
 
 
 
|-
 
|
 
|
 
| Ma hauendo gia basteuolmente tratta to delli combattimenti de le piccioli armi, in questo sesto libro comporremo l’arte delle hastate non di menore leg giadria, et util, che le predette, ilquale comprendera duo giochi prima di rotella et partegiana, & poi di due par tegiane suole, & nel terzo luoco il combattimento di spie di, & seguentemente delle ronche & lancie.
 
 
 
|-
 
|
 
| '''Partisan and Rotella Play'''
 
<br>First arrange yourself at ease with the rotella on the arm, holding the partigiana in the hand in the act of thrusting against your enemy in front of you with the same weapons in the same way. And if by chance he wanted to give you a Partigianata holding in hand, to your left leg, you will cross with the right to the left side<ref>Of the enemy, I think.</ref> and directing the iron of your partigiana to the ground you will extend deeply forward towards his right part. And from that blow you will be able to avoid in a way that the left will follow your right. Then you will give him a punta riversa in the chest and towards yourself you will retire backwards with a leap, do a mezza volta above the head, finnishing in the same position as the begining. If you want to be the offender of the said Partigiana as said before, and your enemy was to defend in the way said before; as he passes with his right foot in order to ward himself you will immediately jump back with the left foot infront.
 
| '''Gioco di Rotella & Partegiana contra alle medesime Armi.'''
 
'''T'''I agierai prima con la roteela in braccio, & con la partegiana in mano in atto di tirare contra il '''[H3v]''' tuo nemico stante con le medesime armi nella predetta guisa. Et se per auentura egli ti uolesse cacciar nella gamba manca una partigianata a mano tenente, tu uarcando con il forte piede uerso le sue deboli parti, & uolgendo il ferro della tua partigiana uerso terra stenderai il braccio fortemente innanzi uerso le sue diritte parti, et iui da quello colpo ti schiferai, in modo, che la gamba man ca seguace sia della destra. Indi gli darai di una punta riuersa nel petto, et per tuo riparo di presente ti leuerai a rietro con uno salto facendo una mezza uolta con la par tigiana sopra la testa, & riducendoti nella maniera, che nel principio ti agiasti. Ma se tu uolesti esser il feritore della predetta partigianata come sopra è detto, et chel ni mico nel predetto modo (che tu apparisti) defender si uolesse. Come li passera con il piede destro per uoler schifarsi, tu subito salterai al indietro, & agieraiti nella guisa di sopra con il piede manco innanzi.
 
 
 
|-
 
|
 
| You will still be able to get to his side and you will still be able to feint a punta for the face, and as he, fore fear of the blow, will raise the rotella you will immediately change the partigana giving him a punta on the body and moving with a jump backwards you will withdraw into the aformemtioned position. But if by change he wanted to hurl<ref>Clash.</ref> the partigiana one against the other but the enemy was first, you will pass with the right foot across towards your right side stretching the partigiana arm out so that the iron looks towards the ground, and the left foot follows the right backwards, this done, you will be warded from the throw.
 
| Tu potrai anchora accostare al nemico, & far sembiante di spignergli una punta nel uolto, & com’egli per timore di quella alciera la rotella, tu subito cangierai la partigiana dandogli di una punta nel corpo, & leuandoti con uno salto al indietro, tornerai la partigiana sopra mano nella anti detta forma rassettandoti. Ma se amenduo uoler uenes se di slanciar un contra l’altro le partigiane, & ch’el ne mico fosse il primo, tu passerai con il piede diritto per tra uerso uerso le tue destre spingendo parimente il braccio della partigiana in fuori, si chel ferro guardi uerso terra, el piede manco seguiti il destro per dietro. Ilche fatto, ti haurai sicurato dalla slanciata.
 
 
 
|-
 
|
 
| And if he hurls another partigianata, you will take back the left foot across towards the left side extending the partigiana widely out toward your right side in a way that the strong foot follows the weak one.
 
| Et s’egli slanciasse '''[H4]''' un’altra partigianata, tu ritornerai il piede manco per trauerso, uerso le tue parti manche, spignerai il braccio della partigiana molto in fuori uerso le tue destre parti in guisa, chel piede ualido seguiti il debole.
 
 
 
|-
 
 
|  
 
|  
| And so that the iron looks towards the ground and so you will ward from this other partigianata and in the said way of thrusting you will go back.
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/130|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/131|1|lbl=61r|p=1}}
| Et ch’el ferro guardi uerso terra, & cosi sarai schermito da questa altra partigianata, & nella maniera detta di tirare ritornato.
 
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Another Play of the Presaid Arms'''
+
| <p>[6] '''Fighting Spetum vs Spetum'''
Following on you call on another gioco di rotella & partigiana. & although not so beautiful that the aforesaid, it will be the same very useful. To begin with, you will take with the right hand the partigiana at the pedale with left the other side of that so that you will hold well the rotella in a way that the joint<ref>''Nodi''.</ref> of both hands look upward & that the partigiana is positioned towards his right parts with the left foot advanced not very much in grande passo, waiting that the enemy strikes. If he were to make a partiginata at your leg, that you will parry that with your partigiana towards the outside, to his left side, so that the right hand is higher and able to ward better. Pulling immediately a cut in the leg, you return in the above position of the casting.
 
| '''Vn’altro gioco delle predette Armi.'''
 
'''S'''Eguentemente si comporta uno altro gioco di rotel la, & partigiana, & quantunche non sia cosi bello chel predetto sera nondimeno utilissimo, nel principio di cui tu piglierai con la mano destra la partigiana nel pedale, & con la sinistra l’altro lato di quella anchora che imbracciata habbi la rotella in modo che li nodi di amendue le mani guardino al in su, & che la tua partigiana sia posta alquanto uerso le sue destre parti con il piede manco innanzi non molto a grande passo espettan do chel nemico tiri, & se per caso ti tirasse di una partigianata per gamba, tu quella con la tua partigiana urterai in fuori uerso le sue manche parti, in guisa che la mano destra sia alquanto piu alta del usato per potere meglio schifarti, tirandogli piu subito una cotale partigianata nella gamba, & reducendoti nella soprana maniera di tirare.
 
  
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+
<p>You will arrange yourself with the left foot forward having the Spiedo in hand and the arms well extended away from the person<ref>Body.</ref> and the left hand low, but the right will be to the back quite high the iron turned towards the ground in the act of warding the ememy’s blows, and as you know with all spearlike-weapons, that is thrust of point therefore we won’t dwell on it too long. So I say that if the enemy will be arranged as you [as above] and if he wishes to thrustgive you a spiedata, either low, or high, this you will parry with your spiedo placed outwards, towards<ref>Turned towards your left part.</ref> so you will be safe, as a riposta to this spiedata you will thrust him on the flank. And increasing the left foot forward in the meantime you will feel like you have more power than him. You will try to lock to lock the wings of his spiedo with the ones of your own and not letting it go, you will make the effort to push it strongly outwards towards your left. And so being able to give him a punta on the flank.</p>
|
 
| But if he trusts a partiginata at the face, you will lower the right hand towards the ground, so that the iron looks toward the above, and in this you will be safe from that slam. And you will give a partigiana punta in the turn, or for the leg, as you wish retreating in the waiting position.  
 
| Et se per caso egli spignesse la partigianata per faccia, tu chinerai la mano diritta uerso terra, si, chel ferro guardi al in su, & cosi ti haurai da quella sicurato. Indi gli cacciarai '''[H4v]''' una punta di partigiana nel uolto, o per gamba, come uuoi riducendoti nel usato agiamento.
 
  
|-  
+
<p>But if he turns Guardia, and if he comes with the right foot forward you will change it<ref>The Guardia.</ref> like him. And the same can be parried with quadrello and spontone (as you wish to call it) except it doesn’t have wings so you can’t lock it like the spiedo.<ref>Spontone, according to Florio, was called a Forest Bill; as far as I can tell is a Spontoon. A Quadrello has a four-edged blade with a rondel its base, much like a rondel dagger on a staff.</ref></p>
 
|  
 
|  
| '''Partisan Play one on one'''
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/131|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/132|1|lbl=61v|p=1}}
Firstly you will take the partigiana in hand in a way that the left hand is ahead and that the knuckles of both hands are turned above, and the partigiana is across<ref>Traverses.</ref> towards your left side. If your enemy ajusts himself in the same manner or any other that he wishes, both of you may injure first. For if your enemy gives injury first thrusting a punta on your leg, you will hit<ref>Parry.</ref> it with your partigiana pushing it very outwards towards his left parts and seeing to that your right hand is placed high and to that the piont of the partigiana is quite turned to the ground and thus making yourself safe. Then immediately you will thrust a Partigianata for the flank, or the leg as you wish, retire back with a leap and come to rest as in the above. But if your enemy extends a thrust at the face or a cut<ref>Slice.</ref> to any of these, you will bend<ref>Or bow.</ref> your right towards the ground, so that the iron of the partigiana is infront of the enemy’s face, there ward from the said blows.<ref>Punta at the face.</ref> Immediately thrust him a partiginata on the flank.
 
| '''Gioco di Partigiane sole.'''
 
'''P'''Rimieramente tu piglierai la Partigiana in mano in modo che la manca mano sia antiposta. Et il piede sinistro a grande uarco innanzi. Et che li nodi di amendue le mani siano uoltati al in su, & la partigiana alquanto per trauerso, et uerso le tue manche parti. Et sel nimico in questo medesimo agiamento si adattera, o in qualunche altro che egli uogli, ciascheduno di uoi potra dare al ferire principio, & per cio sel nemico sera primo feritore menando di una punta per gamba, tu quella con la tua partigiana urterai spignendola molto in fuori uer so le sue manche parti, & farai che la mano diritta sia alta. Et la punta della partigiana alquanto uerso terra, et cosi serai securo. Poi tosto tu gli tirerai di una partigiana per fianco, o per gamba, come uuoi leuandoti al indie tro con uno salto, & agiandoti come di sopra. Ma sel nemico ti spignesse una punta per faccia, ouero di uno taglio, a qualunche di questi tu chinerai la destra uerso ter ra in guisa, chel ferro della partigiana sia dirimpetto al uolto del nimico, iui schermendoti da gli detti colpi. Indi subito gli tirerai una partigianata per fianco.
 
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| But if he wanted to hurt you on the leg, you will ward from it, as you have been taught in the afformentioned game. If it was hurled in one of your upper parts, you will with your left hand near the iron doing so your knuckles must look upwards.<ref>Turned above.</ref> Then you will traverse with your right foot towards his left parts warding from it with the pedale of yours, so that the left leg follows the right backwards. But he having two partigiane, if he wants to hurl you with the second in the same way, you will pass with the left [foot] across, and towards his left parts doing a volta of partigiana so that the iron looks downwards<ref>To the ground.</ref> and the left hand is under the right. And the right leg follows the left, placing in the said position of the hurtling.
+
| <p>[7] '''Fighting Italian Bill vs Italian Bill'''
| Ma se egli uolesse slanciare al sua per gamba, ti riparerai da quella, come nel sopra posto gioco ti fu insegnato, se quel la dalle soprane parti slanciata fosse, tu prenderai la tua partigiana con la mano manca appresso il ferro facendo '''[H5]''' che li nodi della detta mano guardino al in su. Poi tu uarcherai con il piede destro uerso le sue manche parti ri parandoti da quella con il pedale della tua, si, che la gam ba manca seguiti la destra per dietro. Ma hauendo egli due partigiane se uorra tirare la seconda similmente, tu passerai con il manco per trauerso, et uerso le tue manche parti facendo una uolta di partigiana in modo, chel ferro guardi uerso terra, & la mano manca sia sotto alla de stra. Et che la gamba destra seguiti la manca agiandoti nella sopradetta guisa di slanciare.
 
  
|-
+
<p>You will arrange yourself opposite from your enemy with your right foot advance and with the left you will hold the ronca at its pedale and the right hand must be advanced and in this position you will turn towards the enemy and so the corno of the ronca will b turn to the ground, and increasing quite with the right foot advanced you will push him a punta on the face, and at the same time guisto with the said corno a stratiamento<ref>Rip/laceration.</ref> on the arms, and thrusting another punta on the chest and you will move out of the way with a leap backwards into even pace.</p>
|
 
| '''Fighting Spetum vs Spetum'''
 
You will arrange yourself with the left foot forward having the Spiedo in hand and the arms well extended away from the person<ref>Body.</ref> and the left hand low, but the right will be to the back quite high the iron turned towards the ground in the act of warding the ememy’s blows, and as you know with all spearlike-weapons, that is thrust of point therefore we won’t dwell on it too long. So I say that if the enemy will be arranged as you [as above] and if he wishes to thrustgive you a spiedata, either low, or high, this you will parry with your spiedo placed outwards, towards<ref>Turned towards your left part.</ref> so you will be safe, as a riposta to this spiedata you will thrust him on the flank. And increasing the left foot forward in the meantime you will feel like you have more power than him. You will try to lock to lock the wings of his spiedo with the ones of your own and not letting it go, you will make the effort to push it strongly outwards towards your left. And so being able to give him a punta on the flank.
 
| '''Combattere di Spiedo contra Spiedo.'''
 
'''T'''I assetterai con il piede manco inanzi hauendo il Spiedo in mano, et le braccia ben distese fuori del la persona, & la mano manca bassa, ma da destra che sera di dietro alquanto altra, & il ferro sia uerso terra in at to di schifare gli nemicheuoli colpi. Et accio che tu intendi in tutte l’arme hastate, cioè tirare di ponta, et percio con breuitate passaremo. Dico adunque che sel nemico si assettara come tu di sopra & egli uolesse tirarti una spiedata, o bassa, o alta, tu quella con il tuo spiedo per di fuori uerso le tue parti manche urterai, & cosi serai sicurato tirandogli tu percio in risposta di una cotale spieda ta ne gli fianchi, et crescendo in quel tempo alquanto con il piede manco innanzi. Ma se ti sentissi essere piu possente di lui, tu tenterai di inforcare le ali del suo spiedo con quelle del tuo, & non lo abbandonando, ti sforzerai spignerlo forte in fuori uerso le tue manche parti, & cosi '''[H5v]''' gli potrai dare d’una punta ne gli fianchi.
 
  
|-
+
<p>You will arrange with another guardia, that is with the left foot forward, and with the Ronca in the air in the act of giving him a mandritto on the head, you will immediately traverse with the right foot towards his left parts, casting a similar Mandritto on his ronca so that you will hit it on the ground, immediately you will thrust a punta on the flank, moving out of the way backwards with a leap backwards. And then you will go back in that guardia with the left foot forward, in the act of giving him a mandritto on the head.</p>
|
 
| But if he turns Guardia, and if he comes with the right foot forward you will change it<ref>The Guardia.</ref> like him. And the same can be parried with quadrello and spontone (as you wish to call it) except it doesn’t have wings so you can’t lock it like the spiedo.<ref>Spontone according to Florio was called a Forest Bill as far as I can tell is a Spontoon. A Quadrello has a four-edged blade with a rondel its base. Much like a rondel dagger on a staff.</ref>
 
| Ma s’egli uoltasse guardia, & che uenisse con il destro innanzi tu la cangierai come egli, & questo medesimo urtare si puo fare con uno quadrello, o spontone, che dir uuoi, eccetto che per il defetto delle ali non puote in forcare come il spiedo.
 
  
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+
<p>But if he thrusts again to hurt your leg with a mandritto, you will immediately traverse with the right foot forward, ruining the said blow from below to above<ref>Upward.</ref> of your ronca and then pushing him a punto on the flank.</p>
|
 
| '''Fighting Italian Bill vs Italian Bill'''
 
You will arrange yourself opposite from your enemy with your right foot advance and with the left you will hold the ronca at its pedale and the right hand must be advanced and in this position you will turn towards the enemy and so the corno of the ronca will b turn to the ground, and increasing quite with the right foot advanced you will push him a punta on the face, and at the same time guisto with the said corno a stratiamento<ref>Rip/laceration.</ref> on the arms, and thrusting another punta on the chest and you will move out of the way with a leap backwards into even pace.
 
| '''Combattere di Ronca contra Ronca.'''
 
'''T'''I apporrai contra il tuo nimico con il piede destro innanzi, & con la manca prenderai la ronca nel pedale suo, & la mano dritta deue esser dauanti, & in cotale assettamento ti uolgerai uerso lo nimico & farai chel corno della ronca guardi uerso terra, & tu crescendo alquanto con il piede destro innanzi spigneragli nella faccia una punta tirando insiememente giuso con esso cor no uno stratiamento per le braccia, & tirando un’altra punta nel petto ti leuerai al indietro con uno salto a piede pari. Indi ti assetterai in un’altra guardia, cioè con lo piede manco innanzi, & con la ronca in aere in guisa di dargli un mandritto per testa, et cosi gli anderai adosso.
 
  
|-
+
<p>But if he thrust a punta on the face you doing the same pass, you will hit his ronca with a mandritto, thrusting a punta on the chest.</p>
 
|  
 
|  
| You will arrange with another guardia, that is with the left foot forward, and with the Ronca in the air in the act of giving him a mandritto on the head, you will immediately traverse with the right foot towards his left parts, casting a similar Mandritto on his ronca so that you will hit it on the ground, immediately you will thrust a punta on the flank, moving out of the way backwards with a leap backwards. And then you will go back in that guardia with the left foot forward, in the act of giving him a mandritto on the head.
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/132|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/133|1|lbl=62r|p=1}}
| Ma se egli tirasse uno mandritto per testa, tu subito uarcherai con il piede destro uerso le sue sinistre parti tirandogli uno medesimo mandritto in su la ronca sua in modo, che tu la percota in terra subito gli tirerai una pun ta per fianco leuandoti poi con uno salto al indietro. Et indi ritornerai in quella guardia con il piede manco innanzi in atto di dargli di uno mandritto per testa.
 
  
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
|  
 
|  
| But if he thrusts again to hurt your leg with a mandritto, you will immediately traverse with the right foot forward, ruining the said blow from below to above<ref>Upward.</ref> of your ronca and then pushing him a punto on the flank.
+
| <p>[8] '''Fighting with Spear in Hand, One on One'''
| Ma se egli tirasse anchora per ferirti la gamba di man dritto, o di punta, tu subito uarcherai con il piede destro in'''[H6]'''nanzi dannando li predetti colpi con uno falso di sotto in su della tua ronca, et poi sospignendogli una punta per li fianchi.
 
  
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+
<p>Firstly take your lance in the right hand and with the right foot advanced in large pace & supposing that the enemy puts himself in a waiting position.<ref>Rest position.</ref> So if he is first to injure<ref>Offend.</ref> at you, while he has the left foot forward,he’ll take his lancia in hand in order to throw it, towards you, you for a riposta will similarly<ref>Or do the same.</ref> but you will not move the point of the spear from the ground & while you thrust him the first Lanciata, you’ll parry that with your lancia traversing & towards your left parts in manner that you have the ease for delivering of injury.</p>
|
 
| But if he thrust a punta on the face you doing the same pass, you will hit his ronca with a mandritto, thrusting a punta on the chest.
 
| Ma sel tirasse la punta per faccia, tu facendo quello medesimo passare, percoterai pur la sua ronca con uno mandritto cacciandogli dipoi una punta nel petto.
 
  
|-
+
<p>Then immediately you will pass with the right foot & then with the left extending a lanciata to the flank.
|
 
| '''Fighting with Spear in Hand, One on One'''
 
Firstly take your lance in the right hand and with the right foot advanced in large pace & supposing that the enemy puts himself in a waiting position.<ref>Rest position.</ref> So if he is first to injure<ref>Offend.</ref> at you, while he has the left foot forward,he’ll take his lancia in hand in order to throw it, towards you, you for a riposta will similarly<ref>Or do the same.</ref> but you will not move the point of the spear from the ground & while you thrust him the first Lanciata, you’ll parry that with your lancia traversing & towards your left parts in manner that you have the ease for delivering of injury.
 
| '''Combattere con le Lancie in mano da solo a solo.'''
 
'''T'''V piglierai la tua lancia primieramente con la man destra, et con il piede diritto innanzi a gran de passo, & ponendo chel nimico (come tu) si adagi, & ch’egli il primo feritore sia, mentre egli hauente il piede manco innanzi prendera la sua lancia in mano per cagio ne di tirarla, uerso te, tu farai per risposta il somigliante ma non mouerai la punta della lancia da terra, & mentre gli spignerai la prima lanciata, tu l’urterai con la tua lancia per trauerso, & uerso le tue manche parti in guisa, che habbi libertate di andar a ferirlo.
 
  
|-
+
<p>But if you want to be the first to injure. You will cross with the right foot infront and push a lanciata in order he makes the same parry you did, as he parries you, immediately extend your lancia for traversing you will let it go out of the hand & fall above his, towards his right side & in this time running now towards the pedale of his lancia you will give hand to the sword or dagger that you will have at your side & as he won’t expect it, you injure him as you please.</p>
|
 
| Then immediately you will pass with the right foot & then with the left extending a lanciata to the flank.
 
| Indi subito passerai con il piede destro, & poi con il manco tirandogli una lanciata per fianco.
 
  
|-
+
<p>And if by chance he did this strike of the lancia to you, you will give a good blow/strike of your lancia with the right hand taken back leaving to slide of for the your left hand finally to the iron. And in this way he can not to offend you, neither with sword, and nor with dagger & and also he can make this same as you & because a few are experts in this thing, as such as is intended, you will be always the advantaged.</p>
 
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| But if you want to be the first to injure. You will cross with the right foot infront and push a lanciata in order he makes the same parry you did, as he parries you, immediately extend your lancia for traversing you will let it go out of the hand & fall above his, towards his right side & in this time running now towards the pedale of his lancia you will give hand to the sword or dagger that you will have at your side & as he won’t expect it, you injure him as you please.
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/133|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/134|1|lbl=62v|p=1}}
| Ma se tu uolessi essere el primo feritore, tu uarcherai con il piede destro innanzi spin gendogli una lanciata per cagione ch’egli faccia quel urtare, che tu facesti, & com’egli urtera, subito tirando la tua lancia per trauerso la lascerai andar fuori di mano & cader sopra la sua uerso le sue destre parti, & in questo tempo correndogli adosso uerso il pedale della sua lancia caccierai mano alla spada o pugnale, che al lato haurai, & giuntolo inauertito lo ferirai a tuo piacere.
 
  
 
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| And if by chance he did this strike of the lancia to you, you will give a good blow/strike of your lancia with the right hand taken back leaving to slide of for the your left hand finally to the iron. And in this way he can not to offend you, neither with sword, and nor with dagger & and also he can make this same as you & because a few are experts in this thing, as such as is intended, you will be always the advantaged.
+
| <p>[9] Finding yourself again<ref>Or still.</ref> with the left foot advanced opposing your enemy, you traverse<ref>Better pass forward.</ref> with the right foot advanced and striking a lanciata for the chest with a risposta riversa, & if the enemy is the one who gives this lanciata. You will make the semblance of retreating four or five paces backward, taking your lance with the right hand, and in this run you will throw a traversing towards your right side, and there you will take the lancia in hand, and a then advancing on him you will thrust him a lanciata in the flank, because you will find him unprepared.</p>
| Et se per caso egli facesse questo tirare di lancia a te, tu darai una buona '''[H6v]''' tirata alla tua lancia con la mano diritta al indietro lasciandola correre per la tua mano manca per infino al ferro, et a questo modo egli non ti potra offendere, ne con spada, ne con pugnale, & ancho egli potra fare questo medesimo, & perche pochi, di tale cose sono intenditori, uoi sempre sareti gli uantaggiati.
 
  
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<p>But if the enemy did what I taught you above, you’ll ________ the lancia in the hand and you will follow him while he is retreating and as he wants to hurl himself across,<ref>Sideways.</ref> you’ll give him a lanciata before that he arranges to take his lancia.</p>
|
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| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/134|2|lbl=-}}
| Finding yourself again<ref>Or still.</ref> with the left foot advanced opposing your enemy, you traverse<ref>Better pass forward.</ref> with the right foot advanced and striking a lanciata for the chest with a risposta riversa, & if the enemy is the one who gives this lanciata. You will make the semblance of retreating four or five paces backward, taking your lance with the right hand, and in this run you will throw a traversing towards your right side, and there you will take the lancia in hand, and a then advancing on him you will thrust him a lanciata in the flank, because you will find him unprepared.
 
| Ritrouandoti anchora con il piede mancho innanzi contra lo nimico, tu ualicherai con lo piede destro innan zi tirandoli una lanciata per il petto con una risposta ri uersa, & se lo nimico fosse quello, che cotale lanciata tirasse, tu farai sembiante di fuggire quattro o cinque passi al indietro tirandoti dietro la tua lancia con la mano destra, et in cotal correre ti gitterai per trauerso uerso le tue diritte parti, & quiui piglierai la lancia in mano, et andandogli addosso gli spignerai una lanciata ne li fianchi, perche lo trouerai sconcio.
 
  
 
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| But if the enemy did what I taught you above, you’ll ________ the lancia in the hand and you will follow him while he is retreating and as he wants to hurl himself across,<ref>Sideways.</ref> you’ll give him a lanciata before that he arranges to take his lancia.
+
| <p>[10] And more , when you’ll have your lancia in hand, you’ll be able to pretend as if one was going to strike and lanciata, and he for fear of this will retreat with the left foot backward in order to ward himself so you will run four or five paces across/sideways<ref>Traversing.</ref> and towards his left side and so finding him unsheltered you will give him a lanciata to the flank.</p>
| Ma sel nimico facesse quello, che a te ho sopra insegnato, tu torai la lancia in mano & seguitarailo dietro mentre gli fuggira, & com’egli uorra gittarsi per trauerso, tu gli darai una lanciata prima che egli sia agiato per prender la sua lancia.
+
| {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/134|3|lbl=-}}
  
 
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| And more , when you’ll have your lancia in hand, you’ll be able to pretend as if one was going to strike and lanciata, and he for fear of this will retreat with the left foot backward in order to ward himself so you will run four or five paces across/sideways<ref>Traversing.</ref> and towards his left side and so finding him unsheltered you will give him a lanciata to the flank.
+
| <p>[11] You could still run towards his right side and do the same blow which is very particular and useful fighting solo e solo.</p>
| Anchora quando haurai la lancia in mano tu potrai far uista di tirargli una lanciata, & egli per timore di quella fuggira con lo piede manco al indietro per cagion di ripararsi, allhora tu correrai quattro o cinque passi per trauerso, & uerso le sue manche parti, & cosi trouan dolo sconcio gli caccierai una lanciata per fianco.
 
  
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<p>The counter of this is that while you’ll see him running you’ll retreat the right foot backwards, taking your lancia with you left hand because you won’t be injured, being advantaged to injure (like him).</p>
|
 
| You could still run towards his right side and do the same blow which is very particular and useful fighting solo e solo.
 
| Potresti anchora correr uerso le sue destre parti, & far quello medesimo colpo il quale è singolarissimo & utile combattendo o solo con solo.
 
  
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<p>You can _______ throwing him a lanciata with the right foot forward your left hand leaving the lancia, pushing your right arm towards your left side so that your right flank is infront of the race of the enemy<ref>Facing.</ref> and here you will wait that he strikes to injure you with a lanciata on the flank, you will slide with the left foot forward, pushing your right hand quite outward towards your right side and so you will be warded by that lanciata on the hip. Then you will take that lancia at once with the left hand and you’ll pass the right forward, hurting his chest with a lanciata.</p>
 
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| The counter of this is that while you’ll see him running you’ll retreat the right foot backwards, taking your lancia with you left hand because you won’t be injured, being advantaged to injure (like him).
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/134|4|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/135|1|lbl=63r|p=1}}
| El contrario di que'''[H7]'''sto è che mentre lo uederai correre, tu ritirerai il piede destro indietro pigliando la tua lancia con la manca mano, perche non potrai esser offeso essendo buono per ferire (com’egli).
 
  
 
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| You can _______ throwing him a lanciata with the right foot forward your left hand leaving the lancia, pushing your right arm towards your left side so that your right flank is infront of the race of the enemy<ref>Facing.</ref> and here you will wait that he strikes to injure you with a lanciata on the flank, you will slide with the left foot forward, pushing your right hand quite outward towards your right side and so you will be warded by that lanciata on the hip. Then you will take that lancia at once with the left hand and you’ll pass the right forward, hurting his chest with a lanciata.
+
| <p>[12] His counter will be that while he uncovers to shield, you will feint to strike a blow. Because if he comes forward to do the same thing you did, he’ll be all uncovered for the feint you did and so you can injure him with a lanciata where you want. And if you want to put out the enemy for advantage, as you see him with the left foot forward, you’ll change the hands holding the lancia, so that the right is infront of the left and so you’ll slide the right foot forward. Or you will have the lancia with the right hand infront, you’ll change the hand to put out your enemy and when you see him with the right foot forward, you’ll know the enemy put out But you’ll do this change of hand when both of you are in, to put our the enemy, so that he can’t damage you.</p>
| Tu puoi etiandio tirargli una lanciata con il piede destro innanzi abbandonando la manca ma no dalla lancia, spignendo lo braccio destro uerso le tue manche parti, in guisa chel tuo fianco destro sia dirimpet to al uolto del nimico, & la punta della lancia si troui uerso le sue sinistre parti, & quiui aspetterai che egli ti ri, & come egli tirer a per feriti di una lanciata per fianco, tu scorrerai con lo piede manco innanzi spignendo la tua mano destra molto in fuori uerso le tue destre parti, & cosi ti haurai schermito da quella. Poi tu piglierai la lancia di subito con la mano manca, et passerai con il destro innanzi ferendogli el petto con una lanciata.
 
 
 
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| His counter will be that while he uncovers to shield, you will feint to strike a blow. Because if he comes forward to do the same thing you did, he’ll be all uncovered for the feint you did and so you can injure him with a lanciata where you want. And if you want to put out the enemy for advantage, as you see him with the left foot forward, you’ll change the hands holding the lancia, so that the right is infront of the left and so you’ll slide the right foot forward. Or you will have the lancia with the right hand infront, you’ll change the hand to put out your enemy and when you see him with the right foot forward, you’ll know the enemy put out But you’ll do this change of hand when both of you are in, to put our the enemy, so that he can’t damage you.
+
{{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/135|2|lbl=-|p=1}} {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/136|1|lbl=63v|p=1}}
| El contrario suo fia che mentre egli si scoprira per ripararsi, tu farai sembiante di tirare. Perche s’egli uenira auanti per far quello che facesti tu, egli si trouera tutto scoperto per cagione del sembiante da te fatto, & cosi lo potrai ferire di una lanciata a tua uoglia. Se uuoi an chora mettere di fuori el nemico per auantaggio, come tu lo uedrai con el piede manco innanzi, tu cangierai le ma ni la lancia tenente in guisa che la destra sia alla sinistra antiponuta, & cosi scorrerai con il piede destro innanzi. Ouero se tu hauessi la lancia con la mano destra innanzi cangierai la mano per ponere di fuori el tuo nimico, & quando lo uedrai con il piede destro innanzi conosce rai el nimico posto di fuori. Ma cotal cangiare di ma no farai quando amenduo sarete dentro, per mettere di'''[H7v]'''fuori el nimico, accioche nuocere non ti possi.
 
  
 
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| But if you had the lancia and was attacked by someone who had the partigiana, ronca or spiedo or other weapon, you will take the lancia in the middle and it will be enough to satisfy you that you have an arms length of lancia of advantage and more than the enemy’s weapon length and so you’ll be sure that if you wanted to fight with all your lancia length against a short weapon he more easily could parry it and run you over and doing again another time the above said (I’ll close the book and end) that is of all the weapons. That is on the proper injuring, the one of punta.
+
| <p>[13] But if you had the lancia and was attacked by someone who had the partigiana, ronca or spiedo or other weapon, you will take the lancia in the middle and it will be enough to satisfy you that you have an arms length of lancia of advantage and more than the enemy’s weapon length and so you’ll be sure that if you wanted to fight with all your lancia length against a short weapon he more easily could parry it and run you over and doing again another time the above said (I’ll close the book and end) that is of all the weapons. That is on the proper injuring, the one of punta.</p>
| Ma se tu hauessi la lancia & fossi assalito da uno che hauesse partigiana o ronca o spiedo o altra arma, tu piglierai la lancia nel mezzo et sodisfara che tu habbi uno braccio di lancia di uantaggio, & di piu che la lunghez za della nemica arma & cosi serai sicuro che se tu uolessi con tutta la lunghezza della tua lancia combattere contra una arma corta, egli piu ageuolmente la potrebbe urtare & correrti addosso, & replicando un’altra fiata il det to di sopra (chiudero el libro et faro fine) cioè che di tutte le armi hastate è uno proprio ferire, et quello è di punta.
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| class="noline" | Finito li Capitoli ouero generali Regole sopra la ualorosa & bellicosa Arte dello Schermire.
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| class="noline" | {{section|Page:Opera Nova (Antonio Manciolino) 1531.pdf/136|3|lbl=-}}
 
 
Impresso in Vinegia per Nicolo d’Aristotile detto Zoppino.
 
 
 
MDXXXI.
 
  
 
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Latest revision as of 23:18, 14 October 2020

Antonio Manciolino

Illustration from the title page of Manciolino's treatise
Born late 1400s?
Died after 1531
Occupation Fencing master
Citizenship Bolognese
Patron Don Luisi de Cordoba
Movement Dardi School
Influences
Genres Fencing manual
Language Italian
Notable work(s) Opera Nova (1531)
First printed
english edition
Leoni 2010
Concordance by Michael Chidester

Antonio Manciolino was a 16th century Italian fencing master. Little is known about this master's life; he seems to have been Bolognese by birth and he is thought to have been a student of Guido Antonio di Luca,[citation needed] the master who also taught Achille Marozzo. His fencing manual is dedicated to Don Luisi de Cordoba, Duke of Sessa, Orator of the Most Serene Emperor to Adrian VI; this dedication may indicate that Manciolino was attached as fencing master to the ducal court.

In 1531, Manciolino published a treatise on swordsmanship called Opera Nova ("A New Work"),[1] which is the oldest extant treatise in the Dardi or "Bolognese" school of swordsmanship.[2] The 1531 edition describes itself as "corrected and revised" and was probably based on an earlier version printed in ca. 1523; this date is based on the fact that Don Luisi de Cordoba was only orator to Adrian VI between September of 1522 and September of 1523.[3] Despite the breadth and detail of his work, Manciolino's efforts were overshadowed by the release of Marozzo's even more extensive work on Bolognese fencing thirteen years later.

Treatise

As Craig Pitt-Pladdy has refused our request to host his translations on Wiktenauer, we instead have links to their locations on other sites in the appropriate sections until such time as another translation appears.